Auction 23

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1. [AGES OF MAN]. Soneto. [With poem below, commencing]: Pídeme de mi mismo el Tiempo Cuenta.... Mexico, 1803. 14 leaves printed on rectos, from 14 copper-engraved plates by N. Cobo (alternately Covo) and Garrido, after artwork by Coronel, Altarriba, Rosi, and Bonet. Printed entirely from engraved plates. 14.6 x 9 cm, original full mottled calf, spine and covers gilt-rolled. Gilt slightly rubbed in a few places, corners lightly bumped. Hinges open, but holding, front flyleaf with closed tear, several plates with short marginal tears cleanly repaired, some plates lightly waterstained, one plate with small ink stain in lower margin. Plate versos strengthened with translucent white wash. Overall a very good copy with strong impressions and in a handsome contemporary binding. An exceedingly rare and interesting illustrated work. Single copy located by OCLC in Biblioteca Nacional España, but engraved title only.

     First edition of one of the earliest entirely engraved Mexican imprints. Not in standard sources. This unusual book is another manifestation in the ancient tradition of “Ages of Man” literature, the best known of which in the English canon is Shakespeare’s “Seven Ages.” The illustrations chronologically trace the human existence from birth to death with three lines of poetry about the particular age of human life. The book moves from year one to year one hundred, with the first five plates bringing the subjects up to twenty years of age and then moving by decade after that. The illustrations show activities or attitudes appropriate to every age (play, school, courtship, soldiering, sickness, death, etc). The final engraving illustrates a man lying in bed while Death, in the form of a skeleton, pulls back the bed curtains and beside the bed is an extinguished candle. The engravings are detailed and exquisite, capturing the modes and mores of the time, without being moralistic. Despite the lack of pietistic moralizing, the work clearly seems intended as a devotional, urging the reader to consider the ultimate end of life, no matter at what stage this book might come into one's hands.  Unlike the Danza de la muerte tradition, wherein Death cuts off the lives of people of any rank at any point, this text contemplates a full life, although making it clear that all life, no matter how long, ends in death. ($4,000-8,000)

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2.   [ALAMO]. LOGAN, Maurice (artist). The Alamo San Antonio Texas Southern Pacific [in image at lower right] Maurice Logan] [at lower left margin] A-32-1-15-29-3000. N.p.: Southern Pacific Railroad, 1929. Lithograph poster printed on light-weight coated card stock, 58.5 x 40.5 cm. Light marginal wear and slight unobtrusive creasing, overall very good, as-issued condition, excellent color, well preserved, and very beautiful.

     First printing. This scarce 1920s Southern Pacific Railroad Texas travel poster was published and distributed to promote the state of Texas as a travel destination and the Southern Pacific Railroad Line as a way to get there. Artist Maurice Logan created a series of travel posters for the Southern Pacific Railroad in the mid 1920s featuring different destinations across the American Southwest and the Pacific Coast. These are among the most beautiful and highly sought-after travel posters of this period and a wonderful example of Southern Pacific's advertising campaign. Logan's poster is a striking image of the Alamo in shadow and sunlight in his American Impressionist style with Fauvist bright colors and short, quick brush strokes. Logan and five other California plein air painters joined together to form the "Society of Six," a group of artists whose work was categorized first and foremost by bold colors. For more on Logan, see http://www.tfaoi.com/aa/2aa/2aa669.htm ($750-1,500)

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3. [ALAMO]. UNITED STATES.SECRETARY OF WAR (W.L. Marcy). Memoir Descriptive of the March of a Division of the United States Army, under the Command of Brigadier General John E. Wool, from San Antonio de Bexar, in Texas, to Saltillo, in Mexico. [Washington, 1850]. 31st Congress, 1st Session, Senate Executive Document 32. [1-4] 5-67 [1, blank] pp., 8 lithograph plates (including views of the Alamo from eyewitness drawings by artist Edward Everett), 2 folding lithograph maps. 8vo. Dark brown calf over marbled boards, gilt-lettered red leather spine label. Occasional light foxing, otherwise fine.

     First edition of an early U.S. government publication of military affairs in Texas, with the first lithographs of the Alamo made from eyewitness drawings.Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, p. 296. Howes H767. Raines, p. 121. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War, pp. 132-134. Ron Tyler for the following superb notes from his preliminary study of nineteenth-century lithographs of Texas: “In September Everett made his first drawing of the now-famous Alamo, which had been the subject for several other artists, and was then in ruins.... The lithograph of the Alamo façade made after Everett’s watercolor, now in the Amon Carter Museum collection, was not the first published picture of the famous structure, but it was the first to be lithographed from an eye-witness drawing.” ($750-1,500)

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4. ALLAN, Francis D. (compiler). Allan’s Lone Star Ballads. A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made during Confederate Times, “Let me write the Ballads of a Nation and I care not who makes the Laws.”—Montesquieu. Compiled and Revised by Francis D. Allan. Galveston: J.D. Sawyer, Publisher, 1874. [i-iii] iv, [5] 6-222 [2, ads] pp. 16mo, original gilt-decorated green cloth with gilt star and title on upper cover. Spine lightly chipped at extremities, lower cover moderately bubbled, general light wear to binding, endpapers browned, front endpaper with tear (no losses), overall a good copy of a very scarce book. Red ink stamp of Thos. Goggan & Bros., Galveston, on title.

     First collected edition, with many previously unpublished songs added. Allan originally published a much shorter form (62 pp.?) at Galveston-Houston in 1863 under title Allen’s [sic] Lone Star Ballads, No. 1. The 1863 Confederate imprint appeared in very fragile pamphlet form and is excessively rare. References to the 1863 edition: Parrish, Civil War Texana 1. Parrish & Willingham 6615. Winkler 506. References to present edition: Dykes, Western High Spots (“Ranger Reading”), p. 119: “Includes several [ballads] about the Ranger leaders and companies from Texas in War Between the States.” Eberstadt 123:3 (quoting Dobie): “A very good collection of patriotic verse of early-day Texas and the Confederacy.” Eberstadt, Texas 162:12. Leonidas Warren Payne, Jr., A Survey of Texas Literature, New York, etc.: Rand, McNally & Company [ca. 1928], pp. 42-43. Raines, p. 6. Winkler 3336. ($125-300)

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5. ALZATE Y RAMÍREZ, Joseph Antonio. Suplemento a la Gazeta de Literatura. Descripcion de las antiguedades de Xochicalco.... Mexico: Felipe de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1791. [6], 1-24 pp., 5 folded copper-engraved plates (antiquities and archaeology at Xochicalco) by Francisco Agüera Bustamante. 8vo, disbound (removed from a legajo, with contemporary ink number at top right of first page). Second leaf loose, one plate slightly browned at edge, otherwise very fine, with plates in excellent, dark impressions.

     First edition of the first printed notice of the interesting ruins at Xochicalco. Medina, Mexico 8026 (calling for only 2 folded plates). Palau 10139n. Sabin 989 (Gazeta). Handbook of Middle American Indians, Vol. 13, Part 2 (Guide to Ethnohistorical Sources), p. 90: “In January, 1788, [Alzate y Ramírez] began publication of his most important periodical, Gazeta de Literatura.... Alzate carried on a public scientific conversation and controversy with other Mexican intellectuals of his day, generally enlightening, sometimes very cutting. He included valuable data on the condition of the Indians at his time as well as some information on Indian antiquities.” Alzate’s essay is an early, important defense of Mexican indigenous civilizations by a priest who embraced the very religion that had done so much to denigrate and destroy native Mexican civilizations. See Dictionary of Scientific Biography (“Many Mexican intellectuals consider Alzate to be the father of modern natural science in Mexico”). The pre-Columbian archaeological site in Morelos shows affinities with both Teotihuacan and the Maya. ($600-1,200)

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6. ANSON, George. Voyage Round the World, in the Years MDCCXL, I, II, III, IV...Sent upon an Expedition to the South-Seas.... London: Printed for Author by John and Paul Knapton, 1748. [34], [1] 2-417 [1, blank], [2] pp. (p. 319 misnumbered 219), 42 copper-engraved plates and maps. 4to, full contemporary mottled calf. Chafed at joints and light shelf wear, light uniform browning and some offsetting, some plates with a few small tears and browning at edges or folds (but generally dark strong impressions and very clean), overall a fine, crisp set in a handsome original condition. Subscriber Rev. John Linton’s copy, with his ink signature on title. Directions to binder not present, as is frequently the case. Preserved in grey linen case.

    First edition, subscribers’ issue(p. 319 misnumbered 219; plates unnumbered) of which 350 copies were printed. Barrett 2592. Borba de Moraes, p. 38. Hill I(1), pp. 317-318: “England, at war with Spain in 1739, equipped eight ships under the command of George Anson to harass the Spaniards on the western coast of South America, for the purpose of cutting off Spanish supplies of wealth from the Pacific area. The Spanish fleet sent out to oppose the British ran into storms, provisions ran out and many ships were wrecked. Anson continued taking prizes during 1741-42 off the Pacific coast, and in June 1743, captured the Manila galleon containing a treasure of £400,000 sterling, thus returning to England much the richer.... This compilation has long occupied a distinguished position as a masterpiece of descriptive travel. Anson’s voyage appears to have been the most popular book of maritime adventure of the eighteenth century”; II:1718. National Maritime Museum I:109. Palau 12865. Sabin 1625. Wagner, Northwest Coast 558, 559. ($2,500-5,000)

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7.   [ATLAS]. BRADFORD, T.G. A Comprehensive Atlas Geographical, Historical & Commercial. Boston: William D. Tichnor; New York: Wiley & Long, 1835. [1-4] 5-180 pp. (irregular pagination; many pages are engraved plates or maps included in pagination, without any indication of blank versos), 79 copper-engraved plates and maps (including frontispiece and title), most maps with original outline color and border color. Small folio, contemporary three-quarter tan sheep, professionally rebacked with matching tan morocco, spine with raised bands and title lettered in gilt. Binding rubbed and corners bumped, interior fine except for scattered light foxing.

     This was the first atlas to contain a separate map of Texas: Texas. [left margin outside neat line] 64.A.; neat line to neat line: 20 x 26.4 cm; overall sheet size: 25 x 32.5 cm. First issue, including Mustang or Wild Horse Desert shown in south Texas; Nueces River as the southwestern boundary; land grants indicated instead of counties; and town of Austin not yet shown. Following the map is a two-page essay in three columns entitled Texas, which gives an overview of the country and discusses Anglo colonization, referring to Stephen F. Austin as its “prime mover.” Martin & Martin 31. Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 248. Phillips, Atlases 770. Sabin 7260. Shaw & Shoemaker 306134. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, Vol. II, pp. 148-149 & Entries 408, 409, 410 (citing the maps of the United States, North America, and Mexico, Guatemala, and the West Indies). ($1,000-2,000)

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8. [ATLAS]. ENGLISH PILOT. The English Pilot. The Fourth Book.... London: Mount and Page, 1784. [1-3] 4-68 pp. (printed in double column), 23 engraved maps: 19 inserted leaves of engraved plates (some folding, some with more than one map per leaf), 4 large engraved maps in text, over 200 woodcuts in text (profiles, plats, plans, charts, maps). Tall folio, original brown calf, covers with rolled single borders. Spine partially perished, moderate edge wear, corners bumped, mild stain and scuffing with small losses, hinges cracked. Mild browning to text (heavier to blank margins of first two leaves), pp. 39-40 detached and with some wrinkles (but no losses), p. 45-46 loose. For the most part the maps are very good to fine (a few minor tears and splits without losses; Newfoundland map misfolded). Contemporary ink ownership inscription on upper pastedown: “Silas Booth his Book bought in New York pr[ice] 25s.”

     New, updated edition of the long-lived English Pilot, Fourth Book, of “The first significant collection of charts exclusively of the American Coasts to be published in England” (Verner). This edition includes some of the important updated sea charts, such as New York Harbour, Hughes’ South Carolina and Georgia, etc. The first edition of The English Pilot was published in London in 1689 for W. Fisher and J. Thornton; by 1789, thirty-seven editions had appeared. The Fourth Book covers the coasts of the eastern side of America from Hudson Bay to the mouth of the Amazon. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, p. 39: “For British trading in North America and for the colonists there, the publication of The English Pilot: The Fourth Book must have been a godsend. For the first time an English sea atlas presented charts of the whole eastern seacoast of North America. To modern eyes the charts are crude and sparse of detail; but to the navigator of American waters in that period, it was his Bible. Whatever its shortcomings, there was really no substitute, no real competitor, for over sixty years”. English Short Title Catalogue N7822. Martin & Martin, p. 19: “The need of British seamen for navigational aids in their own language was served by The English Pilot, [which] revealed a steady increase in the knowledge of the Gulf coast.” Verner, Carto-Bibliographical Study of The English Pilot, the Fourth Book #35 (noting 64 different chart titles from the editions he examined): “[It was] the first great atlas of wholly English origin to deal exclusively with American waters.” Verner, introduction to the facsimile edition of The English Pilot, The Fourth Book, London, 1689 #35. Tooley, “English Maritime Books” 24. Verner (introduction), facsimile edition of The English Pilot, The Fourth Book: “The English Pilot was the first major sea-atlas produced in England [and] the Fourth Book was the first wholly English sea-atlas of American waters.” (For Texas collectors, two of the maps show the Mississippi River flowing into the Gulf of Mexico at Matagorda Island.) As Jack Jackson explains in Flags along the Coast: “Thornton, while using Bond’s depiction of the Mississippi Delta, ignored his correct name for it, instead labeling a minor river on the Texas coast as the Mississippi.” ($20,000-40,000)

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9. [ATLAS]. GARCÍA Y CUBAS, Antonio. Atlas geográfico e histórico de la República Mexicana. Mexico: José Mariano Fernández de Lara, 1858. [6, introduction]; [1] 2-4 (commentary); [2, list of pre-Conquest kings]; [1] 2-18 (analysis) pp., 32 double-page leaves of lithograph plates containing 33 maps (all but two with original color): 2 maps of the Republic of Mexico, 29 maps of states and territories (one sheet with two maps), 2 maps from Mesoamerican pictorial manuscripts. Large folio, original black sheep over dark brown paper-covered boards, spine gilt. Mild scuffing and edgewear to binding, occasional mild foxing, generally fine to very fine. Two maps trimmed (slightly affecting captions). Rare.

     First edition of the first scientific and national atlas of all of Mexico, which shows for the first time the border between the United States and Mexico as finally delineated in 1857. Antonio García y Cubas is regarded as “el fundador de nuestra geografía como ciencia” (Dicc. Porrúa). Glass, p. 680 (citing the plates and commentary by José Fernández Ramírez on Mapa Sigüenza and Códice Boturini, both of which are reproductions of some of the earliest maps relating to America). Palau 98721. Phillips, America, p. 412. Phillips, Atlases 2683. Rumsey 4116. Sabin 26554 (stating that only 300 copies were printed). The atlas was created during the Golden Age of Mexican lithography (see Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 17-32). ($4,000-8,000)

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10. [ATLAS]. GARCÍA Y CUBAS, Antonio. Atlas geográfico y estadístico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos. Mexico: Debray Sucesores, 1886. [2], title printed in black and red, 30 lithograph maps with original full hand coloring. Folio, publisher’s original binding, quarter brown sheep with gilt-lettered spine, dark green cloth, upper cover lettered in gilt “Atlas Mexicano Geográfico por A. Garcia Cubas.” Spine rubbed, and slightly torn, corners bumped, front flyleaf repaired, maps exceptionally fine. Circular ink stamp on title and first map. Very scarce.

     First edition of another of García y Cubas’ constantly evolving atlases.Phillips, Atlases 2687. Rumsey 5758. García y Cubas totally redrew and updated the present maps to reflect the changes that had occurred in Mexico in the past thirty years, such as state boundaries, railroads, telegraph lines, etc. García y Cubas’ cartographic science visually cemented the nation-state of Mexico in the nineteenth century. Raymond B. Craib, in “A Nationalist Metaphysics: State Fixations, National Maps, and the Geo-Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Mexico” in Hispanic American Historical Review” 82.1 (2002), pp. 33-68: “García Cubas’s success came from his compilation of the best existent maps into a coordinated, coherent whole.... He positioned Mexico for the first time in relation to the Greenwich meridian rather than the easternmost point on the cathedral in the central plaza of Mexico City, the traditional meridian for Mexican maps. He thus brought Mexico into cartographic consonance with what were then construed to be the icons of advanced civilization, giving it a ‘modern’ spatial sensibility. In effect, García Cubas scientifically naturalized the Mexican nation-state through the visual medium of the map.” ($2,000-4,000)

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11. [ATLAS]. GARCÍA Y CUBAS, Antonio. Atlas pintoresco é histórico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos.... Mexico: Debray Sucesores, 1885. Lithograph title on maize ground + 13 double-page chromolithograph plates, each of which is a specialized map of Mexico surrounded by individual vignettes corresponding to the map, such as archaeology, botany, rivers, mining, volcanoes and mountains, railroads, costumed ethnographic types, etc. Oblong double elephant folio, original three-quarter navy blue Mexican sheep over royal blue cloth. Binding with very light edge wear and mild to moderate spotting. Interior exceptionally fine except for mild browning of a few corners (due to contact with binding, none near images). Overall, very fine, original condition, in full sheets, as issued, never folded, as is often the case with this oversize atlas. We know of only one other copy in this unfolded state (Antiquariat Forum in 2003). With text: Cuadro geográfico, estadístico, descriptivo é histórico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos. Obra que sirve de texto al Atlas Pintoresco. Mexico, 1885. Lithograph plate, 3 charts (2 folded), lithograph map (Peregrinación de los Aztecas en el valle de Anahuac). 8vo, contemporary half black sheep. Very good condition. Difficult to find the text and atlas together.

     First edition of one of the most colorful of nineteenth-century Mexican color-plate books, prepared by García y Cubas, known as “el fundador de nuestra geografía como ciencia” (Dicc. Porrúa). Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 44: “Monumental.” Palau 98718 & 98736. Phillips, Atlases 2686. Rumsey 2693: “The maps and illustrations bordering them are superb. García Cubas was the preeminent Mexican cartographer of the nineteenth century.” The atlas contains thirteen maps and over four hundred images. ($8,000-16,000)

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12. [ATLAS]. HUMBOLDT, Alexander Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich. Atlas Géographique et Physique du Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne....Paris & Tübingue, 1808-1812. This copy has five separate title pages. Text: [12 (5 title pages, half title, and dedication leaf for Vues des Cordillères)], [1] 2-4, [2] pp., 19 leaves of engraved plates on heavy paper, 4 double-page and folded, 6 double-page, 9 single-page: 20 maps, 4 folded profiles in sepia and charcoal aquatint, 2 views of volcanoes in sepia aquatint, and charts. The large Carte générale du royaume de la Nouvelle Espagne is on 2 double sheets. Folio, separate sheets loosely laid in original grey pasteboard portfolio with original string ties and printed label for Vues des Cordillères with a description of the six parts of Humboldt’s voyages and their prices; label has been cancelled in purple crayon with notes reading: “Atlas geographique” and “20 Cartes complet.” Portfolio bumped and moderately stained. Contents with occasional light waterstaining, moderate soiling and chipping to a few title pages. Maps with occasional light waterstaining and marginal soiling, not affecting images. Overall in surprisingly very good condition, given its storage in the fragile portfolio. Complete and untrimmed, with Humboldt’s brief manuscript ink presentation note on the third title page.

     First edition, first issue. Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 100-101.” Fiedler & Leitner, Alexander von Humboldts Schriften 4.6.10. Graff 2009. Hill I, p. 149n. Hill II #843n. Howes H786. Jackson, Shooting the Sun #64, Chapter 11 (with excellent deconstruction of the Humboldt-Pike-Arrowsmith controversy) & p. 380. Martin & Martin, 23n. Plains & Rockies IV:7a:3a:l. Sabin 33756. Raines, p. 121. Rumsey 328. Rumsey, Cartographica Extraordinaire, p. 133. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, Plate 139 & p. 127. Streeter 1042 (rating the map of New Spain as one of the six most important maps for a Texas collection): “Without question, the best representation of Texas that had thus far appeared. Streeter Sale 195. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, *272, *274, *275, *302, *304, *305 & Vol. I, pp. 132-138: “A truly magnificent cartographic achievement [which] put into the hands of the reading public the broad geographical relationship of the American Southwest. ($12,000-24,000)

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13. [ATLAS]. TANNER, H.S. A New Universal Atlas.... Philadelphia, 1836. [8, engraved pictorial title with illustration of Columbus,author’s notice, table of contents, index], [4, ads] pp., 68 copper-engraved maps, plus the rivers and mountains chart, all with original hand coloring by state and region. Folio, modern three-quarter leather over contemporary boards, original title label retained on backstrip. Binding rubbed. Scattered minor foxing on a few maps, otherwise a bright, clean, and complete copy.

     First edition. The copy here is the true first edition—with most of the maps dated 1833 (twenty-two dated 1833, six dated 1834, two dated 1835, seven dated 1836, thirty-two ([virtually all of the non-U.S. maps] undated). Phillips, Atlases 774. Rumsey 977 (a variant). The map of North America is noted by Wheat because it documents many of the places explored by Jedediah Smith. Smith’s discoveries were highly significant in opening the American West to expansion by settlers and cattlemen. Wheat comments in Mapping the Transmississippi West, Vol. II, pp. 152-154, (illustrated opposite p. 153, entry 422): There is some question whether Tanner or Gallatin should be accorded the palm for being the first to make Jedediah Smith known to his countrymen. Gallatin and Tanner must both be given the prize. Wheat discusses the differences and similarities of Gallatin’s and Tanner’s use of Smith’s map and discoveries, noting, for instance that Tanner gave the “first correct representation of Jackson Lake on any published map.” One of issue points for the present atlas is the configuration of Texas on Tanner’s 1836 map of North America. Here Texas is still shown as part of Mexico, and in the second issue (also published in 1836), Texas has been colored to indicate it is its own country, including an outsized Panhandle and part of New Mexico. This first issue locates “San Felipe de Austin” in Coahuila & Texas, whereas in the 1836 second issue, the name has been changed to “San Felipe.” Both issues reflect Tanner’s association Stephen F. Austin and his great map of Texas. ($4,000-8,000)

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14. [ATLAS]. TANNER, H.S. A New Universal Atlas...By H.S. Tanner. Philadelphia Published By Carey & Hart, 1843. Philadelphia, 1843.[8, engraved pictorial title with illustration of Columbus, publisher’s notice, index, table of contents] pp., copper-engraved frontispiece (rivers and mountains chart), 71 copper-engraved maps on thick paper. Folio, original half sheep over purple cloth. Binding heavily rubbed and stained, spine chipped with loss at top, joints cracked, hinges cracked and repaired. Frontispiece and title page with mild foxing and offsetting. However, the maps are very good to very fine, with excellent color retention. Atlas complete.

     American Imprints 1843:4862. As noted in the previous description, Tanner’s atlas had a long life. The present issue came out in 1843, after Carey and Hart purchased Tanner’s plates late in 1842. Soon enough the elegant, precise copper-engraving in this atlas would be transferred to stone. One of the maps added to this edition is the large-format version of Bradford’s Texas map showing it as an independent Republic (copyright 1838, engraved by G.W. Boynton), neat line to neat line: 36 x 29 cm. Pristine condition, beautiful color, generous margins. Bradford’s small atlas (1835) was the first atlas to have a separate map of Texas, and it was much smaller than the present map. Martin & Martin 31 state that “Bradford published a completely new atlas in 1838, in a larger format, and the map of Texas it contained was even more clearly patterned on Austin’s.” The present map of Texas is from the same plate as the first issue of the large format Texas map (1838), but it is an advanced issue, dating from 1839 or after: added is the City of Austin, which is shown as the capital (established 1839); the southwestern boundary has been moved farther south (from the Nueces River to the Rio Grande); etc. ($3,500-6,000)

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15. [ATLAS]. WYTFLIET, Corneille. Histoire Vniverselle des Indes, Orientales et Occidentales.... Douay: François Fabri, 1605. [4], 1-126, [2]; 1-20, 20-20, 21-24, 24-24, 25-52, [4 (of 8), index] pp., engraved title page (included in collation), 19 (of 20) folded copper-engraved maps (lacks East Indies map in second part), woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces. Title page is that of the Latin edition with a paste-over cancel slip with the new imprint. Folio, contemporary dark brown calf, spine gilt-lettered and with raised bands, edges tinted red. Binding: hinges open but holding, worn, wormed, and rubbed, but sound. Title page abraded with minor loss of image at bottom, interior somewhat browned, some leaves, including title page, trimmed at top with minor loss, scattered dampstains, 2B2 and o2 with small piece excised from lower blank margins. Maps: generally very good to very fine and in strong impressions.

     First French edition (considerably enlarged) of the first atlas of maps specifically devoted to the Americas, from Wytfliet’s 1597 work in Latin. The fine series of American maps are the same as in the earlier editions, some with occasional minor revisions and corrections. This was the first edition of Wytfliet to have the second part, by Magini and entirely devoted to the East Indies. Bornholt,p. 193: “The importance of his only atlas, the first one ever printed dealing exclusively with America, cannot be emphasized enough.” Borba de Moraes, p. 946. JCB I (2, 1600-1658), pp. 36-37. Echeverria & Wilkie, The French Image of America 1605/1. European Americana 1605/129. Hill II:1920: “The maps of the Americas are handsomely engraved and several are of special interest; such as the first separate map of the West Coast and Alaska region and the first delineation of the Canadian Northwest.” Van der Krogt (editor), Koeman’s Atlantes Neerlandici 371:11 (new edition, Vol. III, Part B). Palau 376626. Phillips, Atlases 1143 (see also 1140). Sabin 105699. Among the eight maps of special interest for North America are Florida Et Apalche (Martin & Martin, Plate 6); Granata Nova Et California (California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present, Map 7 and Wheat, Transmississippi West 29); Norvmbega Et Virginia (Burden 103: “The most accurate map of the east coast until de Laet”; Cumming 19); Limes Occidentis Quiuira et Anian, among the earliest printed maps to show Alaska. ($10,000-20,000)

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16. AUBIN, [J.M.A.]. [Wrapper title] Mémoires sur la peinture didactique et l’écriture figurative des anciens mexicains.... [Main title page] Recherches historiques et archéologiques.... Paris, 1885. [6], [i] ii-xi [1, blank], [1] 2-106 pp. (lexicon of glyphs illustrated in text), 5 chromolithograph plates (codex illustrations of maps with glosses in Nahuatl, written after the Conquest). Folio, original grey printed wrappers bound in new brown French morocco over marbled boards, t.e.g. Author’s signed presentation copy. Wrappers stained and neatly backed (consolidating tears and several voids). Other than scattered light foxing to text, fine, plates clean and bright. Very rare in commerce.

    First illustrated edition (first published in Paris, 1849, without illustrations of the maps). Glass, p. 550: “Complete reprint of Aubin, 1849, with slight revisions by the author and with added color lithographs by B. Schmidt of Mapas Tlotzin and Quinatzin.” Palau 19457n. Pilling 182a. Aubin was the first to publish these manuscripts relating to the migration of the Chichimeca from the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico to the region around the lagoon that is now Mexico City. ($800-1,600)

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17.  [AVIATION]. [CODY, Samuel Franklin]. S.F. Cody. F.R.M.S. of Texas U.S.A. Inventor of the Famous War Kite. Belfast: David Allen; also at London, Harrow, Manchester, Glasgow & Dublin, [ca. 1903]. Folio chromolithograph poster (image area 65 x 44 cm; overall 76 x 51 cm). Except for light wrinkling, very fine.

     Handsome life-size bust image of Cody dressed in a crisp, white military uniform, his flowing locks cascading from beneath his hat. Cody gazes off to the viewer’s right. Below his bust is an image of his war kite resting on a plinth, which is lettered as above. After pursuing a career as an entertainer, Cody experimented with kites capable of lifting men above battle lines to observe the enemy and made many important contributions to stabilizing the platform, among them the war kite shown here, which debuted about 1903. He had become a fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society in 1902. Although the British government was interested in his kite experiments, it was not so fond of his other experiments with powered heavier-than-air vehicles, although his contributions in that field eventually far outweighed the device celebrated here. He made the first powered flight in England, but was killed when one of his planes broke apart in flight. He was the father of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service. See also “Klondike Gold Rush” herein. Handbook of Texas Online (Samuel Franklin Cody). ($500-1,000)

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18. [AVIATION: AMELIA MARY EARHART]. SWARTZ, Fred Charles (1896-1969). “The route the U.S.S. Colorado took on the hunt for Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan. Commenced July 6, 1837 ended July 11, 1937.” [Aboard the USS Colorado, 1937]. Manuscript map on paper in typewriter, ink, and pencil. One leaf, folio ( 33 x 20.2 cm). Key at lower right “Planes Route” and “U.S.S. Colorado’s Route.” Ship’s route shown in wide, dark pencil line; plane search patterns and other comments shown in lighter pencil with directional arrows; latitude, longitude, islands searched, and other comments in typewriter ink; ship’s headings in ink. Professionally repaired with minor losses to blank areas. An excellent, previously unknown, contemporary map documenting the futile search for Earhart.

     The map shows the ship entering the search area at 3° north latitude, crossing the equator and proceeding in a generally southern direction before turning east, after which it sails north and the search is ended just west of Canton Island (“End Search”). Four successive plane launches, recoveries, and search patterns are shown. This map both agrees and differs from two other accounts—the July 13, 1937, report of Captain Wilhelm Friedell (USS Colorado captain) and the July 16, 1937, report of Lt. John Lambrecht (USS Colorado senior aviator), which includes a similar map. The final search, for example, shown on the present map indicates that the search leg was done all in one flight, whereas the other two documents agree that Canton Island was the object of an entirely separate search that occurred after the Swan was refueled, which is noted herein. No obvious explanation for those discrepancies is apparent. Provenance: This map is descended in the family of the maker, who was an officer aboard the USS Colorado during the Earhart search, being on the lead ship in the so-called Lexington Group that searched the Phoenix Islands. ($500-1,000)

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19. [AVIATION]. [LINDBERGH, CHARLES & HAITI]. Two photo albums, one concerning Lindbergh’s 1928 good-will visit with the Spirit of St. Louis to Haiti, one showing scenes around Haiti, and 57 related loose photographs of Haitian or military interest. [1] Album with 20 leaves of heavy-weight black paper with 32 mounted silver print photographs showing aspects of Lindbergh’s 1928 Haiti visit and other subjects of Haitian or Caribbean interests. [Haiti, 1928]. 4to, contemporary black quarter cloth over black pebble cloth, spine sewn with original cord. Except for minor scuffing, in very good condition, the photographs excellent and well focused. All are identified on the album pages in contemporary white ink by the person who assembled the album. Two of the photos featuring Lindbergh are: Lindbergh in the back of a convertible with dignitaries. Signed in black ink at upper right in image: “To Observation Squadron 9th | Port au Prince Haiti | Sincerely | Charles R. Lindbergh | Feb 2, 1928.” (Large photo: 16.8 x 21.7 cm, 2) “Lindbergh arriving in Haiti,” showing the airfield with the Spirit of St, Louis on the runway in the background and spectators in the foreground. The other views show scenes around Haiti. [2] The second album is contemporary black cloth stamped Photographs in gilt on upper cover, spine held with original cord. [Haiti, 1925-1928]. Oblong 4to, with 49 leaves of heavy black paper. Except for minor edge wear, in very good condition, the photographs excellent and well focused. Consists of 114 mounted amateur candids (most 8.5 x 14.5 cm), and one small panorama of Port-au-Prince. ($5,000-10,000)

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20. [AZLOR Y ECHEVERZ, MARÍA IGNACIA DE]. Relacion historica de la fundacion de este convento de Nuestra Señora del Pilar, Compañia de María, llamada vulgarmente La Enseñanza.... Mexico: Felipe de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1793. [10], i-ii, 1-165 [1, blank] [2, table of contents] pp., copper-engraved frontispiece plate of Azlor). 4to, original full green and tan Mexican tree sheep, spine extra gilt with gilt-lettered red morocco label. Small snag on title (no loss), inner blank margin wormed (sometimes touching a letter or two), but overall very good, portrait very fine.

    First edition of one of the few biographies of a woman of the eighteenth-century Spanish-Texas Borderlands. Beristáin de Souza, Biblioteca Hispano Americana Setentrional (1883), Vol. IV, Section 1, no. 4. Bulletin of the New York Public Library (Vol. IX, 1905), “List of Books Relating to Woman,” pp. 535 & 581. Johnson, The Book in the Americas 60: “Women as well as men were called to settle the Spanish borderlands.” Medina, México 8255 (commenting that he knew of only one copy, his own). Palau 259736. Sabin 21777 & 69226. Azlor (1715-1767) is credited with institutionalizing women’s education in New Spain with the foundation of the first convent school of the Order of Mary in 1754. Her system accepted both boarding students and free public classes to girls of any degree, including Native Americans, for whom a special school was founded. Azlor was the younger of the two daughters of one of the most prominent families in New Spain, that of the Marqués de Aguayo, governor of Coahuila y Tejas and first colonizer of Texas. ($750-1,500)

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21. AZUELA, Mariano. Los de abajo, novela (cuadros y escenas de la Revolucion Mexicana). El Paso: Imprenta de “El Paso del Norte,” 1916. 8vo, original grey pictorial wrappers with illustration of man in sombrero standing on high ridge holding a rifle and gazing down into the canyon at his burning home (bound into later red sheep. Exceptionally fine copy of a legendary rarity.

    First edition in book form of the author’s most famous novel. The novel came out serially in 1915 in the Spanish language newspaper El Paso del Norte. Dictionary of Mexican Literature, pp. 59-60. González Peña, History of Mexican Literature, pp. 380-381. Ramos 134. This novel, inspired by the events of the Mexican Revolution, was based in part on the author’s own experiences while serving as physician to the revolutionary forces under Julián Medina, who followed Pancho Villa. See also Stanley Linn Robe’s Azuela and the Mexican Underdogs (UCLA Latin American Studies, V. 48, 1979) for a discussion of the rarity of the work and its genesis. ($1,500-3,000)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

22. [BAEGERT, Johann Jakob]. Nachrichten von der Amerikanischen Halbinsel Californien.... Mannheim, 1772. 2 copper-engraved images on one folded sheet (man and woman of California) and copper-engraved folded map 8vo, modern half vellum over marbled boards. Three small purple ink spots on map at bottom, otherwise fine. Rare.

     First edition. Barrett 129. JCB III (2, 1772-1800) #1817: “A work written to disabuse the public mind as to the ‘rumored mineral riches and pearls of California, which had spread from Mexico to Madrid and Germany.” Graff 137. Hill I, p. 13: “The map is most helpful in giving the location of the many Jesuit missions in Lower California. It also shows the route along the west coast of Mexico followed by Baegert in going to California in 1751, and route out in 1768, after the expulsion of the Jesuits. The two plates which are not found with all copies depict California natives.” Howes B29. Mathes, California Colonial Bibliography 59: “The ex-missionary of San Luis Gonzaga in exile relates his sojourn in California with extensive ethnographic and linguistic details. The volume contains plates of a Guaycura man and woman and a map that follows that of Consag published by Venegas-Burriel. This work appeared in a corrected edition in 1773.” Sabin 4363. Streeter Sale 2442. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest, pp. 154-155 & #631. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 157. ($4,000-8,000)

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23. BAERLE, Caspar van. História dos feitos recentemente praticados durante oito anos no Brasil.... Rio de Janeiro, 1940. [i-ix] x-xvi, [1] 2-424, [2, limitation statement] pp., 57 leaves of plates on maize grounds (some folding), portraits, maps, views, etc. Large folio, original printed paper wrappers. Fragile binding with a few tears and minor, otherwise very fine. Very scarce.

First edition in Portuguese of the classic work on the Prince of Nassau’s Dutch Colony in Brazil. This is a translation of the first edition Rerum per octennium in Brasilia published in Latin. Borba de Moraes, p. 81 (citing the present edition): “To commemorate the third century of Dutch rule in Brazil, Gustavo Capanema, Minister of Education at that time, had Baerle’s book translated and printed by his Ministery. 500 copies of this edition were issued on ‘Vergé’ paper and twenty on ‘Ingres’ paper. Another issue, was printed in the same large format.” Sabin 3408 (citing 1647 edition). For over one hundred fifty years the images in Baerle’s book were the primary references to Brazilian landscapes available in Europe. Today the iconography in this work is familiar to Brazilians as the most important example of their pre-national art. ($300-600)

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24. [BANGS, SAMUEL (printer)]. Original sealed paper for use in Coahuila y Tejas, with caption at top: Sello Cuarto: Una Cuartilla Habilitado Por El Estado De Coahuila Y Texas Para El Bienio De 1828 Y 29. Continued for another year with an ink manuscript certification just below: “Habilitado pa. el Estado de Coahuila y Texas pa. el vienio de 1830 y 31. Seanz[?]” and paraph. [Saltillo, 1828]. [2] pp., verso blank. Folio. Except for a few minor stains, fine.

     First edition. Not in Spell or Jenkins. Some type of sealed paper had been required for practically every legal and business transaction in Mexico since 1640. Its sale and use had long been a significant source of income for the Mexican government. Paper could be a precious commodity, however, and shortages were common, probably more so in the hinterlands. Thus, the stratagem involved was to apply an updated manuscript certification, as has been done here. Austin and his colonists hated stamped paper, since it imposed fees that were tantamount to a tax. He requested that the colonists be allowed to pay only the actual value of the paper rather than the tax represented on it. Sealed paper was just another of the expensive insults heaped on the colonists. An excellent example of yet another of the Mexican outrages that eventually led to the Texas Revolution, printed by Texas’ first printer. ($200-400)

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25. BARTLETT, John Russell. Personal Narrative of Explorations and Incidents in Texas, New Mexico, California, Sonora, and Chihuahua, Connected with the United States and Mexican Boundary Commission.... New York: Appleton, 1854. 2 vols., 8vo, original green pictorial cloth, complete, 45 plates, including 16 toned lithograph plates (2 folded), numerous engraved text illustrations, folding map. Binding lightly rubbed and worn, offsetting to text from a few plates, occasional mild foxing, overall a fine, complete copy. Increasingly difficult to find complete and in the original Southwestern pictorial bindings.

    First edition. Basic Texas Books 12. Cowan II, p. 36. Graff 198: “An essential book for the Southwest.” Hill I, p. 18: “First thoroughly scholarly description of the Southwest.” Howes B201. Kelsey, Engraved Prints of Texas: 1554-1900, pp. 84-86. Plains & Rockies IV:234:1. Tyler, Texas Lithographs of the Nineteenth Century (lists the Texas plate, Camp in Snow Storm on Delaware Creek, Texas). Wheat, Gold Regions 252. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, Vol. III:798, plate following p. 240, p. 237. ($600-1,200)

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26. BAZ, Gustavo & E[duardo] L. Gallo. History of the Mexican Railway...Translated into English by George F. Henderson. Mexico: Gallo & Co Editors [title page verso: Printing Office of F. Escalante, Bajos S. Agustin Street.—Mexico], 1876. [5-8] 9-211 [1, blank] pp., 34 lithographs by Iriarte, most after the designs of S. Hernández, including full-color illustrated title, remainder on tinted grounds; folded uncolored lithograph map: Plan and Profile of the Mexican Railway and Former Project of Colonel Talcott C.E. (33.5 x 48.5 cm; below neat line at left: Lit. de H. Iriarte). Folio (38.5 x 27.3 cm), original dark brown cloth gilt lettered on upper cover (Scientific, Historical and Statistical Notes on Mexico), neatly rebacked in dark brown cloth, spine gilt lettered, new hinges and endsheets. Corners bumped and some edge wear, text block partly split at p. 93 with some signatures starting. Text and plates very good except for ink ownership stamp of the Mercantile Library of New York on title and on some plates and text (discreetly placed at corners). Old ink accession number and label on title page. The book is often found incomplete, but this copy has all the plates and map, all of which are quite fresh and in good impressions.

     First edition in English (first edition, Mexico, 1874). Mathes, Mexico on Stone (citing the first edition). pp. 41: “A high point”; 47 (illustrated); 99 (cited in bibliography); 64 (Iriarte; Llano y Compañía); 65 (Salazar). Railway Economics, p. 339. This volume was compiled to celebrate the completion of the Mexican Railway from Veracruz on the Atlantic Coast to Mexico City, high and deep in the interior. The project had taken some fifteen years from the initial surveys in 1857 to the official inauguration on January 1, 1871. ($2,000-4,000)

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27. BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE, Jacques-Henri. Pablo y Virginia. Mexico: Litografía de Salazar; Imprenta de J. M. Lara, 1843. [4], [1] 2-291 [1, blank] pp., 33 full-page uncolored lithograph plates (including title and sectional title; with a few plates mounted) by Salazar (mostly unattributed), numerous lithograph text illustrations. 8vo (22 x 14 cm), original plain maize paper wrappers bound in later full brown Mexican mottled sheep extra gilt, spine with raised bands and gilt lettered, gilt doublures, edges sprinkled, tan and purple mottled endpapers. Minor rubbing and shelfwear. Light scattered foxing throughout (heavier on some pages and plates), but generally fine condition.

     First Mexican edition (first published in France, 1787). Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 21: “The epitome of Mexican romanticism with drawings by Salazar and typography and lithography of the highest quality from José Mariano Lara”; 56; 64; 65. Mathes (in Nación de imágenes: La Litografía Mexicana del Siglo XIX), p. 25: “Sus mejores trabajos son la ilustración de las novelas Los cientos uno Roberto Macario (1860)y Pablo y Virginia (1843) que, por la combinación armoniosa de tipografía, composición pictórica y hermosas viñetas, constituye uno de los libros más bellos del siglo. Estas litografías fueron realizadas en papel de china, lo cual hace resaltar la textura aterciopelada de dibujo.” Palau 285214: “Bella edición superior a la de París.” Toussaint, La Litografía en México en el Siglo XIX, p. xx. Hipolitó Salazar is considered the Father of Mexican Lithography (see Dicc. Porrúa). ($800-1,600)

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28.  BERTON, Francis. Un Voyage sur le Colorado par Francis Berton Membre Correspondant de la Société de Géographie de Genève. San Francisco, 1878. [1-5] 6-64 pp., 17 lithograph plates, one of which is Kino’s map, text illustrations. 8vo, original blue pebble cloth, title in gilt on upper cover. Spinal extremities very lightly worn, corners slightly bumped, very light shelf wear, and a few minor abrasions on upper cover. Endpapers browned, interior and plates very fine and fresh. Regrettably, the folding map which was affixed to lower pastedown (Map of Arizona Prepared Specially for R.J. Hinton’s hand book of Arizona)is not present (often lacking). Here it is provided in excellent facsimile. Very rare, printed as gifts. Printed at upper right on title: “Avec les compliments de l’auteur.”

      First edition, 50 copies privately printed. Cowan II, p. 51. Edwards, Desert Voices, p. 27. Edwards, Lost Oases along the Carrizo, p. 75: “The author leaves San Francisco in April, 1878, and crosses the San Joaquin and Merced Rivers, the Tehachapi Pass, the Mohave Desert, the San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles, San Gorgonio Pass, the Colorado Desert (with special mention of Seven Palms, Indio, and Dos Palmas). Pp. 14-15 (Mojave) and pp. 22-26 and 93-95 (Colorado) afford us our direct desert references.” Farquhar, The Books of the Colorado River & The Grand Canyon 29: “Berton, Swiss consul at San Francisco, journeyed overland to Yuma and the Gila River country. He published his account in an edition of 50 copies for the benefit of his friends... Several of the plates in Berton’s book are from his own sketches or photographs, notably a photograph of the steamer ‘Cocopah.’” Howell 50, California 1475: “The charming lithographs and maps were prepared by Britton and Rey of San Francisco and include a view of the Tehachapi Pass, the San Fernando Tunnel, and Santa Monica Harbor.” Howes B394. Spamer, Grand Canyon, p. 16. Streeter Sale 523. ($1,500-3,000)

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29. [BIBLIOGRAPHY]. COWAN, Robert Ernest. A Bibliography of the History of California and the Pacific West 1510-1906. San Francisco: The Book Club of California, 1914. [i-ii] iii-xxxi [1, blank], [2], 1-318, [4] pp. 4to, original binding of half tan cloth over original boards, paper spine label. Inscribed by author on front free endpaper. Bookplate of noted collector W.J. Holliday on front pastedown. With some pencil marginalia. Untrimmed, overall very fine and fresh.

     First edition, limited edition (#10 of 250 copies); first book printed by The Book Club of California. Cowan II, p. 146. Holliday Sale 235. Howell 50, California 1507: “The standard bibliography of California.” Huntington Library, Zamorano 80...Exhibition of Famous and Notorious California Classics 23. Streeter Sale 2323. Zamorano 80 #23. Although the 1933 and 1964 editions are preferred for bibliographical research, this first edition contains informative notes not found in the subsequent edition. ($300-600)

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30. [BIG BEND, TEXAS]. Two items: [1] The Alpine Avalanche. Information and History of the Big Bend Davis Mount Area.... [wrapper title]Vol. 60, No. 52. September 14, 1951. 72 pp., illustrated. Folio (37 x 27 cm), original photographic wrappers in blue and brown. Light wear, else fine. [2] Alpine Avalanche Brewster County Diamond Jubilee 1887-1971. Published by Mr. and Mrs. James W. Glasscock [wrapper title]. Vol. 70, No. 39, June 28, 1962. 64 pp., illustrated. Folio (38 x 28), original wrappers lettered in red and blue and with map extending from front to back. Chipped at spine with small losses and tears.

     First edition. CBC lists a couple of issues, including the second item (#644). The periodical is listed in Dudley R. Dobie’s Big Bend Bibliography (first entry). A mine of information on the region, with much on ranching. ($50-100)

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31.  [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: COLORADO SPRINGS & PIKE’S PEAK]. [WELLGE, Henry (attributed)]. Pikes Peak Panorama. [below image, at right] Copyrighted by the American Publishing Co. Milwaukee, U.S.A. Milwaukee: American Publishing Company, n.d. [ca. 1890, per Reps]. Chromolithograph showing Colorado Springs and looking west towards the Front Range of the Rockies with Pikes Peak in the distance. Image: 38.6 x 106.2 cm; image with title: 45.2 x 106.2 cm; overall sheet size. 60.3 x 121.5 cm. Professionally cleaned, freshly mounted on archival tissue consolidating a few marginal tears including one that extends into image at right (barely visible and no losses), overall fine with vivid color retention.

     First edition. Reps, Cities on Stone, p. 95. Reps, Views and Viewmakers of Urban America Color Plate 10 & #474 (attributing the view to Henry Wellge and locating copies at Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Denver Public Library, Library of Congress, and New-York Historical Society). This handsome city view with heights and river in foreground looks west toward snow-capped Pike’s Peak in the distance. The city of Colorado Springs is well laid out on a grid pattern with bustling factories and numerous smoking locomotives passing through. Except for a couple of trolley cars, however, the streets are amazingly deserted. The town is so dwarfed by the landscape that it looks almost like a perfect miniature city. Reps (Views and Viewmakers) includes the American Publishing Company as one of the lithograph firms having unusual and skillful coloring that created consistently superior work with chromolithographs and attributes this unsigned view to Henry Wellge (1850-1917), artist, lithographer, architect, draftsman, and publisher who founded the American Publishing Company. Reps’ article on Wellge (pp. 213-214) ranks him with the most prolific of the city view artists of America, and singles out the present print for its skillful use of printing multiple colors in dramatic tones of ink that resembled oil colors. ($5,000-$10,000)

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32. [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: LAREDO, TEXAS]. [WELLGE, Henry (attributed)]. [Below image] Perspective Map of the City of Laredo, Texas. The Gateway to and from Mexico.... [at top, in image] Presented with the Compliments of the Laredo Real Estate & Abstract Co. W.R. Page, Pres’t. [below image] Copyrighted and Published by the American Publishing Co.... [insets, maps & views] Hotel Hamilton; The Laredo Improvement Co.; Commercial Hotel; Laredo’s Railway Connections; City Hall; Webb County Court House; Opera House; Office Block; Masonic Hall; Continuation of ‘The Heighths’ [sic] from Point A. Milwaukee: American Publishing Co., ca. 1890-1892. Toned lithograph bird’s-eye view with subtle gum arabic highlights in white and pale green toning. Overall sheet size: 61 x 92.5 cm; image and text: 54.5 x 64.7 cm; main view: neat line to neat line: 42.2 x 84 cm. Creased where formerly folded, minor losses at a few folds, small stain at lower left (in image), insect damage at lower right blank margin, light marginal chipping (not affecting image or text), a few small wrinkles, overall very good condition of a very fragile item. Very rare.

    Earliest bird’s-eye view of Laredo listed by Reps (Cities of the American West, Fig. 18.15 & p. 614; Cities on Stone, Plate 48; & p. 94; Views and Viewmakers of Urban America, Plate 70 & 3985 & pp. 55, 85, 215: “By the time this view was published, a new bridge had replaced the more picturesque but less efficient ferry across the river.... Tanneries, brick manufacturing plants, lumber yards and furniture shops, a woolen mill, Fort McIntosh, and a complex of activities associated with railroad maintenance and repair, all provided employment for Laredo’s increasing population.” Henry Wellge “ranks with the most prolific of the city view artists of America” (Reps). See Amon Carter Museum's marvelous exhibit of such views by Ron Tyler. ($5,000-8,000)

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33.  [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: MEXICO CITY]. DUSACQ ET CIE. (publisher). Vue Générale de México | (Vol d’Oiseau) [below title] Dusacq et Cie. Edit, 14, Boul. Poissonnière, Paris | Imp. Becquet à Paris [top right above neat line] No. 85. Paris, n.d. [ca. 1863-1864]. Duo-tone lithograph in sepia and blue on thick paper (bird’s-eye view of Mexico City); image & line border: 41.6 x 60.2 cm; image, line border & text above & below: 45 x 60.2 cm; overall sheet size: 57 x 74 cm. Except for very minor marginal soiling and old adhesive stains on verso, very fine, colors fresh.

     Birds-eye view of Mexico City from northwest to southeast (perhaps after Casimiro Castro’s map). Lombardo, Atlas histórico de la ciudad de México, plate 165 (illustrated). The view is expertly delineated, and the coloring delicate and lovely. The Paris firm Dusacq et Cie. also lithographed portraits of “Maximilien I.er, empereur du Mexique” and “S. M. Carlota Emperatriz de Mexico,” both of which were after art work by Lafosse. The two portraits are in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Other portraits from the series are dated 1863 and 1864. The firm Dusacq et Cie lithographed many prints in the nineteenth century, everything from formal portraits to views to religious themes to a caricature of Abraham Lincoln. Dusacq sometimes collaborated with the great Lemercier (see herein under NEBEL). ($1,000-2,000)

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34. [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA]. GLOVER, E[li] S[heldon]. Bird’s Eye View of San Diego, California 1876. From the North-East, Looking South-West. [below image at left] Drawn by E.S. Clover [sic] and Published by Schneider and & [sic] Kueppers, San Diego. [below image at center] Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by Schneider & Kueppers, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D.C. [below image at right] A.L. Bancroft & Company, Lithographers, San Francisco, Cal.... San Francisco, 1876. Toned lithograph bird’s-eye view of the town, waterfront with piers and bay in distance, several ships on water; visible image including text below: 46.2 x 67 cm. Minor split to right edge of image (no losses), otherwise fine. Under glass, matted, and in vintage gilt and walnut frame.

     According to Reps, this is the fourth bird’s-eye view of San Diego, preceded by earlier views in 1871, 1873, and conjectured  date of 1870-1873. There are at least two variants of this print. Our print is like a Bancroft copy (Call No. BANC PIC 1963.002:0909--D), without vaquero on horseback trying to lasso three cows in foreground at lower right, foreground has been altered adding more shading, and with misprints in text at lower left: “Drawn by E.S. Clover [sic] and Published by Schneider and & [sic] Kueppers, San Diego. Bancroft and Library of Congress have a copy with the vaquero and cows and without the errors in text. Peters, California on Stone, p. 54. Howell & White, California in Lithographs: Nineteenth Century Prints from the Robert B. Honeyman, Jr. Collection, p. 129. Reps, Cities on Stone, p. 97. Reps, Views and Viewmakers of Urban America 228: “The Glover-Bancroft collaboration brought together a skilled topographic artist and high-quality lithographic craftsmanship. The large folio views that resulted are consistent in their style, format, attractive appearance, and use of a single tone stone to provide pleasing and often dramatic cloud and sky effects.” ($10,000-20,000)

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35. [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: SAN FRANCISCO]. BRITTON & REY [Joseph Britton & Jacques Joseph Rey]. San Francisco Upper California, [below border, at lower right] Lith. Britton & Rey. [San Francisco, 1852 or after]. Lithograph letter sheet view of city and harbor, grey wove paper, border to border: 13 x 40.6 cm; image with text below: 14.5 x 40.6 cm; overall sheet size: 15 x 46 cm. Printed across a double sheet, with blank area below trimmed off. Scattered light browning and a few closed tears to blank margins. Very good.

     Variant of Baird 252, title without “In November 1851” and comma after “California.” Our copy matches the copies at the Library of Congress and the Huntington Library, both of which are on whole sheets. Not in Reps. The image is a view of San Francisco from Nob Hill east to the Bay. Telegraph Hill is to the left and a Methodist church is depicted in the center foreground. This was a very popular view, and copies are found with the Quirot imprint (Clifford Sale 258 & Streeter Sale 2678), as well as closely related reworkings (e.g., Baird 239). The Britton & Rey variant is more difficult to find than the Quirot imprint. Hart, Companion to California, p. 52: “The Britton and Rey firm of lithographers [was] the oldest west of the Rocky Mountains.” Palmquist, Pioneer Photographers of the Far West, pp. 124-125 (Britton) & pp. 454-455 (Rey): “The San Francisco lithography firm of Britton and Rey produced a prodigious body of early California town views.... Early on, Britton and Rey earned a reputation for consistently excellent workmanship.” Baird in his long article in California on Stone (pp. 62-89) on Britton & Rey comments that the partnership of Britton and Rey “accounts for some of the most notable lithography done in California from the first to the last of our story.” ($750-1,500)

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36. [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: SAN FRANCISCO]. FREY, Philip & Company-Art Repository (publisher) & Janentzky & Company (sole agent). City and County of San Francisco. Sepia-tone lithograph bird’s-eye view, 7.7 x 23.8 cm, folded into original black embossed covers with title on upper cover, 14 pp. of lithographs illustrating 13 scenes in San Francisco (all but the bird’s-eye view measure 7.7 x 11.7 cm); views fold out in accordion format (7.7 x 164.5 cm), plus Map of the City of San Francisco, uncolored lithograph street map with accompanying text printed on map (federal and state offices, hotels, amusements, and public buildings), one panel on verso of map with printed text within ornate border: 12 Copyright Photographs transferred on to stone by a new process rendering them permanent from Philip Fry [sic] & Co’s Art Repository Sold wholesale by Janentzky & Co. (Sole Agents)...Philadelphia, Pa.; neat line to neat line: 26 x 32 cm; overall sheet size: 28 x 34 cm. [Philadelphia?, ca. 1870 (per Yale)]. Plates: First two images with a bit of light toning. Map: Mild to moderate browning to three sections of the map due to contact with paste used to secure the map into the pocket covers; some splits at folds, and the map section where mounted to covers detached (no losses). Covers: Worn and rubbed. OCLC locates the Yale copy.

     The Glaser-Frey method used to make the lithograph illustration from photographs employed separate stones with oil-based inks, which resulted in a series of shades of the same color and a varnished look that created greater illusion of depth. Small view books with lithographed illustrations of cities, architecture, and scenery became very popular in the late nineteenth century in the United States. This type of production preserves important visual records of larger cities in the United States at that time. ($100-300)

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37. [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: SONORA, CALIFORNIA]. GODDARD, George H[enry]. Sonora from the North. [below image] | G.H. Goddard del. [appears as C.H. Goddard, sic] | Entered according to Act of Congress…1853 by G. S. Wells.... | Lith. Britton & Rey, San Francisco. [below title] Published by G. S. Wells, Sonora May 1853. Lithograph town view on blue grey paper, image (not counting title and imprint): 18.1 x 25.2 cm. Framed. Minor creasing and spots, else fine.

    First edition of an early view of Sonora. Reps (417) locates an 1852 birds-eye view of Sonora, also by Goddard, but not this 1853 view. Issued as a letter sheet with a view of Springfield (see following entry herein), but here separated. Baird 257. Peters, California on Stone, p. 78. ($750-1,500)

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38. [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: SPRINGFIELD, CALIFORNIA]. GODDARD, George H[enry]. Springfield, Tuolumne County [below image] G.H. Goddard del. | Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1853 by G. S. Wells in the Clereks [sic] Office of the Distc. Court of the Northern Distc. of California | Lith. Britton & Rey, San Francisco [below title] Published by G. S. Wells, Sonora May 1853. Lithograph town view on blue-grey paper, image (not counting title and imprint): 18.1 x 25.2 cm. Framed. Minor creasing and light spotting, otherwise fine.

    First edition of an early view of the mining town of Springfield. Issued as a letter sheet with a view of Sonora (see preceding entry herein), but here separated. Baird 257. Peters, California on Stone, p. 78. Reps 423. ($750-1,500)

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39.  [BIRD’S-EYE VIEW: STOCKTON & SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY]. KOCH, Augustus (artist) & Britton & Rey (lithographers). Birds Eye View of the City of Stockton San Joaquin County. 1870. California. [below image at left] Drawn by Augustus Koch. [below image at right] Lith. Britton & Rey, S.F. [between lower image and title, small oval view] Stockton in 1852. [numbered key in four columns left and right of title]. San Francisco, 1870. Toned lithograph view in shades of tan and grey; image: 58.4 x 79.9 cm; image, title and key: 64 x 79.9 cm; overall sheet size: 85 x 89 cm. Light marginal soiling, blank margins chipped with loss, several consolidated tears (most not touching image), old tape stain at upper left blank margin, central vertical crease relaxed, image proper very good to fine. A rare and handsome view.

