Dorothy Sloan -- Books

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AUCTION 21

October 26, 2007

 

259. [WESTERN AMERICANA]. Approximately 60 books.  See below for full inventory.  ($2,000-4,000)

ABERNETHY, Francis Edward. J. Frank Dobie. Austin: Steck-Vaughn, [1967]. ii [2] 52 pp. 12mo, original tan printed wrappers, stapled. Very fine.

     First edition. Southwest Writers Series 1. Cook 420. Biographical sketch and critical survey of one of the premier writers on the range country. “The best critical survey thus far published” (Tinkle).

ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). T for Texas: A State Full of Folklore. Dallas: E-Heart Press, 1982. [2] xiii [1] 277 pp., plates (mostly photographic). 8vo, original red pictorial cloth. Fine.

     First edition. Publication No. 44 of the Texas Folklore Society. Basic Texas Books 203:XLIVn. Includes “Pecos Bill: His Genesis and Creators” by James M. Day; “A Letter from the Long Circle” by Wayne Echols, about his experiences as a ranch hand and in rodeo; and “Night Horse Nightmare” by Paul Patterson, about the A. C. Hoover Horse Ranch.    

ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). Tales from the Big Thicket. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1966]. xii, 244 pp., photographic illustrations, folding map. 8vo, original turquoise cloth. Fore-edges lightly foxed, else fine in fine d.j.

     First edition. Tate, Indians of Texas 1187 (citing article “Tales of the Alabama-Coushatta Indians” by Howard Martin). Has a chapter by Solomon Alexander Wright on herding cattle through the Big Thicket in the 1880s.

ADAIR, Cornelia. My Diary: August 30th to November 5th, 1874. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1965]. xxiv [6] 125 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations by Malcolm Thurgood, photographs. 12mo, original turquoise cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.

     Reprint of the rare first edition (Bath, 1918)—we have had the original edition only once. Herd 7n. Howes A37n. Vandale 2n. Winegarten I, p. 33; II, pp. 2-3: “A New York aristocrat, she and her second husband John Adair (Englishman) went on a buffalo hunt (1874).... Along with Charles and Molly Ann Goodnight, they founded first Texas Panhandle Ranch, JA Ranch, Palo Duro Canyon (1877). As widow she bought out the Goodnights, managing the 1/2 million acre ranch.”              

[ADAMS, ANDY]. FRANK, Seymour J. “Andy Adams: The Cowboys’ Boswell” in The Westerners Brand Book [Chicago Corral] 6:8 (October 1949). Pp. [57]-64. 4to, original white printed self-wrappers. Creased at center where formerly folded, else fine.

     First printing. This issue of the newsletter is almost entirely devoted to Seymour’s article.    

ADAMS, C. F. Forty Years a Fool: Facts, Figures and Fun. Sonora: Published by the Author, [1914]. [2] 100 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations by Ruskin Callan. 12mo, original salmon printed wrappers, stapled. Light wear to wrappers, mild offsetting to frontispiece and title, otherwise fine.

     First edition. Rader 40. Blurb above cover title: “400 Laughs, 4-Bits, The Best Cure on the American Continent for the Blues.” Adams was born in 1857 on a Comanche reservation at Camp Cooper, Texas, where his father was a Texas Ranger. A humorous account of early life in Coleman, Sonora, and Comanche County, including the author’s ventures in sheep and cattle operations in southwest Texas and the Devil’s River area. Adams also organized a Wild West Show at the St. Louis Fair in 1904.    

ALLEN, John Houghton. San Juan. [San Antonio: Privately printed, 1945]. Another copy. Wrappers delaminating along spine (but not splitting), otherwise a very fine copy.    

ALLEN, Ruth. Chapters in the History of Organized Labor in Texas. Austin: University of Texas, Publication No. 4143, November 15, 1941. 258 pp. 8vo, original cream printed wrappers. Moderate marginal foxing to upper wrap, else fine.

     First printing. Winegarten I, p. 121: “Pioneer study of labor in the Southwest.” Account of the Cowboy Strike of 1883 (“the first and only cowboy strike”) on pp. 33-42. The author’s The Great Southwest Strike (pub. no. 4214) is in Adams, Guns (24).    

ALLEN, Winnie & Corrie Allen (eds.). Pioneering in Texas: True Stories of the Early Days. Dallas: Southern Publishing Company, [1935]. [6] 290 pp., text illustrations. 12mo, original turquoise pictorial cloth. A few notations to “Texas Book Label” endpapers, else fine.

     First edition. Campbell, pp. 170-71. Rader 114. Texas textbook with chapters “An English Cowboy in Texas” (J. M. Pollock in the Panhandle), “Nesters and Sheepmen” (also Pollock), and “The SMS Kid Grows Up.”    

AMERICAN CARBON PAPER MFG. CO. & ENNIS CARBON PAPER CO. Two pictorial cardboard boxes of carbon paper: Longhorn Wax Back-Carbon. Ennis, Texas: American Carbon Paper Company, ca. 1967; [&] Longhorn Pasti-Carbon Non-Curl. Paso Robles, Ennis & Chatham, Virginia, n.d. Each box approximately 22.8 x 30.4 cm, containing about 40 or so sheets of carbon paper and protective paper folders, both decorated with longhorns and brands. Boxes a bit worn and foxed, but really quite fine, given their fragility.

     Unusual ranching ephemera. The two boxes bear the same illustration by “M.H.” of a busy corral scene with three singing cowboys sitting on a fence while a cowgirl listens. The illustration on the first box is in full color; the second is in sepia tones.    

ANDERSON, Jan H. S. (ed.). Texas in Pictures. [Austin: Texas in Pictures Company, 1940s]. [56] pp. (consisting of black and white photographic illustrations with captions). 4to, original color photographic wrappers. Fine, in original illustrated mailing envelope.

     First edition. Ephemeral photo-documentary, with several pages at the end on ranching, horses, rodeo, prize cattle, riding the range, etc.    

