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AUCTION 17

VOYAGES & TRAVELS
WITH AN EMPHASIS ON CAPTAIN COOK

Lot 74

Zamorano 80 #77

Fine Set, Atlas in Original Drab Blue Boards

74. VANCOUVER, George. A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and round the World; in Which the Coast of North-West America Has Been Carefully Examined and Accurately Surveyed. Undertaken by His Majesty’s Command, Principally with a View to Ascertain the Existence of Any Navigable Communication between the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans; and Performed in the Years 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794, and 1795, in the Discovery Sloop of War, and Armed Tender Chatham.... London: G. G. and J. Robinson; J. Edwards, 1798. 4 vols., as follows:

Vol. I: [8], xxix [1, blank], [8], 432 pp., 7 plates.

Vol II: [8], [1, 1 blank], 504 pp., 4 plates, 1 map.

Vol III: [8], [1, 1 blank], 505, [3, errata] pp., 6 plates.

Atlas: 10 folding maps, 6 views (profiles of parts of coasts, headlands, etc.), [see partial list of maps, charts, and profiles below].

Total: 34 copper-engraved plates and maps (18 in text; 16 in atlas).

Plates Of Washington, California, And Hawaii Interest

Mount Rainier, from the South Part of Admiralty Inlet. [lower left below image]: W. Alexander del: from a Sketch taken on the Spot by J. Sykes [lower right below image]: J. Landseer Sculp. Vol. I, p. 268.

The Mission of St. Carlos, near Monterrey. [lower left below image]: W. Alexander del: from a Sketch taken on the Spot by J. Sykes [lower right below image]: B. T. Pouncy sculpt. Vol. II, p. 10.

The Presidio of Monterrey. [lower left below image]: W. Alexander del: from a Sketch taken on the Spot by J. Sykes [lower right below image]: J. Fittler sculpt. Vol. II, p. 440.

The Crater on the Summit of Mount Worroray Owhyhee. [lower left below image]: W. Alexander del from a Sketch taken on the Spot by T. Heddington [lower right below image]: B. T. Pouncy sculpt. Vol. III, p. 14. Scene includes artist sketching the volcano.

A Remarkable Mountain near the River of Monterrey. [lower left below image]: W. Alexander del. from a Sketch taken on the Spot by J. Sykes [lower right below image]: Engraved by T. Pouncy. Vol. III, p. 331.

Text: 3 vols., large 4to, contemporary full tree calf, red and green morocco labels, spines with raised bands, edges stained green. Minor shelf wear, bumping, and spotting to binding. Endpapers and flyleaves with marginal darkening due to contact with binding (not affecting text block). Moderate to heavy offsetting from plates, most of which are lightly stained at edges, scattered light foxing to text. Generally a fine, wide-margined copy in original condition, complete with all the plates and maps, errata, and half titles. Engraved armorial bookplates of Joseph Radcliffe on pastedowns.

Atlas: Large folio, original drab blue-grey boards, most of original tan paper backstrip perished. Boards with moderate spotting and rubbing, joints open but holding, some plates with mild to moderate foxing and some darkening at edges, overall a very good to near fine, unsophisticated copy in the desirable boards, plates untrimmed. Preserved in a brown cloth clamshell case with dark brown levant morocco spine, title in gilt on spine, raised bands.

Overall, this is a fine, desirable set, rarely encountered in original condition, particularly with the atlas in boards, and the text bindings fresh and unrestored. Both text and atlas are tall copies, the text 31 cm tall, and the atlas 57.5 cm tall.

Maps, Charts & Profiles of Northwest Coast Interest

Plate 3: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America, with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore has been Finally Traced and Determined from Latd. 38º 15 N. and Longd. 237º 27 E. to Latd. 45º 46 N. and Longd. 236º 15 E. 77.5 x 62 cm (30-1/2 x 24-3/8 inches). Inset: Bay of Trinidad. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 853. Pacific Coast from Northern Oregon to Bodega Bay. Mount Hood is depicted and named; it was named for Lord Hood by Lieut. W. R. Broughton in October, 1792.

[Plate 4]: Views of Parts of the Coast of North West America...Cape Mendocino the South Promontory.... 35.7 x 47.5 cm (14-1/8 x 18-3/4 inches). Six profiles of Northern California to Washington, including Cape Mendocino, Cape Orford, Cape Gregory, Point Grenville, Cape Flattery, and Mount Olympus.

Plate 5: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore has been Traced and Determined from Lat. 45° 30 N. and Long. 236° 12 E. to Lat. 52° 15 N. and Long 232° 40 E. at the Different Periods Shewn by the Tracks. 78.3 x 61.2 cm (30-3/4 x 24-1/8 inches). Insets: (1) Entrance of Columbia River; (2) Gray’s Harbour; (3) Port Discovery. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 854. This chart covers the extreme northern edge of Oregon up to Queen Charlotte Sound, north of Vancouver Island. Mount Rainier is illustrated and named; it was named in May, 1792 after Peter Rainier, who was to become a Rear Admiral within three years of having the majestic peak named for him.

