Dorothy Sloan -- Books

Auction 10, Cartography
(Globes, Atlases, & Maps)

Items 53–74


1821

53. [MAP]. [LAS CASES, Compte de E. M. J.?]. Carte spéciale, historique et géographique de la République des États-Unis de L'Amérique du Nord. [Paris, ca. 1821?]. Engraved map (by J. M. Hacq), original full color and outlining. 25.5 x 42.5 cm (10-3/8 x 16-3/4 inches). Scale not stated. A few minor, neat reinforcements on verso (at folds).
        We are not certain where this map appeared (thanks to the "breaker" who could not be bothered to identify the source). The closest lead we find is in Phillips, Atlases (e.g., 128, 3313, etc.), where the map is listed by title under the atlases of E. M. J. Las Cases (or Las Casas), whose works were issued under the pseudonym of LeSage. We also see that this map is sometimes attributed to Renouard, or possibly Lavoisne. The map shows what is now the United States, with a yellow line designating "Contour du territoire des Etats-unis." This yellow line of demarcation is straightforward on the east coast, but it becomes a bit murky on the Western border, where the boundary line runs up the Sabine at Galveston(!). A diminutive Texas (labeled as such) is curiously truncated and colored yellow like the other established U.S. States. About the only location in Texas is Champ d'Asile, and the western boundary is between Matagorda and some point on the upper Colorado.
        Territories of the United States are colored pink, and include "Territoire D'Arkansas," "Territ. des Florides," "Territoire du Missouri," "Territ. de Michigan," and "Territoire du Nord-ouest." The Pacific coast of the U.S. extends from far northern California (Pt. St. George) to the northern tip of present Washington State. The northern boundary makes an optimistic curve upwards with explanatory text that the boundary is uncertain.
($500-1,000)

54. [BOOK]. ROBERTSON, William. The Works of.... [Vol. VII-IX] History of America. London: T. Cadell, et al., 1821. xliv, 416 + [4] 454 + [4] 432 pp., folding engraved plate of glyphs from the Vienna Codex, 4 folding engraved maps (2 relating to Texas and the Southwest: (1) KITCHIN, Thomas. Mexico or New Spain in which the Motions of Cortez may be Traced. 28.1 x 38.5 cm [11-1/8 x 15-1/8 inches], scale: 1 inch = approximately 160 miles, inset at lower right Supplement of the Environs of Mexico [City], ornate floral cartouche; (2) Map of the Gulf of Mexico. The Islands and Countries Adjacent.... 26.9 x 43.3 cm [10-5/8 x 17 inches], scale not stated). 3 vols., 8vo, contemporary smooth calf extra gilt, spine with raised bands and black gilt-lettered calf labels. Ex-library, engraved bookplates of Nevins Memorial Library in Methuen (with ink "withdrawn" stamp), ink call numbers on spines, old library pockets and call slips at rear, occasional neat notes. Bindings worn and broken, interior crisp and fine.
        Later edition of this multi-volume set; present here are Vols. 7, 8, and 9, with the American maps. See Item 37 above for discussion of Kitchin's map. Burrus, Kino and the Cartography of Northwestern New Spain, p. 69n. Wheat, Transmississippi West 172n. Besides the Kitchin map, these volumes contain a map of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. For more on Robertson's work, see: Glass XV(4)688n. Griffin 517n: "A historical classic, the first successful attempt to write a scholarly history of the Western Hemisphere." Hill, p. 254n: "Through many advantageous connections, the author was allowed to utilize much information that would have been inaccessible to the general public." Howes R358. Larned 403n: "One of the best accounts available in English of the Spanish Colonial administration and commercial system."
($200-400)

55. [MAP]. SHERWOOD, NEELY, & JONES. Spanish Dominions in North America. London, 1821. Engraved map with original full and outline coloring. 18.6 x 24 cm (7-1/4 x 9-3/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 300 miles. Fine.
        Texas is shown with the normal ambiguity of the erasouth Texas is colored yellow and part of Mexico, and North Texas is blue, unnamed, but lying between New Mexico and Louisiana.
($75-150)

56. [MAP]. WEILAND, Carl. F. General Charte von den vereinigten Nordamericanischen Freistaaten nach den vorzüglichstein Hülfsmitteln entworfen. Weimar: Geograph. Institut, 1821. Engraved map with original shading and outlining, on heavy rag paper. 47.5 x 65.2 cm (18-3/4 x 25-5/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 110 miles. Exuberantly engraved title with about a half-dozen types of flourished lettering, bold decorative border. Engraved legend at lower left. A few minor tears affecting blank margins, overall very fine.
        Carl Ferdinand Weiland (1782-1847) published two atlases, Atlas von Amerika (1824-28) and Algemeiner Hand-Atlas (1828-48). Weiland's large and fine map presents the boundary of Texas in its then ambiguous state. Texas stands out on the map, is shaded pale yellow, and has an ambitiously exaggerated Panhandle. Texas is designated Provinz Texas and is shown as part of Provinz Cohahuila, San Luis Potosi, Neu Santander, and even the eastern edge of New Mexico (Santa Fe is shown practically on the border). As with many maps of this era, particularly European ones, Champ d'Asile is located. Wheat, Transmississippi West, p. 96 & #346: "The northern boundary west of the Rocky Mountains extends north to take in the whole of the Columbia watershed. This is called 'New Albion along the coast.'"
($750-1,500)