ANDERSON, J[ohn] W[esley]. From the Plains to the Pulpit. Goose Creek, Texas: J. W. Anderson & Sons, [1922]. 315 pp., portrait, plates (mostly photographic). Small 12mo, original green pictorial cloth (longhorn and ranching images). A few minor stains and abrasions to binding, generally fine and tight (much better than usually found).

     Third edition, further enlarged (one more chapter added [a sermon on eternity], copyright 1907, but verso of family portrait at front dated 1914, preface dated 1922). Dobie, p. 109: “The third, and final, edition, Goose Creek, Texas, 1922, again reset, has another added chapter.”

BAKER, Inez. Yesterday in Hall County, Texas. Memphis, Texas: Privately printed, 1940. [10] 219 pp., portraits. 8vo, original blue cloth decorated and lettered in silver. Very fine in d.j.

     First edition.CBC 2154. Herd 196: “Much on cattle, cowboys, and ranch life.” King, Women on the Cattle Trail and in the Roundup, p. 13: “Interviews with men and women about the early days in Hall County, Texas.” Excellent Panhandle history.

 

BARNES, Grace & Beth Gault. So This Is Langtry. Boerne: Toepperwein, [1946]. 32 pp., photographic illustrations. 8vo, original green pictorial wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by both authors.

     First edition.CBC 4543. Includes the story of a cowpuncher accused of riding a stolen horse; he eluded Judge Bean’s rope necktie by claiming that he had seen Lily Langtry at the Orpheum in Chicago when he went up the trail. The latter part relates the purchase of the Bean property by rancher W. I. Babb and his family.    

BIGGERS, Don H[ampton]. From Cattle Range to Cotton Patch: A Series of Historical Sketches Dealing with Industrial, Social, and Commercial Evolutions That Have Taken Place in Western Texas from the Beginning of the Buffalo Slaughter to Date of First Publication in 1904 [wrapper title]. Bandera: Frontier Times, 1944. 80 pp., printed in double column. Large 8vo, original green printed wrappers. Lightly browned, otherwise very fine.

     Second edition (the first edition, printed at Abilene ca. 1908, is very rare). Campbell, p. 96. CBC 4248n. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 22n (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West”): “Prime source material on the West Texas frontier, cattle, buffalo hunting, Indian fighting.” Graff 297n. Herd 258n. Howes 439. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, pp. 15-16n. Vandale 15n.    

BLAKE, Vernon. Goliad. [Goliad: Goliad Printing Company], n.d. (1935?). [2] 48 pp. 8vo, original pictorial wrappers. Fine.

     First edition.CBC 1939. In the late 1800s, cattle ranching was the primary regional activity. Good statistics, such as 42,096 cattle in Goliad in 1930. Includes a photograph of “Herding Turkeys in Goliad County.”    

BODE, Elroy. Texas Sketchbook.... El Paso: Texas Western Press, [1967]. Another copy. Very fine in d.j. Signed by Bode, Cisneros, and Hertzog.    

[BOOKSELLER’S CATALOGUE]. PRICE, Clyde I. A Catalog of Dime Novels and Books Relating to Texas and the Southwest Catalog No. VIII, April 1946. Clarendon: Clyde I. Price, Bookseller, 1946. 20 pp., text illustrations by Bugbee. 8vo, original tan pictorial wrappers. Mild foxing, generally very good, in original mailing envelope.

     First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bugbee 161).    

BOSWORTH, Allan R. Ozona Country. New York, Evanston, & London: Harper & Row, [1964]. xiv [2] 238 pp., photographic plates (including marks and brands and many documenting ranches and rodeo). 8vo, original black cloth. Very fine in d.j.

     First edition.CBC 1168. The story of Ozona, the “Biggest Little Town in the World” and how oil money transformed this frontier ranching community.    

BRIDGES, Anne C. Huff & Mary Louise Bridges Witt. Do You Remember? Early Days in Luling, Texas. [Luling, 1967]. 59 [2] pp. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers, stapled. Fine, signed by Witt.

     First printing. Covers pioneer days, plantation life, Reconstruction, coming of the railroad, early settlers, the 1880s, and immigrants, with slight mention of open range days, trail drives, mavericks, the great die-off of cattle in the drought of 1873-74, etc. Luling was along the trail from South Texas to Dodge City.     2 copies.743.     BUSHICK, Frank H. Glamorous Days. San Antonio: Naylor, 1934. [2] vi, 308 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates (mostly photographic). 8vo, original orange cloth. Faint discoloration to binding, mild to moderate foxing to fore-edges, endsheets, and adjacent to plates, overall very good in moderately browned d.j. with small chip on upper cover. Author’s signed inscription: “This book ought to stimulate good literature—by contrast.”

     First edition. Adams, Burs II:28. CBC 294. Dykes, Kid 199. Guns 349: “Touches upon many western outlaws, with chapters on King Fisher, Ben Thompson, and John Wesley Hardin.” Herd 384. History of San Antonio 1870-1900, with chapters on “Longhorns and Brush Busters,” “Trooping with Buffalo Bill,” “Going up the Trail,” and “Romance of King Fisher.”    

CARPENTER, Will Tom. Lucky 7: A Cowman’s Autobiography. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1957]. xxii, 119 [1] pp., text illustrations by Lee Hart. 8vo, original light green cloth. Very fine in lightly worn d.j. Laid in is a University of Texas Press catalogue of Western Americana titles with illustrated wrappers by Lea.

     First edition.Herd 418. Carpenter settled in Texas in 1872, working as a cowhand and trail boss until 1900, when he established his own ranch west of the Pecos. Edited and with introduction and notes by Elton Miles.    

CASEY, Robert J. The Texas Border and Some Borderliners: A Chronicle and a Guide. Indianapolis & New York: Bobbs-Merrill Company, [1950]. [4] 440 pp., frontispiece, photographs, photographic plates, endpaper maps, back pocket containing 35 pp. booklet The Guide (list of current area attractions). Spine a bit faded, minor shelf wear, otherwise fine.

