Dorothy Sloan -- Books

Auction 12: The Zamorano 80 Collection of Daniel G. Volkmann Jr.

Lots 77 & 77A

| <<previous lot | |Zamorano 80 contents| |Home| |Zamorano 80 abstracts| | next lot>> |


Item 77. Vancouver’s Voyage, an epic survey with outstanding plates and maps finally showing the West Coast accurately—“[The Northwest Coast is] so remarkably complicated that Vancouver’s systematic and painstaking survey ranks with the most distingished work of the kind ever done” (Pacific scholar J. C. Beaglehole).

77. VANCOUVER, George (1758-1798). A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and round the World; in Which the Coast of North-West America Has Been Carefully Examined and Accurately Surveyed. Undertaken by His Majesty’s Command, Principally with a View to Ascertain the Existence of Any Navigable Communication between the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans; and Performed in the Years 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794, and 1795, in the “Discovery” Sloop of War, and Armed Tender “Chatham”.... London: G. G. & J. Robinson; J. Edwards, 1798. 4 vols.: 3 vols., 4to (text) + folio (atlas). Text: [8] xxix [1, blank] [8] 432 + [10] 504 + [10] 505 [3, errata] pp., copper-engraved map, 17 copper-engraved plates illustrating views on land and sea and natives (including Alaska, Hawaii, California—the 3 plates of California interest are: “The Mission of St. Carlos, near Monterrey”; “The Presidio of Monterrey”; “A Remarkable Mountain near the River of Monterrey”). 3 vols., large 4to, contemporary tree calf (sympathetically rebacked at an earlier date in calf, gilt-lettered red and green morocco spine labels, spine stamped in gilt and blind). Bindings worn, with some cracking of original leather, text and plates uniformly age-toned, some foxing and offsetting from plates to text, upper hinge of vol. 1 weak. Generous margins. Engraved armorial bookplates in all three volumes. Atlas: 10 folding copper-engraved maps, 6 copper-engraved views (profiles of parts of coasts, headlands, etc.) [see partial list of maps, charts, and profiles below]. Large folio, later (early twentieth-century?) three-quarter sheep over blue marbled boards. Binding rubbed and spinal extremities chipped. Early ink manuscript table of contents. Some foxing and browning, heavier along blank margins. Overall a very good to near fine copy, complete.
First edition of “one of the most important accounts of the exploration of the Pacific Northwest” (Streeter Sale 3497). Barrett, Baja California 2485. California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present (Norman J. W. Thrower) 18 (discussing plate 8, the chart of the Northwest Coast with insets of the ports of San Diego and San Francisco; chart illustrated at p. 37; see more discussion of plate 8 below). Cowan I, p. 236. Cowan II, p. 655. Ferguson, Australia 281. Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography 298: “Vancouver, who had served on Cook’s Third Voyage, was made commander of an expedition whose express purpose was to reclaim wherever possible British rights to the Northwest Coast of America.... Vancouver sailed to the Pacific via Australia, where he discovered and charted King George Sound and Cape Hood, passed Van Diemen’s Land, and visited New Zealand, Hawaii, and the Northwest Coast. During the course of three seasons, he surveyed Alaska and the Northwest Coast, investigated the Strait of Juan de Fuca, discovered the Strait of Georgia, and circumnavigated Vancouver Island. He visited San Francisco, Monterey, and other Spanish settlements of Alta California.” Graff 4456. Harlow, Maps of San Francisco Bay 13; Maps of the Pueblo Lands of San Diego 10. Hill, pp. 303-304. Howell 50, California 243; Anniversary Catalogue 112 (Richard B. Reed description) “[Vancouver’s] coastal survey of the area north of San Francisco was the most accurate that had been done to that time.... His Voyage is important not only for the magnificent charts and splendid views that accompanied it, but also for the valuable and extensive amount of information that it provided on the Spanish settlements, the Indian tribes, and the physical features of the country that he visited. It is one of the ‘classics’ of the late eighteenth-century geographical literature.... An 8vo edition, with corrections, was issued in six volumes, without an atlas, in 1801, and French translations appeared in 1800, 1801, and 1803, with German, Swedish, and Russian editions being published in 1799, 1800, and 1827 respectively. None, however, can match the elegance and importance of this first printing.”
Howes V23: “Of all modern exploring voyages to the Pacific those of Cook, La Pérouse and Vancouver were the most important.” Huntington Library, Zamorano 80...Exhibition of Famous and Notorious California Classics 77. Jones 667. Lada-Mocarski 55. Lande 1495. Mathes, California Colonial Bibliography 70. National Maritime Museum Catalogue III 142. Norris 4063. O’Reilly & Reitman, Bibliographie de Tahiti 635. Phillips, Atlases 197. Smith 10469. Staton & Tremaine 688. Tweney, The Washington 89 #78 (illustrated at p. 73 is “the first known picture of Mount Rainier” by John Sykes): “[Vancouver’s] meticulous survey literally put on the map of the world the intricacies of Puget Sound, Hood Canal, and the western coast of mainland Canada. He was the first to circumnavigate Vancouver Island, and the charts and maps he produced were so accurate and complete as to continue being used almost to the present day. He bestowed approximately 400 place names, ninety percent of which are still in use.” Van Nostrand, The First Hundred Years of Painting in California, pp. 6-7, 124-25. Van Nostrand & Coulter, California Pictorial, pp. 8-11 (illustrating John Sykes’s “Presidio of Monterey” and “Mission of San Carlos”). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 853-860 & pp. 239-50. Wickersham 6601. Zamorano 80 #77. Vancouver charted one of the last great unknown coastlines in its entirety. His explorations and maps finally disproved the long-held theory that there was a passage that linked the Pacific Ocean with Hudson Bay. (And in a footnote to ranching history: Captain George Vancouver landed the very first long horned cattle on Hawaii Island in 1793, beginning the cattle ranching industry in Hawaii.)