56. [MAP]. WEILAND, Carl. F. General Charte von den vereinigten Nordamericanischen Freistaaten nach den vorzüglichstein Hülfsmitteln entworfen. Weimar: Geograph. Institut, 1821. Engraved map with original shading and outlining, on heavy rag paper. 47.5 x 65.2 cm (18-3/4 x 25-5/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 110 miles. Exuberantly engraved title with about a half-dozen types of flourished lettering, bold decorative border. Engraved legend at lower left. A few minor tears affecting blank margins, overall very fine.
        Carl Ferdinand Weiland (1782-1847) published two atlases, Atlas von Amerika (1824-28) and Algemeiner Hand-Atlas (1828-48). Weiland's large and fine map presents the boundary of Texas in its then ambiguous state. Texas stands out on the map, is shaded pale yellow, and has an ambitiously exaggerated Panhandle. Texas is designated Provinz Texas and is shown as part of Provinz Cohahuila, San Luis Potosi, Neu Santander, and even the eastern edge of New Mexico (Santa Fe is shown practically on the border). As with many maps of this era, particularly European ones, Champ d'Asile is located. Wheat, Transmississippi West, p. 96 & #346: "The northern boundary west of the Rocky Mountains extends north to take in the whole of the Columbia watershed. This is called 'New Albion along the coast.'"
($750-1,500)

1822

57. [MAP]. FINLAYSON, J. Geographical, Statistical, and Historical Map of Mexico [title at top margin]. Mexico and Internal Provinces [title on map]. [Philadelphia: Carey & Lea, 1822 or after]. Engraved map (by Young and Delleker) and text, original full and outline color. 38.4 x 37.3 cm (15-1/4 x 14-5/8 inches). Map & text: 42.8 x 53.5 cm (16-3/4 x 21 inches). Scale not stated. Explanatory text in columns on right and left. At lower left below neat line: Prepared from Humboldt's Map & other Documents by J. Finlayson. Center fold split where formerly in atlas (neatly reinforced on verso), otherwise fine.
        From text on either side giving population statistics, the date would appear to be ca. 1822, making the probable source one of the many editions of H. C. Carey and I. Lea's A Complete Historical, Chronological, and Geographical American Atlas. Editions appeared, for example, in 1822 (Phillips, Atlases 1373a), 1823 (Phillips, Atlases 3660a), 1827 (Phillips, Atlases 1177), etc. See also Phillips, America, p. 408. "The map shows provinces, towns, rivers, roads, mines, military forts, location of Indian tribes, mountains, various notes on charting of the country, people and government in the margins" (Day, Maps of Texas, p. 13). The side-bar text Civil Divisions and Populations gives the following statistics and chief towns in 1803 as follows: Old California with 9,000 inhabitants (Loreto); New California with 15,600 population (Monterey); New Mexico with 40,200 souls (Santa Fe), etc.
($300-600)

1824

58. [MAP]. FINLEY, A[nthony]. Mexico. Philadelphia, [1824]. Engraved map (by Young & Delleker), original full coloring. 22.2 x 29.2 cm (8-7/8 x 11-1/2 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 200 miles. 31. at lower right. Colors fresh, map fine. Matted.
        Texas is shown with a fat Panhandle reaching up to Spanish Peaks above Santa Fe, and rather than addressing the contemporary ambiguity one often sees, the cartographer simply labels the Texas region as the Intendency of San Louis Potosi, without attaching the name Texas to it at all. Finley (ca. 1790-1840) worked as a cartographer and publisher in Philadelphia, putting out his New General Atlas (1824, with reprints to 1831), New American Atlas (1826), and Atlas Classica (1829). A label on the mat indicates a date of 1821. The map appeared in Finley's A New General Atlas; Phillips (Atlases) records editions of 1824 (4314); 1829 (755); 1830 (755), and 1831 (760). Day, Maps of Texas, p. 14: "This map shows Intendencies of New Mexico, New Albion, New California, Old California, towns, locations of Indian tribes with occasional comments such as 'Yabipias Indians with long beards,' mountains, rivers, lakes, Texas as an original part of the Intendency of San Luis Potosi." Phillips, Atlases 4314.
($250-500)

1825

59. [MAP]. BRUÉ, A[drien Hubert]. Carte générale des États-Unis, du Canada et d'une partie des pays adjacents. Paris: Chez L'Auteur, 1825. Engraved map, original outline coloring. 36.1 x 50.5 cm (14-1/4 x 19-7/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 150 miles. Refined line-pattern border. Cartographer's circular embossed seal at lower right. Color key chart at left indicating U.S., English, and Mexican territories. At upper right: Atlas in 65 feuilles No. 58 en 36 feuilles No. 34. Creased at center fold, where formerly in atlas. Short split at lower blank margin, else fine, with large margins.
        This beautiful map of Canada, the United States, and part of Northern Mexico appeared in Brué's Atlas universel de géographie...seconde édition (Paris, 1828). Not in Phillips (Atlases). Texas is labeled Texas and placed in the northern sector of San Luis Potosi. Like all of Brué's maps, the present one is characterized by elegance and restraint. Cartographer and publisher Brué (1786-1832) was one of the outstanding European mapmakers of the era in depicting the American West. His work is characterized by accuracy and, at moments, genius (see Wheat, Transmississippi West II, p. 145, discussing Brué's 1834 Nouvelle carte du Mexique, which Wheat calls "one of the foundation stones of western mapping history").
($400-800)