     First edition, limited “Lone Star” issue (special leaf signed by author tipped in). Adams, Burs I:73. Campbell, p. 171. Dykes, Kid 414. Guns 392: “Takes in some large territory and covers practically all the outlaws in the Southwest, including those involved in the Lincoln County War.” Herd 429. History of the Texas border, with emphasis on battles and bad men (Sam Bass, Salt War, etc.); also some mention of King Ranch and other ranching topics. The author opens his history with this 1910 quotation by Joe Bailey of the Houston Post: “The Texas border is about a thousand miles long, counting detours, and it’s just as wide as anybody who owns a cow over there thinks it is.”    

CAZNEAU, [Jane M. McManus Storms]. Eagle Pass; or, Life on the Border by Mrs. William L. Cazneau (Cora Montgomery). Austin: Pemberton Press, 1966. [10] 194 pp., endpaper maps. 8vo, original green cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.

     Limited edition (500 copies); facsimile of the first edition (New York 1852), with added introduction and index. Graff 2873n. Hanna, Yale Exhibit: “More than an account of life in Texas in the 1840s and 50s. It is, in general, a plea for just and humanitarian treatment of all people, and, in particular, a stinging indictment of the abominable treatment of the Indian and the Black in America.” Howes C251n. Raines, p. 252n. Tate, Indians of Texas 2466n: “Discusses the continuous Indian raids along the southern Texas border during the early 1850s, and describes the Seminoles who had recently settled along the Mexican side of the Rio Grande.” Wallace (Destiny and Glory, chapter 12) states that the author “was the most adventurous of any American woman on record and deserves far more than the oblivion which has been her fate.” See The Handbook of Texas Online: Jane Maria Eliza McManus Cazneau. Notable American Women I:315-16. An important record of life along the recently acquired Rio Grande frontier by one of the first settlers of Eagle Pass, Texas. Ranching content includes a description of the wretched working conditions of vaqueros and peons on the vast haciendas in Mexico (as described by Severo Valdez, a vaquero who had left Mexico to work as a ranch hand for Col. Henry Lawrence Kinney in Corpus Christi); prospects for stockraising in Texas (“the prairies swarm with fine cattle, and where cows may be had at seven or eight dollars a head, and can rout out and take care of themselves the whole year”); cattle rustling and horse thievery on the border by Mexicans and Native Americans.    

CHABOT, Frederick C. San Antonio and Its Beginnings: Comprising the Four Numbers of the San Antonio Series with Appendix. San Antonio: Artes Gráficas Printing Company, 1936. 99 pp., frontispiece, text illustrations (some photographic), plans. 8vo, original brown pictorial wrappers. Text browned, remains of bookplate inside back wrapper.

     Second edition. CBC 304n. Rader 646. Tate, Indians of Texas 1709. San Antonio history from 1691 to 1731. Includes information on ranching at San José Mission in the late 1700s and statistics on mission herds.    

COLEMAN, Ann Raney. Victorian Lady on the Texas Frontier: The Journal of Ann Raney Coleman. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1971]. xxi [1] 206 pp., frontispiece portrait. 12mo, original light blue cloth. Edges lightly foxed, else fine in very fine d.j.

     First American edition. Coleman came to Texas from England in 1832 and records many experiences of historical interest, with some comments on raising sheep and driving stock. She lived in Brazoria and Cuero and made her living as a school teacher. Edited by Richard C. King.    

CONGER, Roger N. “Fencing in McLennan County Texas: A History of Barbed Wire” [wrapper title] from The Southwestern Historical Quarterly 59:2 (October 1955). Extract containing pp. 215-221, photographs and illustrations. 8vo, original pale green wrappers. Fine.

     First separate printing.CBC 3118. Mohr, The Range Country 653. “Of the several different factors which combined near the close of the last century to bring an end to the romantic era of the cattle trails, one of the most obvious and most important was the advent of the barbed wire fence” (p. 215). Conger presents a history of fencing from early methods of stone, split wood, and bois d’arc hedges to the introduction and spread of barbed wire.    

CONLEY, James K. Memorabilia...An Album of Early West Texas. Abilene: Reporter Publishing Company, [1971]. Very fine. Chicago: Browne & Howell Company, 1913. vi [4] 473 pp., frontispiece portrait (photogravure in sepia tone), foldout maps. 8vo, original navy blue cloth, t.e.g.

     First edition. Reproduction of a photo album for the counties within about a hundred-mile radius of Abilene from the last quarter of the 1800s to about World War II, including a section on “Grazing and Growing” with several ranch and cowboy photographs (Pitchfork Ranch boys tenderly holding coyote pups, with text: “Hollywood cowboys who mumble about ‘those mangy coyotes’ might note this photograph taken in 1917”); Two “authentic cowboys” (Clem Davis and Frank Austin, from a tintype taken June, 1885, in Coleman after a cattle drive); decked-out Abilene cowboy John H. Bullock at eighteen years of age in 1906; a cowboy Christmas in Eastland County ca. 1918 with a Santa looking more like a cowboy; etc.

[COOPER, JOE E.]. The Hottest Book of the Year.... [Dallas: William S. Henson, 1952]. Publicity brochure. 1 folio sheet, illustrated, folded to brochure size. Very fine. Chiliana ephemera.

     Publicity brochure for With or without Beans. Includes an insert with reprints of six newspaper articles reviewing the book (1 folio sheet, folded to brochure size, printed in brown on one side, very fine).    

CRANFILL, J. B. & J. L. Walker. R. C. Buckner’s Life of Faith and Works: Comprising the Story of the Career of the Preacher, Editor, Presiding Officer, Philanthropist, and Founder of Buckner Orphans’ Home. Dallas: Buckner Orphans Home, 1915. xxi [1] 359 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, facsimiles. 8vo, original green cloth. Light shelf wear and mild staining to binding, light foxing to fore-edges and a few leaves near frontispiece, good to very good copy.

     First edition. Dobie, p. 109n: “Cranfill was a trail driver from a rough range before he became a Baptist preacher and publisher.”    