Maps, charts, and profiles of California and Northwest Coast interest:

Plate 3: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America, with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore has been Finally Traced and Determined from Latd. 38° 15' N. and Longd. 237° 27' E. to Latd. 45° 46' N. and Longd. 236° 15'E. 77.5 x 62 cm (30-1/2 x 24-3/8 inches). Inset: Bay of Trinidad. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 853. Pacific Coast from Northern Oregon to Bodega Bay. Mount Hood is depicted and named; it was named for Lord Hood by Lieut. W. R. Broughton in October of 1792.

Plate 4: Views of Parts of the Coast of North West America...Cape Mendocino the South Promontory.... 35.7 x 47.5 cm (14-1/8 x 18-3/4 inches). Six profiles of Northern California to Washington, including Cape Mendocino, Cape Orford, Cape Gregory, Point Grenville, Cape Flattery, and Mount Olympus.

Plate 5: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore has been Correctly Traced and Determined from Lat. 45° 30' N. and Long. 236° 12' E. to Lat. 52° 15' N. and Long 232°40 E. at the Different Periods Shewn by the Tracks. 78.3 x 61.2 cm. (30-3/4 x 24-1/8 inches). Insets: (1) Entrance of Columbia River; (2) Gray’s Harbour; (3) Port Discovery. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 854. This chart covers the extreme northern edge of Oregon up to Queen Charlotte Sound, north of Vancouver Island. Mount Rainier is illustrated and named; it was named in May of 1792 after Peter Rainier, who was to become a Rear Admiral within three years of having the majestic peak named for him.

Plate 6: Views of Parts of the Coast of North West America...The Westernmost of Scot’s Islands.... 36.2 x 46.5 cm (14-1/4 x 18-3/8 inches). Six views of coastal profiles from Oregon to Canada, including Scot’s Island, Cape Scot, Woody Point, Nootka Sound, Columbia River–Cape Disappointment, and Punto Barro de Arena. These views cover the same area as in plate 5: Scott (as it is now) is just north of Vancouver Island. Cape Disappointment is the southern tip of Washington State.