60. [MAP]. BRUÉ, [Adrien Hubert]. Carte générale des États-Unis Mexicains et des Provinces-Unis de l'Amérique Centrale. Paris, 1825. Engraved map, original outline coloring, re-mounted on new cartographic linen in 9 sections. 50.9 x 36.4 cm (20 x 14-3/8 inches). Scale not stated. Large inset map of Central America at lower left: Guatemala ou Provinces-Unies de l'Amérique Centrale, with smaller inset above: Iles Revillegigedo. Refined line-pattern border. Cartographer's circular embossed seal above title. Very fine in contemporary brown and blue marbled chemise and case with gilt-lettered scarlet calf label. Very handsome copy in an elegant case of the period.
        Wheat, Transmississippi West 361n (listing a very similar map of the same year that issued in Brué's 1830 Atlas Universel de géographie; the present map is slightly wider and without the printed atlas designation number of 59): "Brué's 1825 'Etats-Unis Mexicaines,' with R. S. Sacramento ou Timpanogos navigable a plus de 50 lieues (the first hint of the Sacramento River, with an R. S. Joaquin meeting it from the southeast) and with the S. Buenaventura, the Truches or S. Felipe and the R. de los Martires." Phillips, Atlases 758 (1830-1834 atlas) & 4321(1838-1839 atlas). Texas is labeled as such in the southeast, but the entire region that is now Texas is divided among San Luis Potosi, Coahuila, a huge Bolson de Mapimi, and New Mexico (El Paso is in New Mexico).
($600-1,200)

61. [MAP]. FENNER, [R.]. Mexico & Guatamala. [London, ca. 1825?]. Engraved map, original outline coloring, borders shaded yellow. 10.8 x 14.1 cm (4-1/4 x 5-1/2 inches). Scale not stated. Fine.
        This petite map actually shows most of the present U.S., as well as Mexico and Central America. Texas is in one of the oddest shapes yetan outlined pink boxy shape between the Sabine, Colorado, and Red Rivers, and then extending off vaguely to the northwest with no real boundary line to the west. Tooley lists an R. Fenner (no dates), who published a Pocket Atlas of Modern & Ancient Geography about 1830.
($40-80)

62. [MAP]. FINLEY, A[nthony]. Mexico. Philadelphia, [ca. 1825]. Engraved map (by Young & Delleker), original full coloring. 22.2 x 29.2 cm (8-7/8 x 11-1/2 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 220 miles. 32. at lower right. Fine.
        Very similar to Item 58 above, but with some important changes in Texas. San Felipe de Austin has been added, as well as Austin's Settt. (Austin's first colony was founded in 1821). The earlier version showed what is now Texas as in the Intendency of San Luis Potosi, but that designation has been removed and replaced with Coahuila and Texas. Instead of Texas' Panhandle reaching boldly up to Spanish Peaks, in the present version the Panhandle has been eliminated altogether. A few old stains (confined primarily to blank margins). Day, Maps of Texas, p. 17. Phillips (Atlases) lists several of Finley's atlases with the Mexico map as Map No. 31, but in this instance, the map is Plate No. 32. The date may well be a bit later.
($300-600)

63. [MAP]. MEXICO (Republic). MINISTERIO DE GUERRA Y MARINA. Carta general para las navegaciones india oriental por el mar del sur y el grande oceano que separa continente americano del asiático.... Mexico, 1825. Engraved map on high quality rag paper. 62.1 x 69.8 cm (17-1/2 x 24-1/2 x inches). Scale not stated. Title within circle at top. Coastal soundings. Occasional small tears to blank margins, one old tape repair at left.
        This large-scale nautical chart shows the Pacific coast from Alaska to Panama, includes the Hawaiian Islands, and designates coastal cities and other points of interest along the Gulf of Mexico. With this map we include two other large nautical charts from this series of maps put out by the Mexican government: (1) Carta esferica de las costas y golfo de Californias llamado mar de Cortes que comprende desde el Cabo Corrientes hasta el Puerto de S. Diego. Mexico, 1825. Engraved map. 87 x 55.6 cm (34 x 22 inches). Shows the coast line from San Diego to Cabo San Lucas and as far south as present-day Puerto Vallarta. Insets of Guaymas, La Paz, and Pichilingue. A few short tears to blank margin and light waterstaining to upper blank margin. (2) Carta esferica que comprende las costas del Oceano Pacifico desde los 7º. Lat. S. hasta los 9º. Lat. N.... Mexico, 1825. 87 x 55.6 cm (34 x 22 inches). Nautical chart of the Pacific Coast from Peru to Costa Rica. Old tape along outer edge of blank margin, one chip to lower blank right corner, light staining to blank margins.
($250-500)