CRANFILL, J. B. & J. L. Walker. R. C. Buckner’s Life of Faith and Works.... Dallas: Buckner Orphans Home, 1916. xxi [1] 367 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, facsimiles. 8vo, original green cloth. Worn, spine faded, hinges cracked, lightly browned.

     Second edition, revised and enlarged.    

CUTBIRTH, Ruby Nichols. Ed Nichols Rode a Horse. [Dallas]: Texas Folklore Society & University Press, 1943. x, 134 pp., frontispiece by Jerry Bywaters. 12mo, original green cloth. Fore-edges foxed, else fine in d.j. Presentation copy to Dudley R. Dobie, signed by author and Ed Nichols: “To Dudley R. Dobie, from one who was born and raised on the Chisholm Trail and grew up to be one of the best ropers and riders on the trail.”

     First edition. Range Life Series. Dobie, p. 111. Herd 627. McVicker B41. Chapters include “Cow Boy,” “Ranching in Palo Pinto,” “Coming of the Iron Horse,” “Driving Horses to Kansas,” and “Me and Buffalo Bill.”    

DANIELL, L. E. (comp.). Personnel of the Texas State Government with Sketches of Distinguished Texans, Embracing the Executive and Staff, Heads of the Departments, United States Senators and Representatives, Members of the Twentieth Legislature. Austin: Published by L. E. Daniell (at the Press of the City Printing Company), 1887. 317 pp., frontispiece of the State capitol, engraved plates (mostly portraits). 8vo, original brown cloth. Binding worn and faded, front hinge cracked. Old paper spine labels and contemporary ink ownership inscription partially removed.

     First edition. Rader 1056. Raines, p. 61. Biographies (many with portraits) of Texans, including many of interest for ranching history, for example, Robert J. Kleberg, C. C. Slaughter, Charles Goodnight, et al. Daniell prepared biographical compilations of legislators and other Texans in 1887, 1889, 1890, and 1892. Each compilation represents the men in service at the time of publication, and although some biographies are repeated in the series, each compilation is a new work in itself. Taken together, Daniell’s compilations are a rich source of history and biography, sometimes providing details not found elsewhere on men, local history, the cattle industry, and the Civil War.

DANIELL, L. E. (comp.). Personnel of the Texas State Government, with Sketches of Distinguished Texans.... Austin: Published by L. E. Daniell (at Smith, Hicks & Jones, State Printers), 1889. 436 pp., frontispiece engraving of the State capitol, text illustrations and plates (engraved and photographic portraits). 8vo, original maroon cloth gilt. Moderate outer wear, lower portion of spine missing, covers almost detached, interior fine. Contemporary ink ownership signature of noted collector J. C. Ingram, with his pencil notes on the pages of his ancestor, James M. Ingram.

     First edition. Raines, p. 61. Another of Daniell’s compilations (see preceding), including Curran Michael Rogers of South Texas (stock raiser and legislator who served on the special legislative committee on lawlessness in Texas arising from fence cutting); William Frederick Miller of San Antonio (cowboy, farmer, and stock raiser); Blucher H. Erskine (representative for Guadalupe, Uvalde, Kinney, and surrounding counties “engaged in milling and stockraising” in Guadalupe County); Norton Moses of Burnet County (chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Stock Raising); stock raiser Sam Whitted of San Saba County; Edward LeGrand Dunlap of Refugio (ranched in Refugio and Victoria counties); and many more.

         

DANIELL, L. E. (comp.). Personnel of the Texas State Government, with Sketches of Representative Men of Texas. San Antonio: Maverick Printing House, 1892. xvi, 682 pp., frontispiece of Huddle’s painting of the surrender of Santa Anna to Sam Houston at San Jacinto, numerous plates (photographic and engraved portraits—many after Huddle’s paintings). Thick 8vo, original maroon calf stamped in gilt and blind, bevelled edges. Binding worn and spine almost detached, hinges cracked, intermittent browning to text. J. C. Ingram’s signature on front endpaper and pastedown and his card tipped onto front pastedown.

     First edition. Raines, p. 62. This compilation includes Richard King (“known wherever the English language is spoken as the greatest individual ranchman and cattle owner in the world”); Charles Schreiner; Santiago Sanchez (“one of the leading citizens of Laredo and principal land and cattle owner in Tamaulipas”); Thomas O’Connor (“a real-live Texas cattle king”); Dennis O’Connor and his wife, Mary Virginia Drake O’Connor; William Kuykendall; and many more. In our opinion, this is the best of the Daniell compilations, much larger, with interesting additions, more women, and higher quality illustrations.

DAVIS, R. B. & R. L. Spicer. Status of the Practice of Brush Control in the Rio Grande Plain. Austin: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Bulletin 46, 1965. 40 pp., photographic text illustrations, tables, map laid in. 8vo, original olive green wrappers. Very fine.

     First printing. An agricultural study of the brush country of south Texas, with much on its ranches and rangeland, including the King Ranch.

DAVIS, Richard Harding. The West from a Car-Window. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1892. [10] 242 [1] pp., numerous text and full-page illustrations reproduced from photographs and art work by Frederick Remington and others), including frontispiece (“A Bucking Broncho” by Remington). 12mo, original blue cloth with illustration and lettering in silver. Shelf-worn and slightly cocked, covers lightly abraded, spine darkened, paper lightly age-toned.

      First edition, later printing (without 1892 on title).  References to first edition:  BAL 4513. Campbell, p. 104. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington 507). Guns 566: “Scarce.” Herd 656: “A chapter on Texas ranch life, mostly on the King Ranch.” Rader 1072. Raines, p. 64: “A spicy book.” Wynar 2100. This narrative of western travel contains a lively account of the author’s railroad tour through Texas, Colorado, and Oklahoma, with chapters: “From San Antonio to Corpus Christi,” “Our Troops on the Border,” “At a New Mining Camp, A Three-Year-Old City,” “Ranch Life in Texas,” “On An Indian Reservation,” “A Civilian at an Army Post,” and “The Heart of the Great Divide.”      In the chapter “Ranch Life in Texas,” Davis writes: “The largest ranch in the United States, and probably in the world, owned by one person, is in Texas, and belongs to Mrs. Richard King.... The ‘Widow’s’ ranch, as the Texans call it, is as carefully organized and moves on as conservative business principles as a bank.”