Plate 7: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from Lat. 5l°.45' N. and Long. 232°.08' E. to Lat. 57°.30' N. and Long. 226°44 E. at the Periods Shewn by the Tracks... 75.2 x 61.1 cm (29-5/8 x 24 inches). Inset: A Survey of Port Stewart. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 855. This chart covers from Queen Charlotte Sound north to the area of Sitka, Alaska.

Plate 8: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore has been Correctly Traced and Determined from Latde. 30°.00. N. and Longd. 244°.32 E. to Latd. 38°.30 N. and Longd. 237°.13. E. Insets: (1) Entrance of Port Sn. Francisco; (2) Port Sn. Diego. 76.6 x 61.5 cm (30-1/8 x 24-1/4 inches). California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present (Norman J. W. Thrower): “This chart of the California coast from 30° to 38°30' north latitude was compiled from surveys made by Captain George Vancouver of the British Royal Navy. It is one of a series of charts covering the northwest coast of America from 30° to about 60° north latitude made from surveys conducted in the years 1792-1794. These charts superseded all others of the coast, became the standard and were much copied. It was not until the 1850s that Vancouver’s charts for the western coast of the United States were replaced by those of the United States Coast Survey as the standard.... The inset of the entrance to San Francisco Bay is from a survey by Vancouver, while that of San Diego was taken from Spanish charts with additions and corrections by Vancouver.” Harlow, Maps of San Francisco Bay 13 (fourth separately printed map of San Francisco); Maps of the Pueblo Lands of San Diego 10 (third separately printed map of San Diego): “Vancouver made no survey of the port. Noting that Dalrymple’s chart was ‘entitled to much praise,’ he nevertheless suggested some ‘little improvements.” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 856. The map extends from St. Domingo, Mexico in the south to Point Reyes, California, in the north, and the vessels’ tracks are shown by dotted lines. Spanish missions and presidios are noted. A note in the cartouche says “The parts shaded red are taken from the Spanish Authorities.”

Plate 9: Views of Parts of the Coast of North West America...Punto de los Reyes.... 36.7 x 47.3 cm (14-1/2 x 18-5/8 inches). Coastal views including Punto de los Reyes to the Bay of Sir Francis Drake, entrance to the Port of St. Francisco, Point Piños to the River Carmelo, Santa Barbara to beyond the Presidio, Port San Diego Punta de Loma, two remarkable mountains south of San Diego, and Cape Colnett. The profile showing Santa Barbara includes small renderings of the chief architecture then in existence.

Plate 10: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from Latde. of 59°.30' North & Longde. 207°20' East; to Cape Douglas in Latde. 58°.52' North & Longde. 207°20 East. Inset: A Survey of Port Chatham. 77.6 x 62.1 cm (30-5/8 x 24-1/2 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 857. Plates 10, 11, and 12 are all around the same area, the Alaska Peninsula, Kenai Peninsula, and to the east. Plate 10 shows the east coast of the Alaska Peninsula in the Cook Inlet area (Anchorage is at the head of Cook Inlet).

Plate 11: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from Latd. 59°.45' N. and Longd. 219°.30' E. to Latd. 59°.56' N. and Longd. 212°.08 E. at the Periods Shown by the Track. Inset: A Survey of Port Chalmers. 55.2 x 72.1 cm (21-3/4 x 28-3/8 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 858. Plate 11 forms a group with plates 10 and 12, moving eastward to show the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula and Prince William Sound.

Plate 12: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from the Latde. 57°.07½ N. and Longd. 227°.00 E. to Latd. 59°.59. N. and Longd. 219°.00.E. at the Periods Shewn by the Track. Insets: (1) Entrance into Cross Sound; (2) A Survey of Port Conclusion; (3) A Survey of Port Protection. 73.4 x 61.7 cm (28-7/8 x 24-1/4 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 859. Plates 10 and 11 are of a group with plate 12, here showing Prince William Sound to a point near the Alaska Panhandle.