EXCEEDINGLY RARE PORTULANO OF THE GULF OF MEXICO & THE CARIBBEAN WITH IMPORTANT MAPS OF GALVESTON & MATAGORDA

64. [PORTULANO]. SPAIN. DIRECCIÓN DE HIDROGRAFÍA. Portulano de la América Setentrional dividido en quatro partes publicado por orden del Escmo Sor D. Guadalupe Victoria.... Mexico, 1825. Engraved title, 2 descriptive text leaves, 112 engraved coastal charts showing the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico in great detail (soundings, coastal features, composition of shorelines and benthos, forts, city plans, major structures of port cities, etc.), each of which measures approximately 17.6 x 25.4 cm (6-7/8 x 10 inches), scales vary. Included are two Texas charts: (1) Bahia de S. Bernardo [Matagorda Bay], scale: 1 inch = approximately 2-1/2 nautical miles; (2) Bahia de Galvez Town, scale: 1 inch = 2.7 cable lengths. Oblong folio, original three-quarter Mexican green calf over green and black marbled boards, spine gilt. Other than a few old repairs and occasional light staining, a fine, handsome copy. Very rare (Streeter locates only one copy, that held by the Library of Congress).
        First American edition (earlier editions appeared in Madrid in 1809 and 1818). Lowery 744. Palau 233681. Phillips, Atlases 1226. Streeter 1043B (citing Galveston Bay chart) & 1044B (citing Matagorda Bay chart): "First separately engraved maps of Galveston Bay [and St. Bernardo Bay {i.e. Pass Cavallo between Matagorda Island and Matagorda}]." The Portulano is divided into four sections: (1) Antilles (15 maps of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the Windward Islands, including Tobago, Trinidad, Saint Thomas, Antigua, Martinque, Tortola); (2) Colombia, Florida, Bahamas, and the Gulf of Mexico (41 charts, including Esmeralda, Cartagena, Portobelo, Chagres, Bluefields, Veracruz, Matagorda, Galveston, Pensacola, Tampa, San Augustine, Nassau); (3) Cuba (34 charts, including Havana, Mantanzas, Guantanamo; (4) Haiti and Jamaica (22 charts, including Delfin, Tortuga, Antiqua, Kingston, Morante). Individual maps from this portulano are little-known to collectors and rarely come on the market (although a copy of the San Bernardo map sold at Sotheby's in 1999 for $1,631). For a copy of the complete atlas to appear on the market is a minor miracle. I've only seen this complete atlas once before, and it was this copy, which came from a private collector in Mexico in the 1960s.
($20,000-30,000)

65. [MAP]. STARLING, Thomas. Mexico and Guatimala. London: Bull, [ca. 1825?]. Engraved map, original full and outline coloring. 9.1 x 14.4 cm (3-1/2 x 5-3/4 inches). Scale not stated. At left is a key with numbers naming the provinces of Mexico and Guatemala. Fine.
        Starling was active in London between 1815 and 1850. Petite map, with Texas keyed as No. 5 of the Mexican provinces, and shown as a part of New Mexico. San Saba is located.
($30-60)

66. [MAP]. STARLING, Thomas. United States. London: Bull, [ca. 1825?]. Engraved map, original full color with outlining. 9.6 x 14.6 cm (3-5/8 x 5-3/4 inches). Scale not stated. At right is a key with numbers naming the states and territories of the United States. Minor staining.
        Another petite map by Starling (see preceding entry). This map shows the exaggerated claims of the United States in the Pacific Northwest. California is labeled New Albion. Minnesota and Wisconsin are designated simply Chippewas. Texas is shown with a rococo Rio Grande, and about the only location other than rivers is Nacogdoches.
($30-60)