     First edition. Reps, Cities of the American West, Figure 7.17. Reps, Cities on Stone, p. 98 & Color Plate 16. Reps, Views and Viewmakers of Urban America 429. The small oval vignette at the lower portion of the print shows Stockton as it was in 1852, only a few years after Capt. Weber purchased a 45,000-acre rancho which he developed into the major supply point for eager miners going to southern mines during the California Gold Rush. This view shows an expanding Stockton with buildings going up even on the opposite side of the railroad tracks. In the river several steamboats churn, and in the distance two trains puff along the tracks. One factory belches smoke, that sure sign of progress in the nineteenth century. Spanning from Vine street to South street, from Tule Street to East Street, it appears to have everything a civilized town should have from, hotels and commerce, churches of many denominations, as well as two breweries and a courthouse. The town is well served by a rail line that parallels Sacramento Street, and there are numerous docks for boats near the downtown area. ($1,500-3,000)

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40. BLACKMORE, William [Henry]. Colorado: Its Resources, Parks, and Prospects as a New Field for Emigration; With an Account of the Trenchara and Costilla Estates, in the San Luis Park. London: Sampson, Low, Son, and Marstons, 1869. [2], [1-5] 6-217 [1, blank] pp., frontispiece (mounted oval albumen bust portrait of Governor William Gilpin), 3 lithograph maps with original hand coloring. 4to, original dark green pebble cloth. Spinal extremities slightly tattered, corners of binding slightly bumped, a few abraded areas to binding, front hinge slightly cracked (but strong), interior and maps very fine save for mild foxing to endpapers and maps. Photograph of Governor Gilpin slightly faded (as usual) and mounting lightly foxed.

    First trade edition. Two editions of this book were published in the same year, a private edition in two volumes with a different collation, and a trade edition by Sampson, Low, as here. The number of maps and photographs varies, not only between the two editions, but also from copy to copy, as evidenced by Denver Public Library holdings. Adams, Herd 272. Graff 318: “Elaborate land-selling advertisement.” Howes C607. Sabin 14735. Wilcox, pp. 15-16. Wynar 2025. This elaborate promotional work was published to coincide with the completion of the transcontinental railroad, which opened the central United States to prospective immigrants. The maps in this work are not listed by Phillips (America) or Wheat. One of the maps is a reduced version of the exceedingly rare Ebert-Gilpin-Monk 1862 Map of Colorado Territory, Shewing the System of Parks, which Wheat (Mapping the Transmississippi West, Vol. V, p. 56 & #1040) describes as “the first ‘indigenous’ (Colorado) map of importance…a truly imposing map, a credit to all who had a hand in it.” The only copy of the map we find at auction since 1976 is the Streeter copy, which resold in 1999 at $28,000. The 1865 edition of the map is represented in the auction records only by Streeter’s copy in 1968. ($1,500-3,000)

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41. BLANCHARD, [Henri] P[ierre Léon Pharamond], Adrien Dauzats & [Louis] E[ugène] Maissin. San Juan de Ulùa ou relation de l’expédition française au Méxique.... Paris: Chez Gide, Editeur, 1839. [i-v] vi-xii, [1] 2-591 [1, blank] pp., 18 plates engraved on India proof paper and mounted (as issued) with views of the West Indies and Mexico, scenes from the expedition and nautical subjects, numerous text engravings of similar subjects. 4to, contemporary three-quarter dark green morocco over green and black mottled boards, spine gilt-lettered and with raised bands, marbled endpapers. Binding a bit rubbed and corners bumped, upper hinge open, scattered mild to moderate foxing to text and plates.

     First edition, large paper copy. Bancroft, Mexico V, p. 204: “The most exhaustive work on [the Pastry War] episode.” Clark, Old South III:202: “Description of Pensacola Bay, fortifications, and the town, which the ship visited on July 1, 1839.” Graff 323. Howes B507. Palau 30412. Raines, p. 145: “The favorable report of Texas doubtless hastened the recognition of the Republic by France.” Sabin 5832. Streeter 1343: “This narrative is entered because of the account of Texas given by Maissin in Note XIII at pages [522]-572.... The visit of the French officers to Brazoria, Houston, and Galveston in May, 1839, is first described (four pages) and then follows a thoughtful description of the country, its government, commerce, and social customs.” The international incident known as the Pastry War was launched by France on the flimsy pretext that Mexico had not properly paid some money due to a French baker in Tacubaya whose shop was invaded by Mexican army officers who locked him in a back room and devoured all of his pastries. It was independent Mexico’s first brush with a foreign power. The engraved plates printed on thin, high-quality India proof paper are an unusual medium, providing a finer image with more depth than those on ordinary paper. Because the technique of printing on India proof paper is extremely time-consuming, expensive, and challenging, engravings were seldom printed in this way. ($1,000-3,000)

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42. BOBAN, Eugène & E.-Eugène Goupil. Documents pour servir a l’histoire du Mexique. Catalogue raisonné de la collection de M. E.-Eugène Goupil (ancienne collection J.-M.-A. Aubin).... Paris: Ernest Leroux, 1891. 2 vols. of text with one plate + Atlas with 80 leaves of photolithographic plates. Text: 2 vols., folio, original tan printed wrappers bound in twentieth-century maroon cloth (to match original portfolio) Atlas: Oblong folio, original front and back wrappers and plates laid in original gilt-lettered maroon cloth folding portfolio with original maroon cloth ties. Other than inconsequential wear to portfolio binding, an exceptionally fine, fresh, clean set. The work is rare and difficult to find complete.

     First edition. Chadenat,18970. Glass, p. 31 & p. 13. Griffin 1359: “Catalog of the great Aubin-Goupil collection in Paris, with abundant commentary and transcription and a pictorial atlas. The collection includes some of the foremost extant codical documents.” Palau 31075. Ugarte 661A. ($1,500-3,000)

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43. BOLAÑOS, Joaquín. La Portentosa vida de la muerte.... Mexico: Herederos del Lic. D. Joseph de Jáuregui, 1792. [24], [1]-276 pp., 17 (of 18) copper-engraved plates (including frontispiece), fantastic images in the Dance of Death tradition. 4to, original vellum. Recased, missing ties, two dark areas on spine where former labels were removed. Wants the plate for Chapter 8 that appeared between pp. 48-49. Plate at p. 104 with marginal tear (no loss), occasional light staining, overall very good, plates excellent, in strong impressions. Exceedingly rare literary and iconographic work on death and satire in Mexico. No copies in auction records, nor in other market sources, save for a copy offered by Porrúa in 1927 @ 20 pesos.

     First edition of “the earliest documented example of skeletal imagery in Mexico’s literary culture”, Regina M. Marchi, Day of the Dead in the USA (Rutgers University Press, 2009), p. 26. Medina, México 8174. Palau 31711. In 1792 the book was censored by the Inquisition on grounds of incorrect Spanish that was disrespectful to Death. Something of a classical Mexican Ars moriendi, this book was very poorly received because the author recommended it to “Hombres de buen gusto.” The book, apparently falling into the hands of just such people, was met with a frosty reception. Nevertheless, it is considered the first, although tentative step toward an indigenous Mexican literature. In his preface the author makes it clear that he is aware of the novel and somewhat shocking approach he is taking to his subject and remarks that if the reader finds the text objectionable, he has only to lay it aside. The engravings, some of most graphic ever produced in Mexico, were executed by Francisco Agüera Bustamante (active 1784-1829), one of the earliest satirical illustrators in Mexico. ($3,000-6,000)

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44. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO. COMISIÓN PESQUISIDORA DE LA FRONTERA DEL NORTE. Two reports, each having separate title and pagination, plus appendix following second report: Informe de la Comision Pesquisidora de la Frontera del Norte al Ejecutivo de la Union en cumplimiento del Artículo 3o. de la ley de 30 de setiembre de 1872...; [with] Informe...sobre depredaciones de los indios y otros males que sufre la frontera mexicana; [and] Apéndice.... Mexico: Díaz de León y White, 1874. 3 folding lithograph maps with original outline or shading color. Folio, contemporary brown calf over marbled boards. Outer wear, small repair to title at lower blank margin, maps with a few splits or repairs (no losses). Overall a very good, complete copy. Very rare.

     First edition, followed by various Mexican editions (1875 and 1877) and translations into English (New York, 1875, and Washington, D.C., 1876). One of the most important borderlands reports, which has been compared to the Pichardo treatise for its importance to borderlands history. This book is bibliographically complex—for a number of related works see: Adams, Guns 1108. Adams, Herd 558, 1130 & 2264. Graff 2765 (citing New York, 1875 edition). Howes I32, I33, T14. Palau 119576-7. Reese, Six Score 108 (citing the 1876 U.S. government report): “Important report dealing with cattle theft along the Mexican border. The testimony contains much on rustling problems and on cattle in south Texas generally.” The large-scale folding map delineates the Rio Grande from its mouth to the Big Bend region, with portions of Texas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas. This exceedingly rare map is among the most important for Texas and borderlands history in the nineteenth century. The superb detail includes Mexican and American ranches along the Rio Grande. See Day, Maps of Texas, p. 87. ($1,500-3,000)

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45. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO. MINISTERIO DE GUERRA Y MARINA. Reglamento para el establecimiento de las colonias militares en la frontera del norte. México.—Diciembre de 1868. Mexico: Imprenta del Gobierno, en Palacio, á cargo de José M. Sandoval, 1869. [12], [3] 4-118, [26, some folded] pp., folded lithograph map, folded lithograph plan, 2 folded letterpress tables (included in pagination), 3 lithograph plates on maize grounds (mounted dragoon, infantryman, and engineer). 8vo, contemporary red Mexican sheep over red pebbled boards, gilt-ruled spine, upper cover gilt-stamped “C. Comte. de Escuadron Fidencio Caballero,” orange and black marbled endpapers. Spine cracked and chipped at foot, both covers moderately stained, corners bumped. Title page and one other leaf with small tear at bottom margin, pp. 53/54 with small hole affecting two letters, map and folding plan with tear at text block (no losses), the lithos have a few inconsequential fox marks and light waterstaining in blank margins. Overall, interior is fine except for a few closed tears to a few pages or folding material (no lossess). Very rare among institutional holdings and none at auction.

     First edition. Not in Eberstadt, Streeter Sale, Palau, Sabin, Porrúa, Howes, etc. This report relates to Mexico’s establishment of military colonies in the Borderlands to deal with the then general state of lawlessness existing along the border between Mexico and Texas-New Mexico-Arizona-California. The other purpose of the establishment of these colonies was for the final subjugation of the Native tribes who had managed to maintain their strongholds through several centuries of Spanish and Mexican rule.New treaties with the tribes are suggested, and prior treaties are reviewed. There is a wealth of military detail in this rare and excellent report, including such facts as side-arms will be six-shot Colt revolvers. ($1,500-3,000)

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46. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO. MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES. Memoria que en cumplimiento del precepto constitucional presentó al octavo Congreso de la Union en el primer periodo de sus sesiones Juan de Dios Arias.... Mexico: Imprenta del “Eco de Ambos Mundos,” Hospital Real número 3, 1875. Folio (34.2 x 24.5 cm), recent half brown calf over marbled boards, original upper purple printed wrapper bound in. Very good.

     First edition of a very important, detailed report that reveals much about U.S.-Mexican relations at the time, particularly the Borderlands. Not in Palau or other standard sources, but see Latin America: A Guide to Economic History 2885 (similar imprint, but dated 1874). Included as Anexo 1 is the well-known Borderlands report, Informe de la Comisión Pesquisidora de la Frontera del Noroeste; see: Adams, Guns 1108. Adams, Herd 558 & 2264. Graff 2765. Howes I32. Palau 119576–119578. The report is filled with a litany of troubles that the U.S. wants Mexico to address and some that Mexico wants the U.S. to address. Most troubling are the frequent robberies and killings of U.S. citizens living in Mexico. The old problem of Native American raids into Sonora is addressed, and Mexican cross-border raids from Matamoros into Corpus Christi drew vigorous U.S. protests and even rumors of a U.S. invasion to stop the problem. ($200-400)

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47. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO. SECRETARÍA DE ESTADO Y DEL DESPACHO. SECCIÓN DE AMÉRICA. Cuestion Americana. Negocios Diplomaticos con los Estados Unidos. Notas y Documentos Relativos. Edicion oficial. Guadalajara: Tip. de Banda. Exconvento de Sta. Maria de Gracia, 1878. [3] 4-214 pp. (without title page, as issued). 8vo, original stitching (broken), remains of original green wraps on spine (included is a modern copy of upper wrapper with title in typographical border). Except for light soiling to first leaf, text is very good. Only a handful of copies found in institutions; exceedingly rare in commerce. The last copy we trace in the trade was the Porrúa copy in 1949.

     Second edition (first edition published in Mexico City in 1878). Palau 66044. Porrúa Catalogue 5 (1949) 6548. An omnibus review of the continuing border problems caused by U.S. armed incursions into Mexico in pursuit of various groups, such as Native Americans and bandits, who had crossed into Texas and committed depredations. Included in five sections are: communications between Mexican and U.S. officials, provoked by Mackenzie’s incursion (pp. [3]-50); documents concerning Texas governor Richard Coke’s orders allowing Refugio Benavides’ troops to invade Mexico (pp. 50-64); Leander H. McNelly’s incursion (pp. 64-57); Shafter’s incursion into Piedras Negras (pp. 87-125); General Ord’s order allowing U.S. troops to cross the border (pp. 126-143). The final section contains correspondence between the Mexican Secretario de Relaciones and Washington’s ambassador to Mexico, John W. Foster, principally debating Ord’s order. The period covered is 1873-1878. ($200-400)

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48. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO. SECRETARÍA DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES. Memoranda y notas relativas cambiadas entre el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores y el Ministerio Plenipotenciario de los Estados-Unidos. Mexico: Imprenta del Gobierno, 1877. [1-3] 4-45 [1, blank] pp. (text in English and Spanish). 8vo, original green printed wrappers, stitched. Moderately stained with occasional underlining, overall good. Contemporary ink note on upper wrapper, “Paso de la frontera en la persecución de bandidos” (“I go to the frontier to pursue bandits”).

     First edition. Not in standard sources. This bilingual edition sets out the complaints of the U.S. against Mexico in the long-running dispute between Mexico and the U.S. concerning cross border raids resulting in the loss of life and property. An example of U.S. complaints is the murder of seventeen U.S. citizens in Texas by “Indians from Mexico.” William Rufus “Pecos Bill” Shafter is cited, with his terse recommendation to the commission: “The only way to put a stop to the raids is to follow up the delinquents into Mexico [and] attack them in their lairs” (p. 4). The problems covered here were eventually resolved by the gradual spread of law and order in Texas itself, which reduced cattle rustling, and by the eventual conquering by the U.S. of its own Native American population. ($300-500)

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49. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO. SECRETARIO DE ESTADO (Manuel Robles y Pezuela). Memoria del Secretario de Estado y del Despacho de Guerra y Marina, leida en la Camara de Diputados los dias 30 y 31 de enero, y en la de Senadores en 13 de febrero de 1852. Mexico: Imprenta de Vicente G[arcía] Torres, 1852. [1-3] 4-118, [2], 1- 57 [1, blank] pp., 3 folded tables (included in pagination), 2 folding lithograph maps: [Map 1] Cuadro que comprehende la situacion Geográfica y Topográfica de las colonias militares de Sierra Gorda;neat line to neat line; with 7 separate maps around map proper, showing regions and towns; [Map 2] Carta de la Frontera del Norte de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos; neat line to neat line: 16.7 x 55.5 cm; detailed map with hand outline coloring in red showing the border states of Tamaulipas, Coahuila, Chihuahua, and Sonora as defined by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, including roads and watercourses (i.e., from Brownsville to San Diego), some sites on U.S. side located. 8vo, original black embossed grained cloth extra gilt presentation binding with martial symbols, glossy yellow endpapers. Endpapers slightly discolored, front endpapers and first two leaves lightly chipped at bottom, pp. 43/44 wrinkled at lower right corner. Overall, very fine, the maps superb. Signed presentation. Among the key Borderland reports, this one is among the rarest, and one of the few that concerns the time between the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Treaty of Mesilla.

     First edition. Eberstadt 127:49 (this copy). Howes R381: “Includes material on the boundary between Mexico and the United States, the Gadsden Purchase Territory, etc.” Palau 160989. ($1,500-3,000)

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50. [BORDERLANDS]. [NATIVE AMERICAN DEPREDATIONS]. MEXICO. MINISTERIO DE GUERRA Y MARINA. [Decree ordering that Mexican states provide levies to strengthen the army, commencing] Antonio De Leon, General De Brigada, Comandante general y Gobernador interino de este Departamento, á sus habitantes hago saber: Que por el ministerio de la guerra y marina se me ha comunicado la suprema órden que sigue.... [Text begins] Con esta fecha...No contentos los aventuros de Tejas con la criminal usurpation de aquel territorio.... Dated in type Mexico, November 11, 1841; followed by decree of Manuel Maria Sandoval, Mexico, November 11, 1841, concerning men to be recruited by each state; followed by decree of Antonio de León, Oaxaca, November 30, 1841, concerning raising the state’s quota, signed in type Antonio de León and José Esperón. Oaxaca: Impreso de I. Rincón, 1841. Broadside (31.8 x 43 cm), in six columns. Creased where formerly folded, minor losses from a few worm holes, light age toning. Overall, a very good copy of a rare decree.

     Rare Oaxaca imprint about perfidious Texans arming Native Americans. Streeter 970.1: “I have not seen a copy of the original publication of this order, and have entered it from the republication at Oaxaca.” Not in other standard sources. Herein Mexico accuses Texans of arming Native Americans and encouraging them to attack Mexico. ($300-600)

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51. [BORDERLANDS]. [TEXAS MISSIONS]. SPAIN. LAWS, STATUTES (February 14, 1779). [Laws establishing new bishopric to include Texas, with heading] Don Eusebio Bentura Beleña, del Consejo de S.M. y su Alcalde del Crimen de la Real Audiencia de esta Nueva España. [text begins] Desvelado siempre nuestro Rey y Señor Don Carlos Tercero...en proporcionar á sus amados Vasallos, expecialmente á los mas distantes.... Mexico, 1779. Broadside printed in two columns: 57 x 41.5 cm on two joined sheets of laid paper variously watermarked with an escutcheon, a horse, and an equestrian figure. Creased where formerly folded, left lower margin irregularly trimmed, several small worm holes touching some letters but not affecting legibility, faint offsetting at bottom; overall very good. With contemporary ink docket in upper left corner in legible hand summarizing contents, one contemporary ink notation in right margin, two contemporary wood sello quarto stamps on verso. Very rare.

     First edition of a law reorganizing ecclesiastical divisions in the Borderlands, including Texas Missions. Not in Medina, Palau, or Wagner’s Spanish Southwest; no copies on OCLC. See Bancroft, Mexico, Vol. III, p. 693: “In 1777, the pope issued a bull for the erection of the see of Nuevo Leon. In February, 1779, Oidor Beleña defined its territory, which was detached from other dioceses. From that of Guadalajara, the towns in Nuevo Santander, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and Texas, the villa de Saltillo; from that of Michoacan, the towns of Jaumave, Palmillas, Real de los Infantes, and Tula; from that of Mexico, the town of Santa Bárbara.” Up until this time, the local priests were basically independent, and this was the first bishopric that gained widespread recognition and obedience in the area along the Rio Grande and in Texas. One difficulty that faced the establishment of the new diocese was the inability to define its northern boundary because the area was under the control of Native Americans, as is mentioned in the text. ($400-800)

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52. BORGET, Auguste. Fragments d’un Voyage Autour du Monde.... Moulins, [France]: C. Desrosiers, Imprimeur-Éditeur, n.d. [ca. 1842-1850]. [2, lithograph pictorial title], [12 leaves of letterpress text printed on rectos only], 12 lithograph plates on original tinted grounds (New York, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Bolivia, China, Hawaii, Philippines & India). 4to, publisher’s original rose cloth over original tan paper boards affixed to upper cover is full-color chromolithograph. Boards faded and with some water spotting, very minor wear to edges of fragile boards. Slight evidence of label removals from text leaves opposite Plates 5 and 9. Very occasional minor spotting to interior, but overall the text and plates are very fine and bright. This work is difficult to find complete and in decent condition.

     First edition. Berger, Rio de Janeiro, p. 40. Borba de Moraes I, p. 112: “This album is very rare and little known.” Deak, Picturing America 454 (citing the plate of New Jersey-New York windmill plate). Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography, Vol. II, 1766 (citing the plate of Honolulu). Artist and world traveller, Auguste Borget (1808-1877), moved in a circle that included Honoré de Balzac and Charles Baudelaire, the former of whom praised Borget’s artistic talent in the Salon of 1846 (“He has a bright color, easy, and his tones are fresh and pure”) and the latter of whom remarked that “Borget has a style with a little bit of sweet malice that seasons the tale and makes it amusing.” The masterful, elegant, natural style of Borget’s marvelous images is perfectly complemented by his text. ($5,000-10,000)

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53. BOSSUET, [Jacques-Bénigne]. Vida de Jesucristo.... Mexico: Vicente García Torres, 1842. 21 leaves of lithographs on versos (scenes from the history of Jesus), most signed at lower left “Lit. Calle de la Palma No. 4” (i.e., José Mariano Fernández de Lara). Folio, original green printed wrappers, bound in contemporary three-quarter black sheep. Binding faded, corners bumped, lower wrap wrinkled, interior with scattered light foxing, plates separating from the binding. Overall a very good copy of a fragile book.

     First Mexican edition. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 64 (Lara and García Torres). OCLC has two records for the book, one at University of New Mexico at Albuquerque and the other with a note that no copies are located. Each plate is divided thematically into two parts, the upper of which is eighteen boxed lines of explanatory text usually bordered by various abstract elements or imagery, some of it grotesque. The lower half depicts each individual scene, many of them with pronounced late Medieval or early Renaissance themes and dress. The vignettes are extremely detailed, well executed, and confidently drawn and composed, in addition to being beautifully lithographed. One unusually valuable bibliographic aspect of this book is García Torres’ advertisement on the lower wrapper describing his plagiarized edition of Carlos Nebel’s Viage pintoresco y arqueólogico de Megico (see NEBEL herein). ($300-600)

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54. BOTURINI BENADUCI, Lorenzo. Idea de una nueva historia general de la America Septentrional.... Madrid: Juan de Zuñiga, 1746. [40] 167 [1, blank] [8] [1] 2-96 pp., 2 copper-engraved plates: [1] Frontispiece, untitled allegorical representation depicting King of Spain; [2] portrait of Boturini, images of the Virgin of Guadalupe and Veytia Calendar Wheel. 4to, mid-nineteenth-century full crimson morocco extra gilt, a.e.g. Slight outer wear and a few small spots to binding, interior with very mild occasional age-toning, overall a fine copy, the engraved plates very fine and strong.

     First edition of a landmark work documenting on the first important collection on Aztec civilization. JCB III (1, 1700-1771) #817. European Americana 1746/28. Griffin 1360: “No collection of Mexican native materials before or since has equalled [it].” Medina, Hispano-Americana 3403. Palau 33786: “Obra estimada e indispensable a todo americanista.” Pilling 420a. Sabin 6833 & 6834. Boturini, an Italian, went to Mexico to trace the historical origins of the veneration of Our Lady of Guadalupe. During the seven years he spent studying Aztec language, religion, and culture, he assembled the first important collection on Aztec civilization. Considered potentially dangerous by the church, the collection was confiscated and dispersed. ($1,500-3,000)

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55. BRISSOT DE WARVILLE, Anacharsis. Voyage au Guazacoalcos aux Antilles et aux États-Unis, par. M.A. Brissot. Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1837. [1] 2-16 (ads), [4], [i] ii-iv, [1] 2-390 pp., 2 lithograph plates, folded lithograph map (Isthme de Tehuantepec dans lequel se trouve la Concession faite en 1828 par le Gouvernement de la République du Méxique a M.M. Laisné de Villevêque Questeur de la Chambre des Députés, et Gordon, neat line to neat line: 42.5 x 26.5 cm). 8vo, original pale green printed wrappers in original glassine. Uncut, as issued. A superb, unsophisticated copy. Rare in commerce.

     First edition. Monaghan 291. Palau 35969. Sabin 8040. The author was the son of J.P. Brissot de Warville, one of the more influential French commentators on the eighteenth-century United States. The author visited Mexico (primarily Tehuantepec and Southern Mexico), the West Indies (Haiti, Jamaica, etc.), and the United States (New Orleans, New York). He made this trip partially to inspect a proposed colony in Guazacoalcos (an area southeast of Veracruz shown on the folded map), which he totally debunks and proclaims to be nothing but a field of broken dreams for all who ventured there. The Mexican colony was the brainchild of Gabriel Jacques Laisné de Villévêque (1766-1851), a prominent French politician to whom the Mexican government gave a large land grant in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The enterprise was a complete failure. ($750-1,500)

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56. BRY, Theodor de & family (compilers). [ACOSTA, José de, Barent Jansz Potgieter & Olivier van Noort]. Americæ nona & postrema pars.... Frankfurt: Matthew Becker, 1602. Part I: [8 (including title page in passe-partout & half title with copper-engraved coat of arms of Christian II)], 1-362, [2, blank] pp.; Part II: [1-2] 3-56 [p. 55 misnumbered 56] pp., 1 copper-engraved map, [2], i-xxv folios of copper-engraved text illustrations & text; Part III: [1-2] 3-100 pp., [2], i-xiv folios of copper-engraved text illustrations & text. Plates show Native customs and industry, views of battles and ships, town plans, bird’s-eye views, etc. Total of 39 copper-plate engravings plus copper-engraved map. Folio, modern three-quarter crimson calf over marbled boards with gilt-lettered spine, raised bands. Very good, map tattered and with old paper repair at lower blank border edge. Parts I & III washed with professional repairs, Part I with a few worm holes touching text, Part II title page with old paper repair at right blank margin, blank leaf after p. 362 supplied. Typical light browning to text leaves (almost always seen in this series), but generally not affecting maps and plates, which are in excellent impressions. Overall a very good copy.

     First edition, first issue, from De Bry’s Grand Voyages, which Penrose praised as “the cornerstone of every library of Americana” (Travel and Discovery in the Renaissance, 1420-1620), p. 310. JCB I (1, to 1599), pp. 406-408. Church 168. Crawford, De Bry 145. European Americana 1602/1 & 1602/72. Sabin 8784 (3:42-43). Wilgus, pp. 31-32: “De Bry, like Hakluyt and Eden, played an important part in calling the attention of Europe to things American.” The work is especially prized for its many influential engravings of Native Americans and the Conquest. Part I is a translation of Acosta’s Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590), one of the very first detailed and realistic descriptions of the New World by one who travelled extensively there. Part II is a translation of Potgieter’s journal Relatio historica (1600) from Sebald de Weert’s 1599-1600 voyage to the Pacific through the Straits of Magellan. Part III is van Noort’s Additamentum nonae partis Americae (1601); van Noort was the first Dutch person to circumnavigate the globe. ($5,000-10,000)

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57. BULLOCK, William. Catalogue of the Exhibition Called Modern Mexico; Containing a Panoramic View of the City, with Specimens of the Natural History of New Spain, and Models of the Vegetable Produce, Costume, &c. &c. Now Open for Public Inspection at the Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly. London: Printed for the Proprietor [title verso: J. Bullock Printer], 1824. [1-3] 4-28 pp., folded lithograph frontispiece (Exhibition of Modern Mexico at the Egyptian=Hall Piccadilly Drawn, & Printed by A. Aglio. 36 Newman St. Oxford St.). 8vo, modern grey boards, upper cover with paper label. Other than light foxing and offsetting to title, very good. Rare in commerce (in 1977 Swann sold the last copy to appear at auction). Laid in this copy is a different lithograph plate from another issue of the English edition of the pamphlet (View of the Exhibition of Ancient and Modern Mexico).

     First edition. Given the huge popularity of Bullock’s exhibition and the probability of multiple printings, we cannot speculate on the printing sequence, nor is it clear in the bibliographical sources. The title is found with publication dates of 1824 and 1825, and number of pages varies from 27 pages to 32 pages. Sabin 9136 (calling for 27 pp. and plate). This pamphlet is one of a series of exhibit catalogues William Bullock (1773-1849) issued to advertise his various Mexican exhibits, which were based on material he collected on his trip to Mexico. Bullock’s exhibit was held in London’s Piccadilly with its ostentatious Egyptian Hall, a fashionable, profitable venue that saw visitors ranging from the general population to Jane Austen to British and European royalty. The exhibit included remarkable Pre-Columbian treasures, a grand panorama of Mexico City, and even a Native American said to be the first Mexican Indian seen in Europe since the Spanish Conquest. Bullock certainly sparked British interest in Mexico, investment in its resources and economy, and emigration to Mexico. ($750-1,500)

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58. BULLOCK, William. Le Mexique en 1823, ou Relation d’un voyage dans la Nouvelle-Espagne. Paris: Alexis-Eymery, 1824. 2 vols. (text) + oblong 4to (atlas). 19 lithograph plates, plus 2 folded maps, all with full color or tinting. Uniformly bound in recent dark green morocco over light green cloth, red and black leather spine labels, raised bands. Fine set.

    First edition in French (first edition, London, 1824. Abbey, Travel in Aquatint and Lithography 1770-1860 667 (plate list; only 6 colored plates). Church 1326. Glass, p. 568. Hill II:215: “The French editions of both the atlas and the narrative are rarer than the English originals.” Palau 37064, 19385. Sabin 9141. Two costume plates were added to this edition. For more on Bullock, see next  entry. ($2,000-4,000)

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59. BULLOCK, William, Jr. (artist). Six Months’ Residence and Travels in Mexico.... London: John Murray, 1824. 16 aquatint plates (folding frontispiece, and 4 colored costume plates); 2 engraved folding maps. 8vo, original tan paper over drab blue boards, printed paper spine label, untrimmed, as issued. Upper joint partially split, slight offsetting from some plates (including title), otherwise a superb copy in original condition.

    First edition of “perhaps the most interesting of the...books dealing with America” (Prideaux, Aquatint Engraving, p. 256). Abbey 666. Bodleian, Europeans in Latin America, Humboldt to Hudson 60. Church 1326. Glass, p. 568. Hill II #214. Palau 37059. Sabin 9140. Streeter Sale 210. Bullock was one of the early British travellers in Mexico after Independence. The considerable care he lavished on the illustrative materials in the book, mostly based on his own drawings, has been repaid by posterity, which values them as beautiful and accurate depictions of Mexican life at the time. ($750-1,500)

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60. BULLOCK, William, Jr. (artist). Description of the Panorama of the Superb City of Mexico, and the Surrounding Scenery, Painted on 2700 Square Feet of Canvas, by Robert T. Burford, Esq. from Drawings Made on the Spot, at the Request of the Mexican Government, By Mr. W. Bullock, Jr. Now Open for Public Inspection Opposite the Atheneum, Pearl Street, Boston. Boston: J. H. Eastburn, 1828. [1-3] 4-16 pp., folded lithograph plate, original plain grey paper wrappers, original stitching (broken). Wrappers chipped with minor losses, small stains, wrinkled, title page dusty and with a small stain, plate somewhat foxed and wrinkled at left edge. Overall, a very good copy of a very fragile item.

     This ephemeral publication was reprinted at every venue, and it is well nigh impossible to sort out the pollo from the huevo. Sabin 9219. Not in American Imprints. The text here is the same, with minor corrections, that was first published as Description of a View of the City of Mexico...now Exhibiting in the Panorama, Leicester-Square (London, 1826). The plate shows two bird’s-eye views of Mexico City from different perspectives. Both images have an accompanying key with 71 identified locations. The present work is that of William Bullock, Jr., son of William Bullock, Sr. ($400-800)

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61. BULLOCK, William, Jr. (artist). Description of the Panorama of the Superb City of Mexico, and the Surrounding Scenery, Painted on 2700 Square Feet of Canvas, by Robert T. Burford, Esq. from Drawings Made on the Spot, at the Request of the Mexican Government, By Mr. W. Bullock, Jr. Now Open for Public Inspection at the Rotunda, New-York. New York: E. Conrad, 1828. [1-3] 4-16 pp., folded lithograph plate: Explanation of a View of the City of Mexico, exhibiting in the Panorama, Leicester Square. 8vo, original pale slate blue wrappers, new stitching. Wraps wanting two corners, upper wrap repaired, lower wrap with small split, title page lightly stained at upper left, upper blank margin of first few leaves wanting a small area. Interior, including plate, fine.

     American Imprints 32522. Sabin 9219. The text and the plate are the same as in the previous entry. The New York printer used a superior quality of paper than the Boston edition. For notes on the work and its author, see preceding entry. ($500-1,000)

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62. BURKART, [Hermann] Joseph. Aufenthalt und Reisen in Mexico in den Jahren 1825 bis 1834. Bemerkungen úber Land, Produkte, Leben und Sitten der Einwohner und Beobachtungen aus dem Gebiete der Mineralogie, Geognosie, Bergbaukunde, Meteorologie, Geographie etc.... Stuttgart: Schweizerbart’s Verlagshandlung, 1836. Vol. I: [i-v] vi-x, [2], [1] 2-392, [4] pp.; Vol. II: [4], [1] 2-286, [4] pp., 9 lithograph folding plates, 2 folding lithograph maps (one in full original color). 2 vols., 8vo, original high-gloss calendared maize boards, dark brown gilt-lettered leather labels. Fragile boards with light wear and stain on spine of portion of board of Vol. I. Bookplate removed from flyleaves of both vols. with light residue. Both vols. with contemporary ink library notations on titles. Text fine and fresh, plates and maps fine save for some very light staining on folding map in Vol. I. Uncommon.

     First editionof a work that reformed Mexican mining education and techniques, with a rare and beautiful geological map of the Zacatecas mining district. Mapoteca colombiana (Mejico), p. 44, #107.Palau 37502. Sabin 9275. Major Chartres, review in Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London, Vol. 10, 1840, pp. 544-551: “This work contains a mass of information far exceeding in value anything that has appeared on the same subjects since the travels of Humboldt.” Upon Burkart’s death, Santiago Ramírez delivered to the Sociedad Mexicana de Geografía y Estadística a eulogy honoring the contributions of Burkart to Mexico. ($1,000-2,000)

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63. BURLINGTON & MISSOURI RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY. [Wrapper title] B. & M. R.R. Lands in Nebraska 600,000 Acres of Choice Lands for Sale in Nebraska by the B. & M. R.R. Co. at Prices ranging from $2.00 to $10.00 per Acre.... N.p., ca. 1881? [1] 2-24 pp., 3 full-page wood-engraved text illustrations (Farmers’ Creek, Valley of Loup River, Widaman’s Ranch), 2 maps, one each on verso of upper and lower paper wrappers: [1] Map of Nebraska Showing the Location of the Lands A. Zeese & Co., Eng. Chicago; and [2] Map Showing the Leading Through Routes to the West and the Lines of the C.B. & Q. and the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad Co. in Nebraska. 8vo, original yellow pictorial wrappers, stitched, two illustrations on upper cover (Characteristic View in Nebraska 1872; and The Same Land as Improved in 1882). Vertical crease where formerly folded, wrappers lightly stained and a few minor chips, interior with a few light stains, overall good.

     First edition. OCLC lists two copies which appear to be the same imprint: Yale (imprint: Lincoln: State Journal Co., 1881?); and Huntington (imprint: St. Louis: A. Gast, 1881?). The present copy has no imprint. Not in Adams, Herd (his entry 370 is a similar undated promotional of 80 pages, from the Rollins Collection at Princeton). The emphasis is agriculture and stock raising, with glowing essays including “Great Grazing District,” “Livestock in the State,” “The Pure Air of the Prairies,” “The Herd Law—No Fences Allowed,” “Sheep Raising in Nebraska,” “Horses and Cattle,” “Education the Birthright of Every Nebraska Child,” etc. ($150-300)

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64. BUTTERFIELD, Carlos. United States and Mexico. Commerce, Trade, and Postal Facilities Between the Two Countries. Statistics of Mexico. New York: J.A.H. Hasbrouck & Co., 1861. [1-5] 6-109 [1, blank], [2], [1-3] 4-188 pp., 2 lithograph maps (1 double-page and uncolored; plus large folded colored map at rear: Map of the United States and Mexico. Compiled from the Latest Authorities by Col. Carlos Butterfield. December 1860. Engraved by J. Bien 180 Broadway, New York). 8vo, original brown pebbled blind-stamped cloth, spine gilt lettered. Lettering on spine dull, some binding wear (lower corners bumped, moderate stain at top corner), interior fine, large, colored map excellent. Laid in is a two-page government document on settling Butterfield’s claim (1879).

     Second edition, with additional statistics not in the 1860 edition and with a new, revised large folded colored map. Sabin 9666n (1860 edition). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 978n (citing the first version of the map). Rumsey (2554) in the description of a similar pocket map identifies the precursor for this map as D.G. and A.J. Johnson’s 1857 wall map entitled New Map of the Union (Rumsey 0364). The map in the present 1861 edition of Butterfield’s book was made from a new stone, although it is approximately the same size as the map that appeared in the first edition.      After the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase, states and territories rapidly formed. The most important overland mail route is the same on both versions of the map: “The route extends from Boonville southwest to Fort Chadbourne, on the Colorado (of Texas), thence west to El Paso del Norte, north to Doña Ana, in Arizona...and due west to Fort Yuma. From there the line extends northwest to the Pueblo de los Angeles, and on to its western terminus at San Francisco. The map is a most important one for its showing of political subdivisions in the West, and for its tracing of the ‘Mail Route,’ on the route of the Butterfield Stageline.” ($750-1,500)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

65.  CABEÇA DE VACA, Alvar Nuñez. Relation that Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca Gave of What Befel the Armament in the Indias whither Panphilo de Narváez went for Governor (from the Years 1527 to 1537) when with Three Comrades He Returned and Came to Seville. Printed from the Buckingham Smith Translation of 1871. San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1929. [10], [1-3] 4-122, [2] pp., illustrated by Valenti Angelo. 4to, original ecru boards with title printed on spine in terracotta, original plain tan dust wrapper with title printed in black. Spine of wrapper slightly chipped without loss, light offsetting to pastedowns from dust wrapper, otherwise very fine.

     Limited edition (one of 300 but hors serie) of a fine press edition of the first book about Texas and the ultimate Texas overland. Noted as “Printer’s copy” and signed by Ed Grabhorn. Basic Texas Books 24V: “This is the first book relating to Texas.” Grabhorn (1915-1940) 124. For first edition, see: Fifty Texas Rarities 1. Graff 3054. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 1n. See Bill Wittliff’s commentary: http://alkek.library.txstate.edu/swwc/cdv/index.html. ($200-400)

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66. [CALIFORNIA PIOUS FUND]. MEXICO (Republic). LAWS. [Decree of May 25, 1832, on the Pious Fund, commencing] El Escmo. Sr. Vice-Presidente...se ha servido dirigirme el decreto que sigue. Art. 1. El gobierno procederá al arrendamiento de las fincas rústicas pertenecientes al fondo piadoso de Californias, por término que no pase de siete años.... Mexico, May 25, 1832. [2] pp., with conjugate blank. Folio. One horizontal fold, minor wrinkling, and small hole touching no letters. Otherwise, very good.

     First edition of the decree ordering that the properties in the Pious Fund be rented and the proceeds deposited in the Mexican national treasury for the benefit of the California missions. Streeter Sale 2465. Not in Cowan.Secularization of the missions radically changed California from a monastico-missionary regime to the empresario system. ($250-500)

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67. [CALIFORNIA SURVEYING]. EWING, Charles G. Charles G. Ewing, Optician, Importer of Mathematical and Philosophical Instruments, Sole Agent for Mathushek Pianos, No. 111 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. Price List, May 16th, 1874. Printed combination price list and circular letter, dated San Francisco, May 16, 1874, advertising his services and the availability from him of surveyor’s instruments made by W. & L.E. Gurley of Troy, New York. Small folio (32.5 x 14.5 cm) on pink paper. Creased where formerly folded, light stain at one fold, otherwise fine. With ink manuscript note on lower blank portion, “Dear Sir, The usual style of Transits sold to surveyors have Vertical Circle, with Level under Telescope, same as No. 12 in this list, price being $179 in Currency. Respy Chas G. Ewing June 3/74” [original emphasis]. Numbers 12 and 15 on the price list are highlighted by ink notation.

     In his circular letter, Ewing announces that he is the Gurleys’ sole agent for California, Oregon, Nevada, and the Territories, and that the prices of the instruments are being offered at “a great reduction on previous prices charged.” Payment is accepted, however, only in gold coin. An excellent example of a rare survival documenting equipment necessary to service the growing state and the demand for land. ($150-300)

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68. CARTARI, Vicenzo & Lorenzo Pignoria. Le vere e nove imagini de gli dei delli antichi....Padua: Pietro Paolo Tozzi,1615. [32], 1-576, [4], i-lxiii [1, blank] pp., wood-engraved allegorical vignette on title, numerous wood-engraved text illustrations, most within typographical borders (ancient gods, including New World), 2 folded wood-engraved plates (idol; astrological), engraved head- and tail-pieces, initial letters. Total: 144 full-page engravings of gods and heroes of Graeco-Roman mythology, 46 large text illustrations, and 30 full-page engravings of the gods of China, India, Middle America, and Egypt by Filippo Ferroverde. 4to, original Italian burgundy and ivory patterned paper over pasteboards with original dark green calf gilt-lettered spine label. Fragile binding slightly rubbed, upper hinge starting. Title page with several ink stains, light water stain in lower margin, pp. 543/544 torn slightly into text, and a few other minor flaws. Overall a very good copy with strong impressions of the engravings and in original binding.

     First edition with the New World material (first edition, Venice, 1556, with no illustrations. The work has been described as the “first encyclopedia of Classical iconography” (Arntzen & Rainwater, Guide to the Literature of Art History, Chicago, 1980). Subsequent editions were illustrated, but completely new images first appeared in this 1615 edition. Bibliotheca Mejicana 325. Glass No. 270 (Codex Ríos), pp. 186-187, Handbook of Middle American Indians, Vol. 14, Part 3. Praz, p. 298. Sabin 11104. Mexican deities discussed and illustrated include Ometeotl, Tzitzimitl, and others. Cartari’s handbook of deities is a key work in the history of symbolism in the Renaissance and the classic manual for artists depicting attributes of the deities in the seventeenth century. The present edition was edited by Lorenzo Pignoria, a Paduan intellectual, priest, antiquarian, and precocious archaeologist who appended a short discourse on the gods of the East and West Indies. ($1,000-2,000)

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69. CASAS, Bartolomé de las. Narratio Regionvm Indicarvm per Hispanos Qvosdam devastarum verissimi.... [Frankfurt: De Bry & Sauer, 1598]. [8], 1-141 [3, blank] pp. (including copper-engraved pictorial title page), a few woodcut initials and head pieces, 17 large text engravings plus one overlay (total 19 copper engravings) of gruesome Spanish atrocities, executed by Theodor De Bry. 4to, original full vellum over boards, title in sepia ink on spine. Binding soiled and slightly warped, front hinge cracked, front free flyleaf with a few short tears (no losses). Title page with small hole at lower center, slightly chipped at upper right, and trimmed at right margin (slight loss to border and image); illustration on p. 10 with small hole; light to moderate water staining to a few pages at front (pp. 47-51) and to pages from 121 to end (mostly marginal). Overall a very good complete copy, with illustrations in strong impressions and the extra cancelled plate.

     First edition in Latin, first illustrated edition. A cornerstone work for any collection on the New World and Native American history. The first edition came out in Seville between 1552 and 1553 in a series of nine tracts. The present edition is a translation from the edition printed in Paris in 1579. JCB I (1, to 1599), p. 360. Church 320. European Americana 1598/20. Medina, BHA 383. Palau 46960. Sabin 11283: “This edition is much sought for, in consequence of the beauty of the first impressions of the plates.” Streeter Sale 30. Casas, Bishop of Chiapas (1474?-1566), made the first appeal for humane treatment of the natives of the New World in his series of tracts printed 1552-1553, the first printed works advocating abolition of slavery in America. One of the most remarkable and significant works ever written about America, the author gives an account of mistreatment and extermination of Native Americans in regions conquered by the Spanish. Casas’ tracts resulted in the “Black Legend” of Spanish misrule in America and led to the New Laws of the Indies. This compilation in the lingua franca of the time cemented “la leyenda negra” in a way Casas’ original writings never could. The author’s family was among the earliest European settlers in America, and Casas, who became known as “The Protector of the Indians,” was the first Catholic priest ordained in America. He came to Cuba in 1502 and spent most of his time in the Caribbean and Mexico until his final return to Spain in 1547. In 1552 he launched a series of tracts which had been previously banned from publication. ($7,500-15,000)

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70. CASAS, Bartolomé de las. Breve relación de la destrucción de las Indias Occidentales.... [Mexico, 1822]. [2], [1-2] 3-164 pp., copper-engraved illustrated title by Luís Montes de Oca (Mexican eagle on cactus at lower center; two female figures holding vases of flowers intertwining to create border). 12mo, contemporary brown suede. Binding rubbed, spine and extremities chipped. Interior very good, except for occasional light staining and browning, engraving excellent and strong, with old sepia ink stamp at bottom of José e Hijos. Very rare.

     First Mexican edition, same text as the first U.S. edition (Philadelphia 1821 edition; Sabin 11236), but reset and with added engraved title, errors in text corrected, etc. Palau 46951 bis. Sabin 39114. Sabin notes that the work was produced under the supervision of Dr. José Servando Teresa de Mier Noriega y Guerra. The present work is one of the most interesting editions of Casas’ writings. After Mier escaped Spanish authorities at Havana, he made his way to Philadelphia, then a hotbed of Latin American revolutionary activity, and published this little book containing Casas’ first tract, delivered in 1542 to the King and his councils. It is divided into nineteen articles, each portraying in detail the condition of the Indians in the Spanish American provinces, including Cuba, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Venezuela, Florida, New Spain, etc.      This edition is set against the background of the wars of independence then raging against Spain in Mexico, Central, and South America. Mier takes up Casas’ mantra, accusing the Spaniards of again resorting to cruelties and atrocities in the present wars, just as they did in La Conquista. ($750-1,500)

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71. [CASTAÑO, Bartolomé]. CATHOLIC CHURCH. CATECHISM. Doctrina Pequeña en Mexicano. Tepiton Teotlatolli. Mexico: Imprenta del ciudadano Alejandro Valdés, 1831. 15 [1, blank] pp. in Nahuatl, uncut sheet of unwatermarked, untrimmed laid paper. Two printings of the same setting of type on a full sheet, printed on both sides and meant to be divided and folded in half sheets. Horizontal fold with a few minor holes (well away from text), overall a very fine copy of an extremely rare survival.

First edition. Bibliografía Mesoamericana, p. 94. León Portilla, Tepuztlahcuilolli 890: “Un curioso librito.” Palau 74740. Pilling 1056: “Not seen. Title communicated by Sr. Icazbalceta.” Sabin 20420. This unusual imprint in its earliest pre-publication format contains questions and answers about the Trinity and other Church mysteries written in Nahuatl, the Aztec language spoken throughout central Mexico before the Spanish conquest. The catechism was originally written in Spanish by Bartolomé Castaño (1601-1672?) and frequently translated into various Native languages, as is the case here. Castaño, a native of Portugal, spent years in the Jesuit missions of Sinaloa and Sonora after arriving in Mexico. He used the unusual method of music to interest his converts and spoke six Native languages. ($1,000-2,000)

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México y sus alrededores

“The most important work illustrating Mexico City in the nineteenth century” (Mathes)

An introductory essay which provides the general context of the development of this remarkable book and presents detailed examples from seven individual albums of the evolution of specific plates.

72. CASTRO, Casimiro, et al. México y sus alrededores.... Mexico: Decaen, 1855-1856. [2], [1-3] 4-32 pp. (printed in double columns, 29 lithograph plates: pictorial title, pictorial half title, and 27 plates with captions in English, French, and Spanish (3 full-color, remainder on tinted grounds, some of which are duo-tone), 3 with 2 images on one sheet; total: 32 images on 29 leaves. Folio, contemporary three-quarter tan sheep over mottled boards, red leather spine label. Binding worn and scuffed, label rubbed with loss, spine chipped at bottom, hinges barely starting (but strong). Other than occasional mild foxing and staining to plates (mostly confined to blank margins), fine. This copy has one added untitled plate not associated with Castro’s album, but rather with Michaud y Thomas’ Album pintoresco de la República Mexicana [ca. 1850]. Castro 1. ($4,000-8,000)

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73. CASTRO, Casimiro, et al. México y sus alrededores.... Mexico: Decaen, 1855-1856. [2], [1-3] 4-37 [1, blank] pp. (printed in double columns), 38 lithograph plates: pictorial title, pictorial half title, and 36 plates with captions in English, French and Spanish (3 full-color, remainder on tinted grounds, some of which are duo-tone), 4 with 2 images on one sheet; total: 42 images on 38 leaves plus lithograph map. Folio, contemporary dark green calf over black and green mottled boards, spine gilt-lettered and gilt-ruled (expertly re-backed, original spine preserved, a skillful job, with matching gilt tooling added at extremities, board coloring refurbished, original endpapers retained). Hinges starting but firmly attached. Text very good except for some very mild browning and a few leaves (16/17 & 28/29) lightly stained at edge (just touching text). La Glorieta plate with old tape repair on lower right verso consolidating a tear, Cathedral of Mexico plate missing upper right corner (supplied in pen facsimile) and with a repaired tear at lower left extending into English caption (no loss), otherwise plates are very fine except for occasional faint marginal staining and very mild foxing. Map very good except lower margin is slightly stained. Nine new plates were added to this album. Castro 2. ($6,000-12,000)

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74. CASTRO, Casimiro, et al. México y sus alrededores.... Mexico: Decaen, 1855-1856. [2], [1-3] 4-37 [1, blank] pp. (printed in double columns), 42 lithograph plates: pictorial title (dated 1855 y 1857) and 41 plates with captions in English, Spanish, and French (23 full-color; remainder on tinted grounds), 4 with 2 images on one sheet; total: 46 images on 42 leaves). Folio, publisher’s original black boards, gilt lettered on upper cover: Mexico y sus alrededores 1862, brown sheep spine. Fragile boards worn, rubbed, and with a few minor losses at edges (particularly the lower cover), hinges strengthened with dark brown cloth. Text clean and fine. Plates with moderate to heavy foxing (fortunately confined to versos of plates and margins; none affecting images proper). Occasional neat repairs to short marginal tears. Scattered minor worming affecting blank margins of several plates; minute loss of sky at top right of Plate [28], final plate with 7 cm tear into image, repaired and infilled). A good copy of an interesting transitional version of the Castro album, half the images on tinted grounds and the other half in color.

     Castro 3. This transitional version of the Castro album has the first appearance in our series of albums of the bird’s-eye view of Veracruz (Veracruz, Tomado en Globo) and the first mention to Debray. This album adds four additional plates, the most dramatic of which is Manuel Serrano’s A Stage Coach Attacked. ($6,000-10,000)

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75. CASTRO, Casimiro, et al. Mexico y sus alrededores.... Mexico: Decaen, 1863-1864. 42 lithograph plates: pictorial title and 41 plates with captions in English, Spanish, and French (9 full-color, remainder on tinted grounds, some duotone), 4 plates with 2 images on one sheet: total: 46 images on 42 leaves, plus folded lithograph map. Folio, publisher’s original dark green cloth gilt-lettered on upper cover: Mexico y sus alrededores 1866. Binding expertly recased, spine lightly chipped at extremities and corner slightly bumped, binding with a few light stains. All plates and map professionally washed and deacidified.

     Castro 4. Three new images appear in this album: [5, Gendarmerie Mexicaine], [34, Indiens Kikapoos, Présentés á S.M. Maximilien 1t.], and [41, Siege of Puebla]. Plate 5 is Frenchman Jean Adolphe Beaucé’s depiction of the French imperial military police in Mexico. Plate 34 shows members of the Kickapoo tribe and runaway slaves being presented at Maximilian’s court and is an unusual plate in technique as well as a very handsome exotic Borderlands and Texas subject. Plate 41 depicts the 1863 Siege of Puebla and likely is the rarest view from the Castro albums. ($10,000-15,000)

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76. CASTRO, Casimiro, et al. México y sus alrededores...Seconde édition, augmentée. Mexico: Decaen, 1864. [4], [1] 2-67 [3],[i] ii-v [1, verso blank] pp. (printed in double columns, text in Spanish and French), 46 lithograph plates: full-color pictorial title on gilt ground, and 44 plates with captions in English, Spanish, and French (41 full-color, remainder on tinted grounds, some of which are duo-tone), 4 with 2 images on one sheet; total: 50 images on 46 leaves, plus two lithograph maps. Folio, new antique style three-quarter maroon calf and contemporary burgundy and brown mottled paper over new boards (original gilt-lettered spine label retained), spine with raised bands, new endpapers. Text with uniform browning and mild to moderate foxing to title and half-title. Some plates foxed, but mostly confined to margins. Some of the plates have a tiny pinhole at upper right blank corner of image (a pin was often used during the process of making the image to insure stability and maintain perfect registration of colors). This might seem a fault to some eyes, but we believe these unobtrusive pinholes elucidate the methods used for obtaining correct color registration when the prints were created. Castro 5. ($8,000-12,000)

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77. CASTRO, Castro, et al. México y sus alrededores...bajo la direccion de V. Debray...Nueva edicion aumentada.... Mexico: Debray, 1869. [4], [1] 2-67 [3], [i] ii-v [1, verso blank] pp. (printed in double columns, text in Spanish and French), 48 lithograph plates: full-color pictorial title on gilt background and 47 plates with captions in English, Spanish, and French (46 full color—including pictorial title on gilt ground—two uncolored), 4 with 2 images on one sheet; total: 52 images on 48 leaves, plus 2 lithograph folded maps. Folio, publisher’s original brown pebble cloth, gilt-lettered on upper cover: Mexico y sus alrededores 1870, lower cover gilt-stamped ornament with brown cloth onlay matching binding, original pale yellow clay-coated endpapers. Text with uniform mild browning and foxing, title and half-title with light marginal chipping (no losses), half-title backed. Some plates foxed, especially in blank margins. Overall a good copy.

     Castro 6. This album and the one following each have 48 images but here two of the early images are retained: Plate [2, The City of Mexico taken from a Balloon] and Plate [31, View of the Valley of Mexico, Taken from the heights of Chapultepec]. The only new plate in this album is [24, Cathedral of Mexico], which omits the stage coach and adds a group of French Zouaves. ($7,500-15,000)

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78. CASTRO, Casimiro, et al. México y sus alrededores...Nueva edicion aumentada.... Mexico: Debray, 1869. [4], [1] 2-67 [3], [i] ii-v [1, verso blank] pp. (printed in double columns, text in Spanish and French), 48 lithograph plates: full-color pictorial title on gilt background and 47 plates with captions in English, Spanish, and French (46 full color—including pictorial title on gilt ground—two uncolored), 4 with 2 images on one sheet; total: 52 images on 48 leaves, plus 2 lithograph folded maps. Folio, publisher’s original dark green pebble cloth, gilt-lettered on upper cover: Mexico y sus alrededores 1874, original ivory silk moiré endpapers, original tissue guards. Light binding wear most noticeable at extremities, head and tail of spine lightly chipped. Hinges starting, but holding firmly. Text with uniform mild browning, title and half-title moderately foxed. Some plates heavily to moderately foxed, especially in blank margins. Lower gutter margin lightly water-stained at lower blank corner. Overall a good copy. Castro 7. ($8,000-16,000)

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79. CASTRO, Casimiro (artist), Antonio García Cubas (author), et al. [Part 1: Double title page and text in Spanish and English] Album del Ferrocarril Mexicano... Album of the Mexican Railway. [Part 2: French title page and text in French] Album du Chemin de Fer Mexican. Mexico: Victor Debray, 1877. 25 chromolithograph plates (including illustrated title) after original artwork by Castro, plus double-page bird’s-eye view map showing the route between Veracruz and Mexico City. Oblong folio, original red cloth lettered in ebony black and gold. One short, clean tear to front free endpaper, very mild browning to printed title, text very fine. One tissue guard missing, two appear to be modern replacements, and the remainder are browned and a few are torn. A few mild foxmarks to the margins of one plate only, and two plates with very light adhensions marks at lower left corner (less than an inch square), otherwise the plates are exceptionally fine, with vibrant colors and rich patina. Overall, an exceptionally fine, brilliant copy, the plates about perfect and the binding pristine. One would be challenged to find a better copy.

     First edition. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 18, 39 & 42 (illustrating 3 plates); p. 41: “Some of the finest examples of the lithographer’s art during the latter part of the century... Chromolithography by Debray y Cía of the work of Casimiro Castro and A. Sigogne illustrated Antonio García Cubas’ extraordinary Album del Ferrocarril Mexicano”; p. 63 (Debray). Palau 98733. The color plates include spectacular views of Veracruz, Orizaba, Puebla, villages, haciendas, stations, locomotives, freight and passenger trains, bridges, tunnels, and a variety of landscapes in Mexico. This glorious plate book, published the same year Porfirio Díaz came to power, captures a pivotal moment in Mexican history, with its clashing images of powerful machines intruding into pristine, picturesque landscapes, heralding the evolution of the country from a rural-agrarian world of “many Mexicos” to a unified modern technological society. ($6,000-12,000)

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80. CATHERWOOD, Frederick. Views of Ancient Monuments in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatan. London, 1844. [2], [1] 2-24 pp., decorated lithograph title by Owen Jones, 25 lithograph plates with original color tinting, map. Folio, publisher’s original green morocco over green moiré cloth, title in gilt on spine and upper cover, original pale yellow coated endpapers. Minor shelf wear to text and one snag to cloth on upper cover (no loss, neatly pasted down). Map and most of plates detached from binding, as usual. This copy is as fine a copy as one might expect to acquire, untrimmed, in original binding, the plates exceptionally fresh and bright, tissue guards present.