Plate 13: Views of Headlands and Islands on the Coasts of North West and South America, 36.7 x 47.3 cm (14-1/2 x 18-5/8 inches). Numerous views of the coast, including Cook’s Inlet at Port Chatham, Port San Blas and the Islet of Diego Ramírez to the south of Cape Horn. Includes Cabo San Lucas.

Plate 14: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined, from Latde. 29°.54 N. and Long. 244°.33 E. to Cape Douglas in Lat. 58°.52. N. and Long. 207°.20 E. during the Summers of 1792, 1793 and 1794.... 76.8 x 59.5 cm (30-1/4 x 23-3/8 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 860. Here Vancouver presents a combination of all of the maps above, showing the Pacific coast from western Alaska to northern Mexico. Full lines show the vessels’ tracks north, with dotted lines indicating the vessels’ tracks south. A note within the cartouche states, “The parts not shaded to the Eastward of Cape Decision are taken from Spanish Authorities—and those not shaded to the Westward of Cape St. Hermogenes are taken from Russian Authorities.”

This magnificent set is also important for the history of the iconography of California. The prints of Monterey, which were engraved from artwork by British artist John Sykes (1773-1858), are frequently described as the first published views of California. This assertion does not take into account earlier prints such as those found in Montanus (Drake-New Albion), Cooke, and Shelvocke, images on maps (such as land forms of New Albion on the inset of the Hondius map), or even the pictorial vignettes on the beautiful frontispiece map of Venegas (see item 78 herein). However, artist John Sykes’s three plates of Monterey are among the few published prints of California from the eighteenth century. Furthermore, they appear to be among the earliest printed plates of Upper California made from artwork by an artist who actually painted or sketched on site. We think it appropriate to include within the category of published views of California the incredibly detailed coastal profiles of the California coast found in the atlas. These profiles are a true marriage of science and art. Regarding the artwork found in Vancouver’s Voyage, Jonathan Raban in his article “Battleground of the Eye” (Atlantic Monthly, May 2001) comments: “In 1791 and 1792...Spanish and British expeditions cruised through the region, proving the insularity of Vancouver Island and charting Puget Sound. The Spaniards shipped professional artists...whereas the English, under Captain George Vancouver, made do with the artistic efforts of a bunch of talented young midshipmen, including John Sykes, Harry Humphrys, and Thomas Heddington. From the mass of sketches that came home to London and Madrid one can see something of the Pacific Northwest but much more of the tastes and interests prevailing among cultivated young Europeans in the last decade of the eighteenth century. One catches the artists’ excitement at the strange customs, costumes, and architecture of primitive man, and their elation at finding themselves in a real-life Salvator Rosa landscape, with all its shaggy cliffs, tangled woods, blasted trees, and lurid skies.” (4 vols.) ($20,000-30,000)