LARGEST SCALE COLONIAL MAPS OF TEXAS

67. [MAP]. VANDERMAELEN, Ph[ilippe Marie Guillaume]. 5 lithographed maps with original outline coloring, together showing Texas and surrounding areas, consisting of: (1) Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 54 (47.1 x 49.6 cm; 18-1/2 x 19-3/8 inches); (2) Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 59 (46.8 x 52 cm; 18-3/8 x 20-1/2 inches); (3) Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 60 (46.2 x 50.7 cm; 18-1/8 x 19-15/16 inches), extensive text on mining in Mexico within large box at right; (4) Amér. Sep. Partie des États-Unis No. 55 (47.1 x 51.8 cm; 18-1/2 x 20-3/8 inches); (5) Amér. Sep. Parties des États-Unis et du Nouveau Mexique. No. 48 (46.3 x 56 cm; 18-1/4 x 22 inches). [Bruxelles]: H. Ode, Avril [and] Juin, 1825. No scale, but approximately 1 inch = 28 miles. Occasional very mild foxing, generally fine and crisp copies with large, untrimmed margins, original drab blue paper mounts for insertion in atlas on versos. Rarely found in the complete set of five, which together comprise one of the most beautiful and unusual cartographic treatments of Texas ever produced.
        First printing of the largest scale map of Texas printed up to that time. The atlas in which these maps appeared was the first printed atlas of the world on a uniform scale and the first major lithographed atlas. Map No. 55 is the first separate map of North Texas ever printed. These maps appeared in Vander Maelen's Atlas Universel de Géographie.... (Bruxelles, 1827). Day, Maps of Texas, p. 141. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici (Vander Maelen 1) III, p. 142: "During the period when Belgium and the Netherlands together formed the kingdom of the Netherlands, one of the most remarkable developments of private enterprise in cartography took place in Brussels. There lived Philippe Vandermaelen, son of the wealthy soap manufacturer, Guillaume Vander Maelen, who abandoned the soap trade and devoted his life to cartography. He did extremely well and published one of the most remarkable world atlases ever made: a world atlas with 400 maps on a uniform scale of ca. 1:1,6 million. This work, which appeared in 1827, was far ahead of its time, but its appearance could only be justified by the unparalleled zeal of its author.... The completion of the huge work was realized in the amazingly short period of three years."
        Martin & Martin, p. 32: "Van der Maelen's Atlas Universel, the most lavish and detailed cartographic production of the decade and the first major lithographed atlas, included five maps depicting parts of Texas. These maps were based primarily on the outmoded models of Humboldt and Pike." Phillips, Atlases 749. Streeter 1095 (listing all 5 maps): "The entire Texas coast line [is] shown on a single sheet (No. 60)...as a jumble of islands dotting the coast from Galveston Bay (here called Baie Trinidad) to the mouth of the Rio Grande. The Canadian River running across the Texas Panhandle is correctly shown as flowing into the Arkansas, and a 'Little Brazos' running into the Brazos is shown and named. The San Antonio is still incorrectly represented as flowing into the Gulf of Mexico, instead of joining the Guadalupe many miles above. The few place names are...apparently imaginary."
        Taliaferro 219 (discussing Map No. 60): "This is one of five sheets from Vandermaelen's atlas that depict Texas, and it is the only printed map from the colonial period devoted specifically to the Texas coast.... His configuration strongly resembles the Texas coast on Henry Tanner's Map of North America, 1822, and on John Melish's Map of the United States 1816.... There is no sign yet of Austin's colony or any other Anglo settlements." Wheat, Transmississippi West 378 & p. 94: "No mapmaker had previously attempted to use such a large scale for any western area." These maps are very handsome, their place names at times curious, and their history is important and interesting.
($2,000-4,000)

1827

68. [MAP]. HAMILTON ADAMS & CO. Mexico. London, 1827. Engraved map, original full color with outlining and borders shaded pink. 23.3 x 28 cm (9-1/8 x 11 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 150 miles. Fine.
        The word Texas is shown, and the region is shown as part of San Luis Potosi, New Santander, and Coahuila. What is now the Panhandle and the Trans-Pecos West is ambiguous, being either an undesignated area or perhaps an extension of Bolson de Mapimi.
($100-200)


69. [MAP]. YOUNG, J[ames] H[amilton]. Mexico and Guatimala. [Philadelphia, 1827]. Engraved map, full original color, borders shaded in pink. 20.2 x 24.4 cm (8 x 9-5/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 310 miles. Upper margin rough where removed from atlas and a few stains
        Texas is colored bright yellow, shaped rather like a square with a point on the lower left side, and boldly labeled Texas or New Estremadura. This map is a rather pedestrian affair, but it has the distinction of being by an important engraver who created one of the great and long-lived maps of Texas (see Item 92 herein), the Mitchell-Young New Map of Texas, which came out eight times between 1835 and 1845. Young, a native of Scotland, was an engraver of maps, rather than a cartographer. He was active in Philadelphia from 1817 to 1845. At times he was a member of the firms of S. Augustus Mitchell, Kneass & Young, and Young and Delleker. According to Fielding (p. 1068), the only plates signed by Young alone are early encyclopedia plates. DAB says that the maps engraved by Young and published by Mitchell compare favorably with the work of John Arrowsmith, the younger (article on Mitchell).
($200-400)

1828

70. [MAP]. STÜLPNAGEL, L. von. Mexico und Centro-America. Gotha: J. Perthes, 1828. Engraved map, original outline coloring, shaded pink border. 29.7 x 35.8 cm (11-3/4 x 14-1/8 inches). Scale not stated. At lower left, inset map of Mexico City and surrounding area: Umbeg. d. Stadt Mexico in 4 fachen Maasstab. At center left, lettered key for identification of cities in Mexico and Central America. Lower center, numbered key to the states of Mexico and Central America. Upper right: Steilers Hand-Atlas No. 47B. Fine.
        Here Texas is outlined in yellow and reduced to an elongated rectangle with the Rio Grande Valley a sharp point on the southwestern boundary. Stülpnagel (1781-1865), draftsman and engraver, produced maps and atlases in Germany from the 1820s until his death. The present map is Plate No. 47b, extracted from Adolf Stieler's Hand-Atlas. Phillips, Atlases 6075 (listing the 1834 edition).
($100-200)