DAVIS MOUNTAIN FEDERATION OF WOMEN’S CLUBS. The Big Bend of Texas [wrapper title]. [Brooklyn: Albertype, ca. 1928]. [80] pp., numerous sepia-tone photogravures. Oblong 16mo, original cream printed wrappers with photograph of Fort Davis on upper wrapper, map on lower wrapper, string tie. Very fine, sealed in original mailing envelope. Very scarce.

     First edition.CBC 647 (plus 2 additional entries). Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. 6. According to the preface, the prime mover behind this project was Mrs. O. L. Shipman (see Basic Texas Books 184 and Herd 2062 & 2063). This superb guidebook contains descriptive text and excellent photogravures, including Gage Hotel, Rancho Valle la Cienega (“the first dude ranch ever established in Texas”), Brite Ranch, Jones Ranch, Fort Stockton, Alpine, Presidio-Ojinaga, and other landmarks of the region. A photogravure is a photographic image produced from an engraving plate. The process, which was introduced in the mid-nineteenth century, is rarely used today due to the very high cost. Photogravure prints have the subtlety of a photograph and the art quality of a lithograph.

DAY, Beth. A Shirttail To Hang To: The Story of Cal Farley and His Boys Ranch. New York: Henry Holt, [1959]. xviii, 232 pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original salmon cloth. Endpapers slightly browned, otherwise fine in lightly worn d.j.

     First edition, second printing. Preface by J. Edgar Hoover. Biography of Farley who reformed truants and delinquents on his orphanage/reform school ranch. Julian Bivins donated an abandoned ranch near Amarillo to Farley to establish a home for “bottom of the barrel” boys.

DAY, Donald. Big Country: Texas. New York: Duell, Sloan & Pearce, [1947]. x, 326 pp., endpaper maps. 8vo, original blue cloth. shelf-worn and slightly shelf-slanted, some fading and one spot to cover, paper lightly browned, else fine in worn and clipped d.j. with a few tape repairs.

     First edition. American Folkways Series; edited by Erskine Caldwell. Campbell, p. 104: “Manners and customs, history and legends.... A rich, racy variety of interesting materials.” Guns 572. Herd 663. A large portion of the book is devoted to ranching and the related issue of water, including much discussion of longhorns, fencing, mesquite, and railroads.

              

DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver. New York: Bantam Books, [1951]. [12] 212 pp. 16mo, original multicolor pictorial wraps by Tom Lea. Remarkably fine, especially for a popular paperback of this vintage. This one is from Dudley R. Dobie’s library and looks so fresh that it must have been immediately stashed with his other treasures.

     First paperback edition (unabridged). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 128) McVicker A7b. Dobie for the masses, with histrionic advertising blurb on half-title: “Fabulous wealth and incredibly savagery.... The REAL Southwest. Out of the turbulent history of the Southwest comes this record of blood and treasure. Here are the arrogant Spaniards sweltering in armor and encased in fear. Here is the twang of an Apache arrow, the flat crack of a rifle, the rattle of pistol fire. And here is also silence—the shimmering, heat-cracked silence of the vast Southwest.”

DOBIE, J. Frank. Babícora. N.p., [1954]. 8 pp., map. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers. Fine.

     First separate printing, offprint from American Hereford Journal (January 1, 1954). Cook 52. Dykes, My Dobie Collection, p. 9: “Among the scarce and rare Dobie booklets” (#17 on his rarities list). McVicker D51. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 18. JFD’s account of his 1953 visit to William Randolph Hearst’s vast Babícora Ranch in Chihuahua, “where thousands of commercial Herefords were raised each year over a long period. The breaking up of this property last year marked the end of an era.”

    

DOBIE, J. Frank. Ella Byler Dobie and Christmas. [Austin]: The American-Statesman, 1961. Folio broadside printed in three columns. Very fine.

     First separate printing of an article that appeared in the American-Statesman on December 24, 1961. McVicker D78. JFD’s tribute to his mother, with recollections of incidents at Rancho Seco in Nueces County, Texas. “When she was very young, raiders from below the Rio Grande came up into the border ranches and drove off cattle, killed them and skinned them for the hides, raided the Noakes Store in Nueces County, occasionally killed a man. The caution she grew up with never entirely left her so long as she lived on the ranch. When I was a child and Papa was gone, Mama always had the old .44 Winchester right at her head when she went to bed.”

DOBIE, J. Frank. The Flavor of Texas. Dallas: Dealey & Lowe, 1936. [12] 287 pp., frontispiece and text illustrations by Alexander Hogue (mostly full-page). 8vo, original cloth. Fore-edges slightly foxed, otherwise very fine, d.j. not present.

     First edition, first issue binding. Chapter 1 first appeared in The Country Gentleman, the other chapters were printed serially in The Fort Worth Press). Campbell, p. 105. Cook 16. Dobie, p. 51: “Considerable social history”; p. 55: “Chapters on Bean, Green, Duval, Kendall, and other representers of the fighting Texans.” Dykes, My Dobie Collection, p. 8: “Hard to find and expensive” (#11 on his rarities list). Guns 602. Herd 691. McVicker A5. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 8. References to cowboys and ranching are found throughout, and two chapters are specifically devoted to ranching history (“Riders of the Stars” and “The Trail Driver Breed”). One of Hogue’s striking black-and-white illustrations shows a cowboy drinking water from a cow track, with Ab Blocker’s famous quote about how he had “drunk more water out of cow tracks than any trail driver left alive.” JFD includes a first-rate chapter on “How Texas Was Hell on Women.” 

DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest.... Austin: University of Texas Press, 1943. 111 pp., frontispiece, text illustrations (some full-page) by Russell, Borein, Bugbee, et al. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers.  Fine, in original mailing envelope.