77A. VANCOUVER, George. A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and round the World; in Which the Coast of North-West America Has Been Carefully Examined, and Accurately Surveyed. Undertaken by His Majesty’s Command, Principally with a View to Ascertain the Existence of Any Navigable Communication between the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans; and Performed in the Years 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794 and 1795, in the “Discovery” Sloop of War, and Armed Tender “Chatham.”... A New Edition, with Corrections.... London: Printed for John Stockdale, 1801. 28 [33]-410 + [2] 418 + [2] 435 + [2] 417 + [2] 454 + [2] 412 [2, ads] pp. (complete), 19 copper-engraved plates and maps. 6 vols., 8vo, early-twentieth-century three-quarter smooth tan calf over tan cloth, red gilt-lettered morocco spine labels, spines extra-gilt (stamped with nautical vignettes) and with raised bands, marbled endpapers. Minor shelf wear, otherwise a very fine, complete set, the maps and plates backed with linen. Laid in is Newbegin’s Book Shop’s typewritten catalogue description on their printed stationery, along with their promotional pamphlet (Books of the Month for August 1922). Scarce in commerce, especially with all plates and maps present.
Second English edition, first 8vo edition, first corrected edition. Ferguson, Australia 339. Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography 335. Hill, p. 304. Howes V23. O’Reilly & Reitman, Bibliographie de Tahiti 636. Tweney, The Washington 89 #78: “Vancouver’s Voyage has been reprinted many times, and in many languages. A convenient edition was the first octavo edition in six volumes published in London in 1801.” The Advertisement in vol. 1 gives a fascinating explanation of why the work was reprinted: “The Publisher finds it necessary only to state, for the information of the purchasers of this new Edition, that the copper-plates of the charts contained in the folio volume, which accompanied the first Edition, were all stolen, and may therefore be considered as irrecoverably lost. The whole of the Views, except the headlands, are retained. The general chart, and that of the New Discoveries &c. are re-engraved, and will, it is conceived, completely satisfy the majority of his readers. It must, however, be observed, that the other charts are indispensably necessary for such as may hereafter navigate those seas. This Edition has received throughout the requisite corrections of the Editor, John Vancouver, Esq. No work has maintained a higher character in the public estimation than this voyage, and the expense of the quarto Edition could alone have prevented its being universally read. The loss of the Plates, has, of course, greatly enhanced the value of the few Copies of the original Edition, which were not at that time sold. They may however, be had until Christmas next, with the folio volume of charts at Twelve Guineas; but should any then remain they will be advanced to Fifteen Guineas. Piccadilly, 26th October, 1801.”
Regarding the theft of the copper plates used in the first edition of Vancouver’s Voyage, Forbes (298) includes the following information which may or may not relate to the theft: “The Provincial Archives has a copy of the regular issue text [for the first edition of Vancouver] originally owned by Dr. George Goodman Hewett, surgeon’s mate of HMS Discovery. It is interleaved and extensively annotated on both the blank leaves and margins with important comments on the voyage, often highly critical of the actions of Vancouver. Regarding a comment (in the introduction, p. xiv) on charts, plans, and other drawings made by officers, he comments: ‘Many of the young Gentlemen were not only able but in the course of the Voyage did take a great many Views &c. but destroyed them all when they understood their Drawings must be given up and Published for the Emolument of Vancouver who had behaved in a most outrageous and Illiberal [sic] manner to most of them. The few Drawings that are herein were taken by a Mr. Sykes Captn. V’s Agent.’” Vancouver’s accomplishments were nothing short of extraordinary, yet he was surrounded by a series of enemies and plagued by illness during his short but incredible life. For more on Vancouver, see John Robson's website: http://pages.quicksilver.net.nz/jcr/~vancouver1.html. (6 vols.) ($1,500-3,000)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Spanish maritime exploration to the north of Monterey was initiated by naval officers attached to the Naval Department of San Blas, Juan Pérez and Esteban José Martínez, in 1774, with a successful voyage to the Queen Charlotte Islands and Nootka Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. This was followed in 1775 by Bruno de Hezeta and Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra taking formal possession of the coast northward to Mount Edgecumbe. During these voyages, exploration for the reputed Strait of Anián between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans was conducted, and the abundance of fur-bearing mammals was noted.