     First edition, limited edition (300 copies), tinted issue. Hill II:263. Palau 50290. Sabin 11520. Tooley, English Books with Coloured Plates 1790-1860 133. Victor W. Von Hagen, Search for the Maya: The Story of Stephens and Catherwood (Westmead: Saxon House, 1973, pp. 82-77): “In the whole range of literature on the Maya there has never appeared a more magnificent work.” ($25,000-50,000)

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81. CATHOLIC CHURCH. CATECHISM. [First title page] Catecismo en idioma Mixteco, segun se habla en los curatos de la Misteca Baja.... [Second title] Catecismo en el idioma Mixteco, Montañez, para el uso de los curatos que van señalados en la lista que se inserta.... [Third title] Manual en lengua Mixteca de ambos dialectos Bajo y Montañez. Puebla: Imprenta del Hospital de San Pedro, 1837. [14] 1-21 [1, blank] + [4], 1-20 + [1-2] 3-75, [2] pp. (mostly printed in double and triple column). 8vo, unbound, stitching perished. First title page and final page somewhat chipped and stained (no losses to text), small repair to pp. 3-4 of third part, but otherwise a very good copy.

     Second edition of three works issued together and usually considered as a single publication. According to a note on p. [13] of the first part, the first edition of this work was in 1834; no copies of it are known, however. Of the copies of the present edition listed on OCLC, many of them are microforms, ghosts, or records for only part of the publication. A note on the last page of the second work remarks that the third work will be issued separately for the sake of convenience. Palau 50220. Pilling 676, 677 & 678. Sabin 49770 & 49771. Ugarte 97, 98 & 99. “These three works, although printed separately, form in reality but one, as is shown by the prologue of the first, and from the table of errata which is common to the three. The authors promise an Arte and Vocabulario which I think has not been published. Mention is made in this work of another Catecismo Mixteco printed in 1834 by order of the same bishop. I have not seen it.—Icazbalceta” (quoted in Pilling). According to the statement, the 1834 edition was riddled with errors. ($750-1,500)

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82. CATHOLIC CHURCH. MISSAL (Mozarabic). Missa Gothica seù Mozarabica.... Puebla de los Angeles: Typis Seminarii Palafoxiani Anno Domini, 1770. 2 parts in one volume, titles and majority of text printed in red and black, second part printed in double columns, 3 full-page copper-engraved plates pasted onto blank pages), half-page engraving after title, 3 smaller text engravings of music, head- and tail-pieces and initials, occasional type ornamentation. Small folio, original Mexican binding in full chestnut calf gilt, a.e.g. Except for a bit of light marginal staining to edges of title (from binding), a bright, beautiful example in a handsome binding. The Salvá copy, with his red morocco gilt book labels on front and rear pastedowns.

     First edition of a monument of colonial Mexican book printing and engraving. Bibliotheca Mejicana 1146: “This edition presents a pure text of the most ancient service book extant.” Jones, Adventures in Americana 179. Medina, Puebla de los Angeles 864. Palau 172923. Riaño, Critical & Bibliographical Notes on Early Spanish Music, pp. 138-141. Sabin 49459. Salvá 3948: “Edición muy rara.” Mathes describes Nava as “extraordinary” (La Ilustración en México colonial, p. 125) and goes on to say (pp. 127-128): “In Puebla, one of the most talented artists and skilled engravers of his time in the Old World and the New, José de Nava, initiated his career. Nava, born about 1735, created and produced plates, most of which were signed, with unusual rapidity and highest quality and workmanship during a long career ended by his death in Puebla on 12 May 1817.... What could well be considered the pinnacle of his career, however, was reached in 1770 with extraordinarily beautiful arms of Cardinal Francisco Ximínez de Cisneros, an allegory of the burning of books by Moslems, mounted horsemen in Saracen garb, a magnificent Crucifixion, and music for the Missa gothica seú mozarabica, et officium itidem gothicum published by the archbishop of Mexico, Francisco Antonio Lorenzana, and printed by the Seminario Palafoxiano.” ($10,000-20,000)

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83. CATHOLIC CHURCH. PROVINCE OF MEXICO CITY (MEXICO). CONCILIO PROVINCIAL. LORENZANA Y BUITRÓN, Francisco Antonio de & Alonso de Montúfar. Concilios provinciales primero, y segundo, celebrados en la muy noble, y muy leal ciudad de México.... Mexico: Hogal, 1769. [10], 1-34, [2, section title], 35-38, 41-184, [2, section title], 185-396, [12, chapter indices] pp., 8 copper-engraved text illustrations by Villavicencio. Folio, contemporary vellum. Lower joint neatly strengthened. Except for a few lightly scattered fox marks and minor worming in gutter, a fine copy.

     First collected edition of the first and second provincial councils; first printing of the second provincial council. The work is preceded by Lorenzana’s brief history of the Mexican councils and their objectives. JCB III (1, 1700-1771) #1686. Handbook of Middle American Indians, Vol. 13, Part 2, p. 89 (see also pp. 36, 92, 377-380): “Of great importance for the official attitude toward problems involving the Indian.” Medina, México 5299. Palau 142387: “Bella edición.” Sabin 42063. Wilgus, pp. 240-241. Mathes, La Ilustración in Colonial Mexico (Register 5299): “A major engraver, Manuel de Villavicencio [created] an allegory of Faith and allegorical vignettes in Francisco Antonio Lorenzana, Concilios Provinciales by José Antonio de Hogal, 1769.” ($750-1,500)

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84. [CENSORSHIP]. N (pseudonym). La Verdad aunque amargue, es muchas veces el objeto precioso de la libertad de imprenta. [Signed in print “N” at end, and dated at Mexico City, October 28, 1820].[Colophon] Mexico: En la oficina de D. Alejandro Valdés, 1820. 8 pp. 8vo, unbound sheets, as issued. Minor smudges and some light staining, otherwise fine. Ephemeral.

     First printing of a defense of imprisoned liberal pamphleteer Rafael Dávila under the laws of freedom of the press and censorship. Garritz, Impresos Novohispanos, 1808-1821 #3871. Medina, México 11717. Palau 359296. Sabin 98934. Steele, Independent Mexico: A Collection of Mexican Pamphlets in the Bodleian Library, p. 59, 75. Sutro, p. 145. The Napoleonic invasion of Spain led to the establishment of freedom of the press under the Constitution of 1812. Repudiated by Ferdinand VII in 1814, but revived through the revolt of Rafael del Riego y Nuñez in 1820, the active publication of political tracts reopened in Mexico in that year. Richard H. Dillon, “Sutro Library’s Resources in Latin Americana” in The Hispanic American Historical Review, Vol. 45, No. 2, May, 1965, pp. 270-271: “Pamphlets constitute the major source of fresh new material on nineteenth-century and earlier Mexico. They are little exploited or even explored.... Yet, one can find no surer guide to the troublous times of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Mexico than these booklets. Written in the heat of argument, of battle, of revolution, they bring to life a time and place removed from us by hundreds of miles and years.” ($100-200)

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85. CERVANTES SAAVEDRA, Miguel de. El Ingenioso Hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha.... Mexico: Ignacio Cumplido, 1842. Vol. I: [1] 2-24, [i-v] vi-xvi, [1] 2-434 pp., 68 plates, including frontispiece; Vol. II: [i-iii] iv-vii [1, blank], [1] 2-473 [1, blank] pp., 60 plates, including frontispiece and colored half-title, one folded map with key. Total: 128 lithograph plates (including three-color chromolithograph, Vol. 2 half-title on heavy paper) by Massé, Decaen, Iriarte, and Heredia, plus, ornate head- and tailpieces, occasional text engravings. 8vo, contemporary full Mexican tan mottled calf, spines extra gilt, covers with gilt-rolled borders. Rebacked, original spines preserved, original spines worn and with some voids, new endpapers, worn and with some staining and peeling, corners bumped; Occasional mild foxing to text and plates, some leaves and a few plates repaired on versos or with short tears to blank margins, in Vol. 1 frontispiece and first few leaves moderately chipped, map with fold repairs and minor fold losses, interior generally fine, plates mostly very fine. Contemporary ink inscription to both volumes. Complete copies are rare in commerce.

     First literary work in Mexico illustrated with lithographs. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 21: “A magnificent edition...generously illustrated with beautiful lithographs by Heredia and Hesiquio Iriarte.” Palau 52078: “Esta edición fué inspirada en la de B. Bergnes [y] representa un esfuerzo editorial muy estimable para los coleccionistas.” Porrúa 6311: “La composición tipográfica y las bellas litografías que adornan esta edición del Quijote, la convertien en una de las mejores impresiones de Ignacio Cumplido y en valiosa joya de la tipografía mexicana del Siglo XIX.” Toussaint, La Litografía en México, p. xvii. ($750-1,000)

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86. [CHAMP D’ASILE]. CHASSELAT [Charles Abraham] (artist) & [Claude Joseph] Pomel (engraver). Champ d’Asile. [Paris, 1818]. Aquatint engraving, neat line to neat line: 19 x 27.5 cm; image area: 25 x 27.5 cm; overall size 28 x 32 cm. Small paper flaw in lower right blank margin not affecting image, left margin somewhat irregular, slightly browned, washed and stabilized. Rare.

     First edition. Bibliographie de la France, ou Journal Général de l’Imprimerie et de la Librairie, p. 189, #204.De Vinck, Inventaire Analytique 10269. Kelsey, Engraved Prints of Texas, 1554-1900 1.11. This rare Texas scene of prosperity and industry fancifully illustrating the French colony of Champ d’Asile on the Trinity River in Texas was produced in Paris by Romantic propagandists promoting the doomed colony. Ron Tyler remarks that the Champ d’Asile images are “a splendid representation of the Romanticism of the era and stimulated the earliest, and in many ways, the best and most fascinating” images of early Texas. ($750-1,500)

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87. CHAPPE D’AUTEROCHE, Jean. Voyage en Californie pour l’observation du passage de Vénus sur le disque du soleil, le 3 Juin 1769. Paris, 1772. 3 copper-engraved plates, folded letterpress scientific table, copper-engraved folded map: Plan de la Ville de Mexico. 4to, contemporary marbled boards expertly rebacked at an early date with sympathetic calf. Except for scattered minor marginal foxing, fine, plates and map excellent. Old ink library stamps of Library of the London Clockmakers Company on title verso, versos of plates, and a few pages of text.

     First edition of one of the earliest scientific expeditions to California. Barrett, p. 508. Cowan I, p. 46. Cowan II, p. 114. Hill I, pp. 49-50. Hill, II:278. Howes C299. Mathes, California Colonial Bibliography 61. Palau 67059. Sabin 12003. Streeter Sale 2443. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 158a. Streeter Sale 2443. ($2,000-4,000)

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88. CHAPPE D’AUTEROCHE, Jean. A Voyage to California, to Observe the Transit of Venus.... London, 1778. Folded copper-engraved map: Plan of the City of Mexico. 8vo, modern full speckled calf antique. Fine condition, map excellent.

   First English edition (first edition, Paris, 1772, see preceding entry). Barrett 509. Cowan II, p. 114. Hill II:279. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 158a. See Dictionary of Scientific Biography (III, pp. 197-198): “The twin transits of Venus were the capstone of eighteenth-century observational activity, and Chappe shared in these great events, in the former through his participation in a Siberian winter expedition in 1761 and the latter through his participation to Southern California to observe the transit of Venus in 1769.” ($1,000-2,000)

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89. CHARNAY, [Claude-Joseph] Désiré. Les Anciennes villes du nouveau monde. Voyages d’explorations au Mexique et dans l’Amérique Centrale. Paris, 1885. Over 200 engravings, including frontispiece portrait, many from Charnay’s photographs, some full-page (subjects include archaeology, architecture, artifacts, costume groups, views, natives, etc.), 19 maps and plans. Folio, original grey printed wrappers bound in modern black French morocco over marbled boards. About perfect condition of this handsome publication.

     First edition of an early work to photograph Mesoamerican archaeology. Griffin 1157n. Palau 67184. ($600-1,200)

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90.  CHAVANNES DE LA GIRAUDIÈRE, Hippolyte de. Les Petits Voyageurs en Californie. Tours: Ad Mame et Cie, 1853. [2], [1] 2-188 pp., 8 chromolithograph plates. 8vo, (20 x 13 cm) original cream pictorial boards printed in blue, green, red, black, and gold, (upper board shows sea faring scene with ship under sail; lower board is an abstract design, a.e.g. Boards slightly soiled and bumped, but interior and plates very fine.

     First edition. Cowan II, p. 837. Howell 50, California 360. Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 125. Sabin 12350. This optimistic juvenile, which went through several editions, recounts the voyage of M. Canton and his two sons from France to California by way of New York and Panama. Canton, a Paris furniture maker, falls on hard times when his business fails and his wife dies, leaving him with his sons Vincent, age 14, and Arthur, age 12. Deciding to seek his fortune in California, Canton takes his sons on what proves to be a fairly idyllic trip to riches. As Arthur remarks: “Why not emigrate? We would be so strong the three of us that nothing could beat us down or discourage us.” And so it went. Among the notable plates are a charming view of San Francisco and another showing the trio calmly killing a grizzly, an allegory for the entire adventure. One plate is an early illustration of the giant redwoods (clearly inspired by a similar one in Ferry). ($200-400)

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91.  CHERRY, Edgar & Sons (publishers). Redwood and Lumbering in California Forests. With Illustrations. San Francisco: Edgar Cherry & Co., Publishers, 1884. [2], [i] ii, [3] 4-107 [1, blank] pp., 24 mounted albumen prints within purple border. 4to, original red cloth gilt-lettered on upper cover. Rebacked preserving original spine, corners repaired. Interior and images very fine. Overall, very good.

     First edition. Cowan I, p. 186. Cowan II, p. 525. Fritz, California Coast Redwood 1209. Howell 50, California 361: “Of the copies known to us, each is unique—the photographs vary in their order and in the views presented.... A rare work, important for the transition in media of book illustration.” Kurutz, California Books Illustrated with Original Photographs 1856-1890 #7. Miles & Reese, Creating America 74. An important work that covers many of the technical, practical, and business matters associated with the logging industry, but nevertheless written for the layman and for those who wish a view book to preserve their memories of the vast California forests, albeit for those who might prefer their trees horizontal rather than vertical. The authors chose to illustrate this work with photographs because of their verisimilitude, which they consider superior to engraved illustrations produced “perhaps by enthused artists” and therefore perforce inaccurate in their portrayals. ($5,000-10,000)

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92. CHICKASAW NATION. GOVERNOR. JOHNSTON, Douglas Hancock Cooper (“Henry”). Executive Department. Chickasaw Nation. Tishomingo Indian Territory. September 5, 1899. Original typescript, signed by Governor D.H. Johnston, of his address to the Chickasaw legislature. Tishomingo, 1899. 6 leaves with text on rectos. Folio. Creased where formerly folded, light wrinkling, two small stab holes in upper left blank margin where pin was removed. Docketed on verso in purple pencil “Message 1899.” Overall, a fine copy of a very rare survival and a rare original signature.

     Johnston speaks before a rapidly changing backdrop. Both the Curtis Act and Atoka Agreement called for dismembering and ultimately abolishing tribal governments, a policy that Johnston vigorously opposed and actively fought. He also addresses questions of citizenship that had to be settled by lawsuits as ramifications of the Dawes Act, the commissioners of which allowed large numbers of fraudulent claims. He closes his address with a sentiment no doubt felt by many to this day, “Let your session be as brief as possible, consistent with the work before you” (p. 6). Johnston was twice elected governor of the Chickasaw Nation and was influential during a tumultuous time in Chickasaw history. ($1,000-2,000)

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93. CHIHUAHUA. Memoria presentada al honorable Congreso segundo constitucional de Chihuahua por el Secretario del Despacho de Gobierno sobre el estado de la administracion publica. [Chihuahua]: Imprenta del supremo gobierno del estado á cargo de Jose Sabino Cano, 1829.  [2], [1] 2-32 pp., 5 folding tables. Folio, printed self wrappers, title within elaborate grape and grapevine typographical border, original stitching. Very fine. Unrecorded Borderlands imprint.

     First edition. No other copies located. An interesting report that reviews all the different issues surrounding the administration of a Mexican borderland state. Among topics covered are police forces (inadequate), education, Native American raids, hospitals, education, vaccination, expedition to establish boundaries and create a map, etc. Printing was established in Chihuahua in 1824, but the discussion herein of printing notes that the press is due to receive a major upgrade of equipment (pp. 21-22). Interestingly, this item makes it obvious that the press office is well-equipped and the operators are not amateurs. ($400-600)

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94. CHIHUAHUA. Memoria sobre la Administracion Pública del Estado de Chihuahua. Chihuahua: Imprenta del Gobierno dirijida por Domingo Lazo, 1857. [18] pp., 1 folded table, title within decorative typographic border. Folio. Disbound, with evidence of former binding along left edge, title page and some leaves trimmed close on right side with slight loss of border and letters, some leaves becoming loose, folded table has one contemporary ink correction. Overall, very good. A very rare survival.

     First edition. Not in Palau and other standard sources. No copies located on OCLC. This imprint is one of a series of annual reports that documents the continued progress and problems with this borderland state, its neighbors, and its finances. Escudero mentions the importance of maintaining El Paso del Norte as a buffer against the U.S. Although the populace enjoys relative peace and quiet, the constant and brutal raids by Native Americans are disturbing the state greatly. ($200-400)

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95.  [CHORPENNING, JR., George]. A Brief History of the Mail Service, Settlement of the Country, and the Indian Depredations Committed upon the Mail Trains of George Chorpenning on the Several Routes between Salt Lake and California from May 1st, 1850, to July, 1860 [wrapper title]. N.p., n.d. [ca. 1871]. [1] 2-10 pp., folding lithograph map. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers, stitched. One very small chip to lower right corner of upper wrapper; another chip to outer margin of lower wrapper, a few scattered very small spots, but overall a fine copy, with a superb copy of the map. This imprint is rare in commerce; only a few copies were sold or offered in the past five decades.

     First edition. Holliday Sale 202: “George Chorpenning left Sacramento City, California, on May 1, 1851, in charge of the first United States mail that ever crossed the country between the States and the Pacific, and located a mail station, which was the first settlement in the territory now known as the state of Nevada, but which at that time was part of Utah territory. It was Chorpenning who projected and put into operation the first ‘Pony Express’ that ever crossed the country.” Jones, Adventures in Americana 284. Streeter Sale 3107: “This is the classic pamphlet on the overland mail from Salt Lake City to California in the eighteen-fifties. Chorpenning, as the contractor for the first United States mail route from Salt Lake City, carried the mail through under heart-rending difficulties only to have his contracts annulled. The annulment of the contract and Chorpenning’s subsequent attempts to get justice became a cause célèbre on which many pamphlets have been published. This map is unusual and of great interest.—TWS.” Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #1222 & V, p. 36: “Anyone interested in the history of the overland mail and express routes, or the overland trails generally, may study this map with profit.” (6,000-12,000)

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96. [CINCO DE MAYO]. CARRASCO, José (editor). 5 de mayo de 1862 periodico ilustrado.... [Mexico, 1898]. [4], [1-3] 4-17 [1, blank] pp., title within ornamental border 7 plates: lithograph half title (illustrated allegorical title of winged Victory distributing laurels above the battle scene at Puebla on May 5, 1862) plus 6 unattributed lithograph plates (life-size bust portraits: Zaragoza, Berriozabal, Díaz, Méndez, Negrete, and Cravioto); folded leaf at end with descriptive text (official report by Zaragoza, etc. originally printed at Puebla May 9, 1862) surrounding lithograph map: Plano Oficial de la Batalla que tuvo lugar el dia 5 de Mayo de 1862, en los suburbios de la Ciudad de Puebla, entre las fuerzas mexicanas y las francesas, que fueron rechazadas al emprender el asalto del cerro de Guadalupe (leaf measures approximately 44 x 65 cm; map measures 29.2 x 33.5 cm). Folio, original green lithograph and letterpress wrappers bound in later dark olive green gilt-lettered cloth. Wraps lightly faded around outer margins and on back wrap where formerly folded. Interior and plates very fine. OCLC locates 3 copies.

     First edition. Palau 45086. A handsome Cinco de Mayo tribute with excellent lithography, this rare work consists basically of biographies, poetry, other literary musings, and an elaborate folding battle plan with a detailed explanation, including a report by General Zaragoza. The date is observed in the U.S. as a celebration of Mexican heritage and pride. In the state of Puebla, the date is observed to commemorate the Mexican Army’s against-all-odds victory over French forces at the Battle of Puebla under the leadership of Texas-born General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín (see Handbook of Texas Online). ($500-1,000)

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97. [CIVIL WAR]. TERRY’S TEXAS RANGERS. Archive of manuscript and some printed materials relating to this famous Civil War Texas cavalry unit, covering their activities all through the war and their continued activities, such as reunions, after the conflict. Approximately 200 items, almost all in good condition. The material is descended in the family of Major Benjamin Francis Weems, the person who collected and preserved it, and is believed to be the largest and finest contemporary collection of Terry’s Texas Rangers materials in private hands. The collection comprises the following parts:

A.   Civil War materials, retained by Weems during the war as part of his duties as the unit’s adjutant general. Almost all are creased where formerly folded but in good condition, unless noted otherwise. Primarily orders, official communications, other army documents, and three volumes containing contemporary copies of correspondence and orders. (A few are later typescripts of originals.) Includes an extremely rare letter from Terry.

B.   Four contemporary images of Rangers’ commander John Wharton.

C.   Post-war activities. Reunion activities, late nineteenth to early twentieth centuries, consisting of programs, original correspondence related to the reunions, minute book documenting numerous reunions, and a large contemporary photograph of the 1913 reunion.

D.   General materials concerning various aspects of the Rangers and their history, including ALSs from various Rangers concerning their lives and materials related to the erection of both the John Wharton and the Terry’s Texas Rangers monuments.

E.   Revolver. 1851 Navy Colt .36 caliber revolver with engraved Texas Navy naval battle scene on cylinder. #7742 (all numbers match). This revolver was carried and used by Weems during his service with Terry’s Texas Rangers and shows signs of use and wear.

F.   Imprints. Several contemporary and later imprints relating to the Rangers and Texas history, including Leonidas Giles’ extremely rare 1911 Terry’s Texas Rangers, a basic Texas book. Other imprints of war date are also found elsewhere in the collection.

For a full accounting of the contents, see the extended description. ($200,000-300,000)

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98. CLARK, William. The Field Notes of Captain William Clark 1803-1805 edited with an introduction and Notes by Ernest Staples Osgood. New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 1964. [i-xii] xiii-xxxv [3], [1-2], 3-335 [1, blank] pp., portrait of Clark on title, collotype facsimiles of the complete collection of 67 field note documents with a few sketches and maps. Folio, publisher’s original black cloth over green cloth, spine lettered in gilt, facsimile of Clark’s signature on upper cover. Exceptionally fine in price-clipped d.j.

     First edition of the great explorer’s field notes during his epochal journey with Meriwether Lewis. Plains & Rockies IV:4 (note). Review by Dale L. Morgan in Minnesota History, Vol. 39, No. 4 (Winter, 1964), pp. 164-165: “The bulk of the volume is made up of Clark’s field notes written during the voyage to the Mandans, May to October, 1804, with a few scattered entries carrying the story on into the following April.” A necessary adjunct to the scholarship of Lewis and Clark’s American odyssey. ($100-200)

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99. CLAVIGERO, Francesco Saverio. Storia antica del Messico.... Cesena: Gregorio Biasini, 1780-1781. Vol. I: [i-ii] iii-vii [1], 1-303 [1, blank], 303-306 pp.; Vol. II: [1-2] 3-268, 273-276 pp. (pp. 269-272 in facsimile); Vol. III: [1-2], 3-260 pp.; Vol. IV: [1-2] 3-331 [1, colophon] pp. Total map & plate count: 2 folded copper-engraved maps; 20 plates (5 folded) of archaeology, religious rites, calendar, glyphs, artifacts, recreations, tortilla makers, types and costumes, natural history, portraits; 1 folded letterpress genealogical chart of Mexican kings. 4 vols., 4to, contemporary three-quarter vellum over contemporary Italian decorated paper, a few remains of original paper spine labels, edges tinted red. Except for shelf wear and very minor staining to fragile binding, fine, original condition.

     First edition of the first complete history of ancient Mexico (Ronan, p. 281), and the most complete edition of the work until modern times. Subsequent editions were bowdlerized due to Spanish authorities’ negative reaction to what they considered the author’s alleged hispanophobia and exaggeration of the value of Mexican culture to a point that Spain appeared to suffer by comparison. JCB III (1, 1700-1771) #2629. Glass, p. 585: “Major, late Enlightenment survey of pre-Hispanic Mexican Indian culture and history. A very influential work, which constituted the most ambitious treatment of its subject since Torquemada. Illustrations include details from such manuscripts as Codex Mendoza [and] Codex Cospi.” Griffin 1351n. Hill II #304. Palau 55479. Pilling 817. Sabin 13518. Stevens, Biblioteca Historica 377. Wilgus, pp. 236-237. Winsor II, p. 425. ($2,000-4,000)

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100. CLAVIGERO, Francesco Saverio. The History of Mexico. Collected from Spanish and Mexican Historians, from Manuscripts, and Ancient Paintings of the Indians. Illustrated by Charts, and Other Copper Plates.... Translated from the Original Italian, by Charles Cullen, Esq.... London: G.G.J. and J. Robinson, 1787. Vol. I: [2], [i-iii] iv-xxxii, [4], [1] 2-240, [2, letterpress genealogy chart of kings], 241-476 pp., frontispiece map (folded), 24 plates. Vol. II: [4], [1] 2-463 [1, blank] pp., frontispiece map, 1 plate. Total map and plate count: 2 copper-engraved folded maps, 25 copper-engraved plates. 2 vols., 4to, half antique-style russia over marbled boards, spine gilt-ruled and with raised bands, edges sprinkled (skillfully recased). Marbled paper chafed, else fine in a handsome binding.

     First edition in English. JCB III (2, 1772-1800) #3118. Field 1873. Palau 55485. Pilling 818. Sabin 13519. Streeter Sale I:194. This was the first history of ancient Mexico in English that presented a view of the indigenous Aztecs as sensitive and sympathetic to a degree previously unknown. See p. 61 of Cañizares-Esguerra’s How to Write the History of the New World. ($800-1,600)

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101. CLAVIGERO, Francesco Saverio. Historia antigua de Megico...traducida del Italiano por Jose Joaquin de Mora. London: R. Ackermann, Strand, y en su establecimiento en Megico: asimismo en Colombia, en Buenos Ayres, Chile, Peru, y Guatemala, 1826. Vol. I: [i-iii] iv-xxxi [1], [1] 2-432 pp., folded map, 19 plates (1 folded). Vol. II: [i-iii] iv, [1] 2-449 [1], [2, publisher’s ads] pp., folded map, 1 plate. Total map & plate count: 2 folded maps, 20 copper-engraved plates (1 folded). 2 vols., 8vo, contemporary three-quarter crimson sheep over marbled boards. Laid in this copy is a newspaper clipping and original program for the author’s reburial in Mexico City in August of 1970, referring to Clavigero as “a defender of ancient American culture against the criticism of those who did not understand it.” Slightly shelf worn, boards moderately rubbed, joints in Vol. I just starting, hinges of Vol. II cracked. Scattered mild foxing to text, occasional offsetting from plates or maps, overall a very good copy.

     First edition in Spanish (first edition, Cesena, Italy, 1780-1781; see preceding). Translated, edited, and reduced by José Joaquín Mora from the Italian original edition. Palau 55481. Pilling 822. Sabin 13520. Translator José Joaquín de Mora (1783-1964) was a bright light among the group of Spanish liberals who emigrated to England between 1814 and 1834. The choice of Clavigero’s work was a logical one for a liberal like Mora, who, like Clavigero, was imbued with the ideals of the Enlightenment. Subsequently, Mora participated in revolutionary movements in Buenos Aires, Chile, Peru, and Bolivia. ($1,000-2,000)

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102. CLAVIGERO, Francesco Saverio. Storia della California Opera postuma del Nob. Sig. Abate D. Francesco Saverio Clavigero. Tomoe Primo [-Secondo]. Venezia: Appresso Modesto Fenzo, 1789. 2 vols in 1. Vol. I: [1-2] 3-276, [2] pp.; Vol. II: [1-2] 3-212, [2] pp., typographical elements on titles, folded engraved map dated 1788 (based on Consag). 8vo, original pink pastepaper spine over plain tan pastepaper boards. Untrimmed. Except for mild corner bumping (heavier at lower back corner) and two short, clean marginal tears (no losses) in blank margins of map, a pristine, as-issued copy. With contemporary engraved bookplate of Giacomo Miezzi laid in. With the errata leaves at the end of each volume (often lacking). Beautifully printed. Pristine copy. One would be hard-pressed to find a more desirable copy.

     First edition of “one of the rarest primary sources on the history of Baja California” (Hill). Barrett 527. Burrus, Kino and the Cartography of Northwestern New Spain, p. 69. Cowan I, p. 49. Cowan II, p. 129. Graff 747: “Describes the peninsula, its natural history, resources, Indian tribes, and colonies from after its first explorations to the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1767. Calvigero was a teaching priest with a long experience in Mexico.” Hill I, pp. 54-55. Hill II:307. Howes C465. JCB III (2, 1772-1800) 2359. Leclerc 846. Mathes, California Colonial Bibliography 66. Palau 55491. Pilling 825. Sabin 13524. Streeter Sale 2451. Streit III:1113. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 716; Spanish Southwest 172.

     “The second published history of California, the Storia della California..., a fundamental volume of Californiana, did not appear in print in Spanish until 1852 as Historia de la Antigua o Baja California... (México, Juan R. Navarro)”——W. Michael Mathes. ($2,000-4,000)

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103. CODEX AUBIN. Histoire de la Nation Mexicaine depuis le départ d’Aztlan jusqu’à l’arrivée des Conquérants Espagnols (et au de là 1607). Manuscrit figuratif accompagné de texte en langue nahuatl ou Mexicaine suivi d’une traduction en français par Feu J[oseph] M[arius] A[lexis] Aubin. Reproduction du Codex de 1576 appartenant à la Collection de M.E. Eugène Goupil Ancienne Collection Aubin.... Paris: Ernest Leroux, 1893. [4], [i] ii-iii [1, blank], 3-63 [1, blank], pp., 158 numbered pages of hand-colored lithograph plates. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers, sewn. Very fine in cloth case.

     “Second edition of the hand-colored lithographs by Jules Desportes of Codex Aubin with added translation of the Nahuatl text by Aubin and introductory note by E. Boban” (Glass, p. 550). This edition was limited to 170 copies. Palau 19459. See also “Codex Aubin” in Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures. Codex Aubin is one of the few extant published pictorial chronicles relating Aztec history, beginning with their early migrations from Aztlan in 1168 and continuing to 1608. The timeline of the codex presents the transition of the Aztecs to submission to Spanish rule. The codex incorporates written European text in Nahuatl while preserving the main conventions of the pictographic chronotope. It is conjectured that Aztecs wrote this pictorial chronicle based on their collective memories, under Spanish supervision, around 1576 (the codex is also known as “The Manuscript of 1576”). The impact of the Aubin-Goupil collection on the field of Mesoamerican studies has been profound. ($750-1,500)

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104. [CODEX OSUNA]. Pintura del gobernador, alcaldes y regidores de México. Madrid, 1878. 40 leaves of hand-colored lithograph plates of facsimiles of the illustrated codex with Spanish & Nahuatl text. Folio, contemporary tree sheep. Binding worn.

     First printing, limited edition (#27 of 100 copies). Glass, p. 178 & 676: “Forms part of an inquiry into the conduct of the Indian and Spanish governments of Mexico City in 1565.” Codex Osuna includes the De Luna Expedition to Florida in 1561—one of the few Mesoamerican pictorial manuscripts to contain references to events relating to the history of the continental United States. ($1,000-2,000)

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105. COLTON, Calvin. A Lecture on the Railroad to the Pacific. Delivered August 12, 1850, at the Smithsonian Institute, Washington. At the Request of Numerous Members of Both Houses of Congress. New York: A.S. Barnes & Co., 1850. [1-3] 4-16 pp.8vo, new brown morocco over purple cloth. Other than minor browning, fine. Uncommon.

     First edition. Cowan 137. Sabin 14777. The author’s main thesis is that construction of a railroad to the Pacific will assist the spreading of the word of God, and he urges all clergymen to support the Pacific Railroad. The pamphlet came at a time when interest was high in the project, though usually the advocates were more interested in monetary returns. For more on author Calvin Colton (1795-1857), see DAB, Vol. II, pp. 320-321, where the present work is discussed: “In A Lecture on the Railroad to the Pacific (1850)...he advocated a transcontinental railroad on the religious ground that through it the human family, dispersed at the Tower of Babel, might be reunited.” ($150-300)

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106. [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER]. KELSEY, Albert. Program and Rules of the Second Competition for the Selection of an Architect for the Monumental Lighthouse, which the Nations of the World Will Erect in the Dominican Republic to the Memory of Christopher Columbus.... N.p.: The Pan-American Union, 1930. [1-2] 3-187 [1, blank] pp., 2 folded maps, profusely illustrated with designs and plans for the lighthouse, many in color. Folio, original blue cloth, lettered in gilt on upper cover and with embossed gold seal of the Union of American Republics. Exceptionally fine and fresh in original glassine wrapper, original pictorial box present (box worn and split with some missing pieces of edges of lid). Laid in are three related pieces of ephemera.

     First edition in English. The first plans for a memorial lighthouse and mausoleum for Columbus are presented in this publication, which records the outcome of an international competition to design the structure. Although not finished until 1992, the structure is the most prominent Columbus monument in existence. ($100-200)

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107. COMBIER, C[yprien]). Voyage au Golfe de Californie Grands courants de la mer. Paris: Arthus Bertrand, Éditeur, Libraire de la Société de Géographie, 21, rue Hautefeuille [verso of half title & colophon: Paris.—Imprimé par E. Thunot et Cie, rue Racine, 26], [1864]. [i-v] vi-xvi, [1] 2-544 pp., folded lithograph map with outline color showing the borderands with the Gadsden Purchase before and after. 8vo (23 x 14.7 cm), later dark blue morocco over blue and green marbled boards, original yellow printed wrappers bound in at rear. Wrappers professionally backed and slightly stained; scattered light to moderate foxing, some mild waterstaining to lower gutter. Overall a very good untrimmed copy, map fine.

     First edition of a thoughtful and enterprising voyage to Guaymas and Sonora. Barrett 555. Howell 50, California 3517: “Provides abundant information about the products, geology and geography of Sonora.” Monaghan 461. Munk (Alliot), p. 53. Palau 57920. Sabin 14925. Hill, pp. 59-60: “Forced into early retirement for health reasons, Combier set out to write an account of the voyages he had undertaken during the course of his business ventures in the New World.... Combier established himself primarily in Guaymas and Hermosillo and sailed between various Mexican ports such as Guaymas, Acapulco, Mazatlán, and Veracruz. He also visited Valparaiso, Chile, and the La Paz-Loreto environs in Baja California. His observations of the people and terrain of the areas visited were carefully noted and included in his account.” He expressed his admiration of Native Americans, whom he trusted and admired, commenting especially on “sa douceur, de sa fidélité et de son aptitude à la civilisation” (p. 251). ($200-400)

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108. [COMPANHIA GERAL DO GRÃO-PARÁ E MARANHÃO]. PORTUGAL. SOVEREIGNS (Jose I). [Text begins] Dom Joseph por graça de Deos Rey de Portugal...as verdadeiras causas com que desde o descobrimento do Grão Pará, e Maranhão até agora não só se não tem multiplicado, e civilizado os Indios daquelle Estado; desterrando-se delle a barbariadade, e o gentilismo, e propagando-se a douctrina Christãa.... Dated in type, Lisbon, June 6, 1755. [Lisbon? 1755]. 1-12 pp. Folio, left blank margin slightly chipped where removed, contemporary ink foliations in upper right corners, overall fine.

     First edition of a far-reaching law liberating the indigenous peoples in Brazil’s Amazon region. Gauz, Portuguese and Brazilian Books, 1755/22. Not in Borba de Moraes or Sabin. This law is an interesting example of the type affecting American indigenous populations and was very liberal for the time. The law was apparently meant to favor the Companhia Geral do Grão-Pará e Maranhão, which had been established in 1755 by the Marquis of Pombal as a monopolistic trading company, given commercial control of the northern region of Brazil, and was intended to produce cheap exported products for the metropole. The Company was expected to use slaves, which it imported in large numbers, and to have little use for impressed indigenous labor. See Mathias C. Kiemen’s article discussing the background and effects of this law: “The Indian Policy of Portugal in America, with Special Reference to the Old State of Maranhão,” The Americas, Vol. 5, No. 2 (October 1948), pp. 131-171 and Vol. 5, No. 4 (April 1949), pp. 439-461. The Pombaline Reforms, including the establishment of this company, were a series of reforms with the goal of making Portugal an economically self-sufficient and commercially strong nation, by expanding Brazilian territory, streamlining the administration of colonial Brazil, and reforming fiscal and economic matters. The Jesuits, who were specifically a target of this law, were finally officially ejected from Brazil in 1759 as part of this movement. ($300-600)

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109. [COOKBOOK]. EALES, Mary. The Compleat Confectioner: or, The Art of Candying and Preserving in its Utmost Perfection.... London: J. Brindley and R. Mountagu MDCCXXXIII. [10], [1] 2-100, [4, ads] pp. (95 misnumbered 65). 8vo, contemporary blue and red marbled wraps. Slightly cocked, scattered light to moderate foxing, mostly confined to margins. Overall, a very good copy.

     Later edition of a standard, popular cookbook first published in 1718 as Mrs. Mary Eales’s Receipts. This is the first edition with this title, although the publishers also issued an edition this same year with the original title. Cagle, A Matter of Taste (2d edition) 660. English Short Title Catalogue N27767. McLean, p. 40. Oxford, p 55. Simon, BG 541. The author is distinguished in English culinary literature as the first to publish a recipe for ice cream (pp. 92-93). As the title implies, everyone wanting to be “a good house-wife” could prepare such luxuries that were once the preserve of royalty. Also of interest is the inclusion of numerous recipes involving exotic fruits such as oranges and lemons, which would have had to have been imported or grown in expensive, climate-controlled orangeries that only the nobility could have afforded. Finally, some of the recipes are quite complicated, requiring days to prepare and specialized equipment. One suspects that the solitary, average housewife with four children lacked the time to undertake some of these recipes. ($400-800)

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110. COREAL, François. Voyages.... Amsterdam: J. Frederic Bernard, 1722. Vol. I: [1-2] 3-332, [4, table of contents, final verso blank], 4 plates (3 folded), 9 maps (7 folded); Vol. II: [2], 1-302, [2, table of contents], 3 plates (2 folded), 2 folded maps; Vol. III: [2], 1-278, [2, tables of contents] pp., titles printed in red and black. Total: 7 copper-engraved plates and 11 copper-engraved maps of America. 3 vols., 12mo, contemporary full polished calf, spine gilt, red and green spine labels, raised bands, marbled endpapers, a very good set. Maps and plates slightly browned but generally fine. This is apparently the first edition. This edition differs from others printed in 1722 in being in three volumes rather than two. Coreal’s book was published under six separate imprints in 1722, one in Amsterdam and five in Paris. If one judges by the title pages, the present edition is first. European Americana lists six editions in 1722, four of which are designated as being new editions, one of which is conjectured to be a possible reissue, and the present edition. Leclerc (Bibliotheca Americana, 1867:394) calls for 20 plates in the present edition, as opposed to the 15 plates in one of the Paris 1722 editions he lists (395). However, in the 1738 reissue (1266) , he calls for 18 plates, as in the present edition. Berger, Rio de Janeiro 72. Borba de Moraes (180n) erroneously contends that all the 1722 printings are identical, and the printing was likely shared by the various booksellers named on the title pages, but this is not the case because the present volume is in three volumes not two. Authorship has been questioned (cf. Nouvelle biog. générale Vol. 11, col. 807-809). European Americana 1722/50: “Purported Spanish original has not been traced. Includes descriptions of Central & South America. Raleigh’s work transl. from his The Discovery of...Guiana.” Palau 61956. Sabin 16781. Streit III:151. This collection of South American voyages is attributed to the mysterious François Coreal. Borba de Moraes states: “The question {of authenticity of authorship} was very thoroughly studied by Alfredo Carvalho in an article in O Estado de São Paulo of 31 August 1908, and in Aventuras e Aventureiros no Brasil.... There no longer appears to be any doubt as to the authenticity of Coreal’s book, and it is accepted merely as a compilation from other travel accounts.” The unattributed maps and plates include, inter alia, Havana, Valley of Mexico, Mexico, San Salvador, Darien, Rio de Janeiro, Peru, Brazil, the Amazon River, a mining scene, and a native watercraft. All are superbly executed and in dark, excellent impressions. ($1,500-3,000)

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111. CUEVAS AGUIRRE Y ESPINOSA, Joseph Francisco de. Extracto de los autos de diligencias, y reconocimientos de los rios, lagunas, vertientes, y desagues de la capital México, y su valle.... Mexico: Viuda de D. Joseph Bernardo de Hogal, 1748. Title printed in red and black within ornate typographical border, folding copper-engraved map of the watershed of the Valley of Mexico by Sigüenza y Góngora, printed in red. Folio, disbound. First leaf of text with small ink stamp. Occasional light foxing (mostly adjacent to map), a few lower corners at rear slightly dog-eared, last leaf slightly chipped and repaired at lower margin, not affecting text. Map with some foxing (mainly confined to verso) and two old repairs on verso to closed tears. Overall, fine condition of both book and map.

    First edition of one of the most interesting of all books on the city of Mexico and the valley in which it lies. JCB III (1, 1700-1771) #870. Mapoteca Colombiana (Méjico), p. 37, #24. Mathes, Illustration in Colonial Mexico 3887 & text commentary: “[In 1748] a major engraver, Antonio Onofre Moreno, Calle del Angel, began production. He executed an important lacustrian map of the Valley of Mexico based upon that of Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora.” Medina, México 3887. Palau 66220. Sabin 27848. Stevens, Historical Nuggets I:792: “This book is of the utmost typographical and historical importance.” Vindel, pp. 181-184. The book was printed by the widow of Hogal; the press produced its finest and most important books under her leadership. ($6,000-12,000)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

112. DAUBENY, Charles [Giles Bridle]. Sketch of the Geology of North America Being the Substance of a Memoir Read Before the Ashmolean Society Nov. 26, 1838. Oxford: The Ashmolean Society, 1839. [i-iii] iv-xviii, [1] 2-73 [1, blank] pp., chart, 1 folded lithograph map (Map of the United States and Canada; neat line to neat line: 16.9 x 22.6 cm; overall sheet size: 21.7 x 27.7 cm). 8vo, early three-quarter brown leather over marbled boards, marbled endpapers. Map backed and missing a small piece at top left; no loss of text or image. Map and title lightly stained, otherwise fine, with author’s presentation inscription. Scarce.

     First edition. British Museum Catalog, Natural History I, p. 424. Sabin 18661. Dictionary of Scientific Biography, Vol. III, pp. 585-586. Daubeny’s career illustrates the growing nineteenth-century involvement of Anglican clerics and the ancient universities in science, and the way that the biological and earth sciences were at the focus of attention. Daubeny’s introductory essay includes a discussion of the United States, its constitution, populace, and the scientific community in Philadelphia, but not without some criticism and urging of more scientific study by the Americans themselves. Chapters include “Sandstone of Connecticut,” “Pleasing Features of the Valley of Connecticut,” “Geological structure of the Rocky Mountains,” “Iron Mountain in Missouri,” “Similar ore of iron in Arkansas,” “Falls of Niagara considered geologically,” “Thermal Springs of North Carolina,” etc. ($150-300)

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113. DÁVILA PADILLA, Agustín. Historia de la Fundacion y discurso de la provincia de Santiago de Mexico de la Orden de Predicadores por las vidas de sus varones insignes y casos notables de Nueva España.... Brussels: Ivan de Meerbeque, 1625. [8], 1-654, [6] pp. (leaf [2M5] missigned as 2M2), printed in double columns, title printed in red and black with copper-engraved Dominican arms on title page). Folio, contemporary limp vellum, spine lettered in sepia, lacks ties, upper joint cracked, slightly soiled, with evidence of old paper repair on upper hinge. Binding stained and lightened on upper cover, light browning to text, final few lines of verso of final leaf (Index) in skillful manuscript facsimile, contemporary ink ownership inscription erased from title page. Overall a very good copy of a rare work (OCLC locates three copies, all abroad).

     Second and best edition (first edition, Madrid, 1596) of an important account on early Dominican missions in America and an early account of Florida. Brinton, Notes on the Floridian Peninsula, pp. 41-41. European Americana 1625/62. Medina, Hispano-Americana 784. Palau 68981. Sabin 18780. Streit II:155. Wilgus, p. 46. Clark, Travels in the Old South 24 (the present edition is mentioned in his entry for Priestley’s editing of The Luna Papers relating to the Expedition of Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano for the Conquest of La Florida; Clark comments: “The first important steps taken by Spain to protect her empire’s northern frontiers from foreign aggression” and notes that Dávila Padilla’s 1625 book is “among the most important parallel accounts describing the preparations and the expedition itself...pp. 188-229.” See also Ernest J. Burrus, “Religious Chroniclers and Historians: A Summary with Annotated Bibliography” in Handbook of Middle America (Vol. 13), Guide to Ethnohistorical Sources (Part 2), pp. 155-156: “Considered a major or key work. The author extends his account from the first coming of the Dominicans...covering therefore the rich period from 1526 through 1592.” ($1,000-2,000)

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114. DE VOTO, Bernard. Across the Wide Missouri. Illustrated with Paintings by Alfred Jacob Miller, Charles Bodmer and George Catlin with an Account of the Discovery of the Miller Collection by Mae Reed Porter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company; Cambridge: The Riverside Press, 1947. [2, inserted signed limitation leaf, [i-vii] viii-xxvii [1], 2-483 [1] pp, 81 splendid plates (19 in color), maps on endpapers. 8vo (25 x 18.5 cm), original bright red cloth with bevelled edges, spine with black gilt-lettered label, upper and lower covers with gilt illustration, t.e.g. Book: Very fine with original glassine d.j. in publisher’s slipcase (case rubbed and moderately worn).

     First edition, the limited issue of 265 copies (#126, signed by De Voto in ink on limitation leaf) of the author’s Pulitzer Prize-winning history; best edition (“Although since reprinted by others, this original Houghton Mifflin edition is by far the best because of its rich art”—Orlan Sawey, De Voto’s biographer). Dobie, pp. 72, 85. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 54 (“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #69). Eberstadt 128:217: “The grand paintings, most of which are here published for the first time, are among the only ones of the early trappers made on the spot and the first ever made of Rocky Mountain scenery, the Oregon Trail, and the far-western Plains Indians.” Harvard Guide to American History, p. 366. Howes D296. Malone, Wyomingiana, pp. 19-20. Plains & Rockies IV:125n. Smith 2430. Tweney, Washington 89 #9. De Voto includes material on Richard Henry Dana and the California hide and tallow trade. ($150-300)

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115. DIGNOWITY, Anthony M. Bohemia under Austrian Despotism. Being an Autobiography by Anthony M. Dignowity, M.D. of San Antonio, Texas. New York: Published by the Author, 1859. [1-5] 6-236, [2] pp., engraved frontispiece (View of Kuttenberg Castle, author’s birthplace). 8vo, original blind-embossed brown cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Spine expertly repaired with most of original gilt-lettered spine laid down. Partly unopened, but a few bolts roughly cut. Overall very good. With pencil signature of M. Weaver on front pastedown and his small ink stamp on a few pages.

     First edition of “the first English-language work about the situation of the Czechs in Austria, written and published in America” (George Kovtun, Czech Area Specialist, Library of Congress). Malin, Catalogue of Books Relating to, or Illustrating the History of the Unitas Fratrum, p. 83. Raines, p. 67. Rechcigl, Czech American Bibliography, p. 14 “One of the first Czech-born writers to publish in America.” This autobiography of the famous, feisty polymathic San Antonio physician covers his early life and ends with his 1832 arrival in New York City. An Appendix, in which Dignowity displays extreme bitterness, reviews a land dispute with a local widow wherein he was found guilty of larceny but later pardoned by Governor Houston. Dignowity (1810-1875) became a medical doctor and traveled to San Antonio in 1846 with a group of Arkansas volunteers for the Mexican-American War. He remained to became a successful doctor and businessman. After being threatened with hanging because of his abolitionist views, he fled the state for the duration of the Civil War. He returned to San Antonio after the war but was never able to recover his health or his finances. See Handbook of Texas Online for more on the author. ($200-400)

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116. [DIRECTORY]. VALDÉS Y CUEVA, Juan (publisher & editor). Directorio Mexicano. Directorio Comercial, Agricola, Industrial, Profesiones, Artes y Oficios de las Principales Poblaciones de la Republica Mexicana para el año de 1887. Mexico: Juan Valdés y Cueva, 1887 [1886]. [1] 2-428, [i] ii-x pp., 164 leaves of inserted ads on brightly colored papers, 2 large folded lithograph colored maps. 8vo (23 x 17 cm), original red decorated cloth. Binding and first and last few leaves waterstained. Light waterstaining to lower margins of most leaves. Except for a few small tears at text block, interior very fine, maps superb. Directories, especially those published in Latin America, are excruciatingly rare in any condition.

     First edition of a very rare directory with superb maps of Mexico and Guadalajara. Not in Palau. An omnibus publication covering Mexico in general and all the individual states, issued at the height of the Porfiriate. Of particular interest is the detailed discussion of Mexican railroads, their stage of development, and whether they are subsidized. Of interest to bibliophiles are ads and notices for printers, bookbinders, lithographers, paper sellers, and bookstores, which present an impressive display of the printer’s typographical type fonts and decorative elements. A more detailed description of a rapidly growing and evolving Mexico could hardly be found elsewhere. ($500-1,000)

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117. [DIRECTORY: CUBA, MEXICO & NEW YORK]. Nomenclator comercial, agricola, industrial, artes y oficios, y directorio general para 1884-1885 de la Isla de Cuba, México y principa comercio de Nueva York. Segunda serie. Havana: Centro-Editorial de Obras Ilustradas de Molinas y Juli [verso of title page: E. Perez, Impresor, 80 Cliff St., N.Y.], 1884. [20], [1] 2-235 [1 blank], [1] 2-115 [1, blank], [117] 118-158, [4], [4], [1] 2-29 [1, blank], [2], [1] 2-346, [1-2] 3-209 [1, blank], [211] 212-230, [2], i-xx pp., lithograph title page (included in collation), 7 inserted ad leaves, 2 chromolithograph folded maps, 3 folded plates, (about 60 woodcut views of Cuba and Mexico and portrait of Hidalgo), numerous text-illustrations and maps. Folio, original green cloth with black lettering and gilt decorations. Spine slightly frayed at top, cloth faded and stained, corners bumped, hinges weak; text lightly waterstained and with some staining, 1 folded plate chipped (no losses). Despite the flaws, overall a good copy, particularly considering the heavy use and ephemeral nature of directories of this sort and the great weight of the text block on the binding. Very rare. Only two copies on OCLC and the only copy at auction in the past thirty years is one we sold in 1997.

     First edition. This edition not in Palau. Directories are one of the primary historical sources for the intense study of local, soial, cultural, and economic history. This massive directory is filled with incredibly detailed documentation, including maps of each state and province in Cuba and Mexico, as well as maps of each major town and city. Hundreds of business establishments (interior and exterior) and their wares are illustrated.” ($400-800)

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118. DISTURNELL, J[ohn] (publisher). Disturnell’s American and European Railway and Steamship Guide.... New York: J. Disturnell, June 1854. [1-5] 6-122, [22, ads] pp., 2 folding maps (including Map of North America by J. Calvin Smith with inset map, Map of the Gold Region, California, text illustrations, tables. 12mo, original brown printed wrappers. Wraps lightly stained and chipped, spine missing piece at foot, upper wrapper chipped (slightly touching ornamental borders, wraps professionally repaired with missing portions supplied in sympathetic facsimile, right corner provided), title page gutter margin repaired (no losses), text block edges lightly foxed. North America map rejoined at central fold (no losses). Overall a very good copy with wrappers preserved and both maps present. Rare.

     Later edition of a work that seems to have first begun in 1851. OCLC locates editions of 1851, 1853, and 1855, but not the present edition. Goodspeed 551:359 (offering 1854 edition in 1968; no mention of wraps). Robinson Sale 81:259 (offering the 1851 edition in 1959, lacked back wrap). Rumsey 2770 (lists the 1852 edition). Sabin 20136 (lists the 1851 edition and notes “continued”). Not in standard railroad bibliographies. For Map of North America with inset of California, see: Phillips, Maps of America, p. 606. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 801: “Identical with 1851 Smith save for change of date. The several Smith maps vary in their coloring.” Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region (sequence 123, 124, 171, 172, 173, 207, 232). A pocket-sized omnibus guide for travellers in the United Kingdom, Europe, and the United States containing much detailed information on such practical matters as passports, visas, money exchange, lodgings, and transportation. The information given on railroad travel is extremely extensive and detailed. The work is peppered with illustrated ads, many for shipping lines serving the California trade, as well as publisher Disturnell’s own ad. According to a statement herein, Disturnell intended to publish this guide every two months. ($750-1,500)

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119. DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge. Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Illustrated with Six Coloured Lithographs by Marie Laurencin. Paris: The Black Sun Press, Rue Cardinale, 1930. [6], 1-114, [2] pp., 6 original color lithograph plates by Marie Laurencin printed by Desjobert of Paris. Oblong small 4to, original art vellum wrappers printed in red and black, in original glassine wrapper, publisher’s chemise and slipcase with silver trim. Small portion of glassine slightly browned and wrinkled at upper left, spine of chemise slightly chipped, slipcase with slight edge wear and professionally reinforced. Text and plates very fine, tissue guards present.

     Limited edition (#298 of 350 copies on Rives paper for distribution in the United States). From a total edition of 790 copies, 350 copies for Europe, and 420 for the United States, of which 350 were on Rives paper, 50 on Japanese vellum, and 20 on Hollande Vangelder. Minkoff A39. Monod 2304. ($750-1,500)

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120. [DON QUIJOTE DE LA MANCHA] [JARAY Y SÁNCHEZ DE MOLINA, Juan Francisco de la (attributed)]. Adiciones a la historia del ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha, en que se prosiguen los sucesos ocurridos a su escudero el famoso Sancho Panza. Escrita en arabigo por Cide-Hamete Benengeli, y traducidas al castellano con las memorias de la vida de esta Por D. Jacinto María Delgado. Primera Reimpresión Mexicana por S.R. Mexico: Imprenta del ciudadano Santiago Pérez, calle del Angel N. 2, 1842. [1-6] 7-64, 63-121 [1, blank] [4, final verso blank] pp. (text complete), printed on Maguey paper, title within typographical border, text within line borders, initials, ornamental head- and tail-pieces, 17 black and white chalk lithograph plates (unattributed but some after Ortega and Lucio). 8vo, full contemporary black diapered Mexican calf, spine gilt lettered and decorated, ornamental line border on upper and lower covers. Binding rubbed and corners bumped (board exposed on one corner), most signatures sprung or text block slightly loose in binding, lower hinge open. Title page wrinkled, worming at lower gutter margin (affecting several plates and text at bottom), plates browned (more so on versos), some leaves and at least one plate with short marginal tears (no losses). Despite the flaws, a remarkable survival of a very rare book. No copies at auction or other sales records for several decades.

     First Mexican edition (first edition, Madrid, 1786, according to Palau); first literary work published with lithographs in Mexico. Palau 123075 (provides author as above): “Esta edición en papel especial de Maguey, escasea y tiene aprecio.” According to title verso, printed on “papel de Maguey” (i.e., agave) as a patriotic gesture to support national industry, which the publisher notes is “abatida.” Not mentioned by Mathes, Toussaint, et al. This work predates Rivière’s 1851 Antonino y Anita ó Los nuevos misterios de México, which Escamilla claims to be the first literary work published in Mexico to be illustrated by lithographic plates. Social satire on eighteenth-century Spanish society, using the vehicle of Sancho Panza’s adventures after Don Quijote’s death. ($1,000-2,000)

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121. DUBROCA, [Jean]-Louis. Vida de J. J. Dessalines, gefe de los negros de Santo Domingo.... Mexico: Mariano de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1806. [4] 1-10, 1-18, [2] 19-106 pp., frontispiece and 9 copper-engraved plates (portraits and historical scenes) by José Simón de Larrea and Manuel López López. 4to, contemporary full Mexican tree sheep, beige leather spine label, spine gilt. Binding peeling in a few spots and worn at corners, mild shelf wear; interior with light to moderate soiling and a few tears repaired (last leaf with extensive old repair), but overall very good.