     First edition of a pivotal book in the literary historiography of the West (“one of J. Frank Dobie’s most significant contributions to the recognition and study of southwestern literature was his initiation and teaching of a celebrated course at the University of Texas at Austin: ‘The Life and Literature of the Southwest’.... From this course emerged Dobie’s...Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest”—WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 505). Basic Texas Books B73: “A delightful, intensely subjective guide to Dobie’s favorite books.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Borein 51), (Bugbee 65), (Dunton 40), (Hurd 67), (Lea 140), (Leigh 91), (Santee 40), (Thomason 21). Guns 603. Herd 692. McVicker A10a(1).

     Powell, Southwest Classics, p. 348: “[Dobie] met departmental skepticism of a course he proposed on the Life and Literature of the Southwest. When his colleagues questioned that there was any literature, Dobie countered that there was plenty of life and he’d teach it. He did both. The course proved legendary. He kept expanding its syllabus until its final publication as Guide to the Life and Literature of the Southwest, then and now the best of all books of its kind.” Saunders 273b. Yost & Renner, Russell, p. 248 (“Appearances”).

DOBIE, J. Frank. Hunting Cousin Sally [wrapper title]. Austin: Privately published, 1963. 14 pp. (printed in double column). Large 8vo, original blue pictorial wrappers (portrait of Ike Pryor in his hand-me-down Union uniform, by William Wittliff). A few foxmarks to fore-edges, else fine.

     First separate issue, offprint from Southwest Review (Summer 1963), the Dobies’ Christmas greeting for 1963. McVicker D84. Whaley, Wittliff 3. JFD’s biographical notes on cattleman Ike Pryor are followed by Pryor’s firsthand recollections, including how the eighteen-year-old orphan became involved with the cattle business when he was working as a farmhand near Austin: “I could watch the herds of Longhorns trailing by, see the cowboys, and smell the trail dust. I wasn’t a bit satisfied with keeping my eyes on a pair of mule ears and walking up one row and down another between a pair of plow handles. Moreover, I had learned that cowboys were getting thirty dollars a month, while here I was getting just fifteen. I took the cow fever.” One of Pryor’s witticisms is: “Any cowman of open range days who claimed never to have put his brand on somebody else’s animal was either a liar or a poor roper.”

DOBIE, J. Frank. Hunting Cousin Sally [wrapper title]. Austin: Privately published, 1963. 14 pp. (printed in double column). Large 8vo, original blue pictorial wrappers (portrait of Ike Pryor in his hand-me-down Union uniform, by William Wittliff). Lightly foxed, else fine.

     First separate issue, offprint from Southwest Review (Summer 1963), the Dobies’ Christmas greeting for 1963. McVicker D84. Whaley, Wittliff 3. JFD’s biographical notes on cattleman Ike Pryor are followed by Pryor’s firsthand recollections, including how the eighteen-year-old orphan became involved with the cattle business when he was working as a farmhand near Austin: “I could watch the herds of Longhorns trailing by, see the cowboys, and smell the trail dust. I wasn’t a bit satisfied with keeping my eyes on a pair of mule ears and walking up one row and down another between a pair of plow handles. Moreover, I had learned that cowboys were getting thirty dollars a month, while here I was getting just fifteen. I took the cow fever.” One of Pryor’s witticisms is: “Any cowman of open range days who claimed never to have put his brand on somebody else’s animal was either a liar or a poor roper.”

         

DOBIE, J. Frank. I’ll Tell You a Tale: Selected and Arranged by the Author and Isabel Gaddis. Boston: Little, Brown, [1960]. xvii [1] 362 pp., text illustrations by Ben Carlton Mead. 8vo, original tan cloth. Top edge slightly foxed, else fine in lightly worn d.j. Signed by artist Ben Carlton Mead.

     First edition, second printing. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Mead 27). McVicker A17a. WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 542): “The tales were chosen by Isabel Gaddis, herself from the range country and a former student of Dobie’s. The stories are gathered under such headings as ‘The Longhorn Breed’...and they represent Dobie at his best in doing what he did with artistry—telling a tale.”

    

DOBIE, J. Frank. John C. Duval, First Texas Man of Letters: His Life and Some of His Unpublished Writings. Dallas: Southwest Review, 1939. 105 [1] pp., tinted frontispiece and text illustrations by Tom Lea. 8vo, original brown cloth over beige cloth. Fine in slightly browned d.j.

     First edition. Campbell, p. 45: “Not merely a critical and biographical study, but includes a series of Duval’s unpublished writings.” Cook 28. Dobie, p. 55. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 131); Western High Spots, p. 116 (“Ranger Reading”). McVicker A8a(1). One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 14: “Dykes says: ‘Tom Lea illustrated the book with some of his best drawings and naturally the Lea collectors compete when an occasional copy appears for sale.’.... Scarce.”

     The chapter entitled “An Old Time Texas Ranch” deals with the theme of hold-up hospitality on early Texas ranches and gives some pointers on detecting greenhorns (strapping one’s gun to the saddle, carrying an umbrella while on horseback, etc.). Duval (1816-1897), came to Texas in 1835, and, unlike his brother Burr H. Duval, escaped the Goliad Massacre. John was surveying land in Texas in 1840, served as a Texas Ranger with Bigfoot Wallace in Jack Hays’ company beginning in 1845, rose to rank of captain in the Confederate Army, and wrote two early classics on Texas. “His writings justify his being called the first Texas man of letters.... Of all personal adventures of old-time Texans, [Early Times in Texas] is perhaps the best written and the most interesting.... Duval’s most artistic and most important book is The Adventures of Bigfoot Wallace” (Handbook of Texas Online: John Crittenden Duval). One of the good features of this book is Dobie’s detailed bibliography on the various confusing editions and issues of Duval’s published works.

DOBIE, J. Frank. John C. Duval, First Texas Man of Letters: His Life and Some of His Unpublished Writings. Dallas: Southwest Review, 1939. 105 [1] pp., tinted frontispiece and text illustrations by Tom Lea. 8vo, original brown cloth over beige cloth. Fine in slightly browned d.j. Signed by author.