1830

71. [LAND CERTIFICATE WITH MAP]. GALVESTON BAY & TEXAS LAND COMPANY. Ornately engraved land certificate with two cherubs reading at top right, ornate decorative sidebar at left, map at lower left; certificate completed in manuscript, engraved text commences: Galveston Bay & Texas Land Company No. [811] This certifies, 4428-402/1000 Acres. That the Subscribers as the Trustees and Attorneys of Lorenzo De Zavala, Joseph Vehlein, and David G. Burnet, have given and do hereby give to [Rodman Moulton] and h[is] legal representatives the bearer hereof, their consent to the location of, and holding in severalty, One Sitio of Land within the Limits of Four Adjoining Tracts of Land in Texas.... New York, October 16, 1830. Untitled map (southeast Texas with company lands indicated by shading): 6.5 x 10 cm (2-5/8 x 4 inches). Signed in ink by Company officers Anthony Dey, W. H. Sumner, G. W. Curtis, and W. H. Willson, endorsed on verso by bondholder and officer Anthony Dey. 1 p., folio, printed on very thin onionskin paper. Other than light marginal wear, fine.
        First edition, unrecorded issue. Streeter 1117 (documenting only the certificate for one labor of land, whereas the present copy is for one sitio): "According to Dr. Barker (Life of Austin, p. 298), the sale of scrip to finance a company promoting the sale of Texas land...was undoubtedly fraudulent." An unusual feature of this land certificate is its attractive map of southeast Texas and the Louisiana border, locating towns (San Felipe de Austin, Brazoria, Nacogdoches, etc.), Austin's Colony, roads, rivers, Caddo Lake, Sabine Lake, Galveston Island, etc. One of the more interesting and controversial of the colonization companies, the Galveston Bay & Texas Land Company energetically promoted lands between the San Jacinto and Sabine Rivers.
        The Company did not own the land itself; the certificates were only scrip allowing colonists to move into the lands allotted to the three empresarios and there apply for a grant of land. But at five cents an acre, sales were brisk. Unfortunately, unbeknownst to the colonists, Mexico had put into effect its disturbing Law of April 6, 1830, prohibiting further Anglo colonization in Texas. When the emigrants, who were mostly Europeans and not Americans, arrived in Texas, Mexican officials refused to let them settle. The colonists were permitted to build huts and plant gardens but were left on their own to try to acquire land holdings. See The Handbook of Texas Online (Galveston Bay & Texas Land Company) and E. Williams, The Animating Pursuits of Speculation (1949).
($1,000-2,000)

71A. [LAND CERTIFICATE WITH MAP]. GALVESTON BAY & TEXAS LAND COMPANY. Ornately lithographed land certificate with two cherubs reading at top right, ornate decorative sidebar at left, map at lower left; certificate completed in manuscript, lithographed text commences: Galveston Bay & Texas Land Company No. [5739] This certifies, 177-136/1000 Acres. That the Subscribers as the Trustees and Attorneys of Lorenzo De Zavala, Joseph Vehlein, and David G. Burnet, have given and do hereby give to [Anthony Dey] and h[is] legal representatives the bearer hereof, their consent to the location of, and holding in severalty, One Labor of Land within the Limits of Four Adjoining Tracts of Land in Texas.... New York, October 16, 1830. Untitled map (southeast Texas with company lands indicated by shading): 6.5 x 10 cm (2-5/8 x 4 inches). At lower center: E. S. Messier's Litho. Signed in ink by Company officers Anthony Dey, W. H. Sumner, G. W. Curtis, and W. H. Willson, endorsed on verso by bondholder Moulton. 1 p., folio, printed on very thin onionskin paper. Other than light marginal wear, fine.
        First edition. Streeter 1117 (see preceding entry for an unrecorded edition). This certificate is a mystery, in that it appears to be lithographed, whereas the preceding certificate appears to be engraved. At the lower center on the present certificate is the inscription: E. S. Mesier's Litho. The preceding certificate bears no such inscription and appears to be engraved. There are differences on the map, e.g., in the present certificate, the word Matagorda B. does not appear; the place of the names for the Brazos and Navasota Rivers have been moved further to right; the line border on the right is not so sharp, and does not have a heavy center line; the date in the last line reads 16th. October 1830, whereas in the engraved version, the date appears as 16. October 1830; etc. Peters, America on Stone, p. 280: "The Mesiers produced an enormous mass of lithographed sheet music at 28 Wall Street, but there are also other prints of interest... They were important, early, and their work is scarce and almost always of interest."
($1,000-2,000)

1832

72. [MAP]. HINTON, SIMPKIN & MARSHALL (publishers). Map of the United States of America, and Nova Scotia. London, 1832. Engraved map. 25.5 x 40.1 cm (10 x 15-7/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = 100 miles. Inset map: Continuation of the Western Territory on a Reduced Scale. Ornate lettering in title. Lower right: Engraved & Printed by Fenner Sears & Co. Lightly browned at center fold, otherwise fine.
        This map appeared in An Atlas of the United States of North America (London & Philadelphia, 1832). Phillips, Atlases 3691. The little inset of the Pacific Northwest is interesting for showing the northern boundary at 54° 40' and the western boundary between the U.S. and Spain in 1819. The boundaries of the U.S. are indicated with a dash-and-dot line pattern. The western boundary question seems uppermost in the mind of the mapmaker, and the little inset of the Western Territory overlays the western half of Texas. Texas is labeled as Texas, and among the locations is Austin's Town.
($50-100)