First Mexican edition (first edition, Paris, 1804). Mathes, La Ilustración en México colonial 9860. Medina, México 9860. Palau 363023. Romero de Terreros, Grabados y grabadores en la Nueva España, pp. 493-496. Sabin 21029. According to Palau, this edition is preferable to the first edition in Spanish (Madrid, 1805). See John Carter Brown Library “Exhibition of Slavery and Justice” 22 (this edition). The revolt described herein led to the creation of the first independent nation in Latin America. Given the original French source, it goes without saying that the rebellion against French rule is painted in the worst light with no recognition of how momentous an event it was that slaves managed successfully to throw off the yoke of French colonialism and establish a government of any type. As if the text were not graphic enough, some of the illustrations are even worse. The engravers have spared no effort of their burins to depict their subjects literally in the darkest hues, thereby reinforcing in imagery what the text relates. ($3,000-6,000)

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122. [DUPAIX EXPEDITION]. Antiquités Mexicaines. Relation des trois expéditions du capitaine Dupaix, ordonnées en 1805, 1806, et 1807, Paris: Au Bureau des Antiquités Mexicaines, No 55, Quai des Grands Augustins, Imprimiere de Jules Didot l’aîné, No 4, Boulevart d’enfer, 1834. 167 lithograph plates on 162 leaves, all mounted on india proof paper. 3 vols. in 2, grand folio, contemporary full tan levant morocco extra gilt. Slight shelf wear to binding, otherwise an exceptionally fine, complete copy, the plates superb, and in a splendid binding.

     First edition of Dupaix’s seminal work on Mexican archaeology, with “the first drawings of Maya architecture to be published” (Wauchope). Brunet I, cols. 321-322. Field 468. Leclerc, Bibliotheca Americana (1878) 1065. Palau 23069. Pilling 4082. Sabin 40038: “An indispensable supplement to Humboldt, as it contains many interesting discoveries not in the latter work.” This massive work contains the collected official reports of Captain Dupaix, one of the first Europeans to observe, describe, and illustrate the archaeological sites and artifacts of Chiapas, Oaxaca, and Yucatan. ($10,000-20,000)

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123. DURÁN, Diego (compiler) & José F[ernando] Ramírez (editor).  Historia de las Indias de Nueva España y islas de tierra firme.... Mexico: J.M. Andrade y F. Escalante, 1867-1880. Vol. I: [i-iii] iv-xvi, [1] 2-535 [1, blank] pp.; Vol. II: [1-2], [2], [3] 4-304, [2], [1-3] 4-177 [1, blank] pp.; Atlas: [2] pp., 66 uncolored lithographic plates by Jules Desportes (figures from pre-Cortesian illustrations gathered by Durán, plus Codex Ixtlilxochitl). 3 vols., folio, contemporary dark brown roan over marbled boards, spines gilt, raised bands. Vol. I hinge open but strong, spine chipped at extremities, atlas upper joint weak and rubbed. Uniform light browning due to the quality of paper used; text volume title pages moderately browned and foxed. Very good set, unopened, as issued.

     First edition, written by Durán 1578-1581, but not printed until the present edition.  Glass (Bibliography), p. 596 & (Census) #114. Griffin 1406: “Preconquest Indian history but also contains important data on Indians and Spanish of the early sixteenth century, based on now lost Native materials.” Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 35. Palau 77422. “Los ejemplares en perfecto estado escasean. La mayoria de los corrientes en comercio tienen las láminas manchadas de agua.” Pilling 1118 & 1118a. Sabin 21405. ($1,500-3,000)

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124. EDWARD, David B[arnett]. The History of Texas; or, The Emigrant’s, Farmer’s, and Politician’s Guide to the Character, Climate, Soil and Productions of That Country: Geographically Arranged from Personal Observation and Experience.... Cincinnati: J.A. James & Co., 1836. [i-v] vi-xii, [13] 14-336 pp., folded copper-engraved map of the Republic of Texas based on the Austin-Tanner prototype (neat line to neat line: 31.5 x 21.5 cm). 12mo, publisher’s original green cloth with floral pattern, original yellow printed spine label. Professionally recased, corners and spinal extremities restored, a few light stains to cloth. Scattered moderate foxing, heavier on first and last leaves and endpapers. The map, which is often lacking, is fine, with excellent color retention. On verso of map are a few careful archival repairs (no loss to map image). First edition of “one of the essential Texas books”—Streeter. Basic Texas Books 53. Clark, Old South III:35: “Like Mrs. Holley’s Texas, this work was extensively used as a basis for many other books on that state written in the 1830s and 1840s.” Day, Maps of Texas, pp. 23-24. Howes E48: “Conditions just prior to the Revolution described by an actual observer.” Rader 1279. Raines, p. 74. Sabin 21886. Streeter 1199. Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 251. TCU, Going to Texas: Five Centuries of Texas Maps, pp. 38-40, Color Plate 19. ($4,000-8,000)

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125. EGERTON, Daniel Thomas. Three original sketches, as listed below. Mexico, 1830s. Provenance: Egerton descendant with accompanying letter). [1] “San Miguel del Soldado May 1835. D.T.E.” Original finished sketch, sepia wash, black ink, and pencil on paper, signed by Egerton with initials; title, and date in his hand, verso with old ink note: “Mexico, D.T. Egerton.” Image: 23.2 x 31.9 cm. This finished sketch done in Mexico evolved into one of Egerton’s finished oil paintings on canvas dated 1836 (“San Miguel del Soldado above Jalapa, Mexico”; 18.4 by 25.7 cm), which sold for $50,000 at Sotheby’s on November 19-20, 2012 (Lot 102, Sale NO8907). [2] “Distant View of San Agustin from the Rd leading to the Cañada de Madelena.” Original landscape sketch, sepia wash and pencil on paper, on old mounting paper, unsigned, but with pencil title in artist’s hand as indicated; verso with old ink note: “Mexico D.T. Egerton.” [Mexico, 1830s]. Image: 17 x 22 cm; image including mounting paper: 20 x 25.3 cm. Possibly a preliminary sketch for Egerton’s lithograph Sn. Agustin de las Cuevas (see herein). [3] “Bledos.” Original on-the-spot landscape sketch, sepia wash, pencil and ink, white chalk, on original board, unsigned but with title in artist’s hand. Image: 17.6 x 26.1 cm; image blank borders: 21.5 x 29.7 cm. Bledos is in San Luis Potosí. For more on Egerton see full entry herein and the following five entries. ($20,000-40,000)

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126. EGERTON, D[aniel] T[homas]. [Title at lower right] Guadala[jara]. [London, 1840]. Lithograph with original hand-coloring. Titled in stone. Image: 40.5 x 50.4 cm. Trimmed at margins (more so at left and right), with loss of about 5 cm on vertical sides, including part of title and artist’s name. Some light spotting, but generally the image is fine and fresh.
     First printing of one of the twelve prints from the first edition of one of the more beautiful and rare series of prints relating to Mexico (Views in Mexico, London, 1840). Egerton’s views are considered to be among the finest examples of hand-colored topographical lithographs ever produced.Abbey, Travel 670. Palau 787583. Sabin 22044. Tooley 205. Egerton presents a sweeping landscape with high mountains in the background, the city in the middle distance, and groups of costume figures in the foreground amidst a rugged landscape along a ravine. ($2,000-4,000)

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127. EGERTON, D[aniel] T[homas]. [Title at lower left corner] Guanaxuato. [below title] D.T. Egerton, 1840. [London, 1840]. Hand-colored lithograph, mounted on original stiff board with ruled border (as issued). Signed, dated, and titled in stone. Image: 42.4 x 61.3 cm; image and original backing board: 54.5 x 73.7 cm. Signed, dated, and titled in stone. Very fine and fresh.

     First printing of one of the twelve prints from the first edition of one of the more beautiful and rare series of prints relating to Mexico (Views in Mexico, London, 1840). Egerton’s views are considered to be among the finest examples of hand-colored topographical lithographs ever produced.Abbey, Travel 670. Palau 787583. Sabin 22044. Tooley 205. In muted pastels, Egerton depicts the Basílica Colegiata de Nuestra Señora de Guanajuato, the late seventeenth-century Baroque church that now dominates La Plaza de Paz in Guanajuato. ($5,000-10,000)

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128. EGERTON, D[aniel] T[homas]. [Title at lower left corner] Hacienda de Barrera, Guanto. [above title] D.T. Egerton. 1840. [London, 1840]. Hand-colored lithograph, mounted on original stiff board with ruled border (as issued). Signed, dated, and titled in stone. Image: 42.5 x 60.7 cm; image and original backing board: 54.5 x 74.7 cm. Lithograph very fine and fresh. Mounting board with a few minor spots and slight wear at corners and edge.

     First printing of one of the twelve prints from the first edition of one of the more beautiful and rare series of prints relating to Mexico (Views in Mexico, London, 1840). Egerton’s views are considered to be among the finest examples of hand-colored topographical lithographs ever produced.Abbey, Travel 670. Palau 787583. Sabin 22044. Tooley 205. This tranquil scene bathed in light illustrates the magnificent seventeenth-century Ex-Hacienda San Gabriel de Barrera in Guanajuato. Two dogs and a few people, including a musician with a guitar, lounge around a second story balcony with cascading vines and blue pottery overlooking an enclosed courtyard, where packed mules and muleteers have gathered. ($5,000-10,000)

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129. EGERTON, D[aniel] T[homas]. [Title at lower right] Sn. Augustin [sic] de las Cuevas. [lower left] D.T. Egerton 1839. [London, 1840]. Hand-colored lithograph with gum arabic highlights, mounted on original stiff board with ruled border (as issued). Signed, dated, and titled in stone. Image: 42 x 60.4 cm; image and original backing board: 53.5 x 71.2 cm. Scattered light foxing (mostly confined to mount), two very minor losses at very edges of upper right margin, one short closed tear at lower right. Image very fine and fresh, with the original gum arabic highlights in place.
     First printing of one of the twelve prints from the first edition of one of the more beautiful and rare series of prints relating to Mexico (Views in Mexico, London, 1840). Egerton’s views are considered to be among the finest examples of hand-colored topographical lithographs ever produced.Abbey, Travelin Aquatint and Lithography 1770-1860 670. Palau 787583. Sabin 22044. Tooley 205. Egerton presents an expansive landscape of the region around San Agustín de las Cuevas, with the city and its architecture in the distance against the backdrop of mountains, bright sky, and blue river. The middle and foreground are populated with hundreds of inhabitants attending the annual festival of San Augustine which was held in May. ($4,000-8,000)

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130. EGERTON, D[aniel] T[homas]. [Title at lower left] Vera Cruz. 1840. [below title and date] D.T. Egerton. [London, 1840]. Lithograph with original hand-coloring, mounted on original stiff board with ruled border (as issued). A few touches of original gum arabic highlights on figures at lower section of the print. Signed, dated, and titled in stone. Image: 42.7 x 61 cm; image and backing board: 53.3 x 71 cm. Print and mount with moderate foxing. Some slight abrasion at edges. Overall very good.

     First printing of one of the twelve prints from the first edition of one of the more beautiful and rare series of prints relating to Mexico (Views in Mexico, London, 1840). Egerton’s views are considered to be among the finest examples of hand-colored topographical lithographs ever produced.Abbey, Travelin Aquatint and Lithography 1770-1860 670. Palau 787583. Sabin 22044. Tooley 205. Like many a traveller crossing the Atlantic to Mexico, Egerton entered through the gateway city of Vercruz upon his arrival in Mexico in 1830. The present print is among the most rare and iconic views of that great and ancient port of call. Here Egerton demonstrates his genius at depicting light. ($3,000-6,000)

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131. ELÍZAGA, José Mariano.  Elementos de Musica....  Mexico, 1823. [10], 1-76 pp., numerous text illustrations of music expertly drawn in sepia ink (as issued), plus folded typographic plate at end, with staff and notes accomplished in sepia ink, followed by blank folded sheet meant for another plate; both plate leaves at end measure 21.5 x 14.2 cm. 12mo, contemporary Mexican tree sheep, spine gilt decorated. Spine rubbed with some loss of gilt, upper spine end lightly chipped, binding moderately rubbed with some areas of flaying, corners lightly bumped, hinges starting but strong; wants front flyleaf, except for light scattered foxing, interior very fine. Rare.

     First edition of the first didactic Mexican book on music. Palau 79093. This book introduced into Mexico modern musical theories and practices. Such was the state, however, of publishing in Mexico that the musical examples had to be completed in manuscript, a transitional practice documented here. Jesús C. Romero, José Mariano Elízaga (Mexico, 1934), reports that in one private collection he saw a copy of this book with blank spaces instead of music. Elízaga (1786-1842) founded the Sociedad Filarmónica, establishing the first press in Mexico for printing non-liturgical music, and was characterized by Robert Stevenson as “the first important republican composer in Mexico [and] a major figure in nineteenth-century Mexican music” (Music in Mexico: A Historical Survey, New York, 1952, p. 135). ($750-1,500)

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132. ELLICOTT, Andrew. The Journal of Andrew Ellicott, Late Commissioner on Behalf of the United States during Part of the Year 1796, the Years 1797, 1798, 1799, and Part of the Year 1800: For Determining the Boundary between the United States and the Possessions of His Catholic Majesty in America.... Philadelphia: Budd & Bartram, for Thomas Dobson, 1803. [i-iii], iv-vii [1, blank], [1] 2-232, 232-299, [1-2] 3-151 [1, blank], [1, errata + 1, blank] pp., 14 copper-engraved folded maps, mostly on heavy laid paper (all untitled, drawn by Ellicott and engraved by Alexander Lawson). 4to, original blue paper boards, original tan paper label with ink lettering. Professionally recased and washed. A few signatures lightly stained at right blank margins, otherwise a fine, untrimmed copy.

     First edition. American Imprints (1803) 4147. Buck 50. Clark II:89. Graff 1230. Howes E94: “First thorough American survey of the lower Mississippi and Gulf Regions.” Rader 1295. Sabin 22217: “One of the earliest books by an American author, which describes the vast regions traversed by the commission, and is indeed the pioneer account of regions then desert, and now teeming with life, activity and civilisation.” Servies, Bibliography of Florida 768. Siebert Sale 607 . Streeter Sale 1531: “The earliest account of West Florida. Ellicott’s report on the area influenced the eventual. U.S. acquisition of the area.” The maps are original contributions to knowledge of the area. The present work was based on U.S. and Spanish surveys following the Treaty of San Lorenzo. Andrew Ellicott (1754-1820) was one of the more important surveyors of his time. He was chosen, for example, to extend the legendary Mason-Dixon Line west, and his survey of the new District of Columbia became the standard for the nation’s new capital, supplanting L’Enfant. He tutored Meriwether Lewis in surveying techniques before the Lewis & Clark expedition. The superb maps were engraved by Alexander Lawson. ($3,000-6,000)

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133. EMMETT, Chris. Texas Camel Tales Incidents Growing Up Around an Attempt by the War Department of the United States to Foster an Uninterrupted Flow of Commerce Through Texas by the Use of Camels. San Antonio: Naylor, 1932. [i-viii] ix-xvi [1, blank], 1-275 [1, blank] pp., including frontispiece, portraits, scenes (mostly photographic), folded plate of an official document relating to the subject. 8vo, original tan suede, spine lettered in black. Very fine in fine pictorial d.j. (minor chipping to top of spine of d.j.), autographed by author on front flyleaf.

     First edition, with “First Edition” printed on title. Agatha, p. 65. Basic Texas Books 33. Campbell, p. 172. J. Evetts Haley, untitled review in The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. 37, No. 1 (July, 1933), pp. 71-72: “The history of what was probably the most unique transportation experiment of Western America, “Jeff Davis’ camels.” But it remained for Chris Emmett not only to point out the inception of the idea and its official trial and results, but to follow the trail of the camels themselves long after the government had surrendered its interest in the project.... Emmett has successfully searched out the camel tales and contributed his share of adventurous incident to the annals of Texas.” ($300-600)

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134. [EROTICA]. Ten mostly ephemeral imprints with subjects ranging from the erotic to the pornographic, chiefly the latter. Most are believed to be printed in the U.S., ca. 1930. For the most part, these are chapbooks in delicate formats and extremely rare or otherwise unknown. Several of these are probably early examples of U.S. pornographic comic books. One is an expert Tijuana Bible take-off of the popular strip “Bringing Up Father.” ($200-400)

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135. [ESCALANTE, Constantino, Hesiquio Iriarte, Vicente Riva Palacio, et al. (compilers)]. La Orquesta. Periódico omniscio, de buen humor y con caricaturas, redactado en gefe por el ciudadano Roberto Macario, elector elegible. Mexico, 1861-1875. 14 volumes of this important Mexican periodical, examples of El Impolitico and Dona Clara, and an additional volume of plates from the first and second series, many of the characters depicted in them identified in contemporary pencil, including several plates depicting Santa-Anna. Folio, contemporary bindings.

     First editions of the first Mexican periodical to employ graphic political satire in a significant way, and a premier illustrated political periodical for any time or place. Charno, Latin American Newspapers, p. 392. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 30: “In 1861, La Orquesta, a periodical of political satire, established lithographic caricature as a field of its own through the excellent work of Constantino Escalante, virtual pillar of the publication until his untimely death in a railroad accident at Tlalpan in 1868. Palau 204579. Sabin 57650: “The Mexican Punch.” La Orquesta was an important organ of political and social commentary and depiction at the time of the end of Reforms and the period of French intervention, spilling over into the governments of Juárez and Lerdo de Tejada. The publication’s political stance was such that it was persecuted by both presidents. The most important aspect of the periodical was its lithographs, which revealed successive, trenchant observations of Mexican life. Escalante, called the Daumier of Mexico, and his cousin, Carlos R. Casarín, founded La Orquesta, which contains early work from the biting pen of Vicente Riva Palacio. Successive editors and writers of the series represented here included Manuel C. Villegas, H. Iriarte, Escalante, Hilarión Frias y Soto, Juan de Jarras, and José R. Perez. ($8,000-16,000)

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136. ESPINOSA, Isidro Félix de. El Peregrino Septentrional Atlante: Delineado en la Exemplarissima Vida del Venerable Padre F. Antonio Margil de Jesús.... Mexico: Joseph Bernardo de Hogal, 1737. [38], 456 [4] pp., title printed in red and black within typographical border, copper-engraved plate of Margil. 4to, twentieth-century terracotta levant morocco gilt by Sangorski & Sutcliffe. Light wear and small hole to blank right margin of title and occasional very light marginal staining at lower margins of text, otherwise a fine copy, the portrait plate of Father Margil in excellent condition, fresh and a strong impression. Rare.

     First edition, the preferred variant with the title page printed in red and black, and ppl. 426-427 not defaced by Inquisition censors. Basic Texas Books 59A. Fifty Texas Rarities 5. Graff 1260. Howes E84. Jones, Adventures in Americana 444. Mathes, La Ilustración en México colonial, Register No. 3461. Medina, México 3461. Palau 82703. Raines, p. 78. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 102: “Antonio Margil is particularly noted in Southwest history for his expedition to Texas in 1716 and the founding of the missions in northeast Texas.” The portrait of Margil is among the earliest engraved portraits of a person outstanding in Texas history. ($2,500-5,000)

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137. EWELL, Thomas T. A History of Hood County Texas, from Its Earliest Settlement to the Present....Also a Sketch of the History of Somervell County. Granbury: Granbury News, 1895. [4], [1] 2-<161>, [7] pp., 6 leaves of inserted ads on pink paper plus ads on pastedowns. 8vo, original black cloth spine over black pebble cloth with gilt lettering on upper cover. Slight shelf wear (corners lightly bumped), front hinge cracked but firm, lower hinge reinforced, title page with small tear at upper left corner (no loss), text lightly browned as usual due to being printed on newsprint. A very good, complete copy of one of the rarest Texas county histories. Some copies lack the history of Somervell County at the end (present here).

     First edition. Adams, Herd 779: “Rare.” CBC 2475. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 18. Eberstadt, Texas 162:289: “Page 113 is misnumbered 115” [not the case in the present copy]. Graff 1279. Howes E239. Vandale 62. In the early years of the 1850s Anglo stock raisers and farmers began to settle in Hood County on the north central plains of Texas, and in 1866 the county was established. Because the county was ranching country, there is scarcely a page in this quaintly printed, marvelous county history that does not in some way touch on ranching history, with a great deal on early ranchers, cowboys, trail drives, Comanche and Kiowa rustlers, women, and other social history in the cattle country, etc. ($400-800)

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138. FARNHAM, Thomas J[efferson]. Mexico: Its Geography-Its People-and Its Institutions: With a Map, Containing the Results of the Latest Explorations of Fremont, Wilkes, and Others.... New York: H. Long & Brother, [ca. 1846]. [1-5] 6-64 pp., folded lithograph map with original color (Mexico, Texas & California). 8vo, original tan pictorial wrappers in modern brown leather over brown cloth. Ex-library copy with typical library markings, including perforated stamp on title. Wraps soiled and worn. Map moderately foxed, overall very good. This first issue is very scarce.

     First edition, first issue. Day, Maps of Texas, p. 42. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, p. 21. Plains & Rockies IV 120b:1. Sabin 23870. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #508 & III, p. 508. Farnham travelled to the West Coast from Illinois in 1839. Upon arrival at Fort Vancouver on the Columbia River he sponsored a petition calling on the federal government to annex the territory. His arrival in California in April of 1840 coincided with the arrest, and subsequent deportation to San Blas, of Isaac Graham and a group of American and British men on charges of attempting to overthrow the Mexican government. Farnham became the self-appointed legal counsel for the deported men, championed Graham as a pretext for the United States’ seizure of California. He actively promoted U.S. expansion to the western parts of North America. In the present work he reviews Mexico (including California and New Mexico), urging U.S. takeover, and referring to Mexicans as “a race incapable of self-government,” and worse. Rittenhouse (Santa Fe Trail 201) conjectured that he might even have been a secret agent for the U.S. government. His Travels in the Californias, and Scenes in the Pacific Ocean (1844) is a Zamorano 80 selection. ($750-1,500)

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139. [FELIPE DE JESÚS, SAINT]. CATHOLIC CHURCH. México [text commences]: La memoria de un tierno objeto hace formar acia el las mas sólidas reflexîones, tal es, la de la inmortal felicidad de que logran en general las Naciones Católicas, gozandose cada una dulcemente en tantos Santos, sus repectivos Compatriotas, quantos se congratula de que sean adorados por el ambito del Orbe sujecto à nuestra Sagrada Religion.... [Mexico, n.d. (1770s?)]. Broadside printed on laid paper, in red and blue with gold highlights hand-applied to letters, text in red within elaborate wood-engraved lace border in red and blue. 31 x 42.5 (untrimmed). Except for small oxidized stain at lower left in text and contemporary blue ink fingerprint stains caused by careless handling at the press, very fine. All letters have some traces of gold, some more so than others. OCLC locates copies at Harvard, SMU, & Texas A&M.

     This beautiful tour-de-force of Mexican printing in red, blue, and gold was created in honor of St. Felipe de Jesús, Patron Saint of Mexico. It announces a novena for San Felipe de Jesús (born in Mexico 1572-died in Japan 1597), martyr and patron saint of Mexico crucified in Japan (see herein). The novena is to be celebrated on the 27th of the month. The majority of the text is taken up with a review of the blessings various saints have bestowed upon Catholic countries, including those conferred on Mexico by San Felipe de Jesús.      See Medina 7205 for a sermon that appears to be about this mass. The sermon was printed by Zúñiga y Ontiveros. See also Medina 2437. The use of gold leaf to wet red ink was a popular practice in Peru and Mexico in the 1770s. ($750-1,500)

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140. [FELIPE DE JESÚS, SAINT]. MONTES DE OCA, José María (engraver). Vida de San Felipe de Jesus protomartir de Japon y patron de su patria Mexico.... Mexico: Montes de Oca, 1801. 29 copper-engraved plates in dark sepia ink (including illustrated title), all with images and text relating to San Felipe de Jesús, patron saint of Mexico. 8vo, modern tan and brown marbled boards and modern endsheets. Bookplates on paste down: Otto Orren Fisher and Ex-Libris José Ramón de Velasco Mexico. Engravings very fine. Some plates have bleed-through to the verso. One plate has a very small wormhole in blank margin. Edges untrimmed.

    First edition of one of the earliest entirely engraved Mexican imprints. Mathes, Illustration in Colonial Mexico, Woodcuts and Copper Engravings in New Spain 1539-1821, Register No. 1802:9461 (title page). Mayer, México ilustrado, pp. 138 & 139 (illustrated). Palau 363045. Romero de Terreros, Grabados y grabadores en la Nueva España, pp. 500-503 (engraved title only, p. 500). Sabin 76028. See also Carrillo y Gariel, Grabados de la colección de la Academia de San Carlos, p. 78. Not in Medina (México). ($3,000-6,000)

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141. [FELIPE DE JESÚS, SAINT]. MONTES DE OCA, José María (engraver). [MUNIBE, José María de (attributed)]. Breve resumen de la vida y martyrio del inclyto Mexicano, y proto-martyr del Japon, el beato Felipe de Jesus.... Mexico: La Oficina Madrileña, 1802. [1-2] 3-71 [1, blank] pp., 2 copper-engraved plates in dark sepia ink). 8vo, full Mexican tree sheep, gilt rules on spine, edges tinted yellow. Spine rubbed, otherwise binding is very fine. A few remains of old paper label removed from front pastedown. Front hinge open but holding; first and last leaves (including title and illustrated half-title) with light staining to blank margins due to adhesive migration when bound. Generally a fine, complete copy, plates in good impressions.

     First edition. Although the work is sometimes dated 1801, there is no known 1801 edition, such copies being dated from the engraved half-title. Beristáin de Souza, Biblioteca Hispano Americana Setentrional (1883), Vol. II, p. 314. Medina, México 9461. Palau 35446. The poem on p. 16 ends with a comma (the typesetter erred and printed a comma rather than a period). The poem is complete, which comports with Medina’s collation.      This work, which Beristain attributes to José María de Munibe, is a biography of San Felipe de Jesús (De Las Casas, Casas Martínez, or Canales Martínez) (1572-1597). According to statements in the licenses and prefaces this work is intended to replace Baltasar de Medina’s 1683 Vida of the Saint, which was first published in Mexico and reprinted in Madrid in 1751, but which according to the statements has become outdated and of no appeal to current readers. For more on engraver José María Montes de Oca, see the following item herein. Mathes lists the illustrated half-title (La Ilustración en México colonial Register No. 9461). Romero de Terreros Grabados y grabadores en la Nueva España, pp. 500-503 (half-title entered on p. 500). ($2,000-4,000)

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142. FERNÁNDEZ DE LIZARDI, José Joaquín. El Periquillo Sarniento, por El Pensador Mexicano. Cuarta edición corregida, ilustrada con notas, y adornada con sesenta laminas finas. Mexico: Librería de Galvan, 1842. Vol. I: [i-iii] iv-xxii, [iii-v] vi-xx, [1] 2-189 [1, blank] [2, index] pp., frontispiece (portrait of author), 18 plates (including portrait); Vol. II: [i-iii] iv-viii, [1] 2-206, [2, index] pp., 15 plates; Vol. III: [1-3] 4-196, [2, index] pp., frontispiece, 15 plates; Vol. IV: [1-5] 6-230, [2, index] pp., 14 plates. Total: 62 unattributed incredible black and white lithograph plates (scenes from the novel). 4 vols. in two, 8vo, late nineteenth-century smooth black calf, gilt-lettered and decorated spines with raised bands, covers gilt ruled, edges sprinkled. A few minor scuffs to binding, scattered foxing and occasional mild waterstaining to text and plates, a few minor tears neatly repaired (no losses), some wormholes in Vol. 4 repaired (affecting a few leaves and plates). Overall, very good to fine. Vol. 4, chapter title 6 cancelled by pasted-on slip.

     Fourth edition and best edition of the first Mexican novel (first edition, Mexico, 1816). The present edition is the most esteemed of the early editions illustrated with lithographs. González Obregon, Fernandez de Lizardi, p. 50. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 21 (discussing the book); 55 (title cited in bibliography); 63 (Galván). Palau 89062: “Es considerada la mejor edición.”

     The author styled himself “El Pensador Mexicano,” and has been called the Mexican Voltaire. The novel was created during a very tumultuous period of political history in Mexico. Efrain Kristal, The Latin American Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 23-24:

As the nineteenth century began, Latin American writers had not yet produced a work that fully qualified as a novel, though many had written lengthy narratives with certain on literary features. One reason for the delay was Spain’s ban on novels in its American colonies, though his ruling had proven difficult to enforce.... The first Spanish American text that most critics consider a novel is El Periquillo Sarniento (The Itching Parrot) by José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi.

($1,000-2,000)

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143. FERNÁNDEZ DE LIZARDI, José Joaquín. La Quijotita y su prima.... Mexico: Imprenta de Altamirano, á cargo de Daniel Barquera, calle de las Escalerillas, núm. 11, 1831-1832. Se espende en el despacho de ésta oficina. Vol. I: [12], [1] 2-237 [1] pp., frontis, 1 plate; Vol. II: [2], [1] 2-259 [3] pp., frontis, 1 plate; Vol. III: [2], [1] 2-241 [3, final verso blank] pp., frontis, 1 plate; Vol. IV: [2], [1] 2-267 [3] pp., frontis, 1 plate. Total: 8 engraved plates printed in blue. 4 vols., 12mo, full contemporary tree calf, spine with gilt-lettered orange labels and gilt-ruling, edges yellow; 2 spine labels chipped, corners bumped, light shelf wear. Except for light uniform browning and occasional stains, a very good set of a rare book. Although frequently reprinted, OCLC locates no copies of the either the first or this edition, but there is a copy in the New York Public Library.

     Second edition (first edition, Mexico, 1808-1809) of the Female Don Quijote, but the first publication of the added material. González Obregón, Lizardi, p. 55 (listed but unseen). Palau 89085.

     Although written in the form of a novel, this important work is the first book-length treatment on women’s education written and published in Mexico, with especial deference to traditional Mexican customs and mores. Lizardi is especially concerned with women’s success in marriage and is often critical of the ways in which girls and young women are reared. As would be typical of the time, he attributes much of the success of young women to a steady, enlightened male mentor. As such, much of the action seems staged or contrived merely to carry a point. Although a long way from suggesting that women burn their bras, Lizardi does strongly suggest that those in charge of rearing and educating women should rethink some of their actions and attitudes to produce better and more enlightened results. (p. [1]). ($1,000-2,000)

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144. [FERNÁNDEZ DE LIZARDI, José Joaquín (attributed)]. Las Esperanzas de D. Antonio siempre el mismo, or sea Diálogo entre el autor y D. Antonio. [Colophon] México 1821 Primero de la Independencia. Imprenta (contraria al despotismo) de D. J.M. Benavente y Socios. 8 pp. 8vo, unbound sheets, as issued. First page lightly foxed in blank margins and a bit wrinkled, overall very good.

     First printing of an early exposé of Santa Anna as dictator.Castillo Negrete, Mexico en el siglo XIX, Vol. 16, p. 256, #33 (Folletos, 1821). Garritz, Impresos Novohispanos, 1808-1821 #4592. González Obregon, Fernández de Lizardi, p. 78, #88 (Folletos 1821). Oviedo y Pérez Tudela, Los folletos de Fernández de Lizardi, p. 6. Steele, Independent Mexico: A Collection of Mexican Pamphlets in the Bodleian Library, p. 82, 32. Sutro, p. 146 (second supplement). Not in Medina or Palau. This literary dialogue, supposedly between Fernández de Lizardi (under his well-known pen name “El Pensador Mexicano”) and Antonio López de Santa Anna, mocks the latter’s political ambitions. The work is bitterly critical of Santa Anna, and especially his views of the rule of law and freedom of press. Lizardi clearly recognized Santa Anna’s dictatorial tendencies long before they manifested themselves in more destructive ways. ($150-300)

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145. FISHER, George. Printed decree with George Fisher’s holograph translation signed and with his paraph: COAHUILA Y TEJAS (Mexican State). LAWS. [Decree of April 6, 1833, on business laws] ...Art. 1o. Se deroga el decreto nùmero 183, que prohivó el comercio del menudeo á los no nácidos en la republica. [Monclova, 1833]. Broadside. 8vo. Creased where formerly folded, minor stains on blank verso of conjugate leaf, otherwise fine. With a signed holograph translation into English by George Fisher on pp. [2-3].

     First edition of a rare decree. Not in Streeter. One of only two known copies and the only one with the conjugate blank. Kimball 217. Wilkie, Lilly Texana 73: “By this decree the state repeals its 9 April 1832 decree 183 and again allows non-native Mexicans to operate retail businesses.” The person who wrote and signed the English translation on the decree was George Fisher (1795-1873, born in Hungary of Serbian parents. After a wild ride on the roller coaster of life, Fisher landed in Texas hoping to take over lands formerly held by Haden Edwards. In 1835 Fisher helped organize a failed attempt to start a revolt in the eastern states of Mexico, known as the Tampico Expedition, in which he was accused of being a pirate. By 1850, he migrated to California, staying in Panama long enough to print a newspaper and get into hot water. A year later he landed in San Francisco, where among other important posts, he served on the commission established to administer Spanish and Mexican land titles after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. ($500-1,000)

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146. FLORENCIA, Francisco de. Origen de los dos celebres santuarios de la Nueva Galicia.... [Mexico]: Imprenta de la Biblioteca Mexicana, 1757. [24], 1-206, [14] pp., engraved text illustration of arms, 3 copper-engraved plates (Virgin of Zapopán; Prodigious Grass Cross of Tepic; Virgin of San Juan de los Lagos), title printed in red and black within typographical border. 4to, contemporary vellum. Binding stained, text block detached. Edges of text at upper right corners deteriorating from water damage (no losses except minor to border of title page), wormed with minor losses, fore-edges of first few leaves wrinkled, plates good with some staining and browning. Overall, a good copy of a very rare book.

     Second edition of a Mexican colonial bestseller by the first Florida-born author. The first edition came out in Mexico in 1694 (with two plates only, by a different artist). Mathes, La Ilustración en México colonial (Register No. 4406). Medina, México 4406. Palau 92349. Porrúa (1949) 6842 (describing the title page composition as “perfecta”). Sabin 24816. The present work with its lengthy history of the various ecclesiastical establishments and their miraculous images is a valuable historical source for the regional history of Nueva Galicia. The two churches discussed are the Santuario de Nuestra Señora de Tzapopán and the church at San Juan de los Lagos, each with their respective images. The engravings are skillfully executed. The Prodigious Grass Cross of Tepic is exceptionally interesting and highly unusual, giving a birds-eye view of the Tepic region, the Cross, and its history, with a precision and attention to detail one might expect to find in a map rather than in the rendering of a miracle. The engravings and their accompanying text all deal with themes indigenous to Mexican Catholicism rather than European. Most of the author’s writings promoted Mexico’s religious shrines and indigenous saints, the achievements of the Jesuits, and the virtues of the people of Mexico. Florencia was an enthusiastic proponent of the Virgin of Guadalupe. His writings and activities contributed to the establishment of a separate Mexican national identity. ($1,000-2,000)

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147. [FOLSOM, George]. Mexico in 1842.... New York: Charles J. Folsom; Wiley and Putnam; Robinson, Pratt and Co., 1842. [1-5] 6-256 pp., folding lithograph map, original color (outline coloring of Mexican states and Texas in bright rose; Republic of Texas in yellow). 16mo, original dark brown embossed cloth, gilt-lettering on spine. Head of spine skillfully reinforced, foot of spine slightly worn, overall binding is fine and unfaded. Text with occasional mild foxing, the map is pristine with good color retention. Overall a wonderful copy, the map superb.

     First edition. Graff 1372. Howes F226. Palau 93035. Plains & Rockies IV:91. Rader 1423. Raines, p. 83. Rittenhouse 694. Sabin 24968. Streeter 1413. ($2,000-4,000)

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148. FORBES, Alexander. California: A History of Upper and Lower California.... London, 1839. 10 uncolored lithograph plates, folding lithographic map of California with 6 insets of ports. 8vo, original green cloth. Spine slightly faded and just a bit of minor shelf wear, occasional foxing to interior (mainly confined to first few leaves), overall very good to fine, map very fine.

    First edition of “the first book in English to relate exclusively to California” (Streeter Sale 2491). Barrett 866. Cowan II, p. 217. Howell 50, California 83. Howes F242. Sabin 24035. Zamorano 80 #38. Gary Kurutz, commentary in Volkmann Zamorano 80 Catalogue: “His book, more than any other, made California known to the English-speaking world and spurred on both European and American interest in controlling this remote Mexican province.” ($750-1,500)

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149. FRANCE. COMMISSION SCIENTIFIQUE DU MEXIQUE. Archives de la Commission Scientifique du Mexique... [wrapper title]. París: Imprimerie Impériale, 1864-1869. 3 vols. in 10 fascicles, 29 plates, 9 maps, and 1 chart (lithographs and engravings), several text illustrations. 8vo, original printed wrappers in original glassine. Except for a few waterspots and some loose plates at the end of Vol. 3, pristine, as issued. Rare in this condition.

     First edition (not offered for public sale), of an important publication documenting the scientific side of Maximilian’s invasion of Mexico, and the first publication of the Boban Calendar Wheel. BMC (Nat. Hist.) I, p. 608. Chadenat 2210 (1865-1867). Glass, p. 595 (citing this publication Vol. III, pp. 120-133, description and color lithograph of the Boban Calendar Wheel). Leclerc, Bibliotheca Americana (1878) 1067. Palau 15651. Sabin 48286. In 1864, as a consequence of the French invasion of Mexico, Napoleon III established the Commission Scientifique du Mexique, a large-scale multidisciplinary expedition that labored under difficult conditions. Although the commission made many enduring contributions to the understanding of Mexico, its overall success is considered somewhat less than stellar, especially in comparison to other French scientific endeavors, such as those to Egypt, partly because it was cut short by the French withdrawal in 1867. The commission’s work was not helped by the fact that the country was at war, and that situation made it difficult for members to do research unless they were under military protection. Although its activities were confined basically to central Mexico because the French army was nowhere near large enough to hold vast amounts of Mexican territory, the commission did attempt to work with local organizations and learned societies. ($1,000-2,000)

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150. [FRĖMONT, John C.]. WEICHARDT, Karl (editor). Die Vereinigten Staaten von Nord-Amerika und deren Territorien, nebst einem Blick auf Kanada...Capitain J.C. Fremont’s Reisen...Oregon und Nord-Californien in den Jahren 1842-1844....Leipzig: Verlag von August Weichardt, 1848. [i-iii] iv-x, [1] 2-447 [1, errata] pp., engraved frontispiece of Niagara Falls, folding map after Frémont (Die Vereinigten Staaten von Nordamerica und deren Teritorien nebst Canada 1848; neat line to neat line: 26.6 x 37.5 cm; overall sheet size: 31.2 x 41.5 cm). 8vo, early 20th-century black cloth over boards. Pencil inscription on front flyleaf; small ink stamps of another owner on verso of frontispiece and title. Spine beginning to separate, title and a few leaves lightly foxed, underlining in blue pencil, overall very good, map excellent. A very scarce piece of Fremontiana.

      First edition thus. The second part of the book contains an early German translation of Fremont’s report of his first two expeditions. This is a reissue with an added preface. The same sheets were issued twice more in 1848 under different titles, but here with a preface added. Clark, Old South III:431: “Special attention is directed to snakes in Virginia, rice fields in the Carolinas, the Indians of Florida, bear hunts, lynch laws, and itinerant preachers along the Mississippi River. Statistical information for the Ohio Valley, as well as a side trip from Louisville to Lexington.” Howes W222. Plains & Rockies IV:115:12. Sabin 102502. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 560 (map cited, but not the book) & Vol. III, p. 50: “Largely taken from Fremont, so far as the West is concerned.” ($400-800)

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151. FRENCH, W.J. Wild Jim Capt. W.J. French, Texas Ranger. The Texas Cowboy and Saddle King [wrapper title]. [Chicago: M.A. Donohue & Company], n.d. [ca. 1890]. 1-14 [2] pp., photographic illustrations on upper and lower cover, and engraving on final page. 8vo, original tan wrappers with photographic illustrations of Wild Jim, Original staples. Very fine. Preserved in a half dark brown morocco slipcase and cloth chemise.

     First edition of a rare promotional pamphlet. Adams, Burs 141. Adams, Guns 771: “Rare.... This little pamphlet is a sampling of the larger book that followed (Guns 772) and was distributed to help the sale of the latter.” Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 18. Adams, Herd 848 and Howes F374 cite the subsequent book version. French wrote one of the early biographies of a cowboy, published five years after Siringo’s first work; in this case, however, it seems likely that at least part of the tale is fiction written to pander to the mania for Wild West shows of the time. Standard biographies of Texas Rangers, such as Webb, do not list French, nor is he found on the official rolls of the Texas Rangers. Dykes does not list the book in “Ranger Reading” or Rare Western Outlaw Books, but he does list Wild Jim’s book in Burs under the Saddle. ($300-600)

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152. FROEBEL, Julius. Seven Years’ Travel in Central America, Northern Mexico, and the Far West of the United States. London: Richard Bentley, 1859. [i-v] vi-xiv, [2], [1-3] 4-587 [1, blank] pp., 8 wood-engraved plates of scenes in Central America, Northern Mexico, the borderlands, Arizona, Texas, and New Mexico, engraved text illustrations. 8vo, publisher’s embossed blue cloth, spine gilt-lettered and decorated (neatly rebacked, original spine preserved, new endpapers supplied). Binding shelf slanted and somewhat faded, lower part of spine discolored, corners bumped, and edge wear. Interior with uniform light browning and scattered light staining at lower blank margins; plates very fine. Overall a very good copy, untrimmed.

    First edition in English (first edition, Leipzig, 1857-1858). Clark, Old South III:316: “[Froebel] painted with broad and bold strokes the overall picture of American institutions, with their highlights and shadows of regional exception...rich in materials describing Texas—the early routes of travel to Galveston, San Antonio, and El Paso, the vegetation and wildlife, German settlers, and geological lore.” Cowan, p. 226. Graff 1448. Howes F390. Kelsey, Engraved Prints of Texas 1554-1900, Fig. 4.270. Palau 95117. Pilling 1333. Plains & Rockies IV:292:2: “Camp calls this one of the most interesting books of travel through the southwest.” Raines, p. 85. Rittenhouse 231. Sabin 25992. The first part of the present volume describes Froebel’s travels in Nicaragua in 1850 while investigating a possible canal route; the second describes his trip over the Santa Fe Trail to Chihuahua and his return through Texas; and the third describes his journey in 1853 and 1854 across Texas, through New Mexico and Arizona to California. Froebel’s account is excellent, evincing his keen interest in politics, science, mining, natural history, and archaeology. Froebel gives what is probably the first description of Sally Skull. ($1,000-2,000)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

153. [GADSDEN PURCHASE]. MEXICO & UNITED STATES. TREATY. Printed announcement by Santa-Anna publishing the Treaty of Mesilla, dated July 20, 1854, by Manuel Díez de Bonilla. [Text begins] S.A.S. el General Presidente se ha servido dirigirme el decreto que sigue: Antonio López de Santa-Anna...Que habiéndose concluido y firmado en esta capital el dia 30 de Diciembre del año próximo pasado de 1853, un Tratado entre la República Mejicana y los Estado-Unidos de América. Mexico, 1854,[8] pp. Folio. Washed and stabilized. Very rare (5 copies located).

     First edition of the treaty that cemented the Gadsden Purchase. Not in standard sources. The treaty for the Gadsden Purchase resolved the problems that arose in the differing interpretations of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The initial-point controversy was settled by the U.S. purchasing the Mesilla Valley from Mexico for $10,000,000, thus providing the United States with enough land for a southern transcontinental railway route. The treaty also abrogated the article of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which made the United States responsible for Native American raids into Mexico. Finally, the Gadsden Purchase modified some articles of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and gave the U.S. rights of transit across Tehuantepec. “With the Gadsden Purchase, the outlines of the continental United States had been drawn and the first phase of the great imperialistic struggle for the West had been completed” (Goetzmann, Exploration and Empire, p. 263). ($10,000-20,000)

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154. GAGE, Thomas. A New Survey of the West-Indias Or, The English American his Travail by Sea and Land.... London: Printed by E. Cotes, and sold by John Sweeting at the Angel in Popes-head-alley, M.DC.LV. [10], 1-220, [12] pp., 4 copper-engraved maps, woodcut initials and ornaments. Small folio (29.5 x 19.2 cm), contemporary red, blue, and beige marbled paper over boards, expertly rebacked with new smooth brown calf, dark brown morocco spine label with gilt lettering. Light shelfwear to boards, corners bumped. Some foxing and staining to text, one map backed with slight loss at upper left, C6 lacks lower right corner costing some text. Overall a good copy. Engraved bookplate of Holland House affixed to front pastedown.

     Second edition, enlarged (the first edition, London, 1648, did not contain maps; “This second edition is preferable to the first on account of the four excellent maps which appear for the first time”—Harper 201:242). European Americana 655/65. Field 584n. Griffin 2078: Hill I, p. 118 (citing first edition): “Gage smuggled aboard ship in an empty biscuit barrel to circumvent the King of Spain’s decrees against foreigners in Spanish territories of the New World. His book caused a great sensation, for it was the first to give the world a description of the vast regions from which all foreigners had been jealously excluded by the Spanish authorities. Its purpose was to urge mastery of the Spanish territories in the New World by the English.” JCB I (1600-1658), pp. 448-449. Palau 96480. Pilling 1364: “Some brief and short rules for the better learning of the Indian tongue called Poconchi, or Po-coman, commonly used in Guatemala and some other parts of Honduras.” Sabin 26299. Wing G113. One of the more thrilling and authentic seventeenth-century travel accounts concerning Spanish America. This second edition has lost none of its character as a goad to the English to conquer some Spanish possessions in the area. Especially in his dedication to Thomas Fairfax, Gage urges that measures be taken to acquire territory, to which he argues the English have just as much right as the Spanish. ($1,500-4,000)

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155. GAGE, Thomas. Nouvelle relation, contenant les voyages...dans la Nouvelle Espagne.... Amsterdam: Paul Marret, 1695-1694. Vol. I: [22], 1-200, 1-178 pp. Vol. II: [10], 1-316 pp., total engraved plates and maps: 2 pictorial title pages, 12 folded plates (including bird’s-eye view of Mexico City, 4 folded maps (including a map of California as an island). 2 vols., 12mo, contemporary full calf, spine gilt with raised bands (neatly rebacked, original spines preserved). Binding moderately worn and corners bumped, Vol. II upper hinge starting; interior and engravings fine.

     Second edition in French. The first edition was published at London in 1648 under title The English-American his Travail, by Sea and Land.Cf. Hill I(1), pp. 118-119; II:665. The English edition did not contain the plates and Sanson’s maps, or the extracts from the chronicle of Francisco López de Gómara (Wagner, Spanish Southwest 2), which includes material on Coronado, New Mexico, Cibolo, Quivira, Drake, New Albion, etc.). JCB II (1675-1700), pp. 285 & 299. Brunet II, col. 1436. European Americana 1694/71 & 1695/80. Griffin 2078: “A vivid, though prejudiced description of the voyage from Spain to Mexico and of Mexico and Central America in the first half of the seventeenth century by an English Dominican, later turned renegade. An excellent source for social history.” McLaughlin, California as an Island 119. Palau 96485. Sabin 26304. “Gage’s narration of his wanderings...was the first extensive eyewitness description of life in the Spanish colonies by a northern European” (J. Benedict Warren, “An Introductory Survey of Secular Writings in the European Tradition on Colonial Middle America, 1503-1818,” p. 62 in Handbook of Middle American Indians, Vol. 13, Part 2). ($600-1,200)

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156. GALVESTON, HARRISBURG & SAN ANTONIO RAILROAD COMPANY. WHILLDIN, M. (compiler). A Description of Western Texas, Published by the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway Company, the Sunset Route.... Galveston: “News” Steam Book & Job Office, 1876. [2], [1-3] 4-120 pp., 32 lithographs on 31 leaves (including chromolithograph pictorial wrappers and untitled map). 12mo, original colored lithograph pictorial wrappers (upper cover with illustration of bird’s-eye view of route; lower cover with lively pictorial vignettes within fancy borders). Upper wrapper neatly reattached (no losses), small portion of upper corner of upper wrap chipped and replaced (not affecting border, title, or illustration), head and tail of fragile spine slightly chipped, else a fine copy of a very fragile, ephemeral publication. Plates, map, and text exceptionally fine, wrappers fine. Recto of first leaf with contemporary purple ink stamp of Dr. Ammi Brown, “Immigrant Agent” of Boston and contemporary ink ownership signature. Very rare.

     First edition, corrected issue. Adams, Herd 2502. CBC 5036. Eberstadt, Texas 162:909. Graff 4627. Howes W338. Winkler 3913. Some copies have a separately published promotional map inserted, although it is not called for, since a map is already present in the work. This superb traveler’s guide covers the area along the route of the railroad from Houston to San Antonio. Each small town along the way is described, and many are illustrated by full-page lithographic views, some of which are the earliest known depictions of the towns. Many of the towns show the railroad depot, or, in some cases, depict a covered track crossing a river. Included are views of Columbus, Weimar, Flatonia, Gonzales, Luling, and New Braunfels. A large part of the book is devoted to San Antonio with views of the town and several of the missions, including the Alamo. The work will be included in Ron Tyler’s forthcoming work on nineteenth-century lithography, in which Tyler remarks: “The lithographs that accompany the text are extraordinary for nineteenth-century Texas, in that they thoroughly illustrate Whilldin’s text in a manner comparable only to the prints for Gray’s 1856 description of the proposed railroad route from San Antonio to El Paso.”   ($2,500-5,000)

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157. GÁLVEZ, Bernardo de. Diario de las operaciones de la expedición contra la Plaza de Panzacola. Madrid or Mexico, 1781. 4to (19.4 x 14.3 cm), later plain wrappers. Very fine.

     First edition. Howes P59. Jones 574. Medina (Mexico) 7195. Palau 96980. Sabin 19949 & 26475. Streeter Sale 1191: “The only printed book to appear under the name of this outstanding historical figure.” Gálvez, a major force in Spanish Texas and the Borderlands, gives a glorious account of his victory and capture of Pensacola during the American Revolution, which in effect broke the British hold on West Florida and made it likely that Spain would be given Florida at the Peace of 1783. ($3,000-6,000)

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158. GAZTAÑETA Y ITURRIVALZAGA, José Antonio de. Proporciones de las medidas mas essempciales, dadas por el theniente general da la Armada Real del Mar Occeano [sic] Don Antonio de Gastañeta, de Orden del Rey nuestro Señor, para la fabrica de navios, y fragatas de Guerra.... Madrid, 1720. [10], 31 folios, 1 folded table, 1 copper-engraved folded plate of shipbuilding plan for a seventy-gun war ship. Folio, new vellum. First and last leaves stabilized (no losses), all leaves and plate with small worm holes affecting some letters and image, mild stains in last half of book. Overall, very good. Very rare. Only five copies listed on OCLC, with only two in the United States, and no auction records for the past thirty years.

     First edition of the first Spanish scientific shipbuilding guide. Ensayo de bibliografía marítima española 100. European Americana 1720/100. Palau 100976. The first leaf comprises a royal decree of 13 May 1721, ordering that this book be used throughout the kingdom, including the New World, for the construction of ships and that the directions contained in it be strictly followed. He also orders the book to be published and distributed throughout his domains. The book was written at the King’s express command.An extremely detailed shipbuilding guide, the work is divided into several parts. This is a major eighteenth-century treatise on shipbuilding that guided Spanish warship construction for the better part of the century and set the example for scientific ship construction. Gaztañeta (1656-1728) enjoyed a long, distinguished career in the Spanish navy, first sailing as a young man with his father to Veracruz. Despite the honors and increased rank that devolved on him, he always remained interested in piloting, at which he was expert. ($2,500-5,000)

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159. GEMELLI CARERI, Gio[vanni] Francesco. Giro del mondo del Dottor D. Gio: Francesco Gemelli Careri. Nouva edizione accresciuta, ricoretta, e divisa in nove volumi. Con un Indice de’ Viaggiatori, e loro opere. Tomo Primo [-Nono].... Venezia: Presso Sebastiano Coleti, 1728.  Vol. I: [32], 1-314, [6] pp., 6 plates, including frontispiece (1 folded); Vol. II: [4], 1-317, [11] pp., 5 plates (2 folded); Vol. III: [4], 1-256, [10] pp., 17 plates (1 folded); Vol. IV: [4], 1-335, [13] pp., 4 plates (1 folded); Vol. V: [4], 1-268, [20] pp., 2 plates; Vol. VI: [4], 1-292, [12] pp., 13 plates (2 folded), 2 folded maps; Vol. VII: [6], 1-290, [18] pp., Vol. VIII: [2], 1-336, [14] pp., 1 folded plate; Vol. IX: [1], 1-288 pp. Total plates and maps: 48 engraved plates and 2 engraved maps ([1] Copia d’una antica dipintura conseruata da D. Carlo Siguenza; [2] Hÿdrocoaphicame lo Mexicano rappresentato nelle sue Lacune). 9 vols. in 5, 8vo, contemporary quarter vellum over brown and purple mottled boards, edges sprinkled. Except for light shelf wear, in very good condition, plates and maps fine. Vol. IX title page with a few letters in facsimile; otherwise, the interiors are very good with the engravings very fine and in good impressions.

     Fourth edition, augmented (first edition, Naples, 1699-1700; two editions, Venice, 1719), based on a Venice, 1719 edition. European Americana 1728/77. Glass remarks in Vol. 14, pp. 197-198 (#290) that the first map’s source is Códice Ramírez and notes that Gemelli-Carreri’s version of the map was the one used by Kingsborough (see herein) in his monumental work, as well as Humboldt (see herein). Palau 101117n. Porrúa 6960. Sabin 26850. All editions are rare. The only difference between the first Italian edition and later ones is the addition of his European voyage (here Vols. 7-9). The author (1651-1725) was an Italian native who received a law degree from College of Jesuits in Naples and who decided to set out on his journey after a series of reverses, deciding to finance his trip by buying goods at one place and then selling them at a profit at a later venue. ($1,500-3,000)

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160. GERSTÄCKER, Fr[iedrich Wilhelm Christian]. [Cover title with map showing Gold Region] Preis 5 Sgr. Kaliforniens Gold- U. Quecksilber-District. Nach: the California-Herald von Fr. Gerstäcker. 1849. [below map border] Verlag v. Wilhelm Jurany in Leipzig. [printer’s imprint on p. 30, last page of text] Gedruckt bei E. Polz in Leipzig. Leipzig, [1849]. [2, cover title with map; verso blank], [1] 2-32 pp. (final 2 pages are publisher’s ads, the latest of which are dated 1849 and January 20, 1849). 8vo, original white printed upper wrapper, as issued, illustrated with map. Light soiling and marginal age-toning; upper wrapper trimmed close on right side into neat line; a few minor short tears to blank margins of last few leaves mended. Overall a very good copy of an elusive Gold Rush guide and map, professionally and sympathetically conserved.

     First edition. The second had the final page of text partly reset. The third had portions of the final few pages reset, with new text. Other than those changes and the edition statements on the wrapper, all are from the same setting of type. At least three editions came out in 1849 and all are exceedingly rare. Our copy has no edition designated, whereas the other two editions are identified on the covers as second and third revised editions. Cowan I, p. 96. Cowan II, p. 234. Howes G138. Kurutz, “California as We Saw It”: Exploring the California Gold Rush, Section VII, Pt. 1 (“The World Rushed In”) describes the rare map: “Gerstäcker’s slender guide is open to a beautiful untitled map of Northern California showing the gold district.” Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 269: “This pamphlet by the German traveler is based on an issue of the California Herald published on December 26, 1848, and is essentially a guidebook. Gerstäcker provided information on crossing the Isthmus, but recommended the Cape Horn route. He also warned Germans against the overland route. In addition to giving travel advice, the author described San Francisco and the gold region and provided quotations from various newspapers.” Sabin 100179. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region 90. Of Gerstäcker’s immense output of publications, the present Gold Rush guide is the rarest, and perhaps the most influential in respect to American emigration. ($6,000-10,000)

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161. [GIDEON, D.C.]. Indian Territory Descriptive Biographical and Genealogical Including the Landed Estates, County Seats etc., etc. with a General History of the Territory By D.C. Gideon In One Volume Illustrated. Chicago & New York: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1901. [i-iii] iv-xvi, [1] [2] 956 pp., approximately 100 plates plus text illustrations, some full page (mostly portraits, some architecture, and scenes). 4to, original dark brown roan, bevelled edges, neatly rebacked, spine preserved (missing small portions at head and foot of spine), new endpapers. Binding chipped, scuffed, and corners bumped; moderate shelf wear. A few pages at front repaired at edges, text and plates fine, except for light foxing to title, a bit of light staining, and waterstaining to verso of one plate. Very good with original binding preserved. Bookplate of John W. Shleppey, University of Tulsa. Rare.

     First edition (in another issue of the book, Gideon’s name is not listed as author on the title). Adams, Guns 1107: “Has a long section on all the outlaws of the Indian Territory, including the Dalton gang and Cook gang. The author is mistaken in saying that Belle Starr’s brother Ed was her twin, and he repeats all the early and false legends about her.” Howes G158. Adams did not include this work in Rampaging Herd, but the tome has a wealth of material (and many excellent photographs) on Indian Territory ranching and stock raisers, such as Mat Wolf, John D. McLaughlin, Dorsey B. Taliaferro, A. J. McFarlin, et al. Another interesting aspect of the work is biographies of the many Texans who emigrated to Indian Territory and tie-ins between Texas and Oklahoma history. This volume is a cornerstone of historical, anthropological, social, and genealogical research for Indian Territory shortly before it was extinguished in 1907 by Oklahoma statehood. The author’s stance on Native Americans may be inferred by a statement in the section entitled “Indians Becoming Extinct.” ($600-1,200)

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162. GONZÁLEZ CARRANZA, Domingo. A Geographical Description of the Coasts, Harbours, and Sea Ports of the Spanish West-Indies...the Bay of Mexico, and the North Sea of America.... London: Caleb Smith, 1740. 5 folded copper-engraved maps and charts. 8vo, modern full vellum. Very good copy, maps fine.