     First edition. Campbell, p. 45: “Not merely a critical and biographical study, but includes a series of Duval’s unpublished writings.” Cook 28. Dobie, p. 55. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 131); Western High Spots, p. 116 (“Ranger Reading”). McVicker A8a(1). One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 14: “Dykes says: ‘Tom Lea illustrated the book with some of his best drawings and naturally the Lea collectors compete when an occasional copy appears for sale.’.... Scarce.”

     The chapter entitled “An Old Time Texas Ranch” deals with the theme of hold-up hospitality on early Texas ranches and gives some pointers on detecting greenhorns (strapping one’s gun to the saddle, carrying an umbrella while on horseback, etc.). Duval (1816-1897), came to Texas in 1835, and, unlike his brother Burr H. Duval, escaped the Goliad Massacre. John was surveying land in Texas in 1840, served as a Texas Ranger with Bigfoot Wallace in Jack Hays’ company beginning in 1845, rose to rank of captain in the Confederate Army, and wrote two early classics on Texas. “His writings justify his being called the first Texas man of letters.... Of all personal adventures of old-time Texans, [Early Times in Texas] is perhaps the best written and the most interesting.... Duval’s most artistic and most important book is The Adventures of Bigfoot Wallace” (Handbook of Texas Online: John Crittenden Duval). One of the good features of this book is Dobie’s detailed bibliography on the various confusing editions and issues of Duval’s published works.

DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mustangs. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [1952]. xvii [1] 376 pp., color frontispiece and text illustrations (some full-page), illustrated endpapers by Charles Banks Wilson. 8vo, original blue and tan pictorial cloth. Fine in very good d.j. (slight wear, price-clipped).

     First trade edition, first issue d.j. (with Wilson drawing of mustangs on rear panel). McVicker A14a(3). WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 541: “The Mustangs may well prove to be the most enduring of Dobie’s books. The English Romantic, the lover of the open range, and the critic of contemporary society merge into the marvelously elegiac opening lines of the volume: ‘Like the wild West Wind that Shelley yearned to be, the mustangs, the best ones at least, were “tameless, and swift, and proud”.... ’ He wrote obliquely of the spiritual truth of freedom, a value he believed the wild horses and their world embodied. Such a principle, of course, had been defined by Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of the few American writers to significantly influence Dobie. The tales and facts collected in the book, however, have a vital tang of actual experience that transcends the abstract message.”

DOBIE, J. Frank. Some Part of Myself. Boston: Little, Brown, [1967]. xiii [3] 282 pp., portrait of Dobie, photographic plates. 8vo, original green cloth. Very fine in fine d.j., with Bertha Dobie’s presentation card laid in.

     First edition. McVicker A20. JFD (1888-1964) intended to write his autobiography, but did not finish before he rode to the other side. He left behind the beginning chapters covering his life up to the 1930s. Bertha McKee, his ever-faithful wife, companion, and editor, gathered JFD’s notes and edited them to create this book. JFD begins his account with “A Plot of Earth,” an account of his youth on the Dobie family’s ranch in the brush country west of the Nueces River in Live Oak County, Texas. Over half the chapters are on ranching, including “The Cowman Who Was My Father” (Richard J. Dobie), “My Mother—Ella Byler Dobie,” “Uncle Frank Byler,” “Ranch Neighbors,” “Horses out of My Boyhood,” etc.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Up the Trail from Texas. New York: Random House, [1955]. [8] 182 [2, ads] pp., tinted text illustrations (some full-page) by John C. Wonsetler, illustrated endpapers. 12mo, original rose decorated cloth stamped black and blue. Ffine d.j.

     First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 78 (“A Range Man’s Library”): “Primarily for younger readers...dandy book about real trail drivers.” McVicker A16a(1). This book remains a fun, informative book for readers of all ages.

DUVAL, John C. Early Times in Texas [continuation with caption title: The Young Explorers; or, Continuation of the Adventures of Jack Dobell]. Austin: H. P. N. Gammel, 1892. 135 [1] 1-253 pp. 12mo, original green cloth gilt, gilt-lettered on upper cover and spine. Paper browned (“printed on the cheapest possible paper”—Basic Texas Books), cover soiled, worn, and water-stained, cover separating from text block, pencil notes on front endpapers, text yellowed.

     First edition.Basic Texas Books 51: “The most literate of all 19th century Texas memoirs. Unlike the author’s other writings, it is authentic history, with only a little exaggeration thrown in here and there.” Dobie, p. 55: “A Texas classic. Of all personal adventures of old-time Texas it is perhaps the best written and the most interesting.” Graff 1188n. Howes D603. Rader 1248. Raines, p. 74. Tate, Indians of Texas 2365: “Numerous confrontations with Texas Indians (especially the feared Comanches), as told in an engaging but not always accurate manner.”

FISHER, O. C. The Texas Heritage of the Fishers and the Clarks. Salado, Texas: Anson Jones Press, 1963. 241 [1] pp., frontispiece, photographic illustrations. 4to, original white pictorial cloth. Fine, partly unopened, in publisher’s brown slipcase.

     Limited edition. Guns 723: “Has a section on John King Fisher and gives some new information on his early life.” Much of the book is devoted to the trail drive experiences of Fisher’s father, Jobe.

FREEMAN, James W. (ed.). Prose and Poetry of the Live Stock Industry of the United States.... With a New Introduction by Ramon Adams, Illustrated. Prepared by Authority of the National Live Stock Association. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1959. [2] 757 pp., plates (mostly portraits), numerous text illustrations. Small folio, original half dark brown calf (blindstamped with brands) over brown buckram, upper cover with gilt vignette of cow, gilt-lettered spine, t.e.g.  Mild foxing to fore-edges, otherwise fine. Slipcase not present.