1833

FIRST ISSUE OF BURR'S LARGE-SCALE MAP OF TEXAS
WITH A CONTEMPORARY MANUSCRIPT MAP OF MATAGORDA BAY

73. [MAP]. BURR, David H. Texas. New York: J. H. Colton, 1833. Engraved map, original pale blue shading and outlining. 43.5 x 53 cm (17-1/8 x 20-7/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 50 miles. Inset: Plan of the Port of Galveston. Creased where formerly folded, light foxing on verso, very minor voids at six fold intersections, small sepia ink stain at upper ornamental border and neat line. Matted, under double-sided glass, modern wood and gilt frame. Neat ink annotations on the map, locating "Nacogdoches" and "Bolivar" (on the Brazos River) and recording a compass bearing of "28°20'" at "Passo Cavello" on the printed map (the mouth of Matagorda Bay). Table of distances from San Felipe to Bexar, Matamoras, and Monterrey written in pencil in the lower right blank margin. On the verso of the printed map is an interesting and intriguing small manuscript map in ink of Matagorda and Lavaca Bays (approximately 15 x 19 cm; 5-7/8 x 7-1/2 inches), locating Indian Point and other sites in the bays, with a few other contemporary notes in pencil in two other hands. An exceedingly rare map, even more so than the various issues of Stephen F. Austin's map of Texas.
        The importance and value of Burr's landmark map of Texas are well established (see final paragraph of this description). What makes this copy of the Burr map even more special is the presence of the manuscript map of Matagorda and Lavaca Bays on the verso. The rendering is similar to a portolan chart and appears to have been drawn by someone with first-hand knowledge of the Bay and its navigational vagaries and hazards, perhaps to show another Texas immigrant or sea captain how to safely enter the harbor at Matagorda. This excellent little map appears to be contemporary with the printed map, and apparently predates 1841/1842 (Port Lavaca, which is not shown, was founded in 1841 in the aftermath of the 1840 Comanche raid on nearby Linnville; Port Lavaca was named in 1841 and laid out by 1842).
        Although quickly drawn and annotated, the manuscript map is a very accurate representation of the important features of the Bay, showing hazards and sailing bearings of Matagorda and Lavaca Bays (much more accurate than Burr's rendering on the printed map). The person who created the manuscript portolan accurately depicts the several lesser bays and points within Matagorda and Lavaca Bays, specifically naming Indian Point, Cox's Point, Sand Point, and South Point (at the entrance to the Bay). Matagorda is shown as a sizeable town. Shoals and bars are represented by dotted lines. The seaward shore of Matagorda Island has the bearing SWW (southwest by west) indicating the lay of the shore. The safe route for a boat entering from the Gulf to anchorage at Matagorda is shown with a dotted line labeled "Ships Track." The approach to the harbor is noted as NWN (northwest by north), and the correct bearing for actual entry is given as "28°20'" (which is repeated in an ink note on the face of the printed map). A most curious note on the map is a bold circle on Matagorda Island with the name "Camp on Pin sula." One can only guess whether this was to show a suggested camping ground or to mark the presence of an existing camp.
        Matagorda and Lavaca Bays, with their ports and landings that are shown on the manuscript map, were extremely important in the early history of Texas as major point of entry for Anglo and other immigrants. The Colorado River, which flows into Matagorda Bay, was a major route to the burgeoning Anglo colonies in Texas in the early 1830s. The bays were a challenge to navigate, with a difficult passage and entrance having many treacherous bars and shallows; nevertheless, they provided the safest, most convenient harbors on the most direct route to Austin's colonies. By 1832, Matagorda had some 1,400 residents. As early as 1836, Mary Austin Holley reported a population of 200 at Cox's Point, another major point of entry for American immigrants.
        Another site specifically named by the creator of the manuscript map is Indian Point. This manuscript map is one of the few maps to contain a specific reference to "Indian Point"one of the most interesting and colorful sites of Texas geography and history. LaSalle's last ship ran aground near the site in February in 1686. Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels landed at Indian Point in 1844 with one hundred German families. The town of Indian Point (later Indianola) was founded in 1846. During the Mexican-American War, Indian Point became firmly established as a deep-water port, achieving the rank of one of the two top ports in Texas. Indianola was tragically destroyed in two devastating hurricanes (1875 and 1886) and never rebuilt. For more on the sites located on the manuscript map on the verso of the Burr map, see, among others, The Handbook of Texas Online (Matagorda, Indianola, Cox Point, Linnville, Port Lavaca, and Calhoun County).
        Also on the verso are penciled notes in two different hands. One note is the title "Recopilacion de las layes [sic] de Indias." Above this, in a second hand are the city names "Mobile," "Washington," and "Boston," and below is a reckoning of persons' names and dollar amounts. One might speculate that the former could represent ports of call of a ship bound for Matagorda, and the latter possibly represent pay rates for her crew. Another theory about this map that has been offered (which we have not been able to substantiate) is that the manuscript map might have been created by or under the direction of A. C. Allen, who with his brother John K. Allen, founded the city of Houston in 1836. After the Allen brothers arrived in Texas in 1832, they settled briefly at San Augustine and then in Nacogdoches in 1833. The Allen brothers set out to acquire prime coastal real estate in Texas and began exploring the possibilities. We can only conclude there is research remaining to be done on the present copy of Burr's highly important map, and that this is a highly unusual copy.
        Working on the basis of what actually is present on the map, we can state that for its purpose, the manuscript map on the verso is a more accurate representation of Matagorda and Lavaca Bays than found on most other contemporary maps of Texas drawn by professional cartographers. For all the importance of the Matagorda area as an entry point for shipping and immigrants, it is Galveston that usually drew the professional cartographers' attention, as is demonstrated by the inset on the Burr map. But for those who actually brought the goods and settlers to Texas, the matter of accurate knowledge of the harbor at Matagorda was important enough that in one case at least, it was shared in a map on the back of what is now an extremely rare pre-Republic map.
        First state of one of the most important and handsome maps of Texas ever printed. Bryan & Hanak 22. Contours of Discovery, p. 53: "[Burr's] early map of Texas remains a standard view of the area on the eve of the Revolution." Crossroads of Empire, p. 32: "The map also contributes an outstanding inset map of Galveston Bay drawn by Alexander Thompson, an American who was a captain in the Texas Navy." Martin & Martin 30, color plate (p. 123): "Anglo-Americans in the early decades of the nineteenth century reacted quickly to the opportunities to settle in the rich lands made available to them through empresario contracts in the Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas. Stephen F. Austin's 1830 map of Texas, showing his two grants and one to Green DeWitt, aroused great interest in Texas, both on the part of potential settlers as well as in the American government itself. In 1833, the Geographer to the United States House of Representatives, David H. Burr, updated Austin's earlier effort with a new map of Texas showing seventeen land grants.... With the inclusion of the new land grants, his map documented the explosion of immigration into Texas."
        Streeter, p. 329 (designating the Burr map as one of the six most important maps especially desirable for a Texas collection) & 1134 (locating only the Yale copy): "The Burr map of 1833 is the first large scale map of Texas, as distinguished from a general map, to show all of Texas to the Arkansas River and also includes all of the Texas Panhandle.... The Burr map, like the Austin map, is one of the landmarks of Texas cartography." Taliaferro 247 (citing the 1835 issue) and p. 15n (designating Burr's map as important for its contribution to Texas geography as a whole and providing a "valuable record of the social and political evolution of the state during the crucial years when much of its territory was first settled by a population of European origin." ($150,000-250,000)