     First edition? One of two versions that came out in 1740. Apparently no one has yet sorted out which edition came first. European Americana 1740/141. Palau 105157. Sabin 11030, 27899. The work has been questioned as possibly a fabrication published simply to encourage sales of the book, but Lawrence C. Wroth brilliantly deconstructs this intriguing English navigation manual for the Spanish Main in his article “Some American Contributions to the Art of Navigation 1519-1802” (Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Third Series, Vol. 68 October, 1944-May, 1947, pp. 72-112). ($1,500-3,000)

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163. GOTTFRIED, J.L. & Matthaeus Merian. Newe Welt vnd americanische Historien.... Frankfurt, 1655. [6], 661 [2] pp., engraved allegorical title (Historia antipodum oder Newe Welt...), 5 engraved folded maps and views (including Merian’s revision of John Smith’s epochal map of Virginia), about 175 half-page text engravings (views and maps, including early images of Virginia, North Carolina, Florida, and Drake in California). Folio, full modern calf by Aquarius of London. Other than slight browning and occasional staining and a few old repairs, very good.

     Second edition, augmented, of an important compilation on the exploration, conquest, and colonization of the New World (first edition, 1631). Borba de Moraes, pp. 311-313. BMC, Natural History I, p. 272. JCB I (2, 1600-1658), p. 443. Burden 235n & 251n (map of America) & 219n & 164n (John Smith map of Virginia). European Americana 1655/74). Palau 646. Sabin 50. Michiel van Groesen, “America Abridged: Matthaeus Merian, Johann Ludwig Gottfried, and the Apotheosis of the De Bry Collection of Voyages” in Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 41 (2011), pp. 67-92: “A one-volume abridgment of the monumental America series issued by Theodor De Bry and his two sons. Historia Antipodum can be considered the apotheosis of the collection of voyages to the New World. This article argues that Gottfried’s abridgment, rather than the independent publication it is sometimes taken to be, was constructed with the same editorial strategy in mind as earlier De Bry volumes. Heathen beliefs in the western hemisphere were further emphasized, European superiority was visualized more clearly, and the predilection for spectacular images was stronger than ever. In many ways, the modifications Merian and Gottfried made to both texts and illustrations surpassed the changes made for the original volumes of America.” ($5,000-10,000)

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164. GRAYSON, P.W. Vice Unmasked.... New York, 1830. 8vo, recent three-quarter russet calf over marbled boards, black morocco spine label. Very good copy of an uncommon title.

     First edition. American Imprints (1830) 1661. Possibly the author was the Peter Wagener Grayson (1788-1838), attorney, poet, soldier, legislator, and active in Texas from 1830, where he held several important positions before and after the Revolution (see Handbook of Texas). David Grimsted, “Rioting in its Jacksonian Setting” (American Historical Review, Vol. 77, No. 2, April 1872, pp. 371-372): “Vice Unmasked...presents most coherently the intellectual structure of uneasiness with the law that ran through Jacksonian life.... Grayson was unenthusiastic about law because he considered it the greatest obstacle to the realization of the promise of American life.” ($600-1,200)

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165. GUALDI, Pietro. Monumentos de Mejico.... Mexico, 1841. 13 leaves of lithographs on heavy paper (including title): letterpress-woodcut-lithograph title page with ornate border, small view of Cathedral at top, panoramic view of Mexico City and surrounding region below, and a plethora of type fonts and decorative ornaments (verso with Gualdi’s lithograph copyright statement); and 12 lithograph plates of views in Mexico City by Massé y Decaen after art work by Gualdi. Oblong folio, recent three-quarter smooth scarlet calf over marbled boards, recent endpapers. One plate detached. Other than inconsequential scattered foxing, a very fine, wide-margined copy with fresh plates in excellent impressions. We trace no auction records for any edition of this work.

     First edition of one of the earliest Mexican lithograph view books, and the first view book devoted to any Mexican city. Some points of the first edition are: penultimate line on title page: “obsequio a los señores abonados”; table of contents statements on title differ; verso of lithograph title with copyright dated January 9, 1841. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 21. Museo Nacional de Arte, Nación de imágenes: La Litografía mexicana del siglo XIX, pp. 340, 358. Roberto L. Mayer, “Los dos álbumes de Pedro Gualdi” in Anales del Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, UNAM, 1996, pp. 81-102. Palau 109364. Sabin 29048. Toussaint, La Litografía en México, pp. xvii-xviii (Plate 13): “La más importante que salió de sus prensas fué la obra, hoy rarísima: Monumentos de Méjico.” For more on Gualdi see: Palmquist, Pioneer Photographers from the Mississippi to the Continental Divide, pp. 291-292; Erica Segre, Intersected Identities: Strategies of Visualisation in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Mexico (New York: Berghahn Books, 2007), pp. 37-38; and María Esther Pérez Salas, Costumbrismo y litografía en México: Un nuevo modo de ver (Mexico: UNAM, Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, 2005), p. 153. ($15,000-$30,000)

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166. GUALDI, Pietro. Monumentos de Mejico.... Mexico, 1841. Text: [12] letterpress leaves with descriptive text on rectos for each plate (printed by José Mariano Fernández de Lara). Plates: 13 leaves of lithographs by Massé y Decaen after Gualdi, on medium-weight paper (title plus 12 views of Mexico City with emphasis on architecture by Massé y Decaen after Gualdi): letterpress-woodcut-lithograph title page with ornate border, small view of Cathedral at top, long view of Mexico City and surrounding region below, and a playful fusion of type fonts; the other twelve lithographs are views. Oblong folio, contemporary three-quarter diced calf over brown cloth (neatly rebacked, original spine and endpapers retained). Plates and text professionally washed. Some shelf wear to fragile binding, first two leaves with closed tear (slight loss to title page, replaced in pen and ink facsimile). Plate [10] with lower right blank corner supplied and tear repaired at lower left into image (no losses). Otherwise the interior and plates are fine. Rare.

     Second edition of preceding,one of the earliest Mexican lithograph view books, and the first view book devoted to any Mexican city, recording now-lost perspectives of Mexico City itself. The present edition contains revisions and, in some cases, entirely new plates. See previous entry for first edition and notes on Gualdi and his work. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 21. Palau 109364. Sabin 29048. Toussaint, La Litografía en México, pp. xvii-xviii. Plate lists for both editions in full descriptions on our web site. For additional notes on this cornerstone Mexican plate book and Gualdi, see previous entry Roberto L. Mayer, “Los dos álbumes de Pedro Gualdi” in Anales del Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, UNAM, No. 69, 1996, pp. 81-102. ($10,000-20,000)

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167. GÜEMES PACHECO DE PADILLA, Juan Vicente de, Second Conde de Revillagigedo (Viceroy of New Spain, 1789-1794). Copper-engraved appointment form completed in manuscript, appointing José de Andrade lieutenant in the Dragoons Regiment of Spain, signed by Revillagigedo and Antonio Bonilla. Mexico City, March 24, 1794. Folio, elaborate border and large image of the Conde’s arms. Creased where formerly folded, with three small professionally closed splits intruding into image (no losses), several small holes in left blank margin, otherwise fine. The appointment is highly legible and the signatures are dark and bold.

     Embodied in this beautifully engraved Viceregal document is a rare conjunction of Mexican figures involved in the settling and organization of Texas The administraton of Revillagigedo (1740-1799) was very progressive, and included exploratory ventures to the Pacific Northwest, and a more enlightened view of missions and presidios in Texas and the Spanish Southwest. The other signer of this document, Antonio Bonilla, was the first historian of Texas. The engravings of Joaquín Fabregat (1748-1807) are considered to this day “magníficos” and embody a refined neo-Classical style. ($250-500)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

168. HACKETT, Charles Wilson. Revolt of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Otermín’s Attempted Reconquest 1680-1682.... Albuquerque: The University of New Mexico Press, 1942. Vol. I: [i-viii] ix-ccx, [1-2] 3-261 pp.; Vol. II: [i-viii] ix-xii, [1-2] 3-430 pp. 8vo, 2 vols. Very fine, fresh, and unopened, in very lightly chipped pictorial dust jackets.

     First edition of the best scholarly edition on the Pueblo uprising against Spanish Colonization of Santa Fé in 1680. Vols. VIII & IX Coronado Quarto Centennial Publications, 1540-1940. Cumberland, Hackett, p. 146. Laird, Hopi Bibliography, 1032: ”The fundamental work on the Pueblo revolt.” See Carlos Castañeda in The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. 46, No. 4 (April, 1943), pp. 381-383. ($200-400)

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169. HACKETT, Charles Wilson. Revolt of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Otermín’s Attempted Reconquest 1680-1682.... Albuquerque: The University of New Mexico Press, 1970. Vol. I: [i-viii] ix-ccx, [1-2] 3-262 pp.; Vol. II: [i-viii] ix-xii, [1-2] 3-430 pp. 8vo, 2 vols. Very fine, unopened set, in fine dust jackets. Provenance: Charles Wilson Hackett’s Library.

     Second printing of preceding item, from the same sheets as the original edition of 1942 (see preceding). Only the dust jackets have been changed. Vols. VIII & IX Coronado Quarto Centennial Publications, 1540-1940. ($100-200)

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170. [HALE, Edward Everett]. A Tract for the Day. How to Conquer Texas, before Texas Conquers Us. Boston: Redding, 1845. 16 pp. 8vo, later protective wrappers. Other than occasional mild foxing, very fine.

     First edition. American Imprints (1845) 2939. Eberstadt, Texas 162:373. Sabin 29626. Streeter 1583. In this three-penny dreadful, Hale refers to the Texans as “an unprincipled population of adventurers.” His main intention, of course, was to somehow prevent Texas from becoming a slave state by diluting the present population with abolitionist New Englanders who would gain a voting majority if enough of them emigrated. Hale is best known for his popular short story, “The Man Without a Country” (Atlantic Monthly, December, 1863). ($200-400)

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171. HALL, William M[oseley]. Speech of William M. Hall of New York. In Favor of a National Rail Road to the Pacific, at the Great Chicago Convention, July 7, 1847. Also a Review of the Tehuantepec Route, Embracing the Famous Garay Grant, Sloo Contract, and Other Routes and Plans. New York: Printed at the Day Book Female Type Setting Establishment, 1853. [1-3] 4-68 pp. 8vo, new quarter brown morocco over marbled boards, spine gilt-lettered. Title browned and with old red ink stamps of Jas. G. Bennett; tear repaired with no loss (pp. 5/6), else very good.

     Second edition, enlarged (first edition had 22 pp.) of a railroad promotional decrying private speculators. Howes H91. Sabin 29862. Not in Palau. Hall recommends the route proposed by George Wilkes and paints a rosy picture of the prospects for the United States if the national railroad is combined with the telegraph. The printer, Day Book Female Type Setting Establishment, was established in 1853 on account of the strike of the New York Typographical Union. The original speech by Hall is cited in the following article, and briefly quoted: Ben Barker-Benfield, “The Spermatic Economy: A Nineteenth-Century View of Sexuality,” Footnote 62 on p. 70, in Feminist Studies, Vol. 1, No. 1, Summer, 1972. The quoted note is: “This is how William Hall described the observation of the advance of the railroad, in a speech to the 1847 Railroad Commission in Chicago: ‘They saw him pluck out forests, tear up and fling aside the seated hills, and with the rejoicing sound of progress in his train, made way into the body of the continent, with the step of a bridegroom going to his chambers or a prince to occupy his throne.’” See p. 5 in this pamphlet. ($100-200)

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172. HAMILTON, A[ndrew] J[ackson]. Address of A.J. Hamilton [text commences] To the People of Texas. Fellow Citizens—Impressed with the belief that it was the wish of a large portion of the citizens and voters of Texas, I have presented my name as a candidate at the approaching election for the Governor of the State under the New Constitution.... [Austin, 1869]. Folio broadside printed in six columns: Sheet size 46 x 40.2 cm. A few minor splits where formerly folded, a bit of light chipping to blank margins, overall very good.

     First edition. Winkler 2078 (locating copy at Austin Public Library; we had a copy in our last auction). Sabin (29993 & 29994) lists two of Hamilton’s broadsides, but not this one. In this address Hamilton states that he is a supporter of a new constitution and denounces his Democratic opponents as divisive. He remarks he believes everyone of any race should be allowed to vote and that he will defend the rights of people of color. He states that at this juncture all people will suffer if any element in society is slighted and that the populace needs to pull together for their mutual prosperity. See Handbook of Texas Online for more on Hamilton. ($600-1,200)

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173. HAZART, Cornelius. Kirchen-Geschichte, das ist: Catholisches Christenthum durch die ganze Welt auszgebreitet.... Vienna, 1678-1701. Vol. I: [10], 1-666, [16] pp., 2 plates (1 folded); Vol. II: [14], 1-606, [28] pp., frontispiece; Vol. III, Part 1: [14], 1-220, [2], 1-159, [22] pp.; Vol. III, Part 2: [12], 1-304, [8], 5-284, [24] pp., numerous copper-engraved text illustrations (religious scenes, martyrdom). 3 vols. in 2, folio, contemporary full blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards. Very good copy, engravings very fine in strong impressions. Difficult to find complete.

     The first edition, Kerkelijke Historie van de geeheele Wereldt, came out at Antwerp between 1667 and 1671. Cordier, Japonica 379. European Americana 1678/64: “Sets of this edition generally lack Vol. 3.” Field 673: “Pages 311 to 457 are occupied with the Jesuit Missions among the Indians of Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Florida, Canada, Paraguay, and Maragnan [Island of St. Louis, a French colony off the coast of Brazil].” Sabin 31114. Sommervogel, Bibliothèque de la Compagnie de Jésus VII:1407. ($1,500-3,000)

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174. HECO, Joseph. The Narrative of a Japanese.... Yokohama: Yokohama Printing & Publishing Co., Ltd., [ca. 1895]. 14 (of 15) plates (scenes, architecture, documents, map), numerous text illustrations (some full-page). 2 vols., 8vo, publisher’s original cloth lettered in gilt on upper covers and spines (Vol. I, red cloth; Vol. II, light brown cloth). Vol. I recased, spine darkened and repaired at extremities, covers lightly stained and wrinkled. Vol. II: gilt lettering on spine faded, spine extremities repaired. Interiors very fine. Vol. I with several purple ownership stamps of businessman E.H. Tuska of Yokohama, July 1, [18]93. Both volumes with printed bookseller's ticket Jiujiya ofYokohama. Interspersed are pencil annotations and a few corrections. "Of considerable rarity" (Forbes).

     First edition in English (the first edition was published in Japanese in 1863). This is the first autobiography in English written by a Japanese-American. Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography 4681: “Heco first made a brief stop at Hilo in April 1852.... In 1858-1859 Heco made two additional stops in Honolulu.” Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 325a: “Heco in these amazing reminiscences recorded the only published account of a Japanese in the Gold Rush.” Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 94: “His experiences were unique. He saw the Gold Rush through wondering eyes. He became an American citizen, visited Washington and met the President, and thereafter returned to Japan to serve as an official interpreter of the American Mission.” Zamorano Select 46. ($800-1,500)

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175. HELLER, Carl Bartholomaeus. Reisen in Mexiko in den Jahren 1845-1848.... Mit Zwei Karten, Sechs Holzschnitten Und Einer Lithographie. Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann, 1853. [i-ix] x-xxiv, [1-3] 4-432 pp., 2 lithograph maps (Yucatan and Rio Tabasco), 1 plate of antiquity, a few text engravings. 8vo, original brown cloth over paper-covered boards, edges sprinkled. Slightly shelf slanted, fragile boards rubbed with a few losses, corners bumped; text block cracked at pp. xiv/xv, but interior good with scattered light to moderate foxing, maps and plates very good. From the Library of Sir Thomas Phillipps, with his ink shelf mark, manuscript index of plants, and occasional pencil notes. Embossed blind stamp of bookseller Pferrschi on title page and last page. Very rare in commerce. No copies at auction in over thirty years.

     First edition. Palau 112904. Pilling 1720. Sabin 31251. Antochiw, pp. 282-283, discusses the author and illustrates an 1814 copy of the 1798 original of this map; Antochiw, Mapa 118, shows Heller’s rendition. Antochiw remarks that Leon’s map was the last one from Mexico’s colonial period to be printed with the name of its author (p. 284). This rare travel account by German botanist Heller (1824-?) emphasizes natural history, along with some discussion of archaeology. Heller was probably the most important German botanist to visit Mexico since Humboldt. Dicc. Porrúa. ($1,000-2,000)

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176. HERNÁNDEZ, Francisco. Rervm Medicarvm Novæ Hispaniæ thesavrvs, Sev Plantarvm, Animalivm, Mineralivm Mexicanorvm Historia.... Rome: Vitalis Mascardi, 1651. [36], 1-455 [1, blank] 457-950, [2], 1-90, [6] pp., 2 copper engraved plates (pictorial title + botanical plates), engraved text illustration of music, approximately 800 woodcut text illustrations, some with early color. 2 vols., folio, eighteenth-century full mottled calf, spine extra gilt with raised bands and red and green morocco labels. Very slight wear to bindings, title scrubbed with two small losses, very mild scattered foxing, and a bit of marginal water staining, small hole at leaf 3R5 affecting a few letters. The oversize tables in Vol. II are trimmed with loss. Overall a very good copy. The Estelle Doheny copy with her burgundy morocco gilt book labels on front flyleaves.

     First Latin edition, third issueof the first great contribution to an American materia medica, recording and illustrating the first scientific expedition to New Spain. Anker, Bird Books and Bird Art, p. 18. Arents (Add.) 346. JCB I (2, 1600-1658), p. 408. European Americana 1651/81 & 1651/82. Garrison & Morton (5th edition), Medical Bibliography. 1821.1n. Guerra, Bibliografía de la Materia Medica Mexicana 150. Hunt, Catalogue of Botanical Books 247. Medina, Hispano-Americana 1157. Nissen, Die botanische Buchillustration 861. Nissen, ZBI 1908a. Palau 113538. Pilling 1745 & 1746. Price, Medical Americana M207. Pritzel, Thesaurus Literaturae Botanica 4000. Sabin 31516. ($15,000-30,000)

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177. HERRERA Y TORDESILLAS, Antonio de. Descripción de las Indias Ocidentales.... Madrid: Juan Flamenco, [1601].[2], [2], 1-96 pp., copper-engraved pictorial title, plus 14 copper-engraved folded maps of America (old color wash applied in a loose, primitive style). Folio, modern full green morocco gilt, a.e.g. Spine a bit faded and joints a little chafed. Wormed throughout with some loss to maps and text (some leaves extensively). All leaves silked and mounted on stubs. “Rare and much sought after” (Borba de Moraes I, pp. 399-400).

     First edition of the third printed atlas of America (see Burden 115-122). European Americana 1601/41. Martin & Martin, p. 77. Medina, Hispano-Americana 455. Palau 114286. Phillips, Atlases 1141. Sabin 31539. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 226 & pp. 66-77, 93. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 12. Map references: Antochiw, Historia Cartographica de la Peninsula de Yucatán, pp. 16, 137. Bornholdt, Cuatro Siglos de Expresiones Geográficas del Istmo Centroamericano Plate 27 (p. 75). Burden, The Mapping of North America 140-142. Hayes, Historical Atlas of the North Pacific Ocean, p. 1107. Martin, pp. 18 & 77. Reinhartz, Mapping and Empire, Illustration 3.1 & p. 58 Tooley, Landmarks of Mapmaking, p. 16. Vindel, Mapas de America en los Libros Españoles, Plates 63-90. Wagner, The Cartography of the Northwest Coast, pp. 66-67, 93 & No. 226. From the moment of its first publication, Herrera’s chronicle was considered a cornerstone work for the history of the conquest, colonization, and progress of America, constituting the most complete single source for the period. The maps of America found in the present volume are early and important. ($4,000-8,000)

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178. HERRERA Y TORDESILLAS, Antonio de. [Atlas] Descripción de las Indias Occidentales.... [Text & index] Historia general de los hechos de los castellanos en las islas i tierra firme del mar oceano.... Madrid, 1726, 1728, 1730. Atlas + 8 decades of text & index. 9 copper-engraved pictorial title pages with illustrations of Spanish Conquest and colonization in the New World (includes 39 portraits and 72 battle scenes); 14 folded copper-engraved maps. 10 works bound in 5 vols., folio, original vellum. A few old stains to binding and one old repair to Vol. III binding, occasional skillful repairs to text (including early re-margining of Vol. I title and one short tear repaired—no loss to image or border), first map with original thin crease (11 cm long, about half affecting image, remainder in blank margin), otherwise very fine, engravings excellent. Overall, a superb set in original condition. A few scattered old blue ink stamps on text pages (Convento Franciscano de San Felipe).

     Second Spanish edition, from the original 1601-1615 edition. The present edition is frequently described as the best edition because it was compiled under the direction of González de Barcia, who added an enormous index. Borba de Moraes I, pp. 401-402. JCB I (2, 1600-1658), pp. 450-451. Cowan II, p. 276. European Americana 1730/117 & 1730/118. Field 689. Hill I, pp. 143-145. Hill II, #805. Medina, Hispano-Americana 2580. Palau 114287-114288. Phillips, Atlases 1156. Sabin 31541, 31546. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 12k & 12l. Includes Cabeza de Vaca (first recorded journey by Europeans across North America and Texas), and expeditions of Ulloa, Coronado, Cabrillo, De Soto, Marcos de Niza, et al. Selected map references: Burden 140n, 141n, 142n, Martin & Martin 77n. Tooley, Landmarks of Mapmaking, p. 116n. Vindel 63-90n. ($7,500-15,000)

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179. HERRERA Y TORDESILLAS, Antonio de, Jacob Le Maire, et al. Description des Indes Occidentales Amsterdam & Paris, 1622. [8], 103, [1, blank], [6] 107-254 pp., 27 copper-engravings: 22 full-page plates: pictorial title page (with map of California as an island), 17 maps and charts (16 double-page, 1 folding), 4 city views (double-page), 5 text engravings. Folio, recent three-quarter brown morocco over marbled boards. Other than occasional mild age-toning to interior and a few minor nicks to blank margins, a very fine copy, the maps and plates fresh and with generous margins. An extra-illustrated copy with 4 engraved city view, including a primary view of San Augustine, Florida after original drawing of Giovanni Battista Boazio.

     First edition in French, second issue (title page is a cancel, adding the Paris imprint to the Amsterdam imprint). The engraved title has the first printed map showing California as an island. Burden 195-198 (illustrated). European Americana 1622/68. Sabin 31543 (& 14351n). Tooley, California as an Island 107 (Plate 15). Wagner, CNW, pp. 145-146 & No. 291. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 12b. This edition of Herrera is a translation into French of the 1601 edition of the Description (atlas) printed at Madrid. The present edition adds the important account of Jacob Le Maire’s voyage, one of the great early accounts of circumnavigation and Pacific exploration. One of the maps is listed in Martin & Martin’s book on maps of Texas and the Southwest (Plate 7). ($10,000-20,000)

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180. HERRERA Y TORDESILLAS, Antonio de. The General History of the Vast Continent and Islands of America, Commonly call’d, The West-Indies...Translated into English by Capt. John Stevens... London: Batley, 1725-1726. 15 copper-engraved plates, all but 2 folding (portraits, scenes from the Conquest, Amerindian life); plus 3 copper-engraved folded maps. 6 vols., complete, 8vo, nineteenth-century three-quarter crimson morocco over marbled boards (signed binding by James MacLehose of Glasgow). Joints rubbed, a few corners lightly bumped, interior fine except for scattered light foxing to text and plates and a few minor instances of slight worming confined to blank margins. A very good set.

     First English edition. Borba de Moraes I, pp. 401-401. JCB I (3, 1659-1674), p. 355. European Americana 1725/95. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 529. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 12i. “Contains several portions of interest for the history of California: the first complete account of Cabrillo’s discovery and exploration of the California coast in 1542...; the 1535 voyage of Cortez, who discovered Baja California, and according to Herrera, gave the new territory the name of California; and Ulloa’s famous voyage of 1539, during which he discovered that Baja California was not an island but in fact a peninsula, a claim that was not reconfirmed for more than two hundred years” (Howell, California 50:113). ($3,000-6,000)

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181. HERRERA Y TORDESILLAS, Antonio de. Four separate volumes from Pieter van der Aa’s voluminous compilation Naaukeurige versameling, consisting of 28 vols. in 127 parts. The four volumes we offer are drawn from Herrera’s Historia general de los hechos de los castellanos en las islas y tierra firme del mar oceano (1601), translated into Dutch, and illustrated with copper-engraved maps, views, and scenes. The four volumes, which were published in Leyden in 1706-1707, relate to very early voyages, exploration, and conquest in America, particularly Hernán Cortés, and including Lucas Vásquez de Ayllón’s landing in present-day in South Carolina in 1526 and the founding the ill-fated colony of San Miguel de Gualdape, which was the first attempted settlement by Europeans in present-day United States. 29 folded copper-engraved maps and plates. European Americana 1706/117; 1707/67; 1706/111; 1706/111. See our full description for a detailed listing. ($750-1,500)

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182. HOFLAND, Barbara [Wreaks] H[oole]. The Stolen Boy. A Story, Founded On Facts. By Mrs. Hofland.... London: A.K. Newman and Co., n.d. [ca. 1842-1843]. [i-v] vi [1, blank], [9] 10-179 [1] pp., engraved title and engraved frontispiece. 12mo, publisher’s original red roan over marbled boards, spine extra gilt. Upper joint weak and slightly rubbed, minor shelf wear, light abrasion to upper cover, corners bumped, frontispiece and title moderately water stained (remainder of text fine), overall a very good copy of a book in fragile format. Title with contemporary ink ownership inscription. At foot of half title, “London-Darling & Son, Printers, 31, Leadenhall Street.” At foot of p. 179, “Darling & Son, Printers, 31, Leadenhall-street, London.” The title is listed on the ad leaf at end, selling for 2 shillings, 6 pence. Dated from ad at end which lists Godmother’s Tales, published in 1842. Rare in any condition.

     “New Edition” (first edition, London, 1829 or 1830? with 168 pp.). Ayer, Supplement 67. Streeter 1107J (locating only the NYPL copy): “This is the many times printed story of the capture near San Antonio, Texas, of a Spanish boy, Manuel del Perez, by the Comanche Indians, and his escape two or three years later, and his journey across Texas and along the Red River to the settlement at Natchitoches.” Streeter in the introduction to his bibliography of Texas points out this work as especially desirable: “What are known as “Indian Captivities” have a fascination for many, especially if they are fact rather than fiction. There are eleven entries here for Mrs. Hofland’s The Stolen Boy. A Story, Founded on Facts.” ($500-1,000)

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183. HOITT, Ira G. (compiler). Pacific Coast Guide and Programme of the Twentieth National Encampment, Grand Army of the Republic, at San Francisco, August, 1886. Illustrated. Containing Descriptions of the Famous Pleasure Resorts, Routes of Travel, Time Tables, etc.... San Francisco: A.J. Leary, 1886. [2, frontispiece with illustration of Hotel del Monte], [1-6], 7-155 [1, ad] pp., numerous text illustrations, lithograph map: Britton & Rey’s Guide Map of the City of San Francisco... (overall sheet size: 51.2 x 63 cm). 12mo, original blue pictorial wrappers with illustration of Ulysses S. Grant on upper wrap. Fragile wraps neatly rebacked retaining portion of original paper spine. Light marginal chipping to right blank margin of first leaf of text. Map professionally backed with archival tissue (a few small voids at folds). Scarce.

     First edition. Cowan II, p. 288.Rocq 9832. This printed guide covers the high spots of California travel and tourism, including routes, transportation, historical blurbs, etc. The wonders of Yosemite are presented at pp. 115-124. The map is one of the series of excellent San Francisco maps put out by the firm of Britton & Rey, creators of so many classic lithographs of California in the Gold Rush. The book and map were expressly published for a reunion of Union Soldiers who fought in the Civil War. ($200-300)

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184. HOPPE, J[ulius or Janus?] & Georg Adolph Erman. Californiens Gegenwart und Zukunft...Californien...Die bis 1849 bekannt gewordenen Golddistrikte. Berlin: Verlag von G. Reimer, 1849. [i-iii] iv-viii [1] 2-151 [1, errata] pp., 2 uncolored folded lithograph maps (California and world map showing gold deposits). 8vo, original grey printed upper wrapper (title within typographical border), lower wrapper and spine supplied in sympathetic paper. Upper wrapper with mild soiling and moderate marginal chipping, separated from text block, text with light waterstaining at upper and lower outer corners. Maps fine.

     First edition of “one of the most important German publications on the gold discovery in California” (Hill). Cowan II, p. 291. Hill I, pp. 450-451: “The maps are of substantial importance.” Hill II:826. Howes H639 (“aa”). Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 341: “Hoppe believed that the primary interest in California was for the European colonization of the West Coast of North America.” Sabin 32991. Streeter Sale 2573. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region 96 & p. 52. Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 104. ($500-1,000)

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185. HOUSTON, Samuel. Speech of Gen. Sam Houston, of Texas, Refuting Calumnies Produced and Circulated against his Character as Commander-in-Chief of the Army of Texas. Delivered in the Senate of the United States, February 28, 1859. [Washington, D.C., 1859]. Folio broadside, printed in six columns. Bottom torn with loss of small amount of text, minor losses at some folds, right side trimmed with small loss, a few scattered stains, professionally backed. No other copies recorded in this rare format. Very rare unrecorded broadside.

     Unrecorded broadside printing of Sam Houston’s second Battle of San Jacinto, in which he adamantly denies as false the vicious defamations leveled against his conduct at San Jacinto. The text first appeared in the Congressional Globe (Part 2, February 1859, pp. 1433-1438), and also as a fourteen-page pamphlet (of which nine copies are located by OCLC). Eberstadt, Texas 162:411 (pamphlet format): “Important, detailed account of the Battle of San Jacinto.” Sam Houston delivered this heartfelt and indignant speech as his last volley at the end of his term as Texas’ Senator to Washington, D.C., stating: “My object, on this occasion, will be to show the true state of facts connected with that campaign, and with the wars of Texas. It is a subject which I had hoped would never again come under review, particularly my having had any connection with it. I had desired that it would cease forever, so far as I was concerned, and that I should never be placed in a position in which I should seem to be fighting my battles over again. They have not been so numerous, or so illustrious, that I should recall them with any more pleasure than that which arises from having rendered yeoman service to my country, and rendered every duty that patriotism demanded.” Houston then presents a history of events in Texas in 1835-36, commencing with the hasty organization of the Texas Army to repel an invading Mexican army he “was satisfied would advance upon Texas.” He reviews the early weeks of the Texas Revolution, including his countermanded orders to abandon and blow up the Alamo, which he deemed indefensible, and gives a blow-by-blow narrative of events leading up to and including the Battle of San Jacinto. ($5,000-10,000)

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186. HUMBOLDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander. “Tablas geografico-politicas del Reyno de la N. Espa. Que manifiestan su superficie, poblacion, agricultura, frabricas, comercio, minas, rentas y fuerza militar. Por El Baron de Humboldt Presentadas al Sor Virrey del mismo reyno. En el año de 1804.” [112] leaves written in ink on both sides on paper watermarked Elias. 8vo, original plain self wrappers, stitched. Ink highlighted in silver. Dated at end Mexico, 16 July 1804. Pristine in a highly legible professional scribal hand. A very fine, early copy of the entire work.

     Taken as a whole, this pristine manuscript is the first modern statistical analysis of Mexico and the Southwest. The “Tablas” were not completely published completely until 1970, having existed only in partially printed versions or in manuscript versions such as this one. The earliest publication in any form was in vol. 4 of El Diaro de México (1-31 May 1807), wherein appeared the sections on superficie and populación. Publication was probably stopped by the Viceroy because of security concerns. The first book publication was Tablas geográficas políticas (Mexico: Ontiveros, 1822). See Fiedler & Leitner, Alexander von Humboldts Schriften 4.6.9. After Humboldt compiled his statistical tables, he took his original manuscript back to Europe with him but presented a manuscript copy on 3 January 1804 to Viceroy de Iturrigaray in Mexico before his departure. Apparently from that copy other copies such as this were made, and several others are known, dated variously between 1804, the end of the decade, and even later. Despite the overarching, magisterial work that resulted from Humboldt’s research, these tablas reflect the grinding, statistical underpinnings that formed the basis of his vision. Of special Southwest interest are contemporary statistics and conditions for California, New Mexico, and Texas. ($5,000-7,500)

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187. HUMBOLDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander & Aimé Jacques Alexandre Goujaud Bonpland. Essai politique sur le royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne.... Paris: Schoell & Stône, 1811. Text: 2 vols., 4to, contemporary full tan calf expertly rebacked, original spines preserved). Atlas: Atlas Géographique et Physique du Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne.... Paris: Schoell & Stône, 1811. 19 leaves of engraved plates. Large folio, modern three-quarter tan calf over marbled boards. Fine, large set.

     First French edition, second issue, preceded by the fascicules issue. Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 100-101. Fiedler & Leitner, Alexander von Humboldts Schriften 4.6 & 4.6.10. Graff 2009 & 2010n. Howes H786. Jackson, Shooting the Sun #64. Martin & Martin, 23n: “A noteworthy turning point in the cartographic history of Texas.” Miles & Reese, Creating America 23; America Pictured to the Life 45. Palau 116973 (text) & 116974 (atlas). Plains & Rockies IV:7a:3 & 7a:3a:l: “Humboldt’s discussions of California, New Mexico, Texas, and Northern Mexico are detailed and thorough, containing much data that had never before appeared in print.” Sabin 33756 (text & atlas). Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Plate 139 & p. 127: “Humboldt’s map remained the standard map of the Great Basin region until Frémont’s expeditions thirty-five years later.” Streeter 1042 (designates the large map of New Spain as one of the six most desirable maps of Texas). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, 272*, 274*, 275*, 302*, 304*, 305* & Vol. I, pp. 132-138: “Undoubtedly the most important and most accurate published map that had yet appeared.... A truly magnificent cartographic achievement.” ($20,000-40,000)

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188. HUMBOLDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander & Aimé Jacques Alexandre Goujaud Bonpland. Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain.... London: Longman et al, 1811. Text: Vol. I: [i-iii] iv-xvii [1, blank], [2], [i] ii-cxlv [1, blank], [1] 2-289 [1] pp.; Vol. II: [2], [1] 2-531 [1] pp.; Vol. III: [6], [1] 2-493 [1] pp., folded frontispiece engraved map and four statistical tables (see below); Vol. IV: [2], [1] 2-374, [102] pp., folded frontispiece with 8 engraved maps on one sheet (see below). London: Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; and H. Colburn; and W. Blackwood, and Brown and Crombie, Edinburgh, 1811. Atlas: [4] pp., 2 aquatint plates; 3 folded engraved profiles; 4 engraved maps, 3 of which are folding including large map of New Spain. 8vo. Text vols.: contemporary three-quarter reddish brown diced calf over red and blue marbled boards. Rebacked, original spines preserved and consolidated, some corners bumped, moderately rubbed. Text and maps with mild to moderate foxing and offsetting. Atlas: 8vo, original blue drab wrappers, stitched, uncut, as issued, with contemporary ink note on upper wrapper (“Plates to Humboldt’s New Spain”). Spine of fragile paper wraps worn away, some mild chipping and abrasions to paper covers; preserved in quarter tan polished calf folding case with cloth chemise (spine chipped). Maps very fine except for minor offsetting and age-toning. Overall a very good to fine copy of a set difficult to find complete with the atlas and all the plates and maps.

     First English edition, the rare English edition, complete and with Atlas in original wraps, with a Martin & Martin map. Very rare. No complete set at auction in American Book Prices Current in the past thirty-five years. Cowan, p. 296. Hill I (pp. 149-150): “The rare English edition; a cornerstone in any collection on Mexico. Complete sets with the atlas of maps and plates are now extremely scarce.” Hill II 844: “Humboldt’s manifold interests and actions inaugurated the modern type of scientific exploration. He was equally famous as a geographer, naturalist, and humanist. Monuments in cities as far-flung as Philadelphia and Mexico City testify to his fame.” Howes H786: “Of superlative California interest.” Martin & Martin, Plate 17 (this edition), text from p. 109. Plains & Rockies IV:7a:4. Streeter 1042 (see long note): “An atlas with maps on a reduced scale accompanies the London, 1811, edition of the Essay.” Rader 1975. Raines, p. 121. Sabin 33715. Strathern 269ii. Streeter, Texas 1042n. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 303*. Cf. Palau 116977. ($1,500-3,000)

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189. HUMBOLDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander & Aimé Jacques Alexandre Goujaud Bonpland. Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain.... New York:I. Riley, 1811. 2 vols. in one, 8vo, full modern grey buckram. Occasional spotting (including Vol. I title) and staining, paper uniformly browned, otherwise good.

     First U.S. edition of preceding entry, printing through Book IV, Chapter IX. The chapters on the provinces of New Mexico, the Californias, and Provincias Internas (including Texas) are covered in these two volumes. American Imprints 23066. Howes H786. Pilling 1874a. Plains & Rockies IV:7a:5. Sabin 33715. Humboldt was highly displeased with Black’s translation and criticism. ($150-300)

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190. HUMBOLDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander & Aimé Jacques Alexandre Goujaud Bonpland. Vues des cordillères, et monumens des peuples indigènes de l’Amérique. Paris: Chez F. Schoell, 1810-[1813]. [2, half title], [2,  title], [i] ii-xvi, [1] 2-350, [2] pp., 69 engravings and aquatints on 68 sheets, 25 with full original hand-coloring, 4 in sepia tone, 1 with minor color, remainder uncolored (codices, archaeological ruins, views, plans, Native American costume groups). Folio, recent three-quarter tan calf over marbled boards, spine with red calf label lettered in gilt. Other than mild foxing to first few signatures (not affect majority of text or plates), an exceptionally fine, large, untrimmed copy, plates pristine.

     First edition of “the most beautiful and generally interesting of Humboldt’s works” (Sabin 33754).Brunet III, col. 373. Fiedler & Leitner, Alexander von Humboldts Schriften 4.3. Glass 627: “Pioneer work with first partial publications of various Mesoamerican pictorial manuscripts.” Lipperheide 1630. Palau 117026n. Pilling 1871n. Sabin 33754: “Every class of Mexican or Aztec, and Peruvian Antiquities receives in this work the clearest philosophical analysis. Many of the plates are beautifully colored.” This work, the first major one to result from Humboldt’s American explorations, fell like a thunderbolt on the European intellectual, scientific, artistic, and political community, and Humboldt became a cultural hero in the U.S. and Mexico. ($20,000-30,000)

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191. HUMBOLDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander. Volcans des Cordillères de Quito et du Mexique. Paris: Gide et J. Baudry, 1854. [1-5] 6-15 [1] pp., 12 engravings (9 volcanoes in Ecuador after Humboldt’s original drawings, sepia tone, 2 maps, and comparative profile of mountains), mostly after original artwork by Humboldt. Oblong 4to, contemporary tan sheep over mottled boards (neatly rebacked in tan sheep, black leather spine label). Other than occasional extremely mild foxing, very fine, complete.

     First French edition. Fiedler & Leitner, Alexander von Humboldts Schriften 5.4.3.1. Sabin 33749. Ecuador is straddled by the imposing Andean cordillera, running from north to south, named by Humboldt in 1802 as “the Avenue of Volcanoes.” There is no other place in the world where such a high concentration of volcanoes occurs; the Avenue of Volcanoes is truly a unique wonder of geology. ($400-800)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

192. IBARRA, Domingo. Coleccion de bailes de sala, y método para aprenderlos sin ausilio de maestro, dedicada a la juventud Mexicana.... Mexico: Tipograpfía de Nabor Chavez, 1860. [2], [1-5] 6-74, [2], [34 (11 pieces of music)] pp., 6 hand-colored lithograph plates. 8vo, original black half sheep over decorative cloth blind stamped on upper cover, spine gilt-lettered and decorated. Small snag in spine (no loss), lightly rubbed, fore edges of upper board moderately eroded, lower fore edge chipped, corners bumped. Some leaves lightly browned, but otherwise interior, including plates, is fine.

     First published edition of the first Mexican dance instruction book. Cf. Palau 117594 & Porrúa Catalogue 5 (1949) 5949 (1862 2d edition, from the same setting of type but with a new title page). Very rare. None on OCLC, but a copy is in the Biblioteca Nacional of Mexico. The genesis of this work is outlined in four letters printed herein, dated between 1 January 1858 and 28 March 1858, among Benito Soto, Ignacio Herrera, and Ibarra himself. In the first letter, Soto explains to Herrera that he is interested in obtaining a book of dances so that the local youth will have something better to do than play cards and indulge in other less-than-desirable activities. He further notes that the severe winter has increased the desirability of wholesome indoor activities to offset the “horroroso vicio del juego.” ($500-1,000)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

193. [JACKSON, Jack]. Lot of original issues of three of Jackson’s compelling graphic comics telling the story of Cynthia Ann Parker. Titles include: White Comanche, Red Raider, and Blood on the Moon. All issues fine. ($30-60)

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194. [JACKSON, William H. (photographer)]. SCHMIDT, Carl E[rnest]. A Western Trip By Carl E. Schmidt. For Private Circulation Only. [Detroit: Herold Press]: For private circulation only, [ca. 1904]. [1-7] 8-91 [1, blank], [2] pp., title printed in green and black, 30 mounted photographs, including frontispiece (12 full-page photochrome process prints after the photographs of William Henry Jackson), 18 smaller black and white images consisting of candid shot taken by the party). 8vo, original full brown leather, upper cover gilt-lettered and with gilt illustration of cowboy with lasso on a rearing horse, t.e.g., fore-edges untrimmed, burgundy silk endpapers. Binding sun faded, fore-edges of text block lightly browned, light offsetting (not affecting photographic images), a few silver prints slightly faded, otherwise excellent, with author's signed presentation note on fly leaf.

     First edition, with all photographic images mounted.A second edition had a new setting of type, and the black and white images were printed as half-tones in the text with line borders. Eberstadt 136:667d: “Printed in a few copies ‘for private circulation only.’ An interesting journal of the Yellowstone Country, and because of the circumstances of its printing, extremely difficult to come by.” Harrell, William Henry Jackson: An Annotated Bibliography, 1862-1955, p. 43. Howes S170. Streeter Sale 4123. Taylor, Traveling thru Wonderland, pp. 40-41. The color photographs are the work of William Henry Jackson (1843-1942), who served as official photographer of the Hayden survey from 1870-1878 and took the first photos of Yellowstone Park. For more on Detroit entrepreneur Schmidt, see The Book of Detroiters: A Biographical Dictionary.... (Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company, 1914), p. 198. ($1,000-2,000)

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195. [JESUITS: Letters from Missions]. Lettres Edifiantes et Curieuses, Ecrites des Missions Etrangeres par quelques Missionnaires de la Compagnie de Jesús. Paris, 1705. Avec Approbation & Privilege du Roy. [32], 1-287 [5] pp., folding copper-engraved map (Passage par Terre a la Californie....). 12mo, contemporary full French smooth calf, spine extra gilt with raised bands (label missing, neatly rebacked preserving original spine, new endpapers at rear). One printed library label and one printed shelf mark label on front paste down (both Bib: Maj: Sem:), ink stamp on front flyleaf (St. Stanislaus Novitiate House Library Guelph. Ont., ownership inscription in ink on title page of Ch. Konrad(?). Pencil cost code of Eberstadts on front pastedown). Interior fine except for occasional light browning. Map with minor browning and splits at folds with no loss. Overall a desirable copy of an important map and book.

     First edition, first printing of Father Kino’s map, the first printed appearance of Kino’s influential map with California no longer as an Island. This is Vol. V of 34 volumes of Jesuit letters published in Paris between 1702 and 1776, this volume including the map and Picolo’s text on the California missions. Barrett 1470. Burrus, Kino and the Cartography of Northwestern New Spain, Plate X. Cowan (1914), p. 139: “[The map] includes part of California, the Gulf, and New Mexico, with location of Indian tribes... A letter which appears in the preface...relates chiefly to California.” California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present, Map 11, p. 22. Cumming, Exploration of North America 236. Lowery 250. McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island, Entries 258 & 241 (referring to others’ use of Kino’s work). Palau 136972. Sabin 40697. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America 75: Streeter Sale 2424. The map is the famous Kino map of California...which appeared for the first time in this book. The map is remarkably accurate, and remained the best map of much of the area until the twentieth century.” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 483. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 74a. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West I, pp. 75-76: “Kino’s map exerted a great influence on contemporary cartography, especially after the French mapmaker, Guillaume Delisle, adopted the redoubtable missionary’s thesis”; #389. See also Hayes, Historical Atlas of California, Map 69, p. 33. The information on Kino’s map proved to be remarkably accurate and has withstood the test of time. Its publication here is a landmark in North American and California cartography. ($1,500-3,000)

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196. [JOHNSON, Adam Rankin (“Stovepipe”)]. The Partisan Rangers of the Confederate States Army. Edited by William J. Davis. Louisville, Kentucky: Geo. G. Fetter Company, 1904. [i-v] vi-xii, [2], 1-476 pp., 65 photographic plates (including frontispiece, portraits, architecture, scenes). 8vo, original maroon cloth, title in gilt on front cover and backstrip, floral endpapers. Other than minor cover wear, a very fine copy. Not so rare as once thought, but difficult to find in collector’s condition.

     First edition. Basic Texas Books 108: “One of the most interesting firsthand narratives of Texas.” Coulter, Travels in the Confederate States 257. Graff 2213: “The story of a very brave and daring man. His Indian warfare experiences in Texas in the late 1850s, when he was connected with the Butterfield Stage outfit and also when as a surveyor he surveyed much virgin territory, are almost beyond belief. The same or more can be said of his Civil War service in Kentucky as a Partisan Ranger.” Howes J122. Nevins, Civil War Books I:113. Parrish, Civil War Texana 51. After the Civil War Johnson returned to Texas and founded Marble Falls, worked to develop the water power of the Colorado River, and founded the Texas Mining Improvement Company. See Handbook of Texas Online. ($150-300)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

197. KENDALL, Geo[rge] Wilkins. Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition.... New York, 1844. 2 vols., complete with the engraved folding map and 5 engraved plates, 8vo, publisher’s original ribbed embossed dark brown cloth, spines lettered in gilt, each with gilt illustration of a buffalo hunt. Light outer wear, else very fine and bright, all tissue guards present.

     First edition, first issue (“1844” gilt stamped at foot of spine of each volume) of the best account of the abortive 1841 Republic of Texas expedition to establish jurisdiction over Santa Fe. Basic Texas Books 116. Clark, Old South 3:188. Fifty Texas Rarities 26. Graff 2304. Howes K75. Jones 1089. Kelsey, Engraved Prints of Texas 1554-1900, p. 39: “A significant illustrated book”; Figures 3.59 & 3.60. Martin & Martin 34. Palau 127837. Plains & Rockies IV:110:1. Rader 2157. Raines, p. 131. Rittenhouse 347. Sabin 37360. Saunders 2998. Streeter 1515. Streeter Sale 379. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #483 & Vol. II, p. 188. An imperishable classic of Texas, the West, and the Borderlands. ($750-1,500)

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198. KENDALL, George Wilkins & Carl Nebel. The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated.... New York & Philadelphia, 1851. [iii] iv, [1] 2-52 pp., lithograph map, 12 toned lithographs on handmade paper, colored and finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (battle scenes, after art work by Nebel. Large folio, new three-quarter burgundy levant morocco over later red linen. Some water staining to edges of binding. Except for mild water staining at right margin of first two leaves of text, very fine. The plates in this copy are superb and exceptionally fresh, with original gum arabic highlights intact, as issued.

     First edition. Bennett, American-Nineteenth Century Color Plate Books, p. 65: “The very best American battle scenes in existence.” Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War of 1846-1848, p. 31. Tyler, unpublished work on lithographs of nineteenth-century Texas: “An extraordinary portfolio...Palo Alto being the only Texas scene.... Probably the finest lithographic view of Texas produced in the nineteenth century.” Howes K76. Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 148: “The most brilliant and famous published views of the major battles.” Palau 188868. Peters, America on Stone, p. 295. Raines, p. 132. Sabin 37362. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, p. 36: “The eyewitness prints that must be compared against all others are those produced under the direction of George Wilkins Kendall for his book The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated.” Tyler, The Mexican War, a Lithographic Record, p. 11: “Magnificently produced portfolio by...the first modern war correspondent”; p. 18: “Of all the Mexican War lithographs, perhaps the dozen by Kendall and Nebel are the most popular.” Tyler, Prints of the American West, p. 78. ($20,000-40,000)

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199. KINGSBOROUGH, Edward King (Viscount), Agustine Aglio & Guillermo Dupaix. Antiquities of Mexico: Comprising Fac-similes of Ancient Mexican Paintings and Hieroglyphics... London: Vols. I-VII: Printed by James Moyes, Castle Street, Leicester Square; Published by Robert Havell, 77, Oxford Street; Colnagi, Son, and Co. Pall Mall East; Vols. VIII-IX: Printed by Richard and John E. Taylor, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street, Published by Henry G. Bohn, York Street, Convent Garden, 1831-1848. 742 plates (in volumes I-IV), mostly by Augustine Aglio, comprising: 588 lithographs, mostly of Mesoamerican codices, with original hand coloring , 144 uncolored lithographs archaeology, architecture, and scenes, 4 engravings, and 6 aquatints (one folding), 2 lithographic tables in text volumes V and VI. 9 vols., large folio, contemporary three-quarter calf over marbled boards, spines gilt with raised bands. A very good, complete set, some hinges and joints weak or cracked, occasional binding wear, interior fine, with occasional light foxing and browning and a few neat repairs.

     First edition, the Havell issue, colored copy. Bibliotheca Mejicana 879. Boban, “Notes Explicatives...sur les Antiquitès du Mexique,” pp. 67-114 (lengthy analysis of content): “La superbe et unique publication.” Brunet III, col. 663. Glass, p. 631: “Handcolored lithographs of copies by Augustine Aglio of sixteen pictorial manuscripts. They are first editions for almost all of these documents... A monumental and historic work.” Griffin 1397n: “Mammoth pioneering collection.” Lipperheide Md11. Palau 128006. Pinart 513: “Splendide publication.” Sabin 37800. The work includes Dupaix’s Antiquitiés Mexicaines...1805-1807 (Paris: Didot, 1833-1834), “the first drawings of Maya architecture to be published” (Wauchope). ($50,000-70,000)

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200. [KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH]. [CODY, Samuel Franklin]. The Klondyke Nugget. By S. F. Cody. Belfast: David Allen; also at London, Harrow, Manchester, Glasgow & Dublin, [ca. 1898]. Folio chromolithograph poster (image area 71 x 48 cm; overall 76.5 x 51 cm). Creased where formerly folded, minor chipping and tearing on left margin just touching image, verso moderately browned, but image on recto very fine and bright.

     The print consists of three vignettes at top showing S.F. Cody as George Exelby, Madam Lela Cody as Rosie, and Edward Leroy as Joe Smith. The remainder of the poster is taken up with nine vignettes, mostly illustrating scenes from the play: a drunkard playing cards while visions of serpents dance about his head, camp scene with a woman surrounded by several figures, a lone figure with his pack ascending a narrow, steep trail, etc. The images are dominated by a central figure of Cody as George Exelby studying a map. Overall, a busy, active composition seizing on the gold hysteria that gripped the public during the Klondike Gold Rush, 1896-1899. This play was the most successful of such British productions, being first performed on December 5, 1898. Supposedly a native of Birdville, Texas, Cody (1867-1913) was really from Davenport, Iowa, and born Franklin Samuel Cowdery, although he spun legends about himself, including an escape from an Indian attack, work on the Chisholm Trail, and a blood relationship to Wild Bill Cody. See Handbook of Texas on Line: Samuel Franklin Cody. (See also lot 17 herein.) ($500-1,000)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

201. LA MADELÈNE, [Joseph Henri de Collet, Baron de]. Le Comte Gaston de Raousset-Boulbon sa vie et ses aventures (d’après ses papiers et sa correspondance) par Henry de la Madelene. Alençon: Poulet-Malassis et de Broise, 1856. [1-5] 6-162 pp. 12mo, modern three-quarter speckled calf over blue marbled boards, raised bands, gilt-lettered red spine. Very fine.

     First edition. Cowan, p. 340. Howes M198: “The audacious dream of the conquest of Sonora and the mines of Arizona; extinguished only by two ill-starred expeditions and a final firing squad.” Munk (Alliot), p. 144. Sabin 38700. The subject of this biography is Charles René Gaston Gustave de Raousset-Boulbon (1817-1854), the soldier-of-fortune and San Francisco pioneer who organized the celebrated Borderlands filibustering expedition that led to his execution in Guaymas in 1854. He was born to the nobility of France, inherited the title of Count, and quickly squandered his fortune by gambling and partying in Paris. Like many of his time with high hopes, the Frenchman tried his luck in Gold Rush California, including herding cattle to the miners. Rumors of mineral wealth lured the Count to Sonora. The ill-fated, quixotic dreams of the Count resulted in the 1852 organization of the Compañia Restauradora de la Mina de la Arizona, which was conceded rights of mineral deposits south of the Gila, which had been abandoned due to devastating incursions by Apache tribes. Following many intricate adventures, Raousset-Balboun went to trial and was executed after four of his officers mutinied and reported to authorities that he was secretly plotting against Santa-Anna. ($150-300)

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202. LAET, Joannes de. Historie Ofte Iaerlijck Verhael Van de Verrichtinghen der Geoctroyeerde West-Indische Compagnie.... Leyden: Elzevier, 1644. [32], 1-544, [1-2 (sectional title West India report)], 3-31 [verso blank], [11, index] [1, blank] pp., mostly printed in black letter, title printed in red and black with large engraved printer’s device of the Elsevier House, engraved and woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces. 13 folded copper engravings (see complete list in full description). Folio, old vellum over boards, over which is what is probably the original vellum laid down, modern printed spine label. Binding moderately stained, vellum with several voids, recased with new endpapers. Interior with numerous pages lightly to moderately waterstained, mostly in margins, most of preliminaries with small tears (no losses), title with old ink stamp and later ink signature. Overall a good copy of a rare edition in commerce difficult to find complete

     Enlarged edition of the 1630 edition of this important, constantly updated work on the travels of the Dutch to America and the west coast of Africa. The first edition was published in 1625. Asher 22. Borba de Moraes 1:452: “This famous history of the West India Company is today quite rare, especially with the plates.” European Americana 1644/91. JCB I (2, 1600-1658), p. 316-317. Rodrigues 1350: “Obra essencial.” Sabin 38556. Vail 103. Willems, Les Elzevier 571. De Laet constantly revised his text, bringing it down to 1635 in the present edition. This significant book remains one of the more important works on its subject and is consulted even today. Widely translated, it had influence on governmental policies in various nations who were in competition with the Company. Despite its huge importance and considerable influence of trade, foreign affairs, and New World colonization from its founding in 1623, the Dutch West India Company went bankrupt in 1636, where this history ends. The plates contain important views of the New World. ($2,500-5,000)

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203. LAET, Joannes de. Novus orbis, seu Descriptionis Indiæ occidentalis libri XVII.... [Antwerp]: Elzevier, 1633. [32], 1-104, 205-690, [18] pp. (text complete), copper-engraved pictorial title page, 14 folded engraved maps (click on link at end of abstract to see map list), many woodcut text illustrations (flora, fauna, inhabitants of the Americas). Folio, early full calf, gilt superlibros on upper and lower covers, spine with raised bands and original brown gilt-lettered morocco label, edges tinted red. Spine chipped at head, moderately worn, joints cracked but strong; other than light uniform browning, interior very good, maps very fine. Overall a fine, complete copy with early ink ownership inscription.

     First edition in Latin (first edition in Dutch, 1625, expanded in 1630 with four regional American maps and other material not in the 1625 edition). This work is “one of the most famous contemporary descriptions of the natural history of the New World” (Streeter Sale 37) and one of the early atlases to focus exclusively on America after Wytfliet’s atlas of 1597 (see herein) and Herrera’s 1601 atlas (see herein). The present edition was translated’ probably by the author’ from the Dutch edition published inLeyden, 1630. The first edition (Leyden, 1625) had only ten maps. The maps added to subsequent editions are very important for North American cartography. Asher 3. Borba de Moraes, p. 451: “Graesse affirms that this Latin translation was made by the author himself.” JCB I (2, 1600-1658), pp. 246-247. Burden, The Mapping of North America (citing 1630 edition, in which the maps are the same as our 1633 edition) 229, 230, 231, 232, 215 (the latter citing the 1625 edition, same as 1633). European Americana 1633/65. Hough & Hough, Lesser Antilles 31. Palau 129560. Phillips, Atlases 1149: “Maps like the edition of 1630.” Pilling 2162. Sabin 38557. Streeter Sale 37. Vail 84. ($10,000-20,000)

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204. LARRAÑAGA, Bruno Joseph de. Poema heroyco en celebridad de la colocación de la estatua colosal de bronce de Nuestro Católico Monarca el Sr. Don Carlos Quarto, Rey de España y Emperador de las Indias.... Mexico: Mariano de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1804. [6], 1-16, [2], i-vi, [2], 1-10 pp., printed on thick paper, engraved ornamental head- and tail pieces; extra-illustrated with lithograph frontispiece: Estatua Ecuestre de Carlos IV (image size including title: 17.5 x 15.4 cm; the statue is surrounded by an ornamenal iron fence, a well-dressed couple in front looking up at the statue, other figures in the background, unattributed). 4to, contemporary full tree sheep with spine and boards gilt decorated, tinted edges, marbled endpapers. Slightly rubbed, upper cover water stained at right center. Title page with small void at upper right not affecting text. Very good copy.

