Dorothy Sloan -- Books

Copyright 2000-2017 by Dorothy Sloan-Rare Books Inc. for all materials on this site. All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form.

AUCTION 21

October 26, 2007

The Beginnings of Modern Geological Cartography in Texas
Working Maps with Focus on West Texas & the Hill County

148. [MAP]. UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY & TEXAS GEOLOGICAL AGENCIES. Collection of 61 maps of Texas published mostly by the USGS, with a few published by various Texas entities. Washington & Austin, 1899-1919. Color photolithographs. Unless otherwise indicated, all measurements are sheet size. This apparently was a working collection for use in the field, with the majority of the maps sectioned and mounted on linen for ease of handling of the fragile maps on site. There are also occasional manuscript notes and color shading. The notes relate primarily to geology, types of rocks, and railroads, and there are various incidental notes that relate to surveying and which include additional features not on the printed maps. The maps show use, and a few are a bit rough, worn, and stained, but overall good to fine, mostly very good.

Map list:

University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and Technology J. A. Udden, Director. Geological Map of Texas (Revised Edition) 1919. Prepared by J. A. Udden, C. L. Baker, and Emile Böse Drawn by E. L. Porch, Jr.... [lower right] Copyright 1919. Approximately 82.5 x 86.5 cm. Key color coded to geological formations and minerals. Geological layers keyed to various Texas locations. Extensive text at top describes the evolution of the map from various sources, including the original manuscript map of Robert T. Hill. Martin & Martin 50: “As the nineteenth century drew to a close, so too did the last stretches of unknown and unclaimed lands in the American West. While cartographers in the first part of the century had attempted to present the lands in outline form with scant interior information, cartographers at the end of the century were dealing with specific details of land surveys.... The life and career of Robert T. Hill, a distinguished scholar, teacher, geologist, and Texan, spanned this remarkable transition period in knowledge of the geography of the nation and in the techniques of mapmaking.... In 1899 Hill supervised the compilation and drawing of the Map of Texas and Parts of Adjoining Territories, which he included in the Topographic Atlas of the United States: Physical Geography of the Texas Region, published by the United States Geological Survey in 1900. The map added new sophistication to Texas’s cartographic history and helped to set new scientific standards in the mapping of the region.”

HILL, Robert T. Geology of the Black and Grand Prairies of Texas Including the Eastern and Western Cross Timbers by Robert T. Hill, 1899 [top right above neat line]: Twenty-First Annual Report Part VII Pl. LXVI. Approximately 76.5 x 73 cm. Color key to geological features. Excellent color. Mounted on linen. Handbook of Texas Online (Robert T. Hill): “[Hill’s] monographs on the Black and Grand prairies and on the Edwards Plateau are standard references for those areas and classics in Texas geology.”

BENNETT, Hugh & Charles F. Shaw. Texas. Robertson County Sheet [below neat line] A. Hoen & Co. Lith. Baltimore, Md. [Washington, 1907]. Neat line to neat line: 99.5 x 76 cm. Image area: 114.5 x 89.5 cm. Vivid coloring.

DEUSSEN, Alexander. Geologic Map and Sections of Texas East of the Ninety-Seventh Meridian Showing Approximately the Areal Distribution of the Rock Groups and Formations. Compiled and partly revised by Alexander Deussen, 1912 [top left above neat line] U. S. Geological Survey George Otis Smith, Director. 61.4 x 34 cm. Colored and with key to sedimentary rocks, profiles. Sectioned and mounted on linen.

The following sheet and quadrangle maps are sectioned and mounted on cartographical linen, with section name in black ink on versos:

Texas Alpine Sheet...Surveyed in 1893...Edition of Nov. 1895. Reprinted 1916. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 2 copies.

Texas Austin Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1895-96...Edition of Mar. 1910. Reprinted 1921. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Bastrop Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1884-5...Edition of May, 1904. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 3 copies.

Texas Blanco Sheet...Surveyed in 1899...Edition of Mar. 1894. Reprinted 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Agua Fria Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917. Edition of 1917. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Bone Spring Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1920. (First published in 1918). Approximately 50.5 x 43.5 cm).

Texas (Brewster County) Buck Hill Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Bullis Gap Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Chisos Mountains Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1903. Approximately 52 x 64.5 cm. Trimmed with loss.

Texas (Brewster County) Hood Spring Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917. Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County. Marathon Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1919-1920. Edition of 1921. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Maravillas Canyon Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917. Edition of 1919. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Monument Spring Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1919-1920. Edition of 1921. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 2 copies.

Texas (Brewster County) Nine Point Mesa Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917. Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Reagan Canyon Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917. Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Brewster County) Santiago Peak Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917. Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 2 copies.

Texas (Brewster County) Terlingua Special Map...Surveyed in 1902. Edition of Nov. 1902. Approximately 42 x 51 cm.

Texas Terlingua Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1902-1903...Edition of Jan. 1904. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Burnet Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1900-01. Culture Revised in 1909....Edition of Dec. 1909. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Chispa Sheet...Surveyed in 1892. Edition of April 1897, reprinted July 1911. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Dallas Sheet...Surveyed in 1889...Edition of Mar. 1893, reprinted 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (El Paso County) Cerro Alto Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1901-1902...Edition of May 1903. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (El Paso Co.) Eagle Mountain Sheet...Surveyed in 1896...Edition of Aug. 1897. Reprinted in May 1911. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (El Paso County). El Paso Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1891, 1905, and 1907...Edition of Jan. 1908. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (El Paso Co.) Rio Grande Sheet... N.p., n.d. Approximately 25.5 x 28.5 cm. Trimmed with loss.