Plate 6: Views of Parts of the Coast of North West America. The Westernmost of Scot’s Islands.... 36.2 x 46.5 cm (14-1/4 x 18-3/8 inches). Six views of coastal profiles from Oregon to Canada, including Scot’s Island, Cape Scot, Woody Point, Nootka Sound, Columbia River–Cape Disappointment, and Punto Barro de Arena. These views cover the same area as in plate 5: Scott (as it is now) is just north of Vancouver Island. Cape Disappointment is the southern tip of Washington State.

Plate 7: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from Lat. 5lº. 45 N. and Long. 232°.08 E. to Lat. 57°.30 N. and Long. 226° 44 E. at the Periods Shewn by the Tracks.... 75.2 x 61.1 cm (29-5/8 x 24 inches). Inset: A Survey of Port Stewart. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 855. This chart covers from Queen Charlotte Sound north to the area of Sitka, Alaska.

Plate 8: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore has been Correctly Traced and Determined from Latde. 30°.00. N. and Longd. 244°.32 E. to Latd. 38°.30 N. and Longd. 237°.13. E. Insets: (1) Entrance of Port Sn. Francisco; (2) Port Sn. Diego. 76.6 x 61.5 cm (30-1/8 x 24-1/4 inches).California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present: “This chart of the California coast from 30º to 38º30' north latitude was compiled from surveys made by Captain George Vancouver of the British Royal Navy. It is one of a series of charts covering the northwest coast of America from 30º to about 60º north latitude made from surveys conducted in the years 1792-1794. These charts superseded all others of the coast, became the standard and were much copied. It was not until the 1850s that Vancouver’s charts for the western coast of the United States were replaced by those of the United States Coast Survey as the standard.... The inset of the entrance to San Francisco Bay is from a survey by Vancouver, while that of San Diego was taken from Spanish charts with additions and corrections by Vancouver.” Harlow, Maps of San Francisco Bay 13 (fourth separately printed map of San Francisco); Maps of the Pueblo Lands of San Diego 10 (third separately printed map of San Diego): “Vancouver made no survey of the port. Noting that Dalrymple’s chart was ‘entitled to much praise,’ he nevertheless suggested some ‘little improvements.’” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 856. The map extends from St. Domingo, Mexico, in the south to Point Reyes, California, in the north. Spanish missions and presidios are noted. A note in the cartouche says “The parts shaded red are taken from the Spanish Authorities.”

Plate 9: Views of Parts of the Coast of North West America. Punto de los Reyes.... 36.7 x 47.3 cm (14-1/2 x 18-5/8 inches). Coastal views including Punto de los Reyes to the Bay of Sir Francis Drake, entrance to the Port of St. Francisco, Point Piños to the River Carmelo, Santa Barbara to beyond the Presidio, Port San Diego Punta de Loma, two remarkable mountains south of San Diego, and Cape Colnett. The profile showing Santa Barbara includes small renderings of the chief architecture then in existence.

[Plate 10]: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from the Latde. of 59°.30 North & Longde. 207° 20' East; to Cape Douglas in Latde. 58°.52' North & Longde. 207° 20’ East. Inset: A Survey of Port Chatham. 77.6 x 62.1 cm (30-5/8 x 24-1/2 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 857. Plates 10, 11, and 12 are all around the same area, the Alaska Peninsula, Kenai Peninsula, and to the east. Plate 10 shows the east coast of the Alaska Peninsula in the Cook Inlet area (Anchorage is at the head of Cook Inlet).

Plate 11: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from Latd. 59º.45' N. and Longd. 219º.30' E. to Latd. 59º.56' N. and Longd. 212º.08 E. at the Periods Shown by the Track. Inset: A Survey of Port Chalmers. 55.2 x 72.1 cm (21-3/4 x 28-3/8 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 858. Plate 11 forms a group with plates 10 and 12, moving eastward to show the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula and Prince William Sound.

Plate 12: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined from Latde. 57º.07½ N. and Longd. 227º.00. E. to Latd. 59º.59. N. and Longd. 219º.00.E. at the Periods Shewn by the Track. Insets: (1) Entrance into Cross Sound; (2) A Survey of Port Conclusion; (3) A Survey of Port Protection. 73.4 x 61.7 cm (28-7/8 x 24-1/4 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 859. Plates 10 and 11 are of a group with Plate 12, here showing Cape Decision to a point near the Alaska Panhandle.

[Plate 13]: Views of Headlands and Islands on the Coasts of North West and South America. 36.7 x 47.3 cm (14-1/2 x 18-5/8 inches). Numerous views of the coast, including Cook’s Inlet at Port Chatham, Port San Blas and the Islet of Diego Ramírez to the south of Cape Horn. Includes Cabo San Lucas.

Plate 14: A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N.W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty’s Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham...in Which the Continental Shore Has Been Correctly Traced and Determined, from Lat. 29°.54’ N. and Long.244°.33’ E. to Cape Douglas in Lat. 58°.52’ N. and Long. 207°.20’ E. during the Summers of 1792, 1793 and 1794.... 76.8 x 59.5 cm (30-1/4 x 23-3/8 inches). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 860. Here Vancouver presents a combination of all of the maps above, showing the Pacific coast from western Alaska to northern Mexico. Full lines show the vessels’ tracks north, with dotted lines indicating the vessels’ tracks south. A note within the cartouche states, “The parts not shaded to the Eastward of Cape Decision are taken from Spanish Authorities—and those not shaded to the Westward of Cape St. Hermogenes are taken from Russian Authorities.”