     First edition. Medina, México 9702. Palau 132066. Sabin 39084. A controversial equestrian statue (familiarly called El Caballito) conceived by Viceroy Branciforte and cast in Mexico City by Manuel Tolsá, head of the Academy of San Carlos. Before it was finished, a wooden model was erected to much fanfare. When the actual bronze statue was finally installed (with Humboldt in attendance) in December, 1803, the ceremony was greeted with renewed festivities. During the Mexican Revolution, controversy over it began, but it was spared destruction through the intervention of Lucas Alamán, who argued for its artistic merit. It remains in Mexico City to this day and is one of the largest bronze statues anywhere. ($400-800)

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205. LEA, Tom. A Grizzly from the Coral Sea. Conversation and pictures by Tom Lea. [Title verso] Copyright, 1944, by Carl Hertzog, El Paso, Texas. [1-4], [1]-32, [2, colophon Hertzog’s device] Carl Hertzog: Printer, El Paso Texas] pp., title and text illustrations in pale blue and illustrated endpapers by Lea. 8vo, original green cloth without Ursa major decoration on the upper cover. Very fine in very fine d.j.  

     First edition, limited edition of author-artist’s second book (295 copies, type and plates afterwards destroyed). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea) 29. Hinshaw & Lovelace, Lea 65. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 25: “The Scotch-Roman typeface is taut and virile.” Tom Lea (1907-2001), outstanding artist-illustrator, noted American muralist, war correspondent, author, and historian, wrote several classics of southwestern American literature, but in this work of fiction, he draws on his experiences in World War II. From 1941-1946, Tom Lea became an eye-witness reporter for Life, traveling over 100,000 miles to theaters of war where American forces were involved, including the North Atlantic, on board the Hornet in the South Pacific, a trip to China, and landing on Peleliu. Lea spent sixty-six days on the USS Hornet off Guadalcanal in the fall of 1942, and left her just days before she was lost on 26 October in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. ($200-400)

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206. LEA, Tom [Thomas Calloway Lea III]. Randado. [El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1941]. [14] pp., text illustrations by Tom Lea (images in grey, initials in maize). 4to, original textured reddish brown wrappers, upper wrapper with title printed in silver and mounted pictorial paper label, stitched, as issued. Very fine in original glassine d.j. Signed by Lea.

     First edition, limited edition, wrappers issue (#89 of 100 copies, signed by Lea on colophon page). Randado was the author-artist’s first work to appear in print containing both his words and illustrations. Mary Lasswell in her reproduction of the poem in her 1958 book I’ll Take Texas described the work as “an imperishable tribute that tells the story of the Southwest in epic form.” Adams, Herd 1317. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 28). Hinshaw & Lovelace, Lea 46A. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 16: “When Tom Lea undertook to illustrate J. Frank Dobie’s book The Longhorns, the author and the artist made a trip together, visiting the ranches where they might see the last remaining herds of wild longhorns. When Lea saw the ruins of the old ranch at Randado, and heard its legend, he was inspired to write his poetic tribute.... The book is stunning in its format. Only 25 copies were for sale to the public.” See also the introduction to the Book Club of Texas reprint, Randado: A Commemorative Tribute to Tom Lea (2001). El Randado Ranch, dates from the late eighteenth century years of Spanish colonization in Texas. Texas map enthusiasts will be interested in Lea’s observation in his preliminary notes to Randado: “The numberless wild mustang progeny of Randado stock caused cartographers of the early 1800s to mark the region WILD HORSE PRAIRIE.” ($750-1,500)

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207. LEÓN Y GAMA, Antonio de. Descripción histórica y cronológica de las dos piedras que con ocasion del nuevo empedrado que se está formando en la plaza principal de México Mexico: Felipe de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1792. 3 folded copper-engraved plates (Aztec mother goddess and Stone of the Sun). Small 4to, contemporary sprinkled sheep, pale olive green gilt-lettered spine label. Binding slightly rubbed at edges and extremities and peeling in a few places. Except for minor stain to title page and top margins of some pages trimmed close (with a few losses or partial losses of page numbers). Contents fine. Plates very fine, in strong impressions.

     First edition of the first scholarly publication to describe and attempt to explain what has become a national symbol of Mexico. Bernal 3784. Biblotheca Mejicana 934. Dumbarton Oaks, Archaeological Illustration in the Americas: “One of the great early figures in the history of Mexican archaeology, Antonio de León [1735-1802] produced some of the first modern illustrations of Aztec monuments.” Field 908. Medina, México 8204. Palau 135587. Pilling 2257. Sabin 40059. ($4,000-6,000)

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208. LEÓN Y GAMA, Antonio de. Saggio dell’astronomia cronologia e mitologia degli antichi messicani.... Rome, 1804. [i] ii-xiii 3 copper-engraved plates: pictorial title with Mexican eagle + 2 folded plates: Coatlicue statue and Stone of the Sun. 8vo, contemporary green calf over navy blue and black mottled boards. Spine slightly faded, light edge wear, first signature with mild scattered foxing, otherwise fine, the plates excellent. Uncommon.

     First Italian edition of preceding. Palau 135589. Pilling 2258. Sabin 26486 & 40065. Here the plates have been reduced, and the contoured view of the Stone of the Sun is merged with the line relief view to show the alphabetic key. ($1,000-2,000)

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209. LEÓN Y GAMA, Antonio de. Descripción histórica y cronológica de las dos piedras.... Mexico, 1832. 5 folded engraved plates (sculpture of Coatlicue, 2 plates of the Stone of Sun, astronomical diagram used by the Ancient Mexicans, details from a pictorial manuscript). 4to, nineteenth-century half Mexican sheep over marbled boards. Except for browning to title page and first few leaves, very fine, plates excellent.

     Second Mexican edition, the most complete edition, with previously unpublished related work by León y Gama. Editor Carlos M. Bustamante also added a biography of León y Gama and numerous extracts in Náhuatl, and an appendix “Sobre la aritmética de los Mexicanos.” Glass, p. 642. Palau 135588 (noting that for academic work, this is the preferable edition). Pilling 2259. Sabin 40060. ($1,000-2,000)

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210. [LETTER SHEET: CALIFORNIA]. How the California Mines are Worked [above title, below image] Published at the Wide West Office, 184 Clay Street, San Francisco. | Anthony & Baker SC. [in block, lower right]. San Francisco: Wide West Office, [before August 12, 1854]. Woodcut engraving, on white wove paper, of various types of mining including: underground mining, men wheeling an ore cart out of mine entrance in hillside; miners panning for gold and using a long tom; a well; a sluice with flume behind. Under glass, matted, gilt frame. Visible sheet size: 24.6 x 19.5 cm. Light crease at left edge.  A fine copy.

     Baird 104. Clifford Sale (Letter Sheets) 101, Plate 35. ($800-1,200)

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211. [LETTER SHEET: CALIFORNIA]. HUTCHINGS, James M[ason]. The Miners’ Ten Commandments [above lower border center] Hanna & Co., Printers [below lower border] Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1854, by James M. Hutchings, in the Clerk’s Office of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California | Orders addressed, J.F. Larrabee, 130 Sansome St., San Francisco. San Francisco, 1854. Woodcut engraved vignettes surrounding text, gray wove paper, 11 scenes: an elephant at the top points to the Ten Commandments posted on a mining shack; other vignettes illustrate each of the Commandments, neat line to neat line: 27 x 22 cm; overall sheet size: 28.2 x 23 cm. Chipping to left edge, with minimal loss to border at lower left, inch tear at upper left into image (no loss). A very good copy. Remains of former mounting on verso.

     Baird 167b. Clifford Sale (Letter Sheets) 184. James M. Hutchings, originally from England, moved to California during the Gold Rush. He was successful as a miner, but lost his wealth in a bank failure. Subsequently, he established a publishing venture and became editor of Hutchings’ California Magazine, emerging as the most important letter sheet publisher in California. Living in Placerville, the native Englishman issued a series under the title of Hutchings’ California Scenes and enjoyed the distinction of publishing in 1853 the best known of all letter sheets, The Miners’ Ten Commandments. Its “good book” style text was surrounded by eleven appropriate cuts, poking fun at the miners’ lack of morals, along with many other shady miner practices. Hutchings apparently liked this moralizing, as indicated by two more letter sheets: The Miner’s Creed and Commandments to California Wives. ($750-1,500)

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212. [LETTER SHEET: CALIFORNIA]. NAHL, Charles (artist) & J[ames] M[ason] Hutchings (publisher]. Hutching’s [sic] California Scenes. | The California Indians. [8 vignettes, clockwise from top center] [1] An Indian Fandango. Anthony & Baker Sc; [2] Catching Grasshoppers. Anthony & Baker Sc; [3] Grinding Acorns, &c. Anthony & Baker Sc;[4] Cooking Food. Anthony & Baker Sc | C. Nahl del; [5] Burning Their Dead. Anthony & Baker Sc | C. Nahl del; [6] Mode of Traveling. Anthony & Baker Sc; [7] Gathering Seeds. Anthony & Baker Sc; [8] Gathering Acorns. Anthony & Baker Sc; [above border at lower right] Sun Print; [below lower border] Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1854, by James M. Hutchings, in the Clerk’s Office of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, Orders, prepaid, addressed “Box H, Placerville, El Dorado Co., Cal.” [text in center in two columns, commencing] The California Indians are in stature short, but they are well and stoutly formed.... [San Francisco, n.d., ca. 1854]. Wood-engraved pictorial letter sheet on light blue laid paper, the six vignettes down the side each measuring 7.6 x 4.8 cm; vignette at top center 5.5 x 10.4 cm; border to border: 27 x 22 cm; image with copyright notice: 27.2 x 22 cm; overall sheet size: 28.5 x 23.3 cm. Lacking blank conjugate leaf. Creased where formerly folded; except for a small chip at lower left blank margin, fine.

     Baird 105. Clifford Sale (Letter Sheets) 102. One of the most popular letter sheets, with illustrations of California Native Americans and their way of life by Charles Nahl, leading Gold Rush artist. ($750-950)

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213. [LETTER SHEET: TEXAS]. PENTENRIEDER, Erhard. Main Plaza San Antonio, Texas, 185 [below view] Drawn after Nature by Erhard Pentenrieder. Published by Pentenrieder & Blersch, San Antonio, Tex. [long oval illustration at top, center view of the west side of the Main Plaza showing San Fernando Cathedral (constructed from 1738-1749) with a milling crowd, horse-drawn covered wagon, oxen-drawn cart, horses, and camels] Main Plaza San Antonio, Texas; [6 vignettes descending from upper left, the lower five bordered with ornate botanical circle]: untitled standing Native American with bow; Mission San Jose; Mission Conception [with Black man reclining on border); Menger Hotel [with bear reclining on border]; Free Mason Hall [with snake entwined on border]; untitled trotting camel with driver; [6 vignettes descending from upper right, the lower five bordered with ornate botanical circle]: untitled standing vaquero in full regalia; Alamo; Mission San Juan [sitting on border is a Davy Crockett-type hunter wearing a fringed jacket and holding a musket, his dog sitting beside him]; German Casino [with jaguar crouched on border]; untitled view of a rider lassoing a cow [alligator with bared teeth on border]; untitled muleteer with whip. Fancy illustrated lithograph letter sheet on two 4to conjugate leaves, with an excellent three-page letter dated July 1, 1866, discussing high finance, politics in post-Civil War Texas, and guns. Creased where formerly folded, lightly wrinkled, minor fold splits (no losses), overall very good.

     Pentenrieder based this letter sheet on Thielepape’s original letter sheet (ca. 1855-1856), likely the first lithograph view of Texas made in Texas. Petenrieder elaborated upon it considerably, adding along each side fourteen historical vignettes of architecture and scenes in San Antonio, including the Alamo, missions, and the colorful camel experiment. ($2,000-4,000)

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214. LETTS, John M. California Illustrated: Including a Description of the Panama and Nicaragua Routes... Second Thousand. New York: R.T. Young, 1853. [i-v] vi-vii, [8-9] 10-224 [16, ads] pp., 48 lithograph plates (including frontispiece) on tinted grounds or duo-tone (views of Mexico, Central America, West Indies, and California, missions, scenes in the Gold Rush, several early town views). 8vo, publisher’s blindstamped gilt-pictorial green cloth. Chipped at extremities with minor losses, slightly shelf-slanted, minor edge wear, top margin of lower cover wrinkled. Interior with very fine, plates very fresh.

     First edition, second printing. Except for minor changes to title page, this version is identical to the first printing. Cowan I, p. 140. Cowan II, p. 390: “There was evidently a deficiency in the supply of engravings prepared, for the number varies greatly.” Graff 246. Hill I, p. 180. Hill II:1015 & 1016 Howes L300. Jones 1281. Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 398b: “Drawing on his personal experience, Letts produced one of the best accounts of gambling, violence, and life in the mines.... George V. Cooper, Lett’s traveling companion and New York artist, drew the illustrations that embellish this work. His scenes, reproduced as forty-eight tinted lithographs, document the journey across Panama, San Francisco, Sacramento, life in the mines, and Central America.” Sabin 40722. Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 125. ($500-1,000)

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215. L’HERMITE, Jacques, et al. Iovrnael van de Nassausche Vloot...In de Jaren 1623, 1624, 1625, en 1626. [Amsterdam, ca. 1645-1646]. 1-79, [1, blank] pp. (text printed in black letter in double columns), 5 copper-engraved maps & views (including an early bird’s-eye view of Acapulco and an engraving of Waldbeeck’s 1624 chart, the earliest map to show Cape Horn correctly as an island). 2a-2k4. Oblong 4to, eighteenth-century marbled wrappers, stitched. Front hinge weak at top, otherwise fine, maps very fine.

     This account was first published in Amsterdam in 1626 (European Americana 1626/70); the present edition was published as part of Commelin’s collection of early voyages of the Dutch East India Company (European Americana 1645/36 & 1646/41). The present edition is a reprint of the 1643 edition and includes some accounts not in the first edition, e.g., Pedro Fernándes de Queirós account of his quest to discover “Onbekent Austrialia” (Unknown Australia), which was omitted from the 1648 and subsequent editions. Church 408 (citing original edition of 1626): “One of the most valuable and best written of the early Dutch voyages is the journal of Admiral Jacques l’Hermite’s voyage around the world; 1623-1626. The object of this voyage was to find a better passage than that of Magellan by which the Dutch could reach the Moluccas from the east. By means of this voyage the Dutch were able to establish themselves in the East Indies.” ($750-1,500)

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216. LINATI, Claudio. Costumes civils, militaires et réligieux du Mexique.... Brussels: Jobard & Sattanino, [1828]. 50 lithograph plates, 2 of which are uncolored, the remaining 48 with original hand coloring. 4to, contemporary three-quarter red sheep over marbled boards. Binding very worn and corners heavily bumped. Text with extremely light uniform browning and occasional mild foxing, a few leaves with very slight water staining at blank lower margins, one leaf of text and one plate missing sections from blank margins at bottom (without touching image or text). Overall a very good, complete copy, the plates fine and bright. This rare book is seldom found complete and in collector’s condition.

First edition of the first lithograph plate book on Mexico. Colas 1872. Hiler, Bibliography of Costume, p. 545. Lipperheide 1622. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 8-14: “Immediately became the basis for many other illustrations of Mexico, as well as the principal source for information on the region since Humboldt.” Reese & Miles, The Illustrating Traveler: “Linati’s book followed the popular pattern of European costume books which exhibited national characteristics and typical trades, displaying different Mexican types from Apaches to soldiers.” ($5,000-8,000)

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217. LINATI, Claudio. Costumes et mœurs de Mexique.... London: Engelmann, Graf Coindet, & Cie, 1830. 33 lithograph plates with original full hand coloring. 4to, contemporary polished brown calf Cambridge style (skillfully rebacked, new spine antique style, new marbled endpapers). Original covers scuffed, interior generally excellent except for a few minor spots to plates and on text leaf with light creasing, otherwise a very fine, complete copy with fresh, bright, vibrant coloring. The British edition is more rare in institutional holdings, as well as in commerce.

    First English edition, preceded by an edition printed in Brussels in 1828. Colas 1873. ($5,000-8,000)

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218. [LITHOGRAPHY]. La Guirnalda. Periódico literario redactado por una sociedad de jóvenes.... Mérida, 1860-1861. Nos. 1-20 (1 July, 1860-15 February, 1861). [4], [1] 2-200, [4], 201-208, [2] pp., 20 lithograph plates (portraits on tinted grounds, music, patterns, allegorical, views, science and technology) by Espinosa, with 20 original title pages (some on colored paper) and 17 inserted ad leaves (some on colored paper), neither of which are included in collation. Folio (33.2 x 22.5 cm), original colored printed wrappers with typographical ornamentation bound in contemporary half black sheep, spine gilt lettered and decorated. Front cover detached, top of spine loose, light shelfwear and rubbing; interior, plates and wrappers very fine. A rare imprint, especially with the wrappers. OCLC locates only two copies. With ink signature of Stephen Salisbury, Jr., on first title page. Salisbury was co-author with Augustus Le Plongeon of several books of regional interest and archaeology, including The Maya (Worchester: Privately printed, 1877).

     First edition of a short-lived periodical, the end of which is announced in the publisher’s February 14, 1861, statement included in the final issue. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 30: “The publication of La Guirnalda by Espinosa established commercial lithography in Mérida”; 58 (title cited in bibliography with date of 1861); 63 (Espinosa). Palau 111096 (calling for 17 plates).

     This illustrated literary, historical, and scientific periodical is illustrated with lithographs, some on tinted grounds. The periodical was printed by the noted José Dolores Espinosa Rendón (1833-1869), the first to establish a lithography establishment in Yucatan, having studied in Havana. The journal contains the first music printed in Yucatan. “Extremadamente raro” (Antochiw). ($1,000-2,000)

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219. LÓPEZ DE GÓMARA, Francisco. Historia de México.... [Antwerp]: En casa de Iuan Steelsio, [colophon: Impresso en Anvers por Iuan Lacio. 1554], 1554. [1-2] 3-97, 97-349 folios, [23] pp. (text complete; title page is a cancel), wood-engraved arms of Cortés on title. Small 8vo (14.2 x 10 cm), eighteenth-century full tan calf gilt-ruled and decorated, spine with gilt compartments, raised bands, and red gilt-lettered morocco label, edges sprinkled (recased). Head of spine slightly chipped, minor cracks to spine, upper joint weak, hinges slightly cracked but firm. Endpapers stained and with early twentieth-century printed book labels on front pastedown. Interior fine.

     The first edition of this work appeared in Zaragoza in 1552 (Wagner 2); the present edition (Wagner 2i) is from the same setting of type as Bellero’s 1554 edition (Wagner 2g). According to Wagner’s listings, the present work is the eighth printing in Spanish—this despite “almost all historians and bibliographers assert that when this work appeared, it was suppressed” (Wagner, Vol. 1, p. 81). Gómara organized his Historia general de las Indias y Conquista de México in two parts, the first of which contains a dissertation on world geography, location of the Indies, Columbus’ discoveries, colonization of Hispaniola, Peru, etc. The second part presents Cortés’ biography, the Conquest of Mexico, descriptions of life in Mesoamerica at the time of the Conquest, vocabularies, and other invaluable ethnic material. Both parts one and two stand alone as distinct works. The present edition is the second part, including all the material on Mexico as well as all the known information on California and the Southwest at that early date. European Americana 1554/32 (not distinguishing issues). Mathes, California Colonial Bibliography 1n (citing first edition): “Including the expeditions of Cortés in 1535, Francisco de Ulloa in 1539, and Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo in 1542.” Medina, Hispano-Americana 168. Palau 141143. Pilling 1558g (p. 959). Sabin 27731. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 2i. ($800-1,600)

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220. [LÓPEZ DE SANTA-ANNA, ANTONIO]. Don Antonio siempre el mismo se marcha a San Juan de Ulua. [Colophon] Imprenta de D. Mariano Ontiveros, año de 1821. [Mexico City, 1821]. [4] pp. 8vo, folded sheet, as issued. Light age-toning and some wrinkling. Rare.

     First edition? The work was also published at Puebla the same year. Garritz, Impresos Novohispanos, 1808-1821 #5181. Mathes, La Imprenta en el Imperio Mexicano 1821-1823 #121. Sutro, p. 188. Not in Medina or Palau. This anonymous pamphlet impugns the loyalty of Antonio López de Santa-Anna to the Plan de Iguala and the Mexican Empire, indicating that he is siding with the Spanish still occupying the fort of San Juan de Ulúa in the port of Veracruz. Written in first person replete with satire, Santa-Anna remarks that recent developments towards liberty and democracy have frustrated his imperialistic desires. This event marked a new stage of chameleonic cunning in the young Santa Anna’s rising career. ($100-200)

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221. [LÓPEZ DE SANTA-ANNA, ANTONIO]. [Text begins] El Secretario de Estado y del despacho de la Guerra y Maritima y el Vice-Presidente de la Junta Cívica suplican á V. se sirva acompañar desde la Alameda hasta el Cementario de Santa Paula.... [Mexico, 1842]. Dated in type, Mexico, September 24, 1842. Broadside with conjugate blank, printed on green wove paper. Creased where formerly folded, lightly wrinkled, left margin uneven and chipped, rust stain in upper left blank margin. Overall a fine copy of a rare survival.

     First edition. Not in standard sources. This is an invitation, dated September 27, 1842, to accompany Santa-Anna’s leg, lost at Veracruz on December 5, 1838, in the Pastry War, from the Alameda to its final resting place in Santa Paula cemetery. The leg was to be deposited in a memorial. As part of the ceremony, a prayer began the procession at 11:00 a.m. and at the monument an orator praised Santa-Anna. The burial took place on Santa-Anna’s orders. Despite Church opposition, the ceremony was held amid grand pomp, concluding with an oration by Ignacio Sierra y Rosa. See Shannon Baker in Heroes and Hero Cults in Latin America (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2006), pp. 67-70. Santa-Anna had little better luck keeping his replacement cork leg. During the Mexican-American War, it was captured by U.S. troops at Cerro Gordo and taken to Illinois, where it remains in a museum, despite repeated Mexican requests to have it returned. ($600-1,200)

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222. [LÓPEZ DE SANTA-ANNA, ANTONIO]. MEMORY GAME. [Unattributed lithograph images of Santa Anna with captions containing historical notes on his career]. N.p., n.d. [Mexico, ca. 1855-1860?]. 2 sets of 20 miniature lithograph images each mounted on original heavy card stock. Each card measures approximately 5 x 6 cm. Except for soiling and fading, very good, each card numbered in ink on verso. ¡Excepcionalmente raros y desconocidos! No copies located. We have not seen these miniature lithographs before and doubt we will again.

     This memory game was meant to teach history by events in the life of Antonio López de Santa Anna, the most dominant political figure in Mexico in the nineteenth century. The cards cover the period from 1822 to 1855, beginning with his rebellion against Iturbide and ending with his leaving Mexico in 1855. The images include one of Santa Anna at the Battle of San Jacinto in Texas in 1836 (Santa-Anna derrotado en S. Jacinto 1836) and seven from the Mexican-American War. The Mexican-American War sequence starts with his return to Mexico in 1846 and goes through the Battles of Angostura, Cerro Gordo, and finally, his retreat from Mexico City in 1847. Unlike some publications relating to Santa-Anna, these cards are fairly straight forward and without bias. In memory games all of the cards are laid face down on a surface and two cards are turned face up by each player in turn. If they are a matching pair, they are removed by the player; if not, they are returned face down. The object of the game is to find the most matching pairs of cards. ($1,000-2,000)

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223. [LÓPEZ DE SANTA-ANNA, ANTONIO]. Nadar, nadar, y a la orilla ahogar: ó sea Juicio crítico de un Sastre rinconero y de capa rota, sobre la prision del Presidente Santa Anna, y conducta que ha observado el general D. Vicente Filisola, ejecutando las órdenes que le dió desde su prision [caption title]. [Signed in print at end] El Mismo. [Colophon] Mexico: Imprenta de la Testamentaría de Valdes, 1836. [1] 2-4 pp. 8vo (21.5 x 15.5 cm). Folded sheet, untrimmed. Very fine. ($200-400)

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224. [LÓPEZ DE SANTA-ANNA, ANTONIO]. [PORTILLA, Anselmo de la (attributed)]. Historia de la Revolución de México contra la dictadura del General Santa-Anna. 1853-1855. Mexico: Imprenta de Vicente García Torres, 1856. [4], [i] ii-v [1, blank], [1] 2-288, [2], 289-335 [1, blank] [i-iii] iv-clviii (appendix), [12, index] pp., 12 uncolored lithograph portraits (Tomas Moreno, Juan José de la Garza, Santiago Vidaurri, et al.) some attributed to Decaen; 2 folded lithograph battle scenes (Ocotlan and Puebla) both by Decaen; 2 folded lithograph battle maps; 2 inserted folded leaves of charts and one leaf (Batalla de Ocotlan. Esplicación de la lamina,” after p. 288 and included in collation). 8vo (23.3 x 16.2 cm), original embossed purple cloth, spine gilt lettered and decorated (skillfully recased, new blue marbled endpapers). Spine faded, slight shelf wear, corners bumped. Title page with minor hole not touching text. Text with mild uniform browning due to the paper on which it was printed, slight offsetting, plates and maps fine (a few short tears with no losses). Overall very good. With 1915 purple ink stamp of Felipe Elias Guillen on p. [i]. Very rare. Only one copy at auction in thirty years.

     First edition documenting the last overthrow of Santa-Anna during his eleventh term in office, with superb Mexican lithographs (portraits, battles, battle plans). Palau 129763. Sabin 38612 & 76734. The author’s prologue conveys his difficulties in writing history so close to the events described and his difficulties in being impartial. Although he is no friend of Santa-Anna, he also admits that there were more than enough atrocities and horrors on both sides to go around. He grudgingly admits that conditions were such that a dictatorship was probably necessary—just not this one: “A fines de 1853, el gobierno de Santa-Anna habia rasgado ya sus títulos de legitimidad” (p. 15). ($750-1,500)

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225. [LÓPEZ DE SANTA-ANNA, ANTONIO]. Segundo calendario de Pedro Urdimalas para el año de 1857, con un opusculo titulado: Santa-Anna a la faz de sus compatriotas.Adornado de una estampa con veinte cuadros. Mexico: Imprenta á cargo de Leandro J. Valdes, [1856]. [1-27] 28-64 pp., 1 folded lithograph plate: Cuadro histórico del General Santa Anna. 2a. parte. [below neat line] Lito. de Iriarte y Cd. calle de Sta Clara no. 25 (neat line to neat line: 19.5 x 28.7 cm; overall sheet size: 22.5 x 30 cm; twenty vignettes, each 5 x 5.7 cm). 12mo, original printed wrappers, title within architectural border, stitched. Wrappers lightly stained and creased, lower wrapper with minor tears in lower blank margin (not affecting text); interior and plate fine. A rare survival.

     First edition. Not in standard sources. Only one copy of this edition on OCLC, which lists a few scattered copies for other years; no copies at auction in the past thirty-five years. Apparently published for the first time for the year 1856 and for the last time for 1860. The Bulletin of the New York Public Library (1909), “List of Books in the New York Public Library Relating to Mexico,” p. 625 lists 4 issues, Nos. 2-5, from 1856-1859. The article on Santa-Anna is particularly critical of his roles in the loss of Texas and the country’s defeat in the Mexican-American War. The exquisite plate, composed of twenty detailed, finely executed vignettes, shows various important scenes from Santa-Anna’s career, including the Goliad Massacre wherein he is placed at the scene, although he was not actually present. Another vignette shows him signing the Treaty of Velasco. ($500-1,000)

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226. LORENZANA, Francisco Antonio de. Historia de Nueva-España.... Mexico: Hogal, 1770. [18], i-xvi, 1-175, [2], 177-400, [18, contents] pp., title printed in red and black and with allegorical engraving of America; 34 copper-engraved plates, plus 2 folding maps: Plano de la Nueva España (by Alzate y Ramírez) & Domingo del Castillo Pilota me Fecit en México...MDXLI.... Folio, original full vellum. Text block separating from binding, a few trivial tears to a couple of text leaves (not affecting text). Text between pages 201 and 375 lightly stained at upper blank gutters (affecting majority of text between pp. 282-315, and blank margin of California map), otherwise very fine, original condition.

    First edition of a masterpiece of Mexican colonial printing, with important historical content and superb maps and plates. Barrett 3960. JCB III (1, 1700-1771) #1750. Cowan II, p. 396. Glass #368 & 645: “A major source for the study of tribute, place glyphs, and political economy and geography of the Aztecs.” Hill I, pp. 66-69. Hill II #1039: “Included is the voyage of Cortés to Baja California and a report of all of the expeditions to California to the year 1769, the year of the Portolá-Serra expedition to found San Diego and Monterey.” Johnson, The Book in the Americas 26. Medina, México 5380. Sabin 42065. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 152. The general map of New Spain, Texas, and the Borderlands by Alzate y Ramírez is based on his exceedingly rare 1768 prototype map, which is the second printed map of the entire region of the Spanish Southwest to bear the name “Texas.” See Martin & Martin 20 and Wheat, Transmississippi West #149n & Vol. I, p. 87. References to California map: Burrus (Kino and the Cartography of Northwestern New Spain, p. 30), Leighly (California as an Island, p. 13); Mathes in California 49 #2; Wagner (NWC, pp. 31-32), and Wheat (Transmississippi West #3 & Vol. I, p. 19). ($7,000-14,000)

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227. LUCE, Edward S. Keogh, Comanche and Custer. [St. Louis], 1939. xvii [1, blank], 1-127 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates. 8vo, original blue cloth, gilt. Gilt on binding faded and cloth lightly rubbed, else very good. Scarce, privately printed.

     First edition, limited edition (unnumbered). Howes L553. Luther, High Spots of Custer and the Little Big Horn Literature 99 & p. 19: “Three of his appendices add valuable knowledge in regard to the number of recruits in the regiment (much smaller than some historians would lead us to believe) and the killed, the wounded, and the survivors.” The story of the lone four-legged survivor of Custer’s last stand. ($300-600)

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228. [LUNDY, Benjamin]. The Life, Travels and Opinions of Benjamin Lundy, Including His Journeys to Texas and Mexico; with a Sketch of Cotemporary [sic] Events, and a Notice of the Revolution in Hayti. Compiled [by Thomas Earle] under the Direction and on Behalf of His Children. Philadelphia: William D. Parrish, 1847. [4, blank] [5-9] 10-316 pp. (title mounted on stub), mezzotint frontispiece portrait of Lundy after painting by Anson Dickinson and engraved by William Warner; folded engraved map with original hand coloring: California, Texas, Mexico, and part of the United States [text in Gulf of Mexico] Explanation...the territory in dispute...; neat line to neat line: 21.6 x 25.4 cm. 12mo, original brown blind-stamped cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Binding slightly worn at extremities, mild discoloration to cloth which has a few spots and stains, front hinge starting, lacking front free endpaper. Slight to moderate foxing to text, overall a very good copy, the map fine. The Hickory Grove Female Academy & Society-Charles Heartman-William Morrow copy.

     First edition. Clark, Old South III:66. Eberstadt, Texas 162:505. Graff 1195. Howes E10. Matthews, pp. 255-256: “The most traveled of the abolitionists was Lundy, who said he had walked 5,000 miles and had rode another 20,000. He went to nineteen states, Haiti, Canada, Texas, and Mexico.” Rader 2264. Sabin 42693. Sibley, Travelers in Texas, pp. 213 & 179: “Lundy visited all the settled parts of Texas, and his observations are basic to any study of the Texas Negro during the Mexican era.” Streeter 1169n. The map also appeared in Atkinson’s Casket (1836) and subsequently in pocket map format. The present version of the map has added the explanatory text on the disputed border of Texas and Mexico. For variants of the map, see: Graff 4797; Siebert Sale 7315-903; Streeter Sale 286. For a discussion of the map in Atkinson’s Casket as “the first map to show the newly-independent Republic of Texas,” see Matt Walter, “Texas, Mexico and Part of the United States” in The Neatline (February, 2011), p. 5. ($750-1,500)

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229. LYON, G[eorge] F[rancis]. Journal of a Residence and Tour in the Republic of Mexico in the Year 1826. With Some Account of the Mines of that Country. London: John Murray], 1828. 2 vols., 8vo, late nineteenth-century three-quarter polished green sheep over tan marbled boards. Light shelf wear, hinges split but strong, prelims and terminals foxed, else very good.

     First edition. Griffin 3561: “A wealth of detail on mining and mining revenues as well as sophisticated observations on general social and economic conditions.” Gunn 894. Hill, p. 186. Hill II:1056. Palau 144402. ($250-500)

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230. LYON, George Francis. The Sketch Book of Captn. G.F. Lyon R.N. [London: J. Dickinson, 1827]. 10 uncolored lithograph plates on India proof paper mounted on sheets (scenes in Mexico, Native Americans, archaeology), plus 3 lithograph plates on 2 leaves (explanatory text), all printed by C. Hullmandel after Lyon’s drawings. Small 4to, twentieth-century half black morocco over tan and brown marbled boards. Except for some scattered mild foxing, very fine.

     First edition of an outstanding, little-known plate book on Mexico, which also happens to be an exquisite example of early lithography by one of its pioneers, Charles Joseph Hullmandel (1789-1850).Palau 144403. Sabin 43854. British naval officer, mining expert, artist, explorer (America, Arctic and Africa), and socialite George Francis Lyon (1795-1832) went to sea at the age of thirteen, wrote and illustrated books on his travels, and died at sea. He went to Mexico as commissioner of the Real del Monte Mining Company. ($2,000-4,000)

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Addenda Box Lots

231. [MAP]. Anonymous manuscript map in Arabic (?) on heavy laid paper of North and South America, within gilt border, map proper with background painting in slate blue, outlines of countries in green and yellow, some pale green shading to various parts of the continents, rivers in red, text at top and bottom with black ink with red highlights, two ships on Pacific Ocean in red and with sails, a circular symbol at lower right shows inset of a coastline. Verso contains only text, in black ink with red highlights. N.p., n.d. (appears to be early nineteenth century or earlier; judging from the geography, the map may be much earlier). Map border measures 22.5 x 14 cm; overall sheet size: 28.5 x 20.5 cm. Map and verso with a few old stains and repairs, mostly affecting blank margins and border. Four old paper repairs to edges not affecting map or border. The leaf has the appearance of having been removed from a volume.

      This interesting and unusual map needs more research. A river (Mississippi?) is shown flowing into the Gulf of Mexico in the vicinity of Louisiana and Texas). California is not shown as an island. ($300-600)

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232. [MAP]. ALLARDT, G[eorge] F[rederick] (Chief Engineer). [Above top border] Salt Marsh and Tide Lands at North Beach San Francisco. [title & auction information below map proper] Sale Map No. 12 Salt Marsh and Tide Lands Situate in the City and County of San Francisco... To be sold at public Auction by order of the Board of Tide Land Commissioners...at the Sales Rooms of Greenebaum & Co., Auctioneers Nos. 115 & 117 Bush Street, San Francisco. Sale to commence...March 4th, 1873. San Francisco, 1873. Lithograph map mounted on contemporary cartographic linen,; border to border: 47 x 36.5 cm; overall sheet size: 56 x 46.5 cm. Scattered voids in the margins and within the image, including several costing part of the titles. A well-used, dilapidated copy of a rare map. Some moderate staining, mostly marginal.

     Map documenting the 1873 Auction of the Salt Marsh and Tide Lands of North Beach. Rumsey (3971) records a two-map sheet of the same date for the same sale, the right side of which is this map, and the left side of which is an area map of Mission Creek and Mission Bay. The present map was separately issued, with its own border and shows the area of North Beach bounded by the Bay, Webster, and Lombard Streets, and the Presidio. Presented are block and lot numbers, drainage, etc. Originally, San Francisco’s northeast shoreline extended only to Taylor and Francisco streets. What is now North Beach actually was a beach, which was built up with landfill in the late nineteenth century. Such wetlands are crucial to our ecosystem. The Bay Area once contained more than three hundred miles of salt marshes, but it has been estimated that 80% has been lost to development. In recent years, however, some marshes have been restored. On the other hand, in 2007, the American Planning Association named North Beach as one of the “Great Neighborhoods in America.” ($750-1,000)

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233. [MAP]. ÁLVAREZ BARREIRO, Francisco (cartographer) & Juan López (copyist & publisher). Mapa Geográfico de las Provincias al N. de Nueva España.... Madrid, 1803. Copper-engraved map, outline coloring of boundaries and color wash on coasts. Neat line to neat line: 31.5 x 53.8 cm. Very fine. OCLC lists only the copy at Yale, but the Library of Congress has a copy, and a copy is in the Orozco y Berra library in Mexico.

     First printed edition of a map that existed for decades only in Barriero’s original 1728 manuscript; the map is better known through a 1770 copy in the British Library (see Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, Vol. I, following p. 182), and a digital version <http://oieahc.wm.edu/wmq/Jan11/Barr/figure3/index.html>.     Wheat lists three of Barreiro’s manuscript maps (Mapping the Transmississippi West I, pp. 209-210, #113, #114, #115 & pp. 80-84): “Barreiro had long lived and worked in New Spain, and from 1717 to 1720 had served in Texas as a military engineer. He joined the Rivera expedition as engineer, cartographer and statistician, and prepared six maps, which together may be said to form the first reasonably scientific description of the areas covered. The sixth map is a general map of the entire area, including the Province of Texas [which] exists in a 1770 copy made by Don Louis de Surville, which is now located at the British Museum. This overall map was by far the most accurate yet made of much of the area we now know as the American Southwest. It is a cartographical landmark of first importance.” Jackson, Shooting the Sun, Plate 19, pp. 76-81, p. 241 & pp. 365-366: “This Mapa Geográfico de las Provincias al N. de Nueva España was the work of Juan López. Printed at Madrid in 1803, it is fully credited to Barreiro and faithful to his manuscript map in almost all respects...a cartographic milestone.... Thomas Streeter wrote enthusiastically of the [Barreiro’s] general map: ‘It seems to me about the most important of all the eighteenth-century maps showing Texas, sharing that honor with the Delisle 1718 map.’ Barreiro’s work constituted the first cartographic survey of northern Mexico and was “superbly executed.” Martin & Martin, p. 24: “The first renderings of Texas by a trained cartographer from his own observations. They stood unsurpassed for forty years.” ($5,000-10,000)

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234. [MAP]. ALZATE Y RAMÍREZ, José Antonio de. Nuevo Mapa Geográfico de la América Septentrional, perteneciente al Virreynato de Mexico: Dedicado á los Sabios Miembros de la Academia Real de las Ciencias de Paris Por su mui rendido Servidor y Capellan D. Josef Antonio de Alzate y Ramirez. Año de 1768. [lower left between statements of longitude and the neat line] Publicado bajo privilegio de la Academia Real de la Ciencias de Paris. [Below neat line at lower left] Se hallará en Madrid, Calle de Atocha, frente de la Casa de los Gremios. Madrid or Paris, 1768. Copper-engraved map on four joined sheets of laid paper, hand colored outlining and shading to boundaries and coasts; neat line to neat line: 53 x 64.2 cm; overall sheet size: 58.5 x 68.5 cm. Other than old fold lines and one small crease, very fine. Exceedingly rare.    

     This map was the first printed map to apply the name Texas to a geographic region (“Provincia de los Texas”). According to Jack Jackson Shooting the Sun, Plate 37, I, pp. 131-139 & I, pp. 253-255 (27C): “This map was printed in both Paris and Madrid, with some disagreement as to which issue came first”; I, pp. 131-139: “Alzate drew maps that are beautiful expressions of cartographic art, poised on the verge of scientific knowledge that would have taken them out of the decorative realm.” Martin & Martin #20 & pp. 100-101: “The only printed Spanish map of the area produced in the eighteenth century.” Streeter Sale 150 (citing the later 1772 or after edition, with the added Transit of Venus information). Wheat (Mapping the Transmississippi West #149, p. 87 & Plate following p. 146) cites the version like the present copy, giving priority to it and assigning publication at Madrid and giving issue points. See also: Lowery 515 and 516. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast of America 612 (use with caution). ($20,000-40,000)

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235. [MAP]. ANDERSON, J.A. Map of the Rail Roads of Pennsylvania and Parts of Adjoining States. 1872...Prepared from Official data by J.A. Anderson, Supt. of the Belvidere Delaware Rail Road. Published & sold by J.L. Smith...Lith. Jas. Guigan, Phila. [illustration of steamship in red at upper left corner.] Daily Lines of First-Class Passenger and Freight Steamers between Erie, Pa., and Upper Lake Ports. Philadelphia, 1872. Lithograph map showing drainage, counties, canals, stations, and the railroad network in original stencil coloring in red; map mounted on contemporary linen; border to border: 71.7 x 99.5 cm; folded into publisher’s original blind-embossed brown pebbled cloth pocket covers. Upper cover detached, but overall very good.

     First edition, second issue. Modelski, Railroad Maps of the United States 296 (citing the 1871 edition at the Library of Congress). This 1872 issue has some changes, such as the addition of the illustration of the steamboat at top left. Few states have a railroad heritage as rich as Pennsylvania. Rich deposits of anthracite coal triggered the development of the railroads and canals, and in the 1820s this impetus was increased by Pennsylvania’s determination to improve public transportation. By the time of this map, Pennsylvania was covered by the complex web of railroad lines we see on this map. ($750-1,000)

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236. [MAP]. ANDERSON, W[illiam] F., C[harles] D[rayton] Gibbes, et al (cartographers & surveyors), Warren Holt (publisher), & Edward Bosqui (lithographer). Territory of Idaho South of Salmon River and Rocky Mountains Designed as a Guide to all the Mining Districts of the included Country.... San Francisco, 1880. Lithograph map, original full hand coloring, borders in bright rose and teal, 60 sections mounted on original cartographic linen; neat line to neat line: 94.5 x 121.5 cm; overall sheet size: 95.7 x 123 cm., folded into original blind-embossed brown cloth covers, lettered in gilt on upper cover: Anderson’s Map of Southern Idaho, Eastern Oregon and the Regions Adjacent...; text entitled: Map of Southern Idaho and the Adjacent Regions...1880. [1-3] 4-55 [1, blank] pp. (pp. 33-54 printed on slightly thinner and shinier paper, as in the Graff copy). Pp. 55-56 in facsimile on old paper. Map fine except for light staining, mainly to verso of linen backing. Pocket map covers slightly faded and with a few small stains, corners lightly bumped. Text detached from binding, title page adhered to front pastedown at gutter (like the Graff copy), title and some leaves lightly stained, one leaf (pp. 51-52) lightly chipped, pp. 53-54 creased. Publisher’s original large purple ink stamp on front pastedown. Very rare—”Few copies have survived” (Graff). OCLC locates five copies. The copy said to be at the Los Angeles Public Library is a ghost. The copies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the Library of Congress, and the Bancroft Library lack the map. The only copy we found listed on OCLC which has the map is the Graff copy at the Newberry Library.

      First edition.Eberstadt 138:277 (offering a copy sans map): “Very rare. The material for this guide was drawn in large part by Gibbes from the Bonanza City Yankee Fork Herald, and from Judge Anderson’s own personal explorations.” Graff 61: “This very uncommon map contains details of the area previously unpublished. The map was apparently quite popular and seems to have been used roughly, for few copies have survived.” Howes A236. National Park Service, A Bibliography of National Parks and Monuments West of the Mississippi River (Washington: Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 1941), Vol. I, p. 38 (in Yellowstone section): “General description of Yellowstone Park; notes on area, elevations, names, geological features, and scenery.” Streeter Sale 3319: “The large-scale map shows not only southern Idaho but Western Wyoming as far east as Granger, northern Utah and Nevada to as far south as the Union Pacific and on the Central Pacific to Elko, Nevada, and eastern Oregon for nearly 100 miles west of the Oregon-Idaho boundary. Forty-three silver and gold quartz mining districts are indicated by figures on the map which also has legends for placers and quartz mines. It is a magnificent map, valuable not only for showing the development to 1880 of the area covered, but also for indicating the main routes which in the course of years had become wagon and stage roads. It is an excellent aid for following the earlier journeys of the emigrants.” Wheat (Mapping the Transmississippi West) lists maps of 1880 and beyond, such as Warren Holt’s 1884 map of Wyoming, but this map is not mentioned. Not in Blevins, Mapping Wyoming, and other standard sources. ($8,000-$12,000)

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237. [MAP]. ARISTA, Mariano & Joseph Goldsborough Bruff. A Correct Map of the Seat of War in Mexico. Being a Copy of Genl. Arista’s Map, taken at Resaca de la Palma, with additions and Corrections;[five insets at upper right and along right margin]; [horizontal city and bay view at of Vera Cruz at lower center]. New York: John Disturnell, 1847. Lithograph map, original bright outline coloring, border to border: 62.2 x 48.5 cm. Folded into original pocket covers. A few minor splits at folds (no losses) and light browning at a few folds and to blank left margin where pasted to pocket covers, otherwise exceptionally fine. Difficult to find in this fine condition. Front pastedown with contemporary ink signature of Asbury Dickens of North Carolina, signed as Secretary of the Senate (1781-1861).

     Revised edition of the second most important map of the Mexican-American War, the foremost being John Disturnell’s so-called “Treaty Map” (see lot 281 herein). The present map is an intermediate issue, with features added as the war progressed. We have seen three versions of this map, all with the same title and dated 1847. Day, p. 45 (another edition). Garrett & Goodwin (The Mexican-American War of 1846-1848, pp. 413-414) note other variations; for example, sometimes the map is found uncolored, rather than colored (as here). The map was also available as a sheet map or in the preferable pocket map format (as here). Jones, Adventures in Americana 1156. Phillips, America, p. 410. Rumsey 97 (another edition, without the view of Vera Cruz or Plan of Monterey): “Scarce map with drawings by Bruff... From the introduction to his travel diary, it is clear that Bruff drew for the Topographical Engineers and other government departments for over fifty years.” Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, mentions the map in the note to entry #583. This map is among the liveliest Mexican-American War images, depicting Manifest Destiny in full-tilt cartographical mode. This map is most interesting for its impact on the course of the war and how it came into the hands of the U.S. Army and thence to J. Goldsborough Bruff and the U.S. Topographical Engineers. For a discussion of the evolution of this rare printed map, see Jack Jackson’s article “General Taylor’s ‘Astonishing’ Map of Northeastern Mexico” (SWHQ CI:2, October, 1997, pp. 143-173). ($4,000-8,000)

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238. [MAP]. ARROWSMITH, Aaron. A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces Compiled from Original Documents.... London, 1810.Copper-engraved map, original outline color, each Mexican state with full color tint, seas with pale teal wash, 4 separate sheets, each sectioned into 9 pieces (36 total sections), mounted on original cartographic linen, overall sheet size for entire map: 131.2 x 169.4 cm, preserved in original or contemporary green marbled boards and black leather slip case. Uniform light foxing (mainly at folds), some light staining (from original adhesive), a few minor losses and splits at folds, some chipping to marbled panels, case rubbed, generally very good, in “as issued” condition, with excellent color retention.

     First edition, first issue, the “Hydrographer to H.R.H.  The Prince of Wales” issue of the first large-scale map to depict the important discoveries of Pike and Humboldt in the Southwest and the most influential and widely copied map of the region in the era. As an early nineteenth-century publication based on information gathered by Spanish exploring parties in the eighteenth century, Arrowsmith’s map belongs to the beginning of a new cartographic sequence. Martin & Martin, pp. 112-113 & Plate 25. Rumsey 2035.001. Streeter 1046A. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 295 & pp. 27-28. ($15,000-30,000)

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239. [MAP]. ARROWSMITH, J[ohn]. Mexico. By J. Arrowsmith. [inset map at lower left] Mexico, Shewing the connection with the Ports of Acapulco, Vera Cruz, & Tampico; on double the scale of the Map. [below lower neat line at center] London, Pubd. 15 Feby. 1842, by J. Arrowsmith, 10 Soho Square. [lower left blank margin] 44. [atlas tab in right margin] Mexico. London, 1842. Engraved map on heavy paper with atlas tab intact, original color (outline and wash); neat line to neat line: 47 x 60 cm; overall sheet size: 56 x 68.5 cm. Mexico atlas tab darkened. Very fine.

     This map appeared in The London Atlas of Universal Geography (1842-1850), “remarkable for its understated elegance and clarity... one of the first truly modern atlases” (Rumsey). The map first appeared in Arrowsmith’s 1832 atlas, in which Texas was shown in the earlier smaller conformation, without the Panhandle and the southern border at the Nueces rather than the Rio Grande. Phillips, America, p. 409. Phillips, Atlases 789:44. Rumsey 4613:044. Wheat, Transmississippi West I, p. 179 & #459. Texas is outlined in yellow and shown as an independent republic with the huge Emory-style panhandle. This map by the nephew of Aaron Arrowsmith first appeared in 1832 and was reissued and updated several times. The Arrowsmith family members were among the most respected and influential cartographers of the nineteenth century. In 1810 during the Spanish era, Aaron Arrowsmith created one of the outstanding maps of New Spain (see lot 238 herein). In 1841, John Arrowsmith published a key map of the Republic of Texas, which was the best depiction of Texas available in Europe during the Republic and annexation period (see Martin & Martin 32 & Streeter 1373). ($500-1,000)

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240. [MAP]. AUSTIN, Stephen F. Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States... Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner 1836. Copper-engraved map on bank note paper, original color, neat line to neat line: 74.9 x 59.2 cm, original pocket covers. Map backed with archival tissue which is float-mounted on archival board. A few small voids where formerly folded and repair at upper right corner (consolidated by backing), a bit of minor soiling and offsetting, pocket covers slightly faded at edges. A very good copy with excellent, strong color and the elusive pocket covers present.

     This is the 1836 issue of Austin’s map, and the first to show the battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto. The first issue of this cornerstone map was published in 1830. Fifty Texas Rarities 10. Howes A404. Jack Jackson, Shooting the Sun, Vol. II, pp. 452-459: “Austin took the most current sources he could find on Texas and drew a ground-breaking map from them. Much of what he put on paper was based on his own observations and had greater value because of it. Moreover, Austin brought his map to publication, giving the world a better view of the geography of Texas than any man had presented in the foregoing 140 years.” Martin & Martin, pp. 32, 52, 120-121 & Plate 29. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Plate 154 & p. 253. Streeter 1115D. Henry Taliaferro in Paul E. Cohen’s, Mapping the West (pp. 110-113): “No part of the West had been previously mapped on such a large scale and in such detail. All editions are so rare and sought-after that Austin’s map commands a higher price in the market place than any other nineteenth-century American map. Anglo settlements in Texas were the vanguard of the American Western movement; the excellence of Austin’s map makes it one of the most important maps of Texas—not only for the state’s history, but also for documenting the early trans-Mississippi West." ($200,000-250,000)

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241. [MAP]. BAIST, G[eorge] W[illiam]. Baist’s Map of Philadelphia and Environs...1889 [top left, below neat line, publisher’s ad with illustrations including William Penn in 1682 making a real estate deal with the Delaware tribe] G. Wm. Baist Topographical Engineer. Author and Publisher of Atlases and Maps.... [inset maps showing rail routes and the neighborhoods of Darby, Lansdowne & Clifton Heights];[below lower right neat line] Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1889 by G. Wm. Baist in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington D.C. Philadelphia, 1889. Lithograph map on two sheets, each mounted, as issued, on cartographical cloth, original outline color and shading; 2 sheets measuring approximately 131 x 94 cm: overall sheet size: approximately 131 x 188 cm, folded into publisher’s original dark purple blind-embossed covers, gilt lettering on upper cover: Baist’s Map of Philadelphia and Environs Published by G. Wm. Baist. No. 906 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. Map: old staining to cartographical linen on verso of left sheet (barely visible on map proper); overall, the map is very fine with excellent color retention. Covers: spine slightly chipped with a few voids, corners slightly frayed and bumped, overall very good.

     First edition. Purely as an example of mapmaking, this grand map is exceptional in execution. This an extremely detailed map locates political wards, towns, major and minor roadways, property owners, post offices, churches, railroads, and waterways. Circular markings compute mileage from the center of Philadelphia. Ristow notes that George William Baist (1859-1927) in Philadelphia was the most active producer of real estate maps in the U.S. (American Maps and Mapmakers, p. 261). Tooley’s Dictionary of Mapmakers (revised edition), Vol. I, p. 71. ($300-600)

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242. [MAP]. BANCROFT, A.L. Bancroft’s Official Guide Map of City and County of San Francisco, Compiled from Official Maps in Surveyor’s Office.... San Francisco: The Bancroft Co., 1887. Lithograph street map of San Francisco on banknote paper, neat line to neat line: 59.8 x 74.8 cm; overall sheet size: 66.8 x 77.8 cm; folded into original printed and paper covers with illustration of the Bancroft firm.Map fine, covers worn, creased and chipped at one corner (no loss of text).     Bancroft’s guide map to San Francisco was the gold standard of guide maps to the city and area from 1871 to 1893 (OCLC lists about a dozen editions from 1872 to 1893). The same general template was used for all the maps, with updates as the city developed and expanded. Phillips, America, p. 777. Rumsey 3371 (present edition); 45 (1873 edition); 2742 (1881 edition); 2572 (1891 edition). The extensive key at the bottom of the map locates about three hundred landmarks in the city (the key was omitted from some later editions). Concentric circles on the map indicate half-mile distances from the ferries. Development extends as far as the race track. Still undeveloped are Rancho Laguna de la Merced, San Miguel Rancho, and Rancho Cañada de Guadalupe Rodeo Viejo y Vistación. Albert Little Bancroft was the brother of Hubert Howe Bancroft and assumed control of the the Bancroft firm when Hubert retired. ($800-1,200)

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243. [MAP]. BOUCHETTE, Joseph, Jun. [Joseph Bouchette, Sr. & James Wyld]. To His Most Excellent Majesty King William IVth. This Map of the Provinces of Lower & Upper Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland & Prince Edwards Island, With a Large Section of the United States.... London: James Wyld, 1831. Copper-engraved map on three sheets with original outline hand coloring of boundaries, mounted on original cartographic linen, dissected into 48 sections total, approximate overall dimensions for the three sheets together including selvages: 101 x 197 cm. Map folded into original case. The condition of the map is superb, fresh and bright, with original engraved labels. Fragile case darkened and worn.

    First edition of a very rare immigration map of British Canada with strong political implications. The map was intended to accompany (but apparently never is found with) Joseph Bouchette Sr.’s two-volume work, British Dominions in North America: Or, A Topographical and Statistical Description of the Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada... (London, 1831). Phillips, America, p. 196. Rumsey 4436: “Joseph Bouchette Junior carried on his father’s work and this map is a worthy successor to the elder Bouchette’s 1815 map of Upper and Lower Canada. The scale is almost three times as large and the size of the map is doubled. A list of authorities is given, all Canadian, ending with ‘several important American Authorities’ (which are unnamed). Lands belonging to the Canada Company are shown. There is a great deal of detail in the U.S. portions of the map, and attention is paid to the Maine boundary dispute with a note—but only the British claim line is shown.” ($10,000-20,000)

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244. [MAP]. [BRADFORD, Thomas Gamaliel]. Texas [left margin outside neat line] 64.A. [Boston & New York, 1835]. Copper-engraved map, original outline hand coloring of land grants, later color to Gulf Coast (blue outline and wash), title and scale (red), border (yellow). Neat line to neat line: 19.8 x 26.5 cm; overall sheet size: 24.6 x 30.5 cm. Scale: 1 inch = 75 miles. Recto fresh, bright, and fine; verso browned and stained from former framing and matting.

     First issue of the first separate map of Texas to appear in an atlas, with early issue points, including the Mustang Wild Horse Desert shown in south Texas; the Nueces River as the southwestern boundary; land grants indicated instead of counties; and the fact that Austin (founded 1839) is not yet shown. This map is from Bradford’s 1835 Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial. Martin & Martin 31: “Aside from showing Texas as a separate state, the map [is] historically important for clearly demonstrating the demand in the U.S. for information about Texas during the Revolution and the early years of the Republic.” Phillips, Atlases 770. Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 248: "Locates four settlements in the vicinity of Galveston Bay: Harrisburg, Lynchburg, Liberty, and Anahuac. Evidently, not all copies of Bradford’s atlas contained this map.” ($600-1,200)

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245. [MAP]. BRIDGENS, R[ichard] P[erkins]. Map of the City of San Francisco Compiled from Records & Surveys by R.P. Bridgens.... Philadelphia: M. Bixby, 1854. Large-scale lithograph wall map with numerous view and landmarks, within ornamental border, on six sheets of paper mounted on contemporary linen, original hand color, original varnish, original black wooden rollers with original tacks; border to border: 104 x 186 cm; overall sheet size: 146 x 192 cm. Except for light cracking at rollers and a few other areas (minor losses) and light chipping at edges (not affecting image), a very fine copy. Copies located: California State Library and Bancroft Library (University of California at Berkeley). Provenance: Bixby Estate.

     First edition. Warren Heckrotte, unpublished “Preliminary List of Maps of San Francisco” 48. Peters, California on Stone, pp. 58 & 102. Ristow, American Maps & Mapmakers, p. 457. University of California, List of Printed Maps of California, Library Bulletin 9 (Berkeley, 1887),p. 19. Not in Phillips, Maps of America, Rumsey, and other standard sources. This excessively rare map of San Francisco is among the earliest printed maps of the city of San Francisco, and it is notable for its grand dimensions and the wonderful vignettes of the city’s landmarks and magnificent architecture. Bridgens’ map is probably the largest of the city of San Francisco published up to that time. The earliest printed map of the town of San Francisco was made by William Matson Eddy in 1849. The present map, made only six years later, shows a dramatically transformed city due to the enormous economic, social, and political changes which came to the region in quantum leaps. See our full description for more on mapmaker Bridgens. ($15,000-30,000)

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246. [MAP]. BROMLEY-LEWIS LAND COMPANY. Sectional Map of Texas Compliments of Bromley-Lewis Land Company...Omaha, Nebraska... [inset text upper left] The Trinity Valley of East Texas Offers Great Agricultural Opportunities.... [inset text lower left] Join Our Excursions...to Our Lands in the Trinity Valley of East Texas.... [company lands and route to them shown in bright red].Omaha, 1909. Lithograph map of Texas in red and black. Neat line to neat line: 53.5 x 56 cm; overall sheet size: 54.7 x 57.7 cm, folded into original beige paper pocket covers, titled Pocket Map of Texas.... Two folds with short splits (no losses), a few minor spots, else fine. No copies recorded on OCLC.