Texas (El Paso Co.) Sierra Blanca Sheet...Surveyed in 1891...Edition of July 1895, reprinted 1916. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (El Paso County) Van Horn Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1904-1905...Edition of Aug. 1906. 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Flatonia Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1898...Edition of Feb. 1902. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Fort Davis Sheet...Surveyed in 1894...Edition of Mar. 1897. Reprinted May 1911. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 2 copies.

Texas Fort Hancock Sheet...Surveyed in 1891...Edition of Jan. 1894. Reprinted May 1914. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Fredericksburg Sheet...Surveyed in 1884-5...Edition of Mar. 1894, Reprinted 1916. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Georgetown Sheet...Surveyed in 1885...Edition of Dec. 1893 reprinted 1916. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Jordan Gap Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Kerrville Sheet...Surveyed in 1885...Edition of Mar. 1894. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Llano Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1898-99. Culture Revised in 1909...Edition of Oct. 1909. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Marfa Sheet...Surveyed 1893...Edition of Aug. 1895, reprinted March 1915. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 2 copies.

Texas Mason Sheet...Surveyed in 1885...Edition of Feb. 1894, reprinted 1920. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Presidio County) Polvo...Surveyed in 1895...Edition of Nov. 1896, reprinted May 1913. 52 x 39.5 cm. Trimmed with loss.

Texas (Presidio Co.) San Carlos Sheet...Surveyed in 1896...Edition of Dec. 1896, reprinted May 1914. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Presidio Co.) Shafter Sheet...Surveyed in 1895...Edition of Dec. 1896, reprinted May 1913. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas San Marcos Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1906-1908...Edition of Feb. 1911. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Tascotal Mesa Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1917. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Taylor Sheet...Surveyed in 1885...Edition of Jan. 1894, reprinted 1916. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm. 2 copies.

Texas (Terrell County) Dove Mountain Quadrangle. Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas (Terrell County) Dryden Crossing Quadrangle. Surveyed in 1917...Edition of 1918. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas-Indian Territory Denison Quadrangle..Surveyed in 1898-99...Revised...1902...Printed Sept. 1904. First published July 1901. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas-Indian Territory Gainesville Quadrangle...Surveyed in 1898 and 1901-1902...October of 1902, reprinted July 1914. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

Texas Valentine Sheet...Surveyed in 1894...Edition of Feb. 1897, reprinted 1916.

Texas Waco Sheet Camp Mac Arthur...Surveyed in 1890...Edition of April 1892, reissued 1918 with red overprint. Approximately 52 x 42.2 cm.

            The United States Geological Survey, which was responsible for the majority of these maps, was created in 1879 through a Congressional compromise. It was the successor to all previous explorations, such as those by Hayden (q.v.). The present set of maps was prepared at a time when the United States was rapidly changing from an agrarian to industrial economy, which made the mapping and identification of geological and mineral features of crucial importance to the Survey and to the country alike.  These maps, many of which reflect updated surveys that were originally taken several years before their republication here, document the increasingly detailed knowledge that the Surveys were gathering about the state of Texas, and indeed the rest of the country. One crucial event that happened during this time was the discovery of Spindletop Oil Field near Beaumont in 1901. That event forever changed the face of U.S. industry and shifted a great deal of the Survey’s effort to determining oil-bearing formations as opposed to those containing minerals, such as is documented here. In fact, the Survey’s mission at the time was gradually changing to emphasize documentation of fossil fuels.

            These maps, in addition to being testaments to the changing face of Texas, also record numerous places and features that have long since disappeared, thereby providing reliable evidence of what these places looked like a hundred years ago. As the Handbook of Texas Online (United States Geological Survey) points out: “The USGS has been making topographic maps of Texas since the 1880s. The early maps show roads, towns and settlements, and political boundaries though the physical features are only generalized. Some of these maps are valuable for historical studies, since they portray roads and trails, water holes, river crossings, and other important landmarks used by early travelers and cattle drovers.” These maps also locate all ranches of substantial size, such as the Stroud, Talley, Stillwell, Haley, Neville, Brite, Gage Indian Creek, and many more.

            The maps in this collection focus primarily on the Trans-Pecos West, Southwest Texas, the El Paso region, and the Central Texas Hill Country, the last of which, as Robert T. Hill’s large map makes evident, is an area of much geological interest. Although these maps may seem late, in reality those that document such areas as the Big Bend and parts of West Texas are actually among the earliest mapping efforts in those remote and challenging areas. After the great work of De Cordova (q.v.), the U.S.G.S. maps fill in the missing gaps of Texas geography and geology. ($1,500-3,000)

Sold. Hammer: $2,800.00; Price Realized: $3,290.00

Auction 21 Abstracts

Click images or links labeled Enlarge to enlarge. Links labeled Zoom open zoomable images.

Auction 21 | DSRB Home | e-mail: rarebooks@sloanrarebooks.com