In 1778, the great English navigator James Cook reached the Oregon coast and continued northward to Nootka, the Aleutian Islands and, sailing through Bering Strait, reached the Arctic Ocean. Cook then visited the Russian camp at Unalaska, and proceeded to the island of Hawaii where he was killed by natives. The entry of England into claimed Spanish territory caused concern in Madrid, and maritime expansion from San Blas was intensified with a voyage in 1779 by Ignacio de Arteaga and Bodega to the Kenai Peninsula and Afognak Island. However, by 1785 Russia had a permanent settlement on Kodiak and English traders were acquiring sea otter pelts at Nootka. In 1786, the English returned, the region was explored by Jean Françoise Galaup de la Pérouse (q.v.), and the following year four English ships were trading at Nootka.
English and French presence in the Pacific Northwest was answered in 1788 by Martínez and Gonzalo López de Haro sailing to Unalaska, visiting the Russians, and returning to Monterey where Martínez recommended occupation of Nootka. Although primarily concerned over Russian encroachment, entry of U.S. traders added to the urgency of occupation, and Viceroy Manuel Antonio Flores ordered Martínez to settle the sound and cordially manifest Spanish sovereignty. With López de Haro, 4 Franciscans, and 195 men, Martínez sailed from San Blas and on May 5, 1789, reached Nootka where, during the following weeks, he constructed buildings and arrested the captains and crews of Ifigenia Nubiana and Northwest America. In July, James Colnett, commanding Argonaut, rejected Spanish sovereignty and, following a violent exchange with Martínez in which the Englishman referred to him as “Gardem España,” was arrested with his crew and sent to San Blas where his ship was confiscated.
When reports of the Nootka incident reached London, Britain was enraged, and, with her long-standing enmity with Spain, William Pitt threatened war. His Spanish counterpart, Conde de Floridablanca, argued the primacy of Spanish claims to the Northwest Coast and prepared for conflict, but, as a result of the French Revolution and thereby the loss of her major ally, Spain was forced to accept terms of the Nootka Convention of October 28, 1790, that restored all British property, required reparations, and eliminated exclusive dominion over the coast north of San Francisco Bay. To assure proper compliance, a commissioner was to represent each of the signatories; Bodega y Quadra, commandant of San Blas, was appointed to represent Spanish interests, and George Vancouver, who had accompanied Cook in 1778, was named as his counterpart. Sailing from Falmouth with Discovery and Chatham in April 1791, Vancouver and William Broughton rounded the Cape of Good Hope, continued to Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, and Hawaii, and, sighting the California coast in April 1792, explored the coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Meeting Sutil and Mexicana under Dionisio Alcalá Galiano and Cayetano Valdés in the Rosario Strait, they collaborated in the first circumnavigation of Vancouver Island and charting of the coast prior to reaching Nootka Sound in August. Generally amicable, but inconclusive negotiations ensued, and on October 12, the British expedition departed, reaching the Columbia River a week later and continuing to San Francisco and Monterey where Vancouver was well received. From Monterey, Broughton accompanied Bodega to San Blas with Chatham placed under the command of Peter Puget, and Vancouver sailed for Hawaii in January 1793. Leaving the islands in March, Vancouver returned to continue surveys of the coast northward to Alaska, then sailed southward to Nootka and California, and returned to Hawaii in September 1793 to winter over. In March 1794 the expedition surveyed Prince William Sound, Yakutat Bay, and Baranof Island before sailing to Nootka in August and initiating the homeward voyage, completed on October 20, 1795.
The extraordinarily detailed journal and charts of the Vancouver expedition laid to rest the concept of the Strait of Anián and provided the most accurate cartographic and navigational knowledge of the last major region of the globe to be explored by Europeans. A second English edition was published in 1801 and a facsimile of the 1798 edition appeared in New York in 1968. French editions appeared in Paris in 1799 and 1801, and a German translation was published in Berlin in 1799-1800. A definitive scholarly edition prepared by W. Kaye Lamb was published in London by the Hakluyt Society in 1984.

—W. Michael Mathes



Item 77. Engraved profiles from Vancouver’s Voyage, showing northern California to Washington, including Cape Mendocino, Cape Orford, Cape Gregory, Point Grenville, Cape Flattery, and Mount Olympus.


Item 77. John Sykes’s engravings of Monterey—among the few published prints of California from the eighteenth century actually painted or sketched on site in California.



Item 77. Engraved chart from Vancouver’s Voyage, showing the Pacific Coast from northern Oregon to Bodega Bay, including Mount Hood.



| <<previous lot | |Zamorano 80 contents| |Home| |Zamorano 80 abstracts| | next lot>> |