     First edition. This apparently forgotten promotional is for lands in the Trinity Valley (encompassing parts of the counties of Liberty, Waller, San Jacinto, Hardin, Polk, and Tyler) in far East Texas, between Houston and Shreveport. Trinity Valley is touted as having the most productive and well-drained agricultural land in Texas, with two crops a year attainable, with “a more even climate than California.” Other bait includes oil drilling, good roads and railroads, “the Gulf breeze that tempers the summer heat,” etc. Texas is shown in its entirety with transportation routes well delineated. ($400-800)

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247. [MAP]. BRUÉ, [Adrien Hubert]. Carte générale des États-Unis Mexicains et des Provinces-Unis De L’Amérique Centrale...;[large inset map at lower left] Guatemala ou Provinces-Unies de l’Amérique Centrale; [long note at bottom] Nota. Les côtes que offrent les deux parties de cette carte...; [below border at left] Gravée sous direction de l’Auteur. Paris, 1825. Engraved map of Mexico, the Transmississippi West, the Gulf Coast to Mobile, and Central America, original outline color, sectioned and mounted on contemporary linen in eight sections, piano key border, neat line to neat line: 51.5 x 36.5 cm, overall sheet size: 56 x 40.2 cm. Housed in contemporary mottled cartridge paper chemise.

     Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 361n (listing a very similar map of the same year that issued in Brué’s 1830 Atlas Universel de géographie; the present map is slightly wider and without the printed atlas designation number of 59): “Brué’s 1825 ‘Etats-Unis Mexicaines,’ with R. S. Sacramento ou Timpanogos navigable a plus de 50 lieues (the first hint of the Sacramento River, with an R. S. Joaquin meeting it from the southeast) and with the S. Buenaventura, the Truches or S. Felipe and the R. de los Martires.” Phillips, Atlases 758 (1830-1834 atlas) & 4321 (1838-1839 atlas). This is a wonderful example of an important map for Mexican history, Central America, and the Transmississippi West. Brué’s map was one of the earliest to reflect Mexico’s independence from Spain (1822). This map was also used in the dispute regarding British title to the whole of British Honduras (Belize). The map is also notable in being the first published map to name the Sacramento River of central California. For the Southwest and Borderlands, there is little progress shown over earlier maps. Texas is labeled as such, but the entire region that is now Texas is divided among San Luis Potosí, Coahuila, a huge Bolson de Mapimi, and New Mexico (El Paso is in New Mexico). ($300-600)

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248. [MAP]. BRUÉ, A[drien] H[ubert] & Ch[arles] Piquet. Nouvelle Carte du Mexique, et d’une partie des provinces unies de l’Amérique Centrale. Dediee a l’Academie Royale des Sciences de l’Institut de France. Par A.H. Brué, Géographe du Roi, Membre de la common. centrale de la société de Géographie de Paris, membre-honoraire de celle de Londres, &a. Paris, 1834. Chez Ch. Picquet, Géographe du Roi et du Duc d’Orleans, Proprietaire des Cartes et Atlas de Brué, Quai Conti No. 17, près de l’Institut. Oeuvre Posthume;[in oval at left of title] Revue et augmentée par Ch. Piquet en 1839; [in circle right of title surrounded by embosure] Depuis 1822 l’Auteur n’a donne ses soins qu’a...;[inset map showing road between Mexico and Veracruz at lower left] Détails des environs de México et de la Vera-Cruz;[inset map of Yucatán and Central America at lower center] Complement de la Carte donnant le Yucatan et une partie des provinces unies de l’Amérique Centrale.Paris, 1839. Engraved map, original outline coloring, piano-key border. Neat line to neat line: 93.2 x 63 cm; overall sheet size: 96 x 67 cm, cut in 21 sections and mounted on cartographic linen, with engraved book label of Piquet and later bookplate of Antonio Moreno. Slight darkening, a few losses at folds. Folds clumsily repaired on verso with tape.

     Rare and important French map for Texas and the West. Revised edition of Brue’s important 1834 map, noted for early depiction of the discoveries of Jedediah Smith in the West, here with some changes of a constantly evolving map, such as labelling Texas (the next revision includes Texas in the title). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 404 (citing the 1834 version in his entry 401): “A monumental map... Contains the earliest references to Jedediah Smith.” Vol. II, pp. 144-145. Rumsey lists an 1839 edition (5386) and an 1840 edition (5396). ($2,000-4,000)

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249. [MAP]. BUTLER, B[enjamin] C[lapp]. The New York Wilderness. Hamilton County and Adjoining Territory. Compiled by: B.C. Butler. 1879 J.A. Cooper. Del. Lith. by Weed, Parsons & Co. Albany. Albany, 1879. Lithograph cadastral wall map mounted on original cartographical cloth; neat line to neat line: 125 x 94 cm; folded into original brown pebble cloth folder (26 x 15.5 cm), gilt lettering on upper cover: Map of the New York Wilderness. 1879. Cloth folder bumped and frayed at edges and corners. Other than occasional wear and fraying at folds, the map is fine. OCLC locates two copies: Buffalo & Erie County Library and Skidmore College.

     First edition. Caroline Mastin Welsh, Adirondack Prints and Printmakers: The Call of the Wild (Syracuse: The Adirondack Museum-Syracuse University Press, 1998), p. 19: “Between 1871 and 1879 over one-half million acres of Adirondack land reverted to state ownership. Much of the land, which had been sold off during the great land sales of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, went to timber operators who cut the softwoods that could be driven down the rivers. They then let the title revert back to the state for taxes. This amounted to a state subsidy for the timbermen. The practice produced a lively speculative market in Adirondack land, and in 1879, B.C. Butler compiled The New York Wilderness. Hamilton County and Adjoining Territory, a wall map published by Weed and Parsons, which claimed to sort out the Adirondack land ownership confusion.” In 1893, after passage of the Adirondack Park Act (1892) to allow the State to take stock of its Adirondack holdings and reduce poaching, the present map became the basis of the first official map of the park, Map of the Adirondack Forest by State Forester John Koetteritz. ($500-1,000)

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250. [MAP]. CADENA Y MARIN, Aurelio. Plano Geografico, Mercantil y Politico del Estado de Coahuila de Zaragoza.... [below lower neat line] Lit. C. Montauriol y Ca. M; [map at center] Coahuila; [5 groups of views, clockwise from upper left] [1, three combined views] Parroquia del Saltillo; Fabrica de hilados y tejidos La Constancio”...; Ciudad de Parras de la Fuente; [2, three combined views] Fabrica de Papel...; Plaza de Sn. Francisco en Saltillo; Palacio del Gobierno y Calle de Zaragoza en Saltillo; [3, three combined views] Indios Kikapoos; Ciudad del Saltillo; Aprhension de Hidalgo en las Norias de Bajan Marzo 21 de 1811; [4] Aduana Frontériza en C. Porfirio Diaz, (Antes Piedras Negras; [5, three combined views] Fábrica de hilados y tejidos “La Estrella”...; Plaza de Tlaxcala en Saltillo; Molino del Fénix en Saltillo; [7 oval portraits of historical figures (some Tejanos) and Governor José María Garza Galán]; [14 columns of text] Geografia Estadística é Historia del Estado.... N.p., n.d. [ca. 1891-1892, based on García Galán’s governorship, and date of 1891 in text]. Lithograph on heavy paper with original color (grey, tan, and black), original light varnish; border to border: 64.5 x 95.5 cm.; overall sheet size: 70.7 x 99.2 cm. A few clean marginal tears, one of which extends slightly into border on left (no losses), a few minor chips to blank margins (not affecting image or border), otherwise very fine, no cracking or discoloration from varnish. No copies located.

     First edition. Not in standard sources. The map locates ranches, haciendas, mines, railroads, and more, and the promotional text emphasizes natural products, manufacturing, and mining. The historical text includes colonial history relating to Texas, and three the portraits are of men famous in Texas history, or with Texas connections: Ignacio Seguín Zaragoza, José Miguel Ramos Arizpe, and Ramón Músquiz. A circular vignette at lower right illustrates a handsome family group of Kickapoo, that beleaguered tribe whose name ironically means “He moves about.” ($400-800)

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251. [MAP]. CADENA Y MARIN, Aurelio. Plano Geografico, Mercantil, Politico y Religioso del Estado de Sonora formado y publicado con los Datos Oficiales del Estado por Aurelio Cadena y Marin...; [large Mexican eagle below title]; [map at center, 34.5 x 28 cm] Sonora; [views, clockwise from upper left] [1, bird’s-eye view] Ciudad de Alamos; [2, bird’s-eye view] Vista de la Ciudad y Puerto de Guaymas; [3] Vista de la Parroquia en Guaymas; [4, bird’s-eye view] Nogales Sonora y Arizona; [5] Bahia de Guaymas; [10 oval portraits of officials and bishop] Sr. D. Ramon Corral Gobernador del Estado.... [14 columns of text] Geografia Estadística é Historia del Estado.... N.p., n.d. [Mexico: Montauriol y Ca.?, [1895 or after, based on Corral’s governorship, 1895-1899, and date in text of 1890]. Lithograph on heavy paper with original color (green, tan, and black), original light varnish; border to border: 62 x 92.5 cm.; overall sheet size: 70 x 99.5 cm. A few clean marginal tears, one of which extends slightly into text on left (no losses), a few minor chips to blank margins (not affecting image or border), otherwise very fine, no cracking or discoloration from varnish. No copies located.

     First edition. Not in standard sources. Another elaborate Porfiriate promotional, with text containing history, statistics, commerce, natural resources, etc. Especially interesting for Borderlands is the bird’s-eye view of Nogales and Arizona. The map includes Arizona north to above Tucson, western Chihuahua, and parts of Baja California and the Gulf of California. The map key has symbols for locating ranchos, mines, and railroads. ($400-800)

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252. [MAP]. CALIFORNIA GOLD DISTRICT. MITCHELL, A.T. Well executed manuscript map on laid paper, in ink and with light blue wash in Pacific Ocean, entitled “Gold Distrct [sic] in California,” with autograph note in pencil on verso: “Ellen, I send you this small map of the Gold Regions with my respects. A few lines from you would be read with pleasure. Yours with esteem. A.T. Mitchell[?].” N.p., n.d. [California Gold District, ca. 1849-1850]. 13.3 x 8.5 cm. One small hole at left, pencil writing very light, overall very good, an amazing survival of a Gold Rush map drawn on the spot. Maps of this type and quality are seldom found.

     This handsome little map has symbols to indicate, towns. ranchos, and roads, and mark indicating the location where “Gold first discovered.” The main rivers located and named are the Sacramento, American, and San Joaquin. Bays located and named are “Bay of San Francisco,” [San] “Pablo Bay,” and “Susan Bay” [Suisan]. Tributaries along the Sacramento include “Cheo R.” (Big Chico Creek?), “Butte River” (Black Butte River), Feather R. (off the Feather River are Yuba River and Bear Creek). On the America River are Middle Feather, South Fork, and Mill. Along the San Joaquin river are Consumnes River, “Muekelnes R.” (Mokelumne River), “Calveres River” (Calaveras River), “Stanislaus R.,” an decipherable name (perhaps Tuolumne River?), “Mercedes” (Merced River). Locations include Sutter’s Fork and Murphy's. ($5,000-7,000)

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253. [MAP]. CALIFORNIA PROMOTION COMPANY. Map of Part of San Francisco California Showing Buildings Constructed, And Buildings Under Construction During One Year After Fire of April 18, 1906 [above border at lower left] Surveyed and Drawn by Punnett Brothers... [above border at lower center] Copyright, 1907, by Punnett Brothers [above border at lower right] Published by The California Promotion Committee... [inset map at lower left] Map of San Francisco Showing Relative Size and Position of Burned Area. San Francisco, 1907. Lithograph map oriented with north toward lower right, on thin paper with original color (outlining in red in central San Francisco and the area of the Great Fire of 1906; inset map of San Francisco fully colored in the area of the fire). Border to border: 60 x 79 cm; overall sheet size: 65 x 86 cm. Creased where originally folded. Very fine and fresh. Scarce in commerce.

     First edition of a promotional map with good detail and optimistic text (“Building permits issued for year...$60,189,923”). The map is illustrated in Vol. 12 of The Magazine of Business (Chicago, July, 1907), pp. 208-209, with the comment that the map demonstrates “the enterprise and courage of the citizens after a great calamity.” The earthquake on April 18, 1906, ignited devastating fires in the city and along the Northern Pacific coast, lasting for several days. About three thousand lives were lost, over eighty percent of San Francisco was destroyed, and over half the population was left homeless. San Francisco wasted no time in rebuilding its unique city. The map shows as much the spirit of the people of San Francisco as the delineation of the city and the damage. ($750-1,500)

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254. [MAP]. CASE, TIFFANY & COMPANY. Map of the United States [below title, oval portrait of George Washington with eagle and wreath] Washington [below portrait] Hartd. Published by Case Tiffany & Company 1853 [architectural illustration at center] Capitol at Washington [key with symbols for towns, missionary stations, forts, canals, mines, roads, etc.]. Explanation. Hartford, 1853. Lithograph map, original full color to states, territories, and countries, showing the United States, border with Canada, Mexico, Central America, and Cuba; neat line to neat line: 60 x 61.5 cm; overall sheet size: 65.6 x 64.5 cm. Creased where originally folded, small loss at one fold, otherwise fine and fresh.

     According to Rumsey (3930), the present map is a reworking of Case-Tiffany’s ca. 1850 map of the same title, considerably altered here (Texas downsized from the Emory conformation, western territories and California more clearly shown, etc). For the ca. 1850 version, see Rumsey (3930) and Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West (III, p. 148 & #664). Wheat calls the Case-Tiffany ca. 1850 map “clear and definite in the West” and comments that it “is a strange mixture of up-to-date information, and much that goes back for years.” Our map is cited by Rumsey (4404), who notes that “no changes are noted from the 1852 issue by [Horace] Wentworth.” Rumsey is referring to Wheat’s entry #768 (III, p. 156), a map based on the Case-Tiffany map and states: “This is an early map with a late date.”  ($400-800)

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255. [MAP]. [CHÂTELAIN, Henri Abraham]. Carte contenant le Royaume du Mexique et la Floride, Dressez sur les meilleures observations & sur les Mémoires les plus Nouveaux. Tom. VI. No. 17. Pag: 101. [explanatory text at lower left] Remarque.... [Amsterdam, 1719-1732]. Uncolored copper-engraved map on laid paper, original atlas tab on verso, neat line to neat line: 40.5 x 53 cm; overall sheet size: 45.3 x 57. Very fine and fresh, strong impression, uncolored (as issued).

     This is a reduced version of Delisle's momentous 1703 Carte du Mexique et de la Floride (see herein), showing much of the same area but with only minor geographical and place name changes, such as the redrawing of the Gulf of Honduras and more added place names in British North America, up and down the Atlantic coast. According to Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, first edition, Vol. II, pp. 34 & 38, Cha 7(9), the map appeared in Vol. VI of the 1719 and 1732 editions of Châtelain's Atlas Historique (7 vols.). Lowery 292 (citing appearance in the 1719 atlas). Martin & Martin, p. 93 (discussing Delisle's 1703 map and noting that Châtelain copied Delisle's map). Phillips, America, p. 567 (noting appearance in the 1719 atlas). For more on Châtelain (1684-1743), see Tooley's Dictionary of Mapmakers (revised edition), Vol. I, p. 258. Unlike some other mapmakers who copied Delisle's map, Châtelain preserved the clean, scientific style of Delisle. The two explanatory paragraphs of text at lower left contain very flattering remarks about Mexico and Florida, although the Native Americans of the latter are disparaged. ($400-800)

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256. [MAP]. CHUTE, Elmer J. (publisher) & R.W. Griswold (cartographer). Elmer J. Chute’s Map of the Goldfield Mining District Nye and Esmeralda Counties, Nevada. 1905.... Goldfield, Nevada: Elmer J. Chute, 1905 & Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1905. Lithograph map on township and range grid, printed on calendared paper mounted on original cartographic cloth, showing mining district, specific claims in original color (green, yellow, blue, and rose); neat line to neat line: 62.8 x 58 cm; overall sheet size: 67 x 62 cm. Creased where folded, mounted on cartographic linen. Light chipping and mild soiling to blank margins, a few splits at folds (no losses), else very good. Uncommon (OCLC locates 2 copies).

     First edition of a map historically important and visually interesting, with its colorful mosaic presentation of the mining claims. Not in Paher (Nevada). In the years 1903 to 1905, growth was extremely rapid as people stampeded into town to mine the area. Numerous businesses and structures grew up very quickly, followed by a railroad in 1905. By 1906, the amount of ore taken out was valued at approximately $15,000,000. All was not well, however, as labor troubles broke out in opposition to mining company practices. Despite those problems, the town continued to grow and even had a luxury hotel with private baths and a restaurant that served oysters and squid. Decline followed rapidly. In 1913, a flood destroyed much of the city. In 1918, the largest company ceased operations, and in 1923, a fire burned much of the town, effectively marking the end of the Goldfield mining venture. ($800-1,600)

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257. [MAP]. COLTON, G.W. & C.B. Colton. Colton’s Map of the State of Alabama...1883. New York, 1883. Lithograph map on banknote paper, original full and outline color, ornate vine-and-shell border; neat line to neat line: 88.5 x 65 cm; border to border: 96 x 72 cm; overall sheet size: 98 x 75 cm, folded into original dark brown blind embossed cloth pocket folder, gilt-lettered on upper cover. Except for a few minor splits at folds (no losses), superb with bright color. Pocket covers very fine. No copies listed on OCLC.

     This beautiful, grand format pocket map of Alabama shows in great detailed railroad lines, cities and towns, rivers, lakes, and mountain ranges. Not in Phillips, America. ($500 - 1,000)

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258. [MAP]. COLTON, G[eorge] W[oolworth] & C[harles] B. Colton’s Texas...1870. New York, 1870. Lithograph map, original color, ornate floral, bird, and vine border. Insets of Galveston Bay and Sabine Lake. Neat line to neat line: 28.4 x 35.6 cm; border to border: 32.5 x 39.8 cm; overall sheet size: 34.5 x 42 cm. Silked and restored with some splits at fold reinforced and a few small voids. Map with moderate brown stain at left margin (due to earlier removal of pocket folder, which is not present). Modern frame, under glass. Very scarce. OCLC locates only two copies.

     This is a reduced version of Colton’s New Map of the State of Texas, here styled Colton’s Texas and intended for the pocket map version. This is yet another of Colton’s commercial maps of Texas, originally based on De Cordova’s grand map of Texas (1849), subsequently reduced to the present smaller format by J.H. Colton in 1855 for his world atlas, with continual recycling for about three decades to reflect changes such as railroads, proposed route for the Union Pacific, mail routes, numerous new counties, etc. The atlas version had a different border. This is one of the nineteenth-century Texas maps that shows the entire state rather than having the Panhandle as an inset. ($300-600)

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259. [MAP]. COLTON, G.W. & C.B. (publisher) & A. R. Roessler, Karl Wilhelm Pressler, et al (cartographers). Colton’s New Map of the State of Texas. The Indian Territory and Adjoining Portions of New Mexico, Louisiana and Arkansas.... New York, 1872. Lithograph map with original color, 81 x 92 cm, original brown cloth covers with large gilt lone star and lettering in gilt.Professionally conserved, very good condition. Phillips, Map of America, p. 846. BlevinsTexas: Mapping the Lone Star State through History, pp. 68-69 (illustrated). Taliaferro 344A. This very scarce, large-format pocket map is a descendant of De Cordova’s great 1849 map of Texas (see Martin & Martin 39). Publisher Colton chose his sources well, by using updates from Pressler, Roessler, and official surveys. ($3,000-6,000)

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260. [MAP]. COLTON, G.W. & C.B. (publisher) & A.R. Roessler, Karl Wilhelm Pressler, et al (cartographers). Colton’s New Map of the State of Texas The Indian Territory and Adjoining Portions of New Mexico, Louisiana and Arkansas.... New York, 1874. Lithograph map with original color, neat line to neat line: 82.6 x 89.5 cm, folded into original brown cloth covers with large gilt lone star and lettering in gilt. Professionally conserved, folds strengthened on verso, some minor losses at folds, cloth covers rehinged and rebacked, pastedown with insect damage at lower blank margin (slight loss of ruled border). A very good, fresh, and bright copy of a fragile, very rare map. This map is the 1874 edition of the previously described map which first came out in 1872. OCLC locates no copies of this 1874 edition. This very scarce, large-format pocket map is a descendant of De Cordova’s great 1849 map of Texas (see Martin & Martin 39). Publisher Colton chose his sources well, by using updates from Pressler, Roessler, and official surveys. ($3,000-6,000)

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261. [MAP]. COLTON, G.W. & C.B. Colton’s “New Medium” Map of the State of Texas.... New York, 1876. Lithograph map on bank note paper, original pastel wash and bright rose outline of Texas border, ornate border. Neat line to neat line: 44 x 65 cm; border to border: 49.5 x 65.7 cm. Folded into pocket covers, original dark brown embossed cloth, Colton ads affixed to sheet on verso of upper cover.Pocket covers lightly worn at spine extremities. Clean splits at folds (no losses) professionally reinforced on verso. Professionally restored and laid down on acid-free tissue, spine neatly restored. Very fine. Rare. Not in Day, Phillips, etc. Another very detailed and reliable map of Texas from the never-ending stream of nineteenth-century Colton cartographic productions. The map shows an expanding Texas, with some rail lines previously only projected now shown as completed. ($1,200-2,400)

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262. [MAP]. COLTON, G[eorge] W[oolworth] & C[harles] B.. Colton’s New Township Map of the State of Florida.... New York, 1875. Lithograph map on banknote paper with original full coloring and decorative borders of vines and shells. Neat line to neat line: 60.6 x 63.5 cm; border to border: 70.4 x 70.2 cm; overall sheet size: 75 x 72 cm; folded into original blind-embossed cloth pocket folder (15.5 x 10 cm), gilt lettered on upper cover. Professionally stabilized and backed with archival tissue (small tears consolidated and no losses), minor edge chipping on right blank margin, overall very fine, excellent color. Pocket covers very fine. Uncommon.

     This large-scale handsome map of Florida with its lively decorative border first came out in 1868 (Rumsey 6817). The present edition has a few minor changes, such the addition of two insets to the map at lower left corner. The map shows features such as railroads, cotton gins, waterways, towns, battlefields, and military installations. The main settled area remains northern Florida, whereas the southern part of the state, which is now so heavily settled, is basically uninhabited. This is an excellent map of Reconstruction-era Florida. Shown is the site of Dade’s Battle, a disastrous 1835 U.S. defeat that precipitated the second Seminole War. ($750-1,500)

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263. [MAP]. COLTON, G. W. & C. B. & Co. Nuevo mapa de Mexico. Publicado por G.W & C.B. Colton & Co.; [table at top right] Estado de la Division Estension y Poblacion a la Republica Conforme de los Ultimos Datos. New York, 1866. Lithograph map on banknote paper, on four joined sheets, Mexico in original full color and outlining, border between U.S. and Mexico in bright rose, seas in pale blue wash, lilac border. Neat line to neat line: 94.4 x 129.5 cm; overall sheet size: 95 x 132 cm. Folded into original dark brown pocket covers, gilt-lettered on upper cover: Nuevo Mapa de Imperior de Mexico. Map: Backed with archival tissue to consolidate some splits (a few minor voids). Pocket covers: Spine professionally repaired. Very rare. Only two copies located by OCLC (British Library and Yale). Contemporary ownership inscription of Carlos Borsch.

     First edition. Not in Phillips. Large-scale map of Mexico during the French occupation, showing most of Texas, and done on a scale to reflect the grandeur of the French occupation. This map is among the larger and more detailed productions of the cartography of Mexico of that era. Relief shown by hachures; locates roads, railroads, settlements, state boundaries, drainage, etc., prime meridian Mexico City, list of states, capitals, and population figures. ($750-1,500)

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264. [MAP]. COLTON, G. W. & C. B. & Co. Nuevo mapa de Mexico, Publicado por G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co. 172, William St. New York, 1881. New York, 1881. Lithograph map on banknote paper, four joined sheets, Mexico in original full color, border between U.S. and Mexico in bright rose, seas in pale blue wash, ornate botanical border. Neat line to neat line: 90.5 x 152 cm; border to border: 103.5 x 138.7 cm; overall sheet size: 104 x 139.5 cm. Pocket map, folded into original dark brown cloth folder (23 x 12 cm), gilt-lettered: Colton’s Map of Texas G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co.. Spine slightly nicked at top with minor loss, gutter margin perished. A few folds neatly strengthened on verso. Overall very fine, with superb color. Very rare (copies located at Yale, Stanford, UT Arlington, and UC Berkeley).

     This map seems to take inspiration from the same publisher’s Empire map of Mexico (see herein for the 1866 version). Not in Phillips. Magnificent, large-scale map of Mexico, including Borderlands and Texas, running east from San Diego to Mississippi. Relief shown by hachures. Shows roads, railroads, settlements, state boundaries, drainage, etc, with prime meridian at Mexico City. ($1,000-2,000)

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265. [MAP]. COLTON, J.H. Colton’s Map of the United States of America, the British Provinces, Mexico, and the West Indies, Showing the Country from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean...New York 1856, [mapseller’s pasteover] & C.C. Portland, Maine. [below neat line at lower left] Entered according to Act of Congress, February in the Year 1853.... [insets, clockwise] [1] Hawaiian Group of Sandwich Islands;[2] Map of Newfoundland;[3] The Southeastern Part of the West Indies;[4] Map of Central America; [two tables] [1] Statistics of the United States;[2] Table of Distances [numerous vignettes, including ships (some named), flora and fauna, buffalo hunting in Nebraska Territory, stone idol near Central America, volcano, Natives, overland party in covered wagons in Western U.S., etc.]. New York, 1856. Lithograph map (four joined sheets) mounted on original linen, varnished, beige selveges, on original black rollers, original full handcoloring with post-Gadsden Purchase border (“United States and Mexico according to the Treaty of 1854”), elaborate botanical border; border to border: 51 x 56.5 inches; overall sheet size: 52-1/2 x 59.5 inches. A few light cracks (no losses), upper left slightly waterstained, margins slightly tattered where separating from rollers (not affecting image), varnish slightly yellowed, but overall a very good copy in original condition. OCLC locates one copy (Los Angeles Public library, sectioned and mounted on four sheets).

     The map first came out in 1853. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, p. 161 & #776 (listing the 1853 printing and stating): “An atavistic though beautifully done performance. Many towns are listed in the Gold Region, and several in Utah.” On the other hand, Streeter had the 1853 map in his sale (3888) and remarked: “This magnificent map shows the new Territory of Washington organized on March 2, 1853.” The 1853 map, of course, did not show the Gadsden Purchase boundary between the U.S. and Mexico, which is well marked on our map, including boundary and a text note about the Treaty. ($600-$1,200)

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266. [MAP]. COLTON, J[oseph] H[utchins]. Map of California, Oregon, Texas, and the Territories adjoining with Routes &c... [beneath border at left] Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1849 by J.H. Colton in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York. [beneath border at center] D. Appleton & Co. New York. New York, 1849. Lithograph map with original color outlining of the states and territories in pink and Gold Rush region colored yellow, ornate botanical border; neat line to neat line: 47.3 x 40.4 cm; border to border: 51.5 x 45 cm; overall sheet size: 53 x 46.2 cm. Mild to moderate browning at some folds, some splits at folds (a few minor losses), lower blank margin lightly chipped, creased where formerly folded, overall good. Framed.

     “Colton’s large and handsome Map of California, Oregon, Texas, and the Territories Adjoining with Routes &c. is among the best of the commercial maps rushed to press in 1849 to meet the clamor for details on the route to California and location of the gold fields. Typical of this genre of map of the period, two earlier maps were combined (1848 Frémont and 1848 Tanner), and the gold regions were highlighted” (Volkmann Zamorano 80 Sale #74). Colton’s popular map appeared in various permutations as different publishers used it for their publications. The present map is from an 1849 edition of Edwin Bryant’s What I Saw in California, which normally has “D. Appleton...” at center below neat line, as opposed to the map in Jessy Quinn Thornton’s Oregon and California in 1848 (1849), with “Ackermann...” below 1849 in title and “Harper and Brothers...” below neat line at right of imprint. For Bryant, see Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 95. Plains & Rockies IV:146. Zamorano 80 #12. For Thornton, see Kurutz 632. Plains & Rockies IV:174. Zamorano 80 #74. Wheat (Mapping the Transmississippi West 593 & Maps of the California Gold Region 73) cites the map in Thornton’s book. ($1,500-3,000)

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267. [MAP]. COLTON, J.H, (copyright) & G.W. & C.B. Colton (publisher). Colton’s Sectional Map of the State of Iowa.... New York, 1867. Lithograph map on banknote paper, original full color, shell and spiral ornate border, neat line to neat line: 61.3 x 88.5 cm; border to border: 69 x 98 cm; overall sheet size: 70.5 x 94 cm, folded into publisher’s brown cloth pocket covers, blind-stamped, gilt-lettered on upper cover. Map with minor splits at some folds and a few very light spots, minor wear to pocket covers; overall the map is fine, with excellent color retention. The various editions of this map are not particularly rare, but it is a challenge to find a copy in acceptable condition.

     With a continuing flow of emigrants into Iowa after the Civil War, Colton’s firm enlarged, updated, and vividly colored their earlier map of Iowa. The first edition of this enlarged map bears a copyright notice of 1864, but according to Rumsey, the first edition of the map was not released until 1865. Updated versions appeared frequently into the 1870s. Karrow, Check List of Printed Maps of the Middle West to 1900 8:0789. Phillips, America, p. 337 (1865 and other editions). Rumsey 3576 (1869). Rumsey suggests that Colton’s map was a competitive response to Cram’s county map, but that does not comport, either time wise or otherwise. ($400-800)

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268. [MAP]. COLTON, J[oseph] H[utchins] & Company. Kentucky and Tennessee...1856. New York, 1856. Steel-engraved map, original hand coloring, ornate spiral-motif border; neat line to neat line: 28.4 x 35.8 cm; border to border: 33 x 40 cm; overall sheet size: 35,2 x 42.5 cm (eastern and western Tennessee extend slightly beyond ornate borders), folded into original brown embossed cloth covers, upper cover gilt lettered. Minor splits at a few folds (no losses), adhesive staining to left margin where originally affixed to pocket covers (affecting border), overall very good.

     The map first appeared in Colton’s 1855 atlas (see Phillips, Atlases 816 & Rumsey 0149.043). The map locates towns, rivers, forts, roads, railroads, mountain passes, and various topographical details. Colton reissued the map in larger format and mounted on cartographical cloth for use of officers in the Civil War. ($300-600)

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269. [MAP]. COMPAÑÍA COLONIZADORA DE LA MESA DE CORONELES Y METLALTOYUCA EN EL ESTADO DE PUEBLA. Croquis de la terrenos de Metlaltoyuca Conforme al deslinde prartirada [sic] por orden de la Secretaría de Fomento siendo Ministro del Ramo el Co. Gral. Carlos Pacheco. 1883.... [5 scenes surrounding map, 4 of Company lands, and another showing an archaeological site] Rancho del Tecomate; Sierra de Huachinango; Borde Occidental de la Mesa de Coroneles. Rocas de “Dn. Guillen”; Ruinas Metalaltoyuca; Ranchería del Metalaltoyuca. Border to border: 66 x 93 cm; overall sheet size: 77.3 x 95 cm. Lithograph map on heavy paper, boundaries of colony outlined in red and waterways in blue, folded into contemporary presentation binding. 8vo, full crimson sheep blind embossed, gilt-ruled and decorated, gilt-lettered on upper cover: C. General Rafael Cravioto (1829-1903), prominent participant in Mexican civil wars and later governor of Hidalgo; accompanying text: Compañía Colonizadora de la Mesa de Coroneles y Metlaltoyuca, en el Estado de Puebla. Mexico, 1884. [1-5] 6-32 pp. Spine repaired, light outer wear to binding, interior and map very fine (except for a short splits at map folds; no losses). OCLC lists no copies of text or map.

     First edition. Not in Palau or other sources. This publication and its accompanying impressive map were promotional materials for the Company formed to exploit and develop the natural resources within its concession. The Company’s first project was to develop a logging industry in the area. This is an excellent example of one of the numerous internal development schemes that flourished during the Profiriate. ($750-1,500)

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270. [MAP]. [CORONELLI, Vincenzo Maria]. [Globe gore showing Lower California, the Sea of Cortez, the Southwest (including Santa Fe), West Texas and the Rio Grande, and Northern Mexico to Jalisco]. [Venice, 1688-1699]. Copper-engraved globe gore with later partial coloring. Top horizontal measurement: 17.5 cm; lower horizontal measurement: 27.5 cm; vertical: 45.1 cm. Lightly stained on right side (slightly protruding into map image), right side expertly remargined, otherwise fine.

     This half gore by Coronelli was one of twelve for a globe measuring almost four feet in diameter, commercially offered by Coronelli between 1688 and 1699. The geography shows considerable advances in the Southwest, particularly the course of the Rio Grande and discoveries by Peñalosa. Leighley, California as an Island 88. Shirley, The Mapping of the World 537 (Plate 376B). Stevenson, Terrestrial and Celestial Globes, Vol. II, pp. 97-115. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast #420n (discussing the various formats of Coronelli’s globe, including the present one, and commenting that the geography is the same exhibited in his Atlante Veneto of 1690); pp. 135-137. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 73n. Citations to Coronelli’s two-sheet map of America with the same geography: Martin & Martin 12n. McLaughlin, California as an Island 103n. Tooley in “California as an Island” in Mapping of America, p. 125 (#57n & #58n). California is labelled as “Isola di California,” and the text at lower left includes discussion of the insularity of California. ($1,000-2,000)

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271. [MAP]. DE CORDOVA, Jacob Raphael. J. De Cordova’s Map of the State of Texas Compiled from the Records of the General Land Office of the State, by Robert Creuzbaur, Houston 1849. [below and left of title] Without my signature all copies of this map have been fraudulently obtained [original genuine signature with rubric, in ink by De Cordova] J. De Cordova [to left of title] Engraved by J.M. Atwood, New York. [above lower neat line at center] Entered according to Act of Congress on the 28th day of July 1848 by J. De Cordova, in the Clerk’s Office of the United States District Court for the District of Texas [untitled inset oval map at lower right showing Texas in full color and with New Mexico as a Texas county named “Santa Fe. Co.”] [table at upper left] Reference to Land Districts [at lower left are seals of Texas and the Texas General Land Office along with certifications and facsimile signatures of Thomas J. Rusk, Sam Houston, et al]. New York, 1849. Lithograph map on banknote paper with plain pale blue border, original wash and outline color, neat line to neat line: 83 x 76 cm; border to border: 87 x 80 cm; overall sheet size: 89 x 82.5 cm; with original black leather pocket covers, front pastedown inside upper pocket cover reads: Errata. In Colouring:--The country and the forks of the Guadalupe and San Antonio rivers.... A very fine, bright copy with excellent coloring; only very minor stains at folds. Superb ink signature of De Cordova. Signed and dated by Army soldier on pastedown of pocket folder: “George M. Stewart U.S.A. 1849” with three of his small ink notes on map indicating place names: “Ft. Chadbourne” shown in both Bexar and Comal counties, the latter with a little flag; the other notation in Bexar County at Leona Spring (indecipherable).

     First printing of the first official map of Texas as a state, on a far larger scale than any previous map of the state of Texas, and the only edition of De Cordova’s Texas map to include the short-lived Santa Fe County, which comprised much of New Mexico. Basic Texas Books 38: “Sam Houston delivered a speech praising the map on the floor of the U.S. Senate...assert[ing] that it was ‘the most correct and authentic map of Texas ever compiled.’” Contours of Discovery, p. 57: “To meet the needs of new immigrants coming into the state, roads and rivers as well as the political divisions were carefully drawn.” Fifty Texas Rarities 36: “Only nineteen years separate this map and Stephen F. Austin’s, yet the contrast between the two is striking. During those years, Texas had been a part of Mexico, an independent republic, and a state of the United States.” Graff 920. Martin & Martin, Color frontispiece, Plate 39 & p. 39 & pp. 140-141. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, pp. 459-460. Rumsey 3366 (1856) & 4801 (1867). Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 295A. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #603. ($200,000-250,000)

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272. [MAP]. DEBRAY SUCS. Editores(publisher). Plano general de la Ciudad de México. 1884. [legend below title] [inset table at top left] Demarcacion de Manzanas... [above neat line at lower left] Lit. Debray Sucs. Editores. Mexico City, 1884. Lithograph map with original coloring (blocks in tan, railroads in red, wards outlined in various colors); neat line to neat line: 61 x 82 cm; overall sheet size: 62.2 x 83 cm; folded into contemporary quarter red cloth over red and black marbled pocket covers. Map: Several fold tears including a long vertical tear (48 cm) at upper left, but with only minor loss. Pocket covers: Moderately worn.

     This often republished map is an extremely detailed look at Mexico City in 1884, the population of which was 200,000 according to printed statistics on the map. ($200-400)

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273. [MAP]. DEBRAY SUCS. & C. MONTAURIOL (publishers). Plano general de indicacion. De la ciudad de México con la antigua y nueva nomenclatura de las calles 1889. [text in box at lower left re the different quarters of the city, street organization, etc.] La Ciudad se divide en quatro partes... [above lower border in red lettering] Antiqua Litografia de Debray Sucs.—C. Montauriol. México. Mexico, 1889. Chromolithograph map (tan, red, and olive), 21 sections mounted on original cartographical linen; border to border: 44 x 59.5 cm; overall sheet size: 44.5 x 59.7 cm; folded into contemporary quarter dark brown cloth over brown and gold marbled pocket covers. Map fine, upper pocket cover detached.

     Another version of this classic map of Mexico City, with revisions, such as updated street names. ($400-600)

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274. [MAP]. DELISLE, Guillaume [Insulanus]. Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi.... Paris, 1718. Copper-engraved map with original outline hand coloring (yellow in border around map and mountain ranges; orange and green for roads and settlements); later sympathetic outline hand coloring (coast and waterways in blue and pale green wash applied to land mass); neat line to neat line: 48.8 x 65.2 cm; overall sheet size: 52 x 69 cm. Paper expertly strengthened on verso at center and top margin. Exceptionally fine copy.

     First issue, first state (New Orleans not yet located) of “the first detailed map of the Gulf region and the Mississippi, [and]the first printed map to show Texas”(Tooley, French Mapping of the Americas #43). Cohen, Mapping the West, p. 45. Cumming, The Southeast in Early Maps, Plate 47, #170. Harwood, To the Ends of the Earth: 100 Maps that Changed the World, pp. 109-111: “Delisle’s Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours de Mississipi of 1718...is thought to have been the oldest map to have been consulted in the planning of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.... The map’s remarkable topographical and geographical accuracy made it the template for American mapping for a half century, but it was also one of the most controversial maps of its day.” Jackson, Flags along the Coast, Plate 24, pp. 40-45 & footnotes on pp. 123-125 (exceedingly interesting discussion on Delisle’s sources). Karpinski, Maps of Famous Cartographers Depicting North America, pp. 133-134. Kohl 238: “This map is the mother and main source of all the later maps of the Mississippi.” Lowery 288. Luebke, Mapping the North American Plains, p. 10. Martin & Martin 19. Paullin, Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, Plate 24 & p. 24. Phillips, Maps of America, p. 367. Portinaro & Knirsch, The Cartography of North America, 1500-1800, p. 223, Plate CXII. Pritchard & Taliaferro, Degrees of Latitude: Mapping Colonial America, figures 95-96 & 97, #20, pp. 118-121: “One of the most significant maps of America ever made.” Rumsey 4764 (presenting an atlas version, in second state). Schwartz & Ehrenberg, pp. 142-43, 146 & plate 84. Streeter Sale 113. Tooley, Landmarks of Mapmaking, p. 229. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #99; Vol. I, pp. 58-59: “All in all, Delisle’s early eighteenth-century efforts, with their correct course of the Mississippi and many items farther west, are towering landmarks along the path of Western cartographic development”; pp. 66-68. For full treatment of this map, see master’s thesis of Andrew M. Balash, “How Maps Tell the Truth by Lying: An Analysis of Delisle’s 1718 Carte de la Louisiane” (University of Texas at Arlington, December 2008). ($12,000-18,000)

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275. [MAP]. DELISLE, Guillaume [Insulanus] (after). COVENS, Johannes & Cornelis Mortier (publishers). Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi Dressée sur un grand nombre de Memoires entr’autres sur ceux de Mr. le Maire Par Guillme. De L’Isle de l’Academie Rle. des Sciences. [below Gulf of Mexico at lower center, key and imprint] Explication des Marques.... A Amsterdam chez Jean Cóvens et Corneille Mortier Géographes. Eschelle de cent lieues Françoises. [inset map at lower right] Carte Particuliere des Embouchures de la Riviere S. Louis et de la Mobile. Amsterdam, [1730 or after]. Copper-engraved map, original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 43.6 x 59.7 cm; map + title: 44.6 x 60 cm; overall sheet size: 53.5 x 67 cm. Very fine copy, excellent impression.

     This is a re-engraved, slightly reduced version of Delisle’s 1718 map from his revised issue (see preceding herein for the first issue of Delisle’s prototype map). Tooley (#43 et seq, pp. 21-22) sets out the sequence, with Delisle’s 1718 map followed by a second, much reduced version in Garcilaso de la Vega’s Histoire de Conquête de la Floride (Amsterdam, 1727; Tooley #44). The present map is the third version, and still credits Delisle (Tooley #45) while incorporating his updates, such as locating New Orleans. The map first appeared in its present form in Covens and Mortier’s Atlas nouveau (Amsterdam, 1730; see Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, first edition, Vol. II, C&M, Category B, Vol. II, pp. 52-62). Tooley notes that the present map is a “re-engraved copy of the original issue [1718]” and “several later editions were issued of the Covens and Mortier Atlas, but the map did not change.” Cumming, The Southeast in Early Maps 208. De Renne III:1195-1196. Lowery 269. Martin & Martin, p. 99 & plate 19 (citing 1718 edition). Phillips, America, p. 367. Rumsey 4638.095 (listing a 1730 version found in a 1742 edition of Covens & Mortier’s Atlas Nouveau). Ryhiner Collection Ryh 7814:4. Van Ermen, The United States in Old Maps and Prints, Plate 30 (p. 54). ($1,800-2,400)

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276. [MAP]. DELISLE, Guillaume [Insulanus]. Carte du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi...Chéz l’Auteur Rue des Canettes.... Paris, 1703. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper with watermark and countermark (PG with heart); title within cartouche; original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 47.5 x 64.5 cm; overall sheet size: 55 x 77 cm. Upper blank margin lightly soiled, five small holes in blank margins (likely from much earlier framing), one old closed tear in right blank margin professionally repaired, overall a very good copy with strong color retention.

     First edition, first issue, with Rue des Canettes imprint, first printed map to accurately delineate the Mississippi River. Antochiw, Historia Cartografía de la Peninsula de Yucatán, Color Plate 17 & p. 167. Bornholt, Cuatro Siglos de Expresiones Geográficas del Istmo Centroamericano #60 & p. 120. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, pp. 6-12. Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps #137. Day, Maps of Texas, p. 4n. Ehrenberg, Ralph, “Mapping the North Plains” in Luebke, Mapping the North American Plains, pp. 180-181 & #II.5. Karpinski, pp. 118 & 123, #XXXII. Lowery 256. Mapoteca colombiana (Méjico), p. 37, #18. Martin & Martin, p. 50, p. 92-93 & #14. Phillips, America, p. 405. Phillips, Atlases 533 & 641 Reinhartz & Saxon (editors), Mapping and Empire: Soldier-Engineers on the Southwest Frontier, pp. 14-15 (Mathes). Rumsey 4764.099 (citing a 1708 or later edition in an atlas). Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Plate 82 & pp. 137-138: “Earliest printed map to show an accurate definition of the lower Mississippi River and its delta.” Streeter Sale 110: “One of the most definitive maps of the time, as well as the most influential in the later cartography of North America.” Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 99. Tooley, America p. 22 (#48). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 474. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 84 & Vol. I, pp. 58-59. ($6,000-12,000)

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277. [MAP]. DELISLE, Guillaume [Insulanus]. Carte du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi. Dressée Sur un Grand nombre de memoires principalemt. sur de ceux de Mrs. d’Iberville et le Suere Par Guillaume Del’Isle Geographe de l’Academie Royale des Sciēces A Paris Chéz l’Auteur sur le Quai de l’Horologe Privilege du Roy põ. 20. ans 1703 [below cartouche] C. Simanneau, fecit. Paris, 1703 [but 1708 or later]. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper; title at lower left within elaborate cartouche with allegorical figures; original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 47.4 x 64.4 cm; overall sheet size: 52.3 x 74.5 cm. Creased at center where formerly folded, minor smudges in blank margins, remains of two old mounting tabs on verso, overall a very good copy. Upper right recto and verso in contemporary ink the number 56, and on verso also in contemporary ink XCI. At lower right on face beneath “Tabago,” the word “abandonnée” has been struck through in contemporary ink and the words “aux François” have been added in the margin.

     First edition, early variant issue of the 1703 first issue (see preceding entry), here with the imprint Quai de l’Horológe. Not noted by Tooley (America), who describes two similar imprints (#49 & #50, p. 23). In this version the words “a la Couronne de Diamans” have been scrubbed, but Renard’s imprint has not been added. Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps, Plate 43 & #137A. Day, Maps of Texas, p. 4. Karpinski, Maps of Famous Cartographers Depicting North America, pp. 118 & 123, #XXXIIn. Martin & Martin, p. 50 (color plate) & p. 92 (black & white plate), p. 93 & #14 (text), citing a Quai de l’Horloge imprint retaining “a la Couronne de Diamans.” Rumsey 4764 (same imprint as present map; Rumsey’s copy is in an undated atlas). Streeter Sale 111. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 84 & Vol. 1, pp. 58-59. ($1,000-2,000)

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278. [MAP]. DELISLE, Guillaume [Insulanus] (after). COVENS, Johannes & Cornelis Mortier (publishers). Carte du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles. Du Cours des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi. Dressée Sur un grand nombre de memoires principalment sur ceux Mrs. d’Iberville et le Sueur Par Guillaume De l’Isle Geographe de l’Academie Royale des Sciences. A Amsterdam Chez Iean Covens & Corneille Mortier Avec Privilege 1722. [below cartouche] I. Stemmers Senior Sculp. [additional title across top, above neat line] Tabula Geographica Mexicæ et Floridæ &c. Amsterdam, 1722. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper; title at lower left within elaborate cartouche with allegorical figures, serpents, cornucopia; original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 46.7 x 59.6 cm; map with title above: 48.5 x 59.6 cm; overall sheet size: 55 x 64.5 cm; dotted sailing lines showing the route of the Spanish galleons. Professionally backed with thin archival tissue, a fine copy in strong impression.

     This is Covens & Mortier’s re-engraved version of Delisle’s influential and long-lived 1703 map Carte du Mexique et de la Floride... (see herein), with an added title in Latin above top border, cartouche by a different engraver, changes to title, addition of routes of and notes on the Spanish galleons, etc. Cumming, The Southeast in Early Maps 161. Karpinski, p. 134. Lowery 313. Phillips, America 406. Rumsey 4638.096 (in Covens & Mortier’s Atlas nouveau, contenant toutes les parties su Monde). Tooley, Mapping of America #51, on p. 23. Cf. Wheat, Martin & Martin, et al for references to the 1703 edition. According to Verner’s classification, the present map is an ectype because it is a replica (re-engraving) of Delisle’s original 1703 map, with some bibliographical details changed as noted above. ($600-1,200)

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279. [MAP]. DELISLE, Guillaume [Insulanus] & Philippe Buache (after). DEZAUCHE [Jean Claude]. Carte du Mexique et des Etats Unis D’Amérique, Partie Méridionale. Dressée sur un grand nombre de Memoires, et sur les meilleures Cartes du Pays. Assujetie aux Observations Astronomiques de Mrs. de l’Acadamie Royale des Sciences Par Guil. De L’Isle Iers Géogr. de l’Ac. Nouvellement Revuë et Augmentee Par Dezauche Successeur des Srs. De L’Isle et Phil. Buache premiers Géographes A Paris Rue des Noyers Année 1783. [below cartouche] Avec Privilège d’Auteur 1783. C. Simonneau fecit. [lower right below neat line] Ph. Buache P.G. de R. de l’A.R. de S. Gendre de l’Auteur Avec Privilege. Paris, 1783 [1789 or later]. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper; title at lower left within elaborate cartouche; original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 47.6 x 65 cm; overall sheet size: 54.3 x 75.5 cm. One vertical crease where formerly folded, light staining in blank margins, small light water stain at upper center, otherwise fine, with good color. Contemporary ink notation “34” on verso.

     Last issue of the Delisle’s 1703 map (Carte du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi; see herein), with parts re-engraved from the first issue original (as evidenced by additional place names, changes in lettering, etc.); the first and only Delisle map recognizing the newly independent United States, as revised by Jean Claude Dezauche eighty years after the first edition (the Dezauche firm was preceded by the firm of Philippe Buache, son-in-law of Guillaume Delisle). Despite the date on the map, this copy probably issued in 1789 or later and reflects the chilling influence of the French Revolution in the removal of the words “du Roi” in the twelfth line of the cartouche after “Geographes.” The United States extended westward to the Mississippi, boundaries were inserted in color to indicate different possessions: green for the United States, red for England, blue for France, and yellow for Spain (Tooley, America, p. 23 & #53 & pp. 38-39). Lowery 655. Phillips, America, p. 409. Phillips, Atlases 3512 & 5993 (citing atlas appearances of the map, 1769-1824). This map is an early French recognition and depiction of the newly independent United States. ($1,000-2,000)

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280. [MAP]. DENNY, Edward & Co. Denny’s Pocket Map of Placer County California Compiled from Latest Official and Private Data. Edward Denny & Co. Map Publishers 1132 Shotwell St. San Francisco. Copyright 1916 by Edward Denny & Co. San Francisco: Edward Denny & Co., 1916. Blue line map (12 panels mounted on cartographic cloth, as issued), depicting steam and electric railroad lines, wagon roads, trails, towns, creeks, National Forest Reservations, power lines, etc., overall sheet size: 60 x 106 cm. Very fine. OCLC notes copies at two university libraries: University of California (Berkeley, Earth Science, 4 copies, each with differing annotation for land ownership, irrigation, schools, utilities), and University of California (Davis).

     First edition of a classic Denny blue line map. Placer County stretches from the suburbs of Sacramento to Lake Tahoe and the Nevada border. It was here that James Marshall discovered gold on the American River near Auburn and instigated the Gold Rush accompanied by a mushrooming of mining sites and towns. Edward Denny was actively engaged in creating maps in San Francisco from the 1890s through the first decades of the 20th century. This finely detailed map is typical of Edward Denny’s precise cartographic work using the blue line method, which by the time of this map had become the favored medium for accurate, official, inexpensive map reproduction. But Denny was not confined to blue line maps, and one of the most popular maps he worked on was Blum’s 1896 fully colored Map of California Roads for Cyclers. ($300-600)

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281. [MAP]. DERBY, [George Horatio]. The Sacramento Valley from the American River to Butte Creek, Surveyed and Drawn by Order of Genl. Riley, commang. 10th. Military Dept. by Lieut: Derby, Topl. Engrs. September & October 1849.... [Washington, 1850]. Lithograph map showing an area north of the confluence of the Sacramento River and Butte Creek and south of Wolf Kills-Puta Creek-Sacramento-Sutter’s Fort-Columa, delineating parts of Sacramento River, Butte Creek, Feather River, Yuba River, Bear Creek, American River, emigrant routes, etc.; neat line to neat line; 55.5 x 44.3 cm; overall sheet size: 57 x 45.5 cm. Uniform age toning and waterstaining, marginal chipping (slight loss of neat line at lower left margin).

     First edition. The map appeared in Tyson’s Report...Geology and Topography of California (SED No. 47, 31st Congress, 1st Session, Washington, 1850), the first scientific report of the gold discoveries. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region #149 & pp. xxvii-xviii: “Of the maps which were actually produced in 1850, those of Lieutenant George H. Derby are of particular interest. Derby, though better known today as a brilliant humorist (he was the author of Phoenixiana and The Squibob Papers), was a trained and competent topographer.... His Sacramento Valley from the American River to Butte (made in the fall of 1849 [and other maps from the Tyson report] are all maps of major importance.” The present map on a generous scale of 4-1/2 miles to an inch presents a detailed view of the region that includes gold diggings, towns, ranchos, trails, grazing regions, waterways, areas inhabited by Native Americans, presence of wild cattle, elk, and antelope, etc. Derby presents a comprehensive view of the topography and vegetation of the Sacramento Valley, the branches of the Sacramento River, the roads across the Valley and into the mountains to the gold region. See Francis P. Farquhar, “The Topographical Reports of Lieutenant George H. Derby,” California Historical Society Quarterly, Vol. 11, No. 2 (June 1932), pp. 99-123. ($300-600)

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282. [MAP]. DISTURNELL, J[ohn] & [Joseph Goldsborough Bruff (draftsman)]. Map of the Valley of Mexico, and the Surrounding Mountains. New York Published by Disturnell. No. 102 Broadway 1847. [above lower neat line] Miller’s Lith. 102 Broadway, N.Y. | Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1847, by John Disturnell, in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York; [inset map at upper right extending beyond neat line] Map of the Route between Vera Cruz, Alvarado & Puebla; [profile right center] Profile of the Route between Mexico and Vera Cruz. New York: J. Disturnell, 1847. Lithographed map, with routes colored goldenrod, bodies of water shaded blue, volcanoes highlighted in red. Neat line to neat line: 37.4 x 44.5 cm; overall sheet size: 45 x 55.5 cm. Pocket map, folded into original red embossed cloth covers, gilt lettered: Map of the Valley of Mexico and Road to Vera-Cruz. Covers rubbed, new blue endpapers, mild to moderate staining to covers, Map with some folds browned or strengthened on verso. Overall very good to fine. Uncommon. Rare in commerce.

     First edition. Phillips, America 410. Rumsey 4530: “Phillips attributes this to J.G. Bruff, although his name is not listed on the map. This is a detailed map of the Valley of Mexico with some of its information and profile taken from the larger Disturnell ‘Treaty Map.’“ Not in Garrett & Goodwin (UT Arlington now has a copy). ($1,500-3,000)

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283. [MAP]. DONCKER, Hendrick. Pascaart vertoonende de Zeecusten van Chili, Peru, Hispania Nova, Nova Granada, en California.... [3 insets at left, each within gracefully curving strap work border]: [1] Yedso Iapan; [2] Islas de las Velas alias Ladrones; [3] Zelandia Nova. Amsterdam, [1659]. Copper-engraved sea chart of the western coast of America depicting California as an island (map oriented with north to left), contemporary color (outline and partial on ornate cartouche with decorative strap work borders), rhumb lines, compass, ship at sea; neat line to neat line: 43.5 x 54.5 cm; overall sheet size: 45 x 57 cm. Moderate light spotting at upper right (mainly affecting upper blank corner), moderate browning on map at area of ship, mild age-toning. A few small holes in sea area (not noticeable since the map is mounted on an extra blank sheet, as issued). Generally very good.

     First edition, state 1, without added outline of Yucatán Peninsula and east coast of Central America. Burden 340: “The chart is from the first edition of Hendrick Doncker’s Zee-Atlas, of which no surviving copy is known. The map’s composition is original, being orientated with the east at the top of the map, and depicting virtually the entire west coast of North and South America. It depicts California as an island on a larger scale than any earlier sea chart." Goss, The Mapping of North America, Map 35 (state 1). Howse & Sanderson, The Sea Chart, p. 61. Koeman (1967) IV (Maritime Atlases), p. 159. Leighley, California as an Island 36. Lowery 150. Mapoteca Colombiana, p. 16, #45 Ámerica en Jeneral). McLaughlin, California as an Island 21 (State 1). Phillips, Atlases 468. Tooley, in “California as an Island” in Mapping of America, p. 116 (#17), Plate 33 (illustrating state 2). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast #382. ($1,500-3,000)

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284. [MAP]. DUDLEY, Robert, Sir. Carta particolare della Baia di Messico con la costa. La Longitudine comincia da L’Isole di Picho d’Azores D’America Carta VII; [lower right within map] AF Lucini, fece. [Florence: F. Onofri, 1646-1647]. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper, showing in detail the coast of the Gulf of Mexico (extending from Cape Canaveral on the Atlantic coast of Florida round the Gulf to Yucatán peninsula), coastal towns, harbours, and islands, title cartouche with droll faces, large decorative compass rose, ships at sea, soundings, exceptionally graceful calligraphy. Plate mark: 47.5 x 75 cm; overall sheet size: 57 x 83.3 cm. A few small chips to blank margins (no losses), very light browning at centerfold where the two sheets were joined, else very fine, with generous margins. Excellent dark impression and a beautiful example of seventeenth-center copper engraving and printing. Very rare.