     Second edition, limited edition, not numbered (550 copies, 500 of which were numbered); facsimile of the extremely rare 1905 first edition, with a new introduction by Ramon F. Adams. References to the first edition:  References to first edition: Loring Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 35. Dobie, p. 114. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 12; Kid 41: “Contains a chapter on ‘The Range Rustler’ in which the Lincoln County War is called ‘the most famous of the troubles of the cattlemen in the Southern country’”; Western High Spots, p. 27 (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West”); pp. 86-87 (“A Range Man’s Library”): “An exceedingly rare book.” Graff 1412. Guns 764. Herd 844. Howes P636 (“c”). McCracken, 101, p. 28. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 18. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 53. Reese, Six Score 41: “The most desired and desirable book on the range cattle industry. This book contains an incredible collection of information on men and events concerned with cattle. This volume is the only one of the three projected that was ever published, since its publication bankrupted the printing company and nearly broke the association.”

Streeter Sale 2391: “One of the rarest, most important, and thorough books on the American cattle industry.” Vandale 136.

GARD, Wayne. Rawhide Texas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1965]. xi [1] 236 pp., plates (mostly photographic). 8vo, original orange cloth. Light foxing to edges of text block and endpapers, otherwise fine in d.j. (illustrated by Tom Lea). Rosengren of San Antonio book label on lower pastedown.

     First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 158). Guns 802: “Tells about the lawmen and Texas Rangers.” Northouse, First Printings of Texas Authors, p. 18. The people of Texas are portrayed in a series of informal sketches depicting pioneer life on the Texas frontier and illuminating the still-emerging Texas character. Social history with chapters on Comanches, plantations, cattle, sheep, sodbusters, schools, newspapers, oil, etc.

GOODWYN, Frank. Lone-Star Land: Twentieth-Century Texas in Perspective. New York: Knopf, 1955. xii [2] 352, x [2] pp., photographic plates, maps. 8vo, original blindstamped blue cloth. Poor copy in worn & browned d.j. 

     First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 6: (“Collecting Modern Western Americana”): “Vivid, balanced word picture of present-day Texas.... Chapters on ‘The Longhorns,’ ‘The Cowboy,’ and ‘New Horizons on the Range’”; p. 90 (“The Texas Ranch Today”). Herd 906.

GRACY, David B. Littlefield Lands: Colonization on the Texas Plains, 1912-1920. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1968]. x [4] 161 pp., photographic plates, maps, tables. 8vo, original dark green cloth. A few spots to half-title and opposing page, else fine in d.j with one small tear.

     First edition. No. 8 in the M. K. Brown Range Life Series. This is a study of the recolonization of the Texas plains, as the large land holdings of the stockmen were broken up to make way for farmers and towns.

GREEN, Ben K. Horse Tradin’. New York: Knopf, 1967. xiv, 304 [2] pp., frontispiece and illustrations by Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original cream pictorial cloth over blindstamped black cloth. Binding moderately foxed along spine, otherwise fine in very fine d.j.

     First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bjorklund 53). Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 85. Wilson 7. Authentic stories of the range and the chicanery of western horse trading.

     A. C. Greene & His Library: “This was Ben Green’s great first national publication. Neither Ben nor the publisher ever looked back after this. And the stories are superb. Frank Dobie, whom Ben despised, and I’m told, vice versa (possibly both attitudes tainted a bit with jealousy)—a not unusual Texas-writer reaction to Dobie—never could quite capture the realism Ben Green seemed inherently to possess. Dobie, if, indeed, this was his feeling for Ben, was not alone.”

     “There was a deviousness about Ben that shone through. One West Texas rancher told me, `It was his beady eyes.’ Another ranch story involved Ben and a young rancher who bought a stud horse together but Ben took over completely and the young rancher found out little if anything about their mutual investment. One day Ben was driving along and saw the young rancher pulling a horse trailer with ‘their’ stud aboard. Ben turned around his pickup and stopped his partner, asking where he was going with `our’ horse. The young man said, `Well, he’s pretty worthless to me, so I going to shoot my half and sell it for dog food.’”

    

GREEN, Ben K. A Thousand Miles of Mustangin’. Flagstaff: Northland Press, [1972]. Another copy. Not signed by author. Very fine in very fine d.j.

    

GREEN, Ben K. The Village Horse Doctor West of the Pecos. New York: Knopf, 1971. [8] 306 [2] pp., frontispiece and full-page text illustrations by Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original beige pictorial linen. Very fine in d.j. Signed by author.

     First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bjorklund 58). Wilson 84.

     A. C. Greene & His Library: “During World War II, when all the younger veterinarians were called into service, Ben was given a U.S. government certificate to practice veterinary medicine and this book is the result of those years west of the Pecos. (Incidentally, Ben once told me he hated what he called ‘small animals.’ I don’t think he hated the small animals so much as their owners. He worked only with large animals, he said.)”

    

GREEN, Ben K. Wild Cow Tales. New York: Knopf, 1969. [6] 306 [2] pp., frontispiece and illustrations by Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original blindstamped brown cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Very fine in price-clipped d.j. Signed by author. Typed index card laid in: “4-11-69—10:25 am Mr. D: Just in case you did not get one of the enclosed signed copies accept this one with my compliments for your personal library. ERW.”

     First trade edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bjorklund 55). Reese, Six Score 50: “Dr. Green mostly wrote about horses, but could do just as well with cows, as this book proves.” Wilson 11A: “Green demonstrates an encyclopedic and very practical knowledge of cow psychology, which he puts to good use in a number of difficult situations.”

    

GRIMES, Roy (ed.). 300 Years in Victoria County. Victoria, Texas: Victoria Advocate Publishing Company, [1968]. [16] 649 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, text illustrations (photographs and sketches by Tom Jones). 8vo, original teal cloth gilt. Fine in d.j., signed by author.

     First edition. This comprehensive history of coastal Texas, center of early Anglo-American settlement, is rich in ranching material, including Spanish and Mexican land grants, devoting almost 75 pages to the subject. Included are lists of early, important ranchers, the founders who owned giant spreads, and even a whole chapter on slaughter and packing plants.

Auction 21 Abstracts


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