FIRST BOOK ON TEXAS BY AN ANGLO-AMERICAN
WITH THE HOOKER MAP

74. [BOOK]. HOLLEY, Mary Austin. Texas. Observations, Historical, Geographical and Descriptive, in a Series of Letters. Baltimore: Armstrong & Plaskitt, 1833. 167 pp., engraved folding map on thin paper (Map of the State of Coahuila and Texas, W. Hooker Sculpt.. 26.4 x 33.8 cm; 10-3/8 x 13-5/16 inches; scale: 1 inch = approximately 90 miles). 16mo, original brown cloth (rebacked, original spine preserved). Binding light (perhaps faded from plum to brown, remains of gilding on upper cover). Some staining and rubbing, hinges reinforced, occasional foxing, overall very good, in original binding, the map excellent condition, crisp and in a fine impression.
        First edition, the issue with copyright notice pasted in (on a slip tipped in before the dedication leaf to Col. Stephen F. Austin; no priority established), the map with W. Hooker Sculpt. in imprint, Beales and Rayuelas [sic] Grant, and the other changes outlined by Streeter (see Streeter 1136). Basic Texas Books 93B: "The first book on Texas by an Anglo-American. A key force in inducing subsequent immigration to Texas. Austin guided [Holley] in every aspect of the writing of her book, which she dedicated to him. His map of Texas, the best by far up to that time, was reprinted in smaller format for use in the book with corrections given by Austin to Holley." Howes H593.
        Martin & Martin, p. 32: "In 1833, Austin's cousin Mary Austin Holley produced a promotional tract on Texas which, because Tanner refused Austin permission to use his map for the purpose, was issued with an accompanying map by William Hooker, which was clearly based on Austin's sources." Sibley, Travelers in Texas, pp. 178-79: "Mary Austin Holley opened the great era of travel literature in Texas with Texas: Observations, Historical, Geographical and Descriptive. Her books are standard sources for the later Mexican period because they are based on the writer's observations and information obtained from her cousin, Stephen Fuller Austin." Streeter 1135 (selected as one of the books "especially desirable for a Texas collection. One of my favorite books on life and travel in Texas"-pp. 327-28): "The first book in English entirely on Texas. For a long time, I have regarded it as one of the Texas classics." Taliaferro 241: "Hooker's map is one of the earliest maps of Texas to show all of Texas to the Arkansas River, including the Panhandle." Vandale 87. For other issues of the Hooker map, see Items 78 and 89 herein.
($7,500-15,000)

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