     First edition of “one of the most important accounts of the exploration of the Pacific Northwest” (Streeter Sale 3497). Bagnall I, pp. 1055-1056. Barrett, Baja California 2485. California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present 18 (discussing plate 8, the chart of the Northwest Coast with insets of the ports of San Diego and San Francisco; chart illustrated at p. 37; see more discussion of plate 8 above). Cowan I, p. 236. Cowan II, p. 655. Cox II, pp. 30-31. Day, Pacific Islands Literature, One Hundred Basic Books 23. Ferguson, Australian Bibliography 281. Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography 298. Graff 4456. Harlow, Maps of San Francisco Bay 13; Maps of the Pueblo Lands of San Diego 10. Hill I, pp. 303-304. Hill II:1753. Cf. Hocken, pp. 29-30n. Cf. Howell 50, California 243; Anniversary Catalogue 112: “None...can match the elegance and importance of this first printing.”

     Howes V23: “Of all modern exploring voyages to the Pacific those of Cook, La Pérouse and Vancouver were the most important.” Huntington Library, Zamorano 80...Exhibition of Famous and Notorious California Classics 77. Jones 667. Judd 178. Lada-Mocarski 55. Lande 1495. Mathes, California Colonial Bibliography 70. Norris 4063. O’Reilly- Reitman 635. Sabin 98443. Smith 10469. Staton & Tremaine 688. Strathern 582. Streeter Sale 3497. Tweney, The Washington 89 #78 (illustrated at p. 73 is “the first known picture of Mount Rainier” by John Sykes). Van Nostrand, The First Hundred Years of Painting in California, pp. 6-7, 124-25. Van Nostrand & Coulter, California Pictorial, pp. 8-11 (illustrating John Sykes’s Presidio of Monterey and Mission of San Carlos). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 853-860 & pp. 239-50. Wickersham 6601. Zamorano 80 #77.

     Vancouver’s voyage was a fitting capstone to an illustrious and significant century of discoveries by European powers in all areas of the world. Despite confrontations in other parts of the world, such as North America, India, and Africa, probably no area excited such curiosity and energy as the relatively unknown vastness of the Pacific between North America and Japan. Having sailed with Cook on both his second and third voyages, Vancouver was uniquely equipped by both experience and training to fulfill his mission of investigating the area and resolving the problems presented by the Nootka Convention, both of which he was specifically charged to undertake. A mere partial listing of Vancouver’s accomplishments exhausts the rhetoric of even his most ardent admirers, and we here shall not attempt to out-Hector Hector except to note that he named about four hundred places on this voyage (many of those names have become permanent) and drove the final nails into the coffin of the Northwest Passage theory. In an odd twist, he claimed Hawaii for England on the basis of a cessation he negotiated, but the government failed to act upon the agreement. He even established the Hawaiian ranching industry when in 1793 he introduced cattle to the islands. (Horses were not introduced until 1803 when Richard Cleveland brought them aboard a ship commanded by William Shaler.) Ironically, Vancouver did not live to see his work in print, although he did correct most of the proof sheets.

     This magnificent set is especially important for the history of the iconography of California. The prints of Monterey, which were engraved from artwork by British artist John Sykes (1773-1858), are frequently described as the first published views of California. This assertion does not take into account earlier prints such as those found in Montanus (Drake-New Albion), Cooke (see Item 61 herein), and Shelvocke, images on maps (such as land forms of New Albion on the inset of the Hondius map), or even the pictorial vignettes on the beautiful frontispiece map of Venegas. However, Sykes’ three plates of Monterey are among the few published prints of California from the eighteenth century. Furthermore, they appear to be among the earliest printed plates of Upper California made from artwork by an artist who actually painted or sketched on site. We think it appropriate to include within the category of published views of California the incredibly detailed coastal profiles of the California coast found in the atlas. These profiles are a true marriage of science and art. Regarding the artwork found in Vancouver’s Voyage, Jonathan Raban in his article “Battleground of the Eye” (Atlantic Monthly, May 2001) comments: “In 1791 and 1792...Spanish and British expeditions cruised through the region, proving the insularity of Vancouver Island and charting Puget Sound. The Spaniards shipped professional artists...whereas the English, under Captain George Vancouver, made do with the artistic efforts of a bunch of talented young midshipmen, including John Sykes, Harry Humphrys, and Thomas Heddington. From the mass of sketches that came home to London and Madrid one can see something of the Pacific Northwest but much more of the tastes and interests prevailing among cultivated young Europeans in the last decade of the eighteenth century. One catches the artists’ excitement at the strange customs, costumes, and architecture of primitive man, and their elation at finding themselves in a real-life Salvator Rosa landscape, with all its shaggy cliffs, tangled woods, blasted trees, and lurid skies.” (4 vols.) ($50,000-100,000)

 

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