Dorothy Sloan -- Books

AUCTION 21

October 26, 2007

Early & Exceedingly Rare German Emigration Map of Texas
Inset Town Plans of Castroville & New Braunfels

73. [MAP]. BÄDEKER, J. Karte des Staates Texas (aufgenommen in die Union 1846.) nach der neuesten Eintheilung. 1849 [left of title, Lone Star flag flying upside down] [below neat line] Verlag v. J. Bädeker in Elberfeld. | Lith. bei Fr. Koenen, Elberfeld. [inset plan at lower right, neat line to neat line: 6.8 x 8.1 cm] Plan von Castroville. [inset plan at lower left, neat line to neat line: 5.3 x 8.1cm] Plan von Neu-Braunfels und Comalstadt. Lithograph map on wove paper, original hand coloring (red outline color indicating counties; German settlements of the “Deutsche Colonie des Mainzer Vereins” and “Franxös Colonie” shown in yellow wash; Rio Grande and Indian Point on Gulf Coast (latter, being the official point of entry established by the German Emigration Company) in blue; Texas flag with original hand coloring in red, white and blue. Neat line to neat line: 29 x 36.2 cm. Overall sheet size: 32.7 x 40.5 cm. Neatly laid on early cartographical linen and stitched selvage. Creased where formerly folded, uniform light age-toning, small losses at folds in image area, small water stain in left blank margin (not affecting image), dime-size scrubbed area at upper left just touching neat line, “0.7” in black ink at upper left margin, and a few small scattered stains. Overall this is a very good copy of an exceedingly rare German-Texas emigrant map, printed on cheap paper.

            First edition of a very early German emigration map of Texas. Day, Maps of Texas, p. 51: “Map in English and German...following cartographers Arrowsmith, Emory, Gregg.” Graff 136. Taliaferro 294 (citing only a photostat): “Published to serve the prospective European immigrant to Texas, the map designates in color the colonies of Solms-Braunfels and Henri Castro. Organized counties are outlined in red. The inset plans of New Braunfels and Castroville are among the earliest cartographic records of those two towns.”

            The map is sometimes found with Viktor Bracht’s book on Texas, Texas im Jahre 1848... (Elberfeld & Iserlohn: Julius Bädeker, 1849). For more on Bracht’s book see: Basic Texas Books 21: “One of the best Texas immigrant guides.” Clark, Old South III:278: “An important contribution to the early history of Texas.” Eberstadt, Texas 162:78. Howes B682. Library of Congress Exhibition 110. Raines, p. 29. Sabin 7161. Vandale 19. The map of Texas is not noted by Clark, Howes, etc., and the few copies of the book offered in the past twenty-five years, including the Eberstadt copy in their Catalogue 162, lacked the map.

            In addition to its fame as an emigration item, this map, in the Castroville inset, also preserves a bit of Texas land use history. On the curve of the Medina River one can clearly see the so-called long lots that were laid out on European models of land development along rivers. See Terry G. Jordan, “Antecedents of the Long-Lot in Texas,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Vol. 64, No. 1. (March, 1974), pp. 70-86.

            Tooley does not mention publisher Julius Bädeker, who was apparently more than a passing acquaintance of Communist Friedrich Engels, who expressed great enthusiasm for a Communist revolution taking place in the place of publiation, Elberfeld. In 1844, shortly after they met, Engels suggested to Karl Marx that sensitive material could be sent to various correspondents in the town by addressing such to Bädeker. Bädeker published other emigration guides, including August Rauschenbusch’s Einige Anweisungen für Auswanderer nach den westlichen Staaten von Nordamerika und Reisebilder (Elberfeld, 1848). ($25,000-35,000)

Auction 21 Abstracts

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Copyright Dorothy Sloan 2007