     First state, without Lo.6o added to the title. First published sea chart of the Gulf of Mexico; from the first sea atlas of the entire world based on Mercator’s Projection, “one of the most significant landmarks in the history of cartography” (Martin & Martin). The map appeared in Vol. III, Book 6 of Dudley’s Dell’ arcano del mare, 1646-47 (see Printing and the Mind of Man 134: “This magnificent book is the most famous of all early sea atlases”). Bryan & Hanak, plate 5. Burden 282. Jackson, Flags along the Coast, p. 136: “This chart influenced the way the English mapmakers drew the coast until the century’s end.” Lowery 108. Martin & Martin, Plate 9 & p. 81: “[Dudley’s] depiction of the Gulf of Mexico was the first published sea chart of that area.” Phillips, Atlases 457:III:105. Dudley (ca. 1573-1649) was the illegitimate son of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, brother-in-law of Thomas Cavendish, and a favorite of Queen Elizabeth. He showed an interest in marine warfare and navigation at an early age and led an English expedition to Guiana and Trinidad in 1594 in search of El Dorado. Twelve years and 5,000 pounds of copper were expended in the preparation of Dudley’s extraordinary atlas, of which only a small number of copies were printed and sold. ($15,000-30,000)

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285. [MAP]. DUDLEY, Robert, Sir. Carta particolare della parte ocidentale dell nuoua Spagnia è della California. La longitudine Comincia da l’Isola di Pico d’Asores. D’America Carta XXXI. [below lower neat line at left] AF Lucini Fece. [Florence: Francesco Onofri, 1646-1647]. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper, showing the Pacific Coast of Mexico from the southern part of Baja California (labelled “La California”) to south of Acapulco, good detail (coastal towns, harbors, islands), title cartouche with droll face, large decorative compass rose, ship at sea, soundings, exceptionally graceful calligraphy; plate mark: 48 x 75.8 cm; overall sheet size: 52 x 79 cm. Mild age-toning and light staining along margins and centerfold, overall very good.

      First state. The map appeared in Dudley’s Dell’ arcano del mare (1646-1647, Vol. III, Book 6), the first sea atlas of the entire world.Nordenskiöld 70:129. Phillips, Atlases 457:III:129. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library: A Descriptive Catalogue, Dudley-1a, 144. Wagner, Cartography of theNorthwest Coast 352b (Wagner suggests that Dudley borrowed from John Daniell and other snarky characterizations, such as “Dudley’s usual penchant for invention,” “the most remarkable genius for invention ever displayed by a cartographer,” and observing: “Dudley was living in Florence during part of his life and the fact that Daniell’s maps are still in Florence is significant, to say the least.” More likely, Cavendish was used for the Pacific maps). For more on Dudley, see Burden 266, Lord Wardington, “Sir Robert Dudley” in The Book Collector, 52, Nos. 2-3, 2003, and preceding entry herein. ($1,000-2,000)

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286. [MAP]. ENSIGN, T. & E.H. Ensign’s Travellers’ Guide and Map of the United States...1845 [below title] Engraved on Steel by J.W. Wells, Brooklyn, L.I. [below images at bottom] Entered according to Act of Congress in the Year 1840 by Phelps & Ensign in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Southern District in the State of New York [37 insets of scenes, maps, profiles, portraits]. New York, 1845. Steel-engraved and varnished wall map on five sheets, with original outline and wash color, mounted on original linen, a few remains of selvages, contemporary black wooden rollers. Map proper within ornate vine border: 40.3 x 90.7 cm; overall image including scenes below: 60.5 x 103.5 cm; overall sheet size: 70 x 104.5 cm. Some areas of fading, moderate waterstain at upper left, slight chipping to blank margins, slightly yellowed from varnish. Usually this type of map is found in poor condition, but this is a very good, unsophisticated copy.

     This extravagant icon of Young Republic popular culture came out in several editions during this time period. An 1837 copyright has been noticed for one version, with copies of 1838 and 1839 found. The 1840 edition was extensively revised, and the first to show Stephen F. Austin’s colony in Texas. The map reaches farther west than most maps of the United States at this period, extending to the Rockies, including a huge Missouri Territory (seemingly encompassing all of the Great Plains), New Mexico (with southeastern boundary at San Antonio), and a scaled-down Texas as an independent political entity; the town of Austin is now located. Matthew H. Edney, Mapping the Republic: Conflicting Concepts of the Territory and Character of the U.S.A., 1790-1900 (citing the 1841 edition in an exhibit at the University of Southern Maine): “The political juxtaposition of the Republic with the Revolution and the Declaration of Independence was made explicit by culturally rich wall hangings such as this. The map...was displayed within a larger complex of images symbolizing the history and character of the Republic.” ($1,200-2,400)

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287. [MAP]. ENSIGN & THAYER (publishers). Map with pictorial broadside, all enclosed within a green border of stars and chains and red U.S. shields at each corner: [Title of broadside at top]: Ornamental Map of the United States & Mexico; [title of map] Map of the United States and Mexico Including Oregon, Texas and the Californias; [below lower border of broadside] Entered according to Act of Congress in the Year 1848...[portraits, scenes, statistics, etc.]. New York, 1848. Cerograph map and pictorial broadside with full original bright color; map: 36.5 x 39 cm (map); map, text, vignettes: 74.5 x 54 cm. The minor condition problems mostly affect the blank margins, only slightly touching the image and map. Foxing (mainly confined to lower border), edges of blank margins browned, marginal chipping (including a larger void to top left blank margin). Despite the minor faults, this is a fine copy; most copies on the market are in terrible condition.

     Rumsey 2914). Streeter Sale 3872. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 557. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Regions 28: “A flamboyant affair.... As in 1846—Haven, ‘Sutter’s Colony’ is given prominence in ‘New California,’ but no hint of the gold discoveries on either the map or the broadside that surrounds it.” A busy production expressive of Yankee aspirations achieved, perfectly capturing the concept of self-satisfied, fanatical U.S. Manifest Destiny dished up for the eager masses. If ever the term “the climax of cheapness” fit, this is it. Texas is shown in the Emory conformation with the northern Texas border extending almost to the 40th parallel and taking in almost all of Eastern New Mexico. The northern border of Mexico is shown at the Rio Grande and Gila Rivers, but runs from the confluence of the Gila and Colorado west, leaving San Diego in upper California. Text on map: “The Texians claim as their Boundary the Rio del Norte.” ($750-1,500)

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288. [MAP]. ENSIGN & THAYER (publishers). Map with pictorial broadside: [Title of broadside at top]: Seat of War & Battles; [title of map]: Map of the Seat of War; [below lower border of broadside]: Entered according to Act of Congress...1847, by Ensigns & Thayer...Sowle & Ward....; [numerous scenes, portraits, text boxes, ornamentation]. New York, 1847. Wood-engraved pictorial broadside and map of Mexico and most of Texas, with original color, mounted on contemporary cloth; map: neat line to neat line: 16.5 x 20.5 cm; text, map, and vignettes: 73.5 x 54.2 cm. Uniform mild toning and a few spots and stains, a few short tears not affecting image, otherwise fine. The ephemeral nature of this series of popular prints has resulted in their being fairly scarce, especially in acceptable condition.

     This map is one of six maps used in teaching American history on the theme of visualizing U.S. imperial expansion into Mexico during and after the Mexican-American War. Garrett & Goodwin, Mexican-American War, p. 563. Rumsey 4080: “The text follows war developments up to September 15, 1847.” The keen interest evoked by dramatically unfolding events in the Mexican-American war led to an outpouring of images and imprints, attempting to sate the public’s deep need to know. For ten years, people in the United States had been following events in the Texas-Mexico conflict—the Alamo, Goliad, the Santa Fe Expedition and prisoners, the decimation after Mier, Texas annexation, and, finally, the opening battles of the Mexican-American War fought on Texas soil. News of the conflict created great excitement, and publishers, printers, and mapmakers were quick to supply images and imprints to document a truly international event with resounding consequences. The present print is an amazing example of the iconography of that period, which seemingly captures the three genres—images, maps, and text embodying the propagandistic history associated with Manifest Destiny. ($750-1,500)

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289. [MAP]. ENTWISTLE, J.C. Entwistle’s Handy Map of Washington and Vicinity Showing Public Buildings, Churches, Hotels, Places of Amusement and lines of Street Rail Roads... Washington, D.C. 1876. Lithograph map with street rail routes hand colored in red, public places hand colored in green; border to border: 42 x 53.6 cm; overall sheet size: 45.7 x 60.6 cm; folded into original blind-embossed brown cloth pocket covers. Some splits at folds, with repairs on verso, clean tear with no losses at junction of pocket covers and map. Some wear and rubbing to covers. Overall a good copy of a scarce map published the year of the centennial.

     The first edition of this map was in 1876, and it seems to be a map that was used over time for various purposes, such as a later version that superimposed the sewer lines of the city onto the map and added annotations in red type that are later overprints. Phillips, America 1029 (1879 edition). Copies of the various editions recorded by OCLC are: Huntington Library (1876); Library of Congress (1876 [2 copies, one with copyright notice and the other without]; 1879, 1882); McGill University (1886); Harvard (1876). The present copy comports with the Huntington copy. ($200-400)

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290. [MAP]. EXPEDITION DU MEXIQUE. MEXICO. SECOND EMPIRE. Collection of five working maps, printed and manuscript, relating to the reorganization of Mexico’s geographical divisions under Emperor Maximilian (ca. 1864-1865), plus an 1863 lithograph map of Michoacan published in Mexico, and three later thematic maps of Mexico published in Paris in 1891, laid together in a contemporary portfolio, contemporary green leather over mottled boards with contemporary handwritten ink title label on upper cover (“Expedition du Méxique”). The portfolio is very heavily worn and scuffed. Maps good to very fine. Provenance: Found in France and apparently assembled by a member of the French Commission Scientifique du Mexique.

     The six pertinent maps are [1] DECAEN Y CÍA (lithographers). Carta general del Imperio Mexicano.... Mexico: Decaen y Cía, 1864. Lithograph map on 4 joined sheets, original linen backing; neat line to neat line: 77.5 x 112.5 cm. Upper left section missing (13 x 9 cm), creased at folds, overall browning and light waterstaining along centerfold (more visible on verso). Given the context in which this map was found and the accompanying manuscript maps, it seems likely that the present map was a working copy used to reorganize the territorial division of Mexico (the resulting reorganized map was printed in 1865). Very rare. The map is illustrated in El Territorio Mexicano, Vol. I, p. 311 (folding plate). Emperor Maximilian arrived in Mexico on May 28, 1864, and on July 27 of the same year assigned to Manuel Orozco y Berra (1816-1881) the task of developing a new territorial and political division of the Mexican Empire. [2] Manuscript map, undated: “Guerre du Mexique Expédition dite de l’interieur Carte du territoire parcouru les troupes françaises.” Black and blue ink on heavy paper. 13 x 49.5 cm. Shows a large area in Central Mexico that was explored by a French party. [3] Untitled, undated manuscript map drawn on cartographical linen. Precisely executed with superb detail, outlining boundaries and other details in color. 64 x 87.5 cm. Fine finished map, probably from a field survey. [4] Untitled, undated manuscript map in black and red ink, on cartographical linen. Precisely executed with good detail detail. 50 x 66 cm. [5]  Untitled, undated manuscript map of Guadalajara and surrounding regions, black, red, and blue ink, paper mounted on contemporary paper board. Irregular shape, approximately 28 x 34.5 cm. For more on the French Commission Scientifique du Mexique under Maximilian see under “France” herein. ($4,000-$6,000)

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291. [MAP]. [FER, Nicolas de (after)]. Carte de la Nouvelle France, où se voit le cours des Grandes Rivieres de S. Laurens & de Mississipi aujour d’hui S. Louis, Aux Environs des-quelles se trouvent les etats, Païs, Nations, Peuples &c. de la Floride, de la Louïsiane, de la Virginie, de la Marie-Lande, de la Pensilvanie, du Nouveau Jersay, de la Nouvelle Yorck, de la Nouv. Angleterre, de l’Acadie, du Canada, des Esquimaux, des Hurons, des Iroquois, des Ilinois &c. Et de la grande Ile de Terre Neuve: Dressée sur les Memoires les plus Nouveaux recueillis pour l’etablissement de la Compagnie Françoise Occident. [below title at left in rectangular box, map of the Gulf of Mexico from Atchafalaya River to St. Joseph Bay, Florida] Les Costes de la Louisane depuis la Baye de L’Ascension jusques a celle de St. Joseph... [below title at right] Tom: VI. No. 23. Pag. 92. [inset at lower right] Les Environs de Quebec, Ville Capitale de la Nouvelle France... [inset at lower left below preceding inset] Veue de Quebec... [inset text at center of left margin] Remarques. Des deux fameuses rivieres... [very busy assortment of embellishments, 3 compasses, numerous ships, sea monster, Native village in New Mexico, Native in canoe, Natives in a circle watching another dance, usual bull in Texas, etc., etc.]. [Amsterdam: Henri Abraham Châtelain, 1710]. Copper-engraved map mounted on fresh linen; border to border, including title at top: 41.5 x 48.2 cm; overall sheet size: 44.7 x 52.6 cm. Very fine.

     This map appeared in Châtelain’s Atlas Historique (Amsterdam, 1719), Vol. 6, reduced from De Fer’s landmark four-sheet map of 1718 (McCorkle 1718.2). Likely De Fer created his map to promote the Compagnie Françoise Occident and French emigration to America, leading to the Mississippi Bubble. Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada II: 332-333. McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 719.4: “The frame around the views distinguishes this map.,..from a very similar one published separately the same year” [on p. 83 McCorkle illustrates the present map along with the variant border for the subsequent map, which is her entry 719.5]. ($1,000-2,000)

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292. [MAP]. FER, Nicolas de. Cette Carte de Californie et du Nouveau Mexique, est tirée de celle qui a êté envoyée par un grand d’Espagne pour être communiquée a Mrs. de l’Academie Royale des Sciences. Par N. de Fer Geographe de Monseigneur le Dauphin Avec privilege du Roy 1700 A Paris dans l’Isle du Palais sur le quay de l’Orloge a la Sphere Royale [above neat line, to right of cartouche] C. Inselin Sculps. [at top, 10 columns of text keyed to 314 place names]. Paris, 1700. Copper-engraved map of California as an Island, the Gulf of California, mainland from Gran Quivira and Nuevo Mexico to Compostela-Mexico City, on laid paper, original outline coloring, simple line cartouche, small compass rose; neat line to neat line: 22.5 x 34 cm; overall sheet size: 28.5 x 44.5 cm. Mild staining at upper blank margin (not affecting map image), otherwise very fine.

     First state (reissued in 1705). Fer’s map, pirated from Father Kino, is sometimes referred to as the last significant map to show California as an island. Leighly, California as an Island 110n. McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island 134. Tooley, California as an Island 62: “Highly important map... Very unusual.” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 462. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #78 & I, pp. 45-46. ($750-1,500)

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293. [MAP]. FER, Nicolas de. La Californie ou Nouvelle Caroline. Teatro de los trabajos, apostolicos de la Compa. de Jesus en la America, Septe. Dressée sur celle que le Viceroy de la Nouvelle Espagne envoya il ya peu d’années a Mrs. de l’Academie des Sciences. Par N. de Fer Geographe de sa Majesté Catholique;[36-line engraved text giving names and dates of European landings in California, followed by] A Paris dans l’Isle du Palais a La Sphere Royale, 1720;[at top center descending to right within scrolls are pictorial vignettes of Native Americans engaged in various activities, such as making manioc, dancing, and planting]; [at lower left is a scale within cartouche decorated with birds, armadillo, sloth, and cactus]. Paris, 1720. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets of laid paper with watermark of Strasburg lily within sunburst and name of papermaker, original outline color of land masses in blue, pink, and yellow. Neat line to neat line: 45.2 x 66 cm; overall sheet size: 50.4 x 79.4 cm. Other than a few light waterstains to blank margins and short nick at upper corner, very fine.

     First printing of one of the largest and most handsome maps of California as an island, which was published in Fer’s Atlas ou recüeil de cartes géographiques [1709-1728]. It is an enlarged and revised version of Fer’s 1700 map of California and New Mexico. Howell, Anniversary Catalogue #42: “Extraordinary.” Leighly 146 (Plate XXI). Library of Congress, California Centennial #10: “A vivid example of contemporary cartography.” McLaughlin, California as an Island 196. Rumsey 8572. Tooley, America 83, pp. 130-131. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 517. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #102 & Vol. I, pp. 45-47, 69 & 77: “An important and carefully drawn map.” Based on Father Kino’s map of 1696, “This fine rare map is a reissue of Fer’s map of 1705 but on a larger scale and with some notable additions” (Tooley, California as an Island 83). Also, see Burrus’ good discussion, Kino and the Cartography of Northwestern New Spain, Plate XIV & pp. 65-66. ($4,000-8,000)

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294. [MAP]. FER, Nicolas de. Plan de la fameuse et nouvelle Ville de Mexique. Par N. de Fer 1715. [Paris, 1715].  Copper-engraved city plan of Mexico City, full contemporary color and shading. Neat line to neat line (not including title at top above neat line): 22 x 33 cm; plan and title: 22.5 x 33 cm; overall sheet size: 27.5 x 39 cm. With accompanying engraved descriptive text (in French) and numbered key (Description de la Fameuse Ville de Mexique, par N. de Fer 1715...A Paris chez l’auteur avec Privilege du Roy). Old tape stains on verso of plan (barely visible on face of map); some age-toning and browning, engraved Description with tape stains on blank margins, and small chip at top right blank margin.

     Lombardo, Atlas histórico de la ciudad de México, plate 130. This attractive, detailed city plan of the Venice of the West appeared only in the late issues of De Fer’s L’atlas curieux (first edition, Paris, 1700, with five parts, extending to 1717; see Phillips, Atlases 532 & 546). The plan includes a schematic representation of Lake Texcoco and its divisions. The city is still completely surrounded by water. The key on the text leaf identifies 48 locations. The maps and plans of Nicolas de Fer (1646-1720) are highly regarded for their decorative qualities. Fer served as French Royal Geographer. ($200-400)

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295. [MAP]. GALLATIN, Albert. Map of the Indian Tribes of North America about 1600 A.D. along the Atlantic; & about 1800 A.D. westwardly. Published by the Amer: Antiq: Soc: From a drawing by Hon: A. Gallatin.... Engraved map on thin paper, original hand coloring indicating tribal locations; neat line to neat line: 38 x 41 cm; overall sheet size: 41.5 x 46 cm; folded into book: Archæologia Americana. Transactions and Collections of the American Antiquarian Society. Vol. II. Cambridge: Printed for the Society, at the University Press, 1836. [iii-vii] viii-xxx, [2], [1] 2-573 [1, blank], [2, errata] pp., 8vo (25 x 15.5 cm), recent tan cloth, gilt-lettered dark brown leather label. Map: 2 splits at folds and short tear at juncture of map and book (no losses), minor toning at very edge of lower blank right margin, otherwise very fine and fresh with superb color. Book: Scattered moderate foxing to text, otherwise fine. It is always preferable to have a map in situ with the book in which it appeared. In this case, Gallatin includes a discussion of his map at pp. 140-142 of his essay.

     First edition. The map appears in Gallatin’s article “A Synopsis of the Indian Tribes within the United States East of the Rocky Mountains, and in the British and Russian Possessions in North America” (pp. 1-422). American Imprints (1836) 37582. Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 114-115 (with color illustration): “[Henry] Adams pointed out that Gallatin had not only ‘first established the linguistic groups of North American Indians,’ but also ‘made the first ethnographical map of North America which had real merit.’” Graff 49. Howes G30 (remarking on map): “Best of western country up to this time”. Pilling 1391: “A general discussion on the construction of Indian languages, with examples in various tongues.” Plains & Rockies IV:34n. Rumsey 3388: “The map, in addition to its abundant information regarding the Indian Tribes, shows Jedediah Smith’s route of 1827 across the Great Basin, one of the earliest American maps to do so.” Sabin 1049. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #417, Color frontispiece to Vol. 2, & Vol. II, pp. 151-152: “An achievement, as important for the imaginary geography which its author wisely eschewed as for the items he included.” ($1,200-$1,600)

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296. [MAP]. [Recto] GALVESTON, HOUSTON, & HENDERSON RAIL ROAD. Texas of the United States of America, Shewing The Galveston, Houston, & Henderson Rail Road. [below neat line at lower left] King, Lith. 63 Queen St. New Cannon St. London, [1857]. Lithograph map with original pastel blue wash on most of Texas, borderlines with Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mexico in pastel pink wash. Neat line to neat line: 39 x 51 cm; overall sheet size: 40 x 53.5 cm. Shows railroads open and under construction; [verso] United States of America. Railroads already open_______. Lithograph map, Original pink coloring of Texas, showing connections of Texas railroads to the U.S. lines. Neat line to neat line: 27 x 37 cm. Overall sheet size as above. Professionally washed, stabilized, and backed with archival tissue (the latter obscuring the U.S. map on verso; facsimile of U.S. map supplied). Old cellophane tape removed, leaving significant stains. Small losses at folds (some touching Texas map image), larger losses at right center and lower right (affecting neat line but not map). Lower margin lightly chipped (costing three letters of imprint). Rare in any condition. Accompanying the map is research material including two facsimiles of the map, folder of various notes, and a facsimile of Colton’s 1856 map of Texas. Exceedingly rare and important.

     First edition. Rumsey 5179: “This is probably the first railroad map of Texas. Although undated, this map is clearly derived from the 1857 Colton atlas map of Texas; and the Galveston, Houston, & Henderson Railroad was raising money in London (where this map was published, probably to accompany a bond prospectus) and Paris in 1857 to finance expansion.... The railroad development shown on the Texas map would indicate 1857.” The railroad operated under its charter longer than any other, for 136 years. See also William Rapp’s article on the Galveston, Houston, & Henderson line in The Railroad History Monograph (Vol. IV, Nos. 2, 3 & 4, without mentioning this map). See also George C. Werner, “Galveston, Houston and Henderson Railroad,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eqg07). ($2,000-4,000)

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297. [MAP]. GARCÍA CONDE, Diego. Plano general de la Ciudad de México.... [Mexico, 1807]. Copper-engraved wall map, approximately 5 feet 3 inches by 6 feet, 8 inches. Scale: One inch = approximately 100 Spanish varas. A completely unsophisticated copy with only a few minor neat repairs and reinforcement along outer edges. Because of the large size of the map, some copies are varnished and on rollers. Copies are frequently found in deteriorated or heavily repaired condition with losses, but this copy is missing nothing, and, in fact, has lain folded for most of its existence. The versos of three of the sheets have duplicate printings of various sections of the map, specifically the upper central panel and the lower left and right panels. This is a most desirable copy of a rare and important map, one of the finest ever made of Mexico City.

     First and only printing in large format (the plates for this map were destroyed and lost, but the map was republished in much smaller format in London in 1811, and again in New York in 1830). Carrera Stampa, Planos de la Ciudad de Mexico 245. Cartografía de Ultramar 57. Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, El Territorio Mexicano II, p. 761 (illustrated). Lombardo, Atlas histórico de la ciudad de México, plate 144. Mathes, Illustration in Colonial Mexico: Woodcuts and Copper Engravings in New Spain, 1539-1821, Register 9989. Palau 98695. Diego Garcia Conde’s Plano general de la Ciudad de México is the most spectacular of all maps of Mexico City, and it is probably the most important plan drawn of Mexico City in the nineteenth century, not only because of its size, but also for the excellence of the artists involved in its production. This grand plan became the source for many others, as it was copied and updated numerous times, though never again on this scale. The plan, conceived and created at one of the best moments in the history of Mexico City, is also one of the most unusual examples of Mexican printing—nothing of this size had previously been engraved in Mexico. ($15,000-30,000)

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298. [MAP]. GARCÍA CONDE, Diego. Plano general de la Ciudad de Mexico.... Engraved by Peter Maverick.... New York, 1830. Copper-engraved map of Mexico City on banknote paper, original full color; neat line to neat line: 47.7 x 53.2 cm, folded into original bright red leather pocket covers. Pocket covers slightly scratched and with a few spots, otherwise superb condition with outstanding coloring. Very rare, especially in the original pocket covers. This U.S. edition is rarer than the original immense version of 1807.

     First U.S. edition. For the first printing of this map, see preceding. Nothing can compare with the grand format of the first edition graced with the handsome engravings by Fabregat, but this augmented and corrected pocket-map version by New York engraver Peter Maverick has a charm and beauty all its own. Carrera Stampa 256. Lombardo, Atlas histórico de la ciudad de México, plate 152. Palau 98697. It is appropriate that the first United States edition of one of the greatest maps ever created in Mexico should have been re-engraved and published by the technically proficient engraver and artist, Peter Maverick (1780-1831), a pioneer in his field and one of the most prominent engravers of his time. ($6,000-10,000)

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299. [MAP]. GARCÍA Y CUBAS, Antonio. Carta general de la República Mexicana formada por Antonio García y Cubas. 1863. [lower left below neat line]; Imprenta litográfica de H. Iriarte y Ca. Ce. de Santa Clara No. 23, México. [lower right below neat line; text partially obscured by lower roller, but] J.M. Muñozgúren grabó en piedra en México; [2 large inset views at top]; [upper left] E. Landesio Pintó | Acueducto de la Hacienda de Matlala... | H. Iriarte Litografió; [upper right] H. Iriarte Dib. y Lit. | Valle de México...; [upper right below large view on right] Estado de la Division, Estencion y Poblacion de la República, conforme a los últimos datos; [14 inset maps and text in 4 rows at lower left]; [center left above insets] Comparacion de las Principales Alturas de la República. Mexico: H. Iriarte, 1863. Lithograph map in four joined sheets, original outline color, varnished, mounted on new cloth, new black wooden rollers; border to border: 120 x 144 cm; overall sheet size: 122 x 149.5 cm. Blank margins slightly frayed (no losses), small loss of border at upper right (supplied in good manuscript facsimile), a few minor abrasions, overall superb condition. Very rare.

     The extremely detailed map executed in grand format is a dramatic nationalistic representation of Mexico and one of the landmarks of Mexican cartography. The map was the most important and physically imposing map of Mexico of its time. It is rich in place names and shows the political divisions of Mexico according to the Constitution of 1857. Phillips, Maps of America, p. 413. El Territorio Mexicano, Vol. I, p. 322 (illustrated). ($4,000-8,000)

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300. [MAP]. [GASTALDI, Jacopo]. Nueva Hispania Tabula Nova. [Venice, 1548]. Line-engraved copperplate map, seas in undulating lines. Neat line to neat line: 12.5 x 17.1 cm; neat line to neat line with title at top: 13.2 x 17.1 cm; overall sheet size: 16.2 x 25.2 cm. Italian text on verso commencing: “*Della Nova Hispania*” Impression somewhat light, two tiny holes at lower center of image, fold on verso lightly browned, but overall a very good copy of a rare and important map.

     First separately printed map of the Gulf Coast, Mexico, and the Southwestern United States, the first small-format atlas designed with travellers in mind. Burden 17. Kapp, Central America 1. Karrow, Mapmakers of the Sixteenth Century and their Maps, pp. 216-249. Martin & Martin Plate 3 (showing the later version by Ruscelli, with Yucatán as part of the continent) & p. 18 re Gastaldi: “Exemplified a lack of hard data”; p. 69: “Master Italian cartographer Jacopo Gastaldi working from Münster’s and using his maps as a source, produced a new edition of Ptolemy’s Geography. In this work Gastaldi abandoned the woodcut and engraved the maps, producing the first set of maps on copper [and] the first set of engraved maps since the 1508 edition of Ptolemy, including the first map specifically devoted to New Spain. It was a notable improvement over previous depictions of the area.” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast II #18 (p. 278). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West Vol. I, #7 & p. 20: “It is a beautiful and significant little map.” Winsor, Ptolemy, p. 24. ($1,500-3,000)

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301. [MAP]. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CALIFORNIA. WHITNEY, J.D. & & C.F. Hoffmann. ...Map of the Region Adjacent to the Bay of San Francisco. 1873. The Coast, Rancho, Township and Section Lines from Materials Furnished by the U.S. Coast Survey and the U.S. Surveyor General’s Office, the Topography chiefly from Original Surveys by C.F. Hoffman...Julius Bien, Lith. New York, 1873. Lithograph topographical map on two sheets of thin paper, original outline and color wash, each sheet measures overall: 6l.5 x 91 cm; neat line to neat line if joined: 110.15 x 86.7 cm, with original dark green folder, upper cover lettered in gilt. Light toning along some fold lines, minor losses at a few fold intersections but reinforced with archival tissue. Covers: Light edgewear and small section at lower left corner discolored from label removal.

     This is the third map of the Bay Area produced by the Whitney Survey, preceded by editions in 1868 and 1870. The map shows the region from just south of Petaluma to the Sacramento area, extending south to Pt. Jarro and the Gilroy area. Gudde, California Place Names, p. 388: “Hoffmann...is responsible for the adoption of the contour line for the topographical atlas of the United States made by the U.S. Geological Survey.” Hayes, Historic Atlas of California, pp. 128 & 194. Howell 50:1625A. Norris 2358. Rumsey (5806). Vogdes, pl. 178 & p. 20. See Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West (Vol. 5, Part 2, pp. 331-332. A landmark publication in the mapping of California and western U.S. topography, and one of only a few large format maps issued by the Whitney survey. His map is reproduced in full on p. 364 of Goetzmann’s Exploration and Empire (“Whitney’s method made possible the later large-scale mapping of the West”). ($500-1,000)

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302. [MAP]. GIBBES, Charles Drayton (cartographer) & Warren Holt (publisher). Map of the States of California and Nevada...Entered According to Act of Congress in the Year 1876 by Warren Holt in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington [lower center above border] S.B. Linton (Formerly of the U.S. Coast Survey) Draughtsman & Lithographer.... [insets and text above title]: [1] Judicial Districts of California;[2] Explanations;[3] United States Land Districts. San Francisco, 1876. Lithograph map on thin paper, original outline hand coloring (vivid rose at boundary of California), geometric ornamental border, border to border: 94.5 x 79.5 cm; overall sheet size: 85 x 102 cm. Folded into original pocket covers, original green cloth lettered in gilt on upper cover. Map: Except for minor fold splits with no losses, very good with bright color retention. Pocket covers lightly rubbed. Overall very good.

     Gibbes’ maps of California and Nevada were constantly updated as new information and improvements became available, and the more information that was added the more dense the maps became, the present edition being an almost indecipherable miasma of detail. A thorough cartobibliographical study of the variants is long overdue. Eberstadt 106:058a (the only dealer listing we find for an 1876 edition). Rumsey 2578n (1875 edition). Vogdes, p. 8 (listing an 1876 edition). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #1240n (citing 1873 edition) & Vol. V (part 2), p. 285: “Gibbes assumed responsibility as compiler, though this map is the lineal descendant of the 1869 production”; Wheat (1208 & V, pp. 268-269). Cartographer Gibbes and publisher Holt were responsible for some of the more important and influential maps of California and Nevada during the mid- and late nineteenth century. ($2,000-4,000)

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303. [MAP]. GODDARD, George H. Britton & Rey’s Map of the State of California.... San Francisco, 1857. Lithograph map of California, original outline color by county with original color wash for each county, mounted on contemporary loose-weave cartographic cloth, previously folded into original brown cloth covers, with printed paper label on upper cover. The map been unfolded (folds not flattened) and loosely affixed on acid-free brown mat board. Minor splits and small holes at a few folds and margin (minimal losses). Moderate staining along blank margins. A few remains of newer tape along blank margins, one larger piece of tape in title between “Britton & Rey’s” and “Map” affixing paper label with manuscript “1857.” Paper label on pocket covers very rubbed, stained, and with some loss of text. Under glass and in handsome gilt frame. Overall this is a very good copy of an exceptionally rare map.

     First edition. Heckrotte & Sweetkind, California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present 36. Rumsey 2901. Streeter Sale 2819. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 921 & Vol. IV, pp. 59-63. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region 302 & pp. xxxix-xlii: “This map, a beautiful example of the cartographer’s art, is unfortunately rare and little-known...by far the most accurate and complete map of California and of its gold regions which had as yet been published.” Wheat, Twenty-Five California Maps 22. ($20,000-40,000)

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304. [MAP]. GOOS, Pieter. Pascaerte Van Nova Hispania Chili, Peru, en Guatimala.... Amsterdam, 1666. Copper-engraved sea chart with contemporary outline coloring, cartouche in full color with illustrations of Blacks, borders in red and yellow, scale below two compass roses, three ships, rhumb lines. Neat line to neat line: 44.5 x 55 cm; overall sheet size: 51.5 x 62.8 cm. Very fine and a beautiful impression with superb color. OCLC locates three copies of the separate map: Princeton, Biblioteca Nacional (Madrid), and Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Paris).    

     Rare and beautiful sea chart, from De Zee-atlas ofte water-wereld... by Pieter Goos. Nautical chart showing the coastline of Central America, Peru, Chile, Yucatán, and part of Southern Mexico (Nova Hispania). Oriented with north towards left. Kapp, Central America 14. Phillips, Atlases 5690-39. See Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, IV, p. 197, #39 (citing 1664). ($400-800)

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305. [MAP]. [GOOS, Pieter, after Hessel Gerritsz]. Pascaerte Van Westindien De Vaste Kusten en de Eylanden. [inset at lower left] Het Canael tusschen Havana aen Cuba eñ de Tortugas eñ Martyres aen Cabo de la Florida in Groot besteck [title cartouche showing two young Black men in loincloths holding up a cow skin with horns and tail still attached; two compass roses]. Amsterdam, 1666. Copper-engraved sea chart from Venezuela to the Gulf of Mexico, Florida, the West Indies, and the Atlantic coast up to north of Chesapeake Bay, on thick paper, contemporary color (outline and full in cartouche), rhumb lines. Neat line to neat line: 45 x 54.5 cm; overall sheet size: 51 x 62 cm. Very fine decorative map with excellent color.

     Burden, The Mapping of North America 389: “This chart of the West Indies and south-east North America is one of the derivatives of the Hessel Gerritsz c. 1631.... In some ways it follows more than most the original by Gerritsz, as it is the first to include the inset of the north-west coast of Cuba. However, it emulates the van Loon, 1661 in the Gulf of Mexico, and the Doncker, 1659, in its inclination of the south-east coastline. Here, though, Goos has dramatically improved the scale and depiction of the Outer Banks.” Koeman, vol. 4, p. 197 Goos 1B no. 35. Lowery 156. Phillips, Atlases 473-474. Jack Jackson, Flags along the Coast: Charting the Gulf of Mexico, 1519-1759: A Reappraisal, p. 8: “Hessel Gerritsz’s ca. 1631 chart of the Gulf of Mexico set the pattern for most maps of the seventeenth century”; p. 11: “Blaeu was not the author of the most influential Gulf map of the seventeenth century—Hessel Gerritsz was, a fact that most cartographic historians have overlooked; p. 103: “Goos issued in 1666 his Paescarte van West Indien which appears to be the Geritsz c. 1631 chart.” ($800-$1,600)

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306. [MAP]. [GREENE CONSOLIDATED GOLD COMPANY]. RAND, McNALLY & company. Mexico [inset map at lower left] Topographical Map of the Eastern Portion of the State of Sonora, showing the operating and projected railways with relation to the property of the Greene Consolidated Gold Co.... N.p.: Rand, McNally, 1904. Color lithograph map, overall sheet size: 53 x 67.5 cm. Folded into printed pocket covers, upper cover titled: Mexico Compliments of Greene Consolidated Gold Company. A few clean splits and slight chipping to lower blank margin, otherwise a very fine, fresh copy of an ephemeral map.

     First edition. A fine, large, and detailed map of the region in Sonora where the mine was located. The mining venture was incorporated in West Virginia in 1904 with capital stock of $5,000,000, and its president was William Cornell Greene. Steven E. Sanderson, Agrarian Populism and the Mexican State: The Struggle for Land in Sonora (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981), pp. 43-44: “Probably the most illustrious example of Yanqui presence in Sonora’s mines was Colonel William C. Green.” ($125-$250)

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307. [MAP]. HALL, Sidney & Simon A.G. Bourne. Mexico. and Guatimala. Corrected from original information communicated by Simon A.G. Bourne, Esq. [below lower border] London, Published by Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, Paternoster Row, March, 1828. London, 1828. Engraved map, original outline color, piano key border; border to border: 41.5 x 51.5 cm. Some moderate staining (mainly confined to blank margins), offsetting from another map at left margin. Overall very good.

     First edition of a map of Mexico and Texas based on observations by an Englishman adventurer-entrepreneur in Texas in the 1820s. Phillips, Atlases 756. Rumsey 4224.047. Wheat (Mapping the Transmississippi West, II, p. 95 & #381) cites the map as an example of the generation of maps that followed Lewis & Clark’s maps. Hall credits Simon A.G. Bourne in the title cartouche. The same year as this map Bourne published in London a 16-page book on Texas, Observations upon the Mexican Province of Texas. Streeter (1099) comments on Bourne’s Observations: “Apparently founded in part on first-hand knowledge with a good account of the physical characteristics of Texas, its population, climate, fertility of the soil, and so on, with a section at the end, ‘Grants of Land for Colonization’.... On page 16 there is a reference, ‘See the annexed Map.’ My copy is in the original stitching and there is no sign of a map having once been present. It may have been intended to publish with the pamphlet Sidney Hall’s map, Mexico. and Guatimala. Corrected from original information communicated by Simon A.G. Bourne Esq., London, 1828, a separate of which is in my collection.” Robert S. Martin (“Maps of an Empresario: Austin’s Contribution to the Cartography of Texas” in Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. 85, July 1981-April 1982, p. 382) notes that Stephen F. Austin’s 1822 manuscript map of Texas at the Witte Museum bears both the names of Austin and Bourne. The printing of Austin’s map was 1830, two years after the present map. ($300-600)

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308. [MAP]. HALSALL, John (publisher) and J[oseph] H[utchins] Colton (copyright holder). Sectional Map of the Territory of Kansas Compiled from the Field Notes in the Surveyor General’s Office. St. Louis [i.e., New York: J.H. Colton], 1857. Lithograph map on banknote paper, original hand coloring in wash and outline, ornate border; neat line to neat line: 66 x 50.5 cm; border to border: 70.5 x 55 cm; overall sheet size: 74.2 x 58.5 cm, folded into publisher’s brown cloth embossed pocket covers, lettered on upper in gilt and in blind on lower cover. A few tears and stains to map, pocket covers faded.

     First edition, early issue. Several variants of this map were published in rapid succession in 1857 and 1858. Heaston, “The Kansas Pocket Map: The Cartographer’s Orphan” (elements of entries 6 & 7): “One of the first pocket maps of Kansas to be issued as a Kansas map, with detail much improved.” Phillips, America, p. 346. Rumsey 4094. This map was issued at a critical period in Kansas’ history when both pro-slavery and anti-slavery emigrants were flooding into the area. A very nice map showing Bleeding Kansas and displacement of Native Americans. ($2,000-4,000)

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309. [MAP]. HANAK AND HARGENS. Road Map of the Southern Part of Marin County California Compiled and Drawn from the Latest Official Data Showing Railways, Wagon Roads, Trails, Elevations.... San Francisco, 1903. Blue line map of Marin County, showing such towns as San Rafael, Sausalito, Bolinas, etc. and features such as Mount Tamalpais, with roads and trails delineated; overall sheet size: 69 x 75 cm; folded into original orange printed paper covers titled: Road Map of Marin County and Mount Tamalpais Showing Railways, Wagon Roads, Old and New Trails, Elevations, Springs, and Water Falls Compiled and Drawn from the Latest Official Data.... Map foxed and spotted, split at folds (minor losses), tear at upper left (some loss), water staining to one panel, paper covers stained and scuffed. Early ownership inscription of E. Ham, who has signed the map in pencil and outlined a few railroads and trails. A fair copy of a rare survival. Only one copy on OCLC (University of California at Berkeley).

     First edition of one of the earliest road maps of southern Marin County and the incomparably beautiful Mount Tamalpais. The railroad shown which goes to the east peak of Mount Tam, operated between 1896 and 1930, and is known as “The Crookedest Railroad in the World.”

     Publishers Hanak and Hargens consisted of Fred Hanak, President, and George Hargens, Secretary. The enterprise was based in San Francisco and specialized in books (especially guide books) and stationery. ($250-500)

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310. [MAP]. HARDCASTLE, [Edmund Lafayette] (draftsman). Battles of Mexico, Line of Operations of the U.S. Army under the Command of Major General Winfield Scott, On the 8th, Capt. [George Brinton] Mc.Clellan, and Lieut. Hardcastle. Corps of Top: Engineers Drawn by Lieut: Hardcastle; [followed by facsimile signature of William Turnbull]; [above neat line at lower right] P.S. Duval Lith. Philada. Philadelphia: P. S. Duval’s Lith., 1847. Uncolored lithograph map of battle scene, neat line to neat line: 71.5 x 55.5 cm; overall sheet size: 77.5 x 58.5 cm. Fine.

     This is a rare separately published Mexican-American War map that appeared in various U.S. government documents, without the page number given at top. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, pp. 426-428. Shows position and route of troops, towns, roads, structures and fortifications, farmlands, lava field, and the Churubusco River. Includes notes and key to symbols. Illustrated in fine, large detail is the last important battle of the Mexican-American War that changed the geography of both countries forever. ($100-200)

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311. [MAP]. HOMANN, Johann Baptist. Regni Mexicani seu Novæ Hispaniæ, Floridæ, Novæ Angliæ, Carolinæ, Virginiæ et Pensylvaniæ, necnam Insvlarvm archipelagi Mexicaniin America Septentrionali accurata Tabula exhibita À Ioh. Baptista Homanno Noribergæ. Nuremberg, [ca. 1712]. Copper-engraved map on original outline and wash coloring, uncolored decorative cartouche at upper left; elaborate mining scene at upper right (Native Americans displaying treasure to Europeans against a backdrop of mountains where men are mining); flamboyant naval scene at lower left; neat line to neat line: 47.5 x 56.5 cm; overall sheet size: 53.1 x 60 cm. Original atlas tab on verso, contemporary ink ms. note on verso “15.” Very fine, strong impression with excellent original color as issued.

     This is the early issue of Homann’s elaborate version of Delisle’s 1703 Carte du Mexique et de la Floride (see herein). Homann later replaced Florida in the title with Louisiana to reflect political changes due to the Treaty of Utrecht (1713) and French expansion into Louisiana in the following decade. The cartouche of the present map does not have the added engraved note regarding Homann’s privilege as Imperial Geographer, which he was granted before August 17, 1715. The present map most likely first appeared in Homann’s Neuer Atlas (ca. 1710 or 1712-1730; see Phillips, Atlases 3474). Homann and his heirs were enthusiastic, commercial recyclers of their copper plates; for the second issue of this map, see next entry. This early issue is rarer than the later issue because of the rapid ascension of France in the Mississippi Valley, which led to an emphasis on the term Louisiana. The appearance in the title of the place name Florida rather than Louisiana was a short-lived occurrence in the history of Homann’s long-lived map. Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps 137n. Martin & Martin, Plate 17 (second issue). Portinaro & Knirsch, The Cartography of North America, 1500-1800, Plate CXV & pp. 226 (second issue). Tooley’s Dictionary of Mapmakers (revised edition), Vol. II, p. 361. ($800-1,600)

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312. [MAP]. HOMANN, Johann Baptist. Regni Mexicani seu Novæ Hispaniæ, Ludovicianæ, Novæ Angliæ, Carolinæ, Virginiæ et Pensylvaniæ, necnam Insvlarvm archipelagi Mexicani in America Septentrionali accurata Tabula exhibita À Ioh. Baptista Homanno Noribergæ Cum Privilegio Sac. Caes. Maj. Nuremberg, n.d. [ca. 1716 or later]. Copper-engraved map, original outline and wash coloring, cartouche and vignettes in later full color; decorative cartouche, mining scene, and sea battle as described in previous entry. Neat line to neat line: 47.4 x 56.7 cm; overall sheet size: 53.3 x 62.6 cm. Original atlas tab on verso, contemporary ink ms. note on verso “32.” Top blank margin lightly soiled and slight remains of adhesion intruding into border in one area, otherwise fine.

     Revised issue of Homann’s version of Delisle’s 1703 Carte du Mexique et de la Floride (see herein). See preceding entry for Homann’s earlier issue of the map, which is identical to present issue except for two revisions to the cartouche: Florida in the title changed to Louisiana, and the added engraved note regarding Homann’s privilege as Imperial Geographer. This revised issue of the map has never been satisfactorily dated, due to the Homann firm reusing it repeatedly for decades without dating it and apparently refreshing the plate. Phillips (Atlases) locates Homann’s Regni Mexicani multiple times in various atlases dating from ca. 1716 to the late eighteenth century, but does not indicate if the privilege is in the cartouche, or if the map is the early version with Florida or the revised version with Louisiana. Martin & Martin, Plate 17 (illustrating the present revised issue). Phillips, Maps of America, p. 406. Portinaro & Knirsch, The Cartography of North America, 1500-1800, pp. 226-227 & plate CXV (dated 1725, with privilege): “Homann’s map shows the de facto and de jure political division of North Americana after the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713 and the French expansion into Louisiana in the following ten years.” ($600-1,200)

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313. [MAP]. HUNT, A.R. The Metropolitan Area of Greater San Francisco. Based on the United States government census reports of 1910, the population of this area was 700,000. The ratio of increase during the past decade indicates a present population of 750,000. Copyright 1912. [four small inset maps along right margin] [1] Greater New York. [2] Greater Chicago. [3] Greater Los Angeles. [4] Greater San Francisco. [List of over twenty ship routes at left] Pac. Mail Trans. Pac... [key to seven rail lines at lower left] Ocean Shore RR... [above lower neat line at left] A.R. Hunt. [San Francisco], 1912. Photomechanical map printed thin paper; border to border: 48 x 39.2 cm; overall sheet size: 55.5 x 43.2 cm. Creased where folded, a few minor holes to left blank margin, and a few light stains and spots. else fine. OCLC locates one copy (UC Santa Barbara).

     First edition. A crisp and clean, visually striking, black-and-white map showing the area from San Anselmo and Mount Tam to Stanford University, and east of Richmond-Berkeley to Newark-Dumbarton Union Bridge and the proposed route of the San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose Railroad. Relief is shown by hachures and spot heights. The four insets are presented to suggest that Greater San Francisco is actually larger than New York, Chicago, or Los Angeles. This is San Francisco boosterism at its best, and highly commendable in light of the fact that only a few years had passed since the devastating 1906 earthquake. ($150-300)

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314. [MAP]. HUTAWA, Julius. Map of Mexico & California Compiled from the latest authorities by Juls. Hutawa Lithr. Second St. 45 St, Louis, Mo. 2nd. Edition 1863 [St. Louis faintly visible under edition statement, and 1863 handstamped]; [inset map at upper right] Vicinity of Mexico. St. Louis, 1863. Lithograph map with original vivid outline coloring, neat line to neat line 59.2 x 48.3 cm, folded into original goldenrod printed paper boards. Covers expertly rebacked (slightly rubbed, upper cover lightly stained at bottom). Mild foxing at some folds and left blank margin and a few folds professionally strengthened on verso, otherwise very fine.

     This was a fairly longed-lived map, due to the enterprising publisher, who figured out how to capitalize on the keen interest of the populace in the Mexican-American War, which subsequently evolved into a need for maps on how to get to the California Gold Rush and the West. The present map is another issue of a map that first came out in 1847. Graff 2026. Rumsey 0335.001. Streeter Sale 179 & 180. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 1072. The map seems clearly intended for use as something of a vade mecum for the western traveller and miner. ($1,200-2,400)

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315. [MAP]. INTERNATIONAL & GREAT NORTHERN RAILROAD OF TEXAS. Map of the International and Great Northern Railroad.... St. Louis, [1877]. Black & white lithograph map, neat line to neat line: 41 x 38 cm; overall sheet with text: 42.5 x 56.5 cm. Except for minor loss at one fold, very fine. The map is folded into, as issued, pamphlet with wrapper title: The Lone Star Guide Descriptive of Counties on the Line of the International and Great Northern Railroad of Texas.... St. Louis: Woodward, Tiernan & Hale, [1877]. 32 pp., 11 wood-engraved text illustrations. 8vo, original green printed wrappers, stitched. Upper wrapper badly torn with loss of some text, lower wrapper lightly chipped and stained, upper right corners of text chipped and dog-eared, but with no loss of text. Very scarce in commerce as well as institutional holdings (OCLC locates five copies).

    First edition. Rumsey 5051: “An early issue.” This extremely detailed map of Texas and the I&GN route no doubt served as a spur and guide to Texas emigration, especially with the I&GN’s bold statements, such as “Reduced Limited First Class Rates,” “Reduced Emigrant Rates,” and effusive descriptions of the land along the route. The pamphlet and map demonstrate the type of promotional literature used to develop towns across Texas and the rest of country by employing tactics to shape the imaginations of emigrants and those wishing to promote a particular town. ($400-800)

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316. [MAP]. INTERNATIONAL COMPANY OF MEXICO. Map of Colony Carlos Pacheco, including the Ranches Ensenada, Cipres, Maneadero & Puntabanda, Surveyed for the International Company of Mexico. By Rich. Stephens, C.D. [Mexico? International Company of Mexico, 1886]. Lithograph promotional map showing Town of Ensenada, Todos Santos Bay, colony with numbered plots, coastlines and waterways in blue, neat line to neat line: 69 x 78.4 cm; overall sheet size: 73.3 x 82.5 cm. Light wear to blank margins and a few slight separations not affecting map proper. The only copy recorded by OCLC is a photocopy at the Bancroft. An original is in the Orozco y Berra Library in Mexico.

    First edition of the map recording the founding of modern-day Ensenada. Not in standard sources, although Barrett (Baja) records several maps and promotional items relating to the International Company, comprised of U.S. citizens, English, and Mexican investors. David Piñera (American and English Influence on the Early Development of Ensenada, Institute for Regional Studies of the Californias, San Diego State University, 1995) gives a good overview of the early development of Ensenada at the time of this map, which is illustrated on p. 91 of his study: “Ensenada’s location, so close to the border between the United States and Mexico, gave this urban development a special dimension. Most importantly, Southern California’s real estate boom of the 1880s reached Ensenada. American land promoters saw the convenience of expanding California’s profitable real estate market south of the border. The border line seemed to disappear in 1886, opening a bi-national zone homogenized by the same economic dynamics.... Along the entire U.S.–Mexican border, there is no other case of such strong American influence in the origins of a Mexican town as can be seen in the example of Ensenada.” ($250-500)

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317. [MAP]. KEULEN, Gerard van. Pas Kaart van de Golff van Mexico t Amsterdam by Gerard van Keulen Boek en Zee kaart verkoper aande Niewe-Brug inde Gekroonde Lootsman, Met Privilegie voor 15 iaaren; [cartouche at upper right with two cherubs]; [inset map at lower left] De Haaven van Iuan d’Ulhua in t Groot. Amsterdam, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart with contemporary outline and shading color, two compass roses, ship, and rhumb lines; neat line to neat line: 51 x 58.6 cm; overall sheet size: 53.4 x 61 cm. Mild to moderate age-toning. Trimmed close and blank borders a bit chipped, but image unaffected.

     Fourth state, with revisions, most closely matching Burden’s State 4 (#592); the present copy has 14 at lower left and no number at lower right; “Coast de Piscadoris” offshore at top center; large shoal off Yucatán coast; etc. The name of Johannes van Keulen has been scrubbed from the title, and his son’s name, Gerard van Keulen, substituted. The first state of the map was 1684. Koeman, The Sea on Paper 44. Martin & Martin Plate 11 (citing original edition). Burden comments: “The main feature of this map is its originality of form. It is the first sea chart of the western portion of the Gulf of Mexico detailing the coastal waters of present-day Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana.” Van Keulen’s grand sea atlas first appeared serially; the Gulf of Mexico chart first appeared in the fourth part of the atlas (ca. 1684). Because of its superiority to anything else then available, the atlas was reissued repeatedly. ($1,500-3,000)

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318. [MAP]. KIEPERT, H[einrich]. Mexico Texas und Californien.... Weimar: Geographische Institut, 1847. Engraved map of the American West, Texas, the Gulf Coast to Tallahassee, Mexico, and Central America, with original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 53.5 x 62.5 cm; overall sheet size: 60 x 72.4 cm. Light and expert stabilization (marginal and centerfold reinforcement), no losses. Overall fine. Uncommon in commerce.

     First edition. The map appeared in Carl Ferdinand Weiland’s 1848 Allgemeiner Hand-Atlas der ganzen Erde... (Phillips 6107, Map 69). Subsequent editions of this map that appeared in Weiland’s atlas indicate the rapid changes that occurred in the Western United States from this 1847 edition until after 1855. Wheat notes that Kiepert based his map of the Western regions on Frémont and cites the 1851 edition of the present map (Mapping the Transmississippi West #723n; Maps of the California Gold Region #199n). Kiepert’s rendering of Texas and its then-disputed boundary walks a line of circumspect neutrality. Kiepert shows two blue outlined boundaries, one in the Emory conformation with the overextended, ambitious Panhandle, along with another possibility, the truncated version of Texas without Panhandle and with southwestern boundary at the Nueces River. The outlining of Texas’s boundary with Mexico is thin and tentative, but the other boundaries are quite boldly colored. The German Colony in Texas is shaded pale green and labeled Deutsche Colonie des Mainzer Verein (the largest influx of Germans to Texas occurred between 1844 and 1847). ($1,500-$3,000)

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319. [MAP]. KIEPERT, H. Mexico Texas und Californien.... [inset at left center] Haupt-Gold-District in Californien im doppelten Maasstab der Hauptkarte. Weimar: Geographisches Institut, [1854, or after]. Engraved map of the American West, Texas, the Gulf Coast to Tallahassee, Mexico, and Central America, with original outline coloring; neat line to neat line: 54.3 x 63 cm; overall sheet size: 56 x 68 cm. Upper margin rough (occasionally touching border), centerfold neatly reinforced, otherwise fine. Editions with the inset of the California Gold Region are rare in commerce. Streeter copy.

     Updated edition of Kiepert’s 1847 map (see preceding entry), with added inset of the California Gold Region and the “Gold Region” located on the map proper and more toponyms in California; furthermore the Gadsden Purchase is more strongly delineated. Rumsey 2077:63 (his map appears to be slightly earlier than the present map, showing the boundary between the U.S. and Mexico with the pre-Gadsden borderline). Wheat cites the 1851 edition (Mapping the Transmississippi West #723; Maps of the California Gold Region #199). In this edition, the cartographer has taken most of New Mexico away from Texas and more boldly delineated the boundary between the U.S. and Mexico. More place names are shown in Texas, no doubt partially in response to the wave of continued German emigration to Texas. ($2,000-4,000)

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320. [MAP]. [KINSLEY, KANSAS]. CUMMINGS, J.M. Petersburgh Pawnee County, Kansas. [inset at lower right] Topographical Sketch of Petersburgh and Vicinity. N.p., [1873]. Lithograph town plan with title as indicated above, but marked through in blue ink changing the name of the town to Kinsley, and the county name of Pawnee to Williams [sic]; town plan measurement, approximately 28 x 32.5 cm; overall sheet size including large title at top, 44.3 x 35.1 cm. A working map with numerous manuscript annotations, mostly in red, with notes setting aside lots and blocks, such as “For County Purposes,” “For Church,” etc. Many lots have the red ink notation “xx,” which is explained in another contemporary ink note on right: “Lots marked xx are owned by the Bureau.” Seven chips to blank margins (no losses), otherwise fine.

     Unrecorded. Obviously, from the manuscript notes on the present map, the town was a work in progress, with even the name of the town and county subject to change. The Chicago Workingmen’s Town Company founded the town in 1872 and Petersburgh was named for T.J. Peter, General Manager of the Santa Fe railroad, which was then building westward. In 1873, when settlers from Massachusetts came on the scene, the town was renamed in honor of E.W. Kinsley, a Boston philanthropist who donated money to the town to build a Congregational Church. Edwards County was named for W.C. Edwards, who built a block of brick buildings in early downtown Kinsley. As for the original county name of Pawnee County, in 1867 the legislature eliminated Peketon County from the map and formed other counties out of its territory, among which was Pawnee county. After a decent beginning, the area suffered from grasshoppers, drought, and a national financial panic. Nevertheless, the town persevered, thanks in part to that essential element of any community of success—the railroad. The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, which was so pivotal to the development of western Kansas towns, arrived in Kinsley in August of 1872. ($500-800)

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321. [MAP]. LLOYD, James T., Bartholomew Bowen & William Bowen. Lloyd’s Map of the Lower Mississippi River from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico.... New York, 1863. Steel-engraved map with transfer lithography, outline of county and parish lines in original bright hand coloring, waterways shaded in blue, mounted on original linen, the lower course of the River shown in five columns (with names of lot owners adjoining the Mississippi and the borders of their lots shown in detail); neat line to neat line: 94.3 x 129.8 cm; verso of map with original white and blue decorated wall paper at lower right panel, folded into original brown cloth covers (25 x 15.5 cm) with white labels on both covers printed in red. A few short, clean splits with minimal losses, otherwise very fine with excellent color retention. Covers split and fair only.

    Second edition (first edition, 1862). Modelski, Railroad Maps of the United States 139 (listing the 1862 edition and mentioning this second edition). Phillips, America, p. 441 (1862 edition). Rumsey 4842 (first edition). Stephenson, Civil War Maps 41. The present edition of the map has changes from the first edition in the text below title. Some changes have been made to the map proper. For example, of particular interest for the Civil War is the addition of “Grants Vicksburg Cut-Off.” Both editions of the map show 1862 Civil War actions along the Mississippi. ($20,000-30,000)

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322. [MAP]. LÓPEZ [DE VARGAS MACHUCA], Tomás. Mapa Geográfico de la Península y Provincia de Yucatán.... Madrid, 1801. Copper-engraved map with outline coloring in red and green shading. Neat line to neat line: 59.5 x 70 cm; overall sheet size: 62 x 73.5 cm. Cut in 24 sections and mounted on contemporary cartographical linen. Rough condition, staining, wormholes (with a few losses), two old ink manuscript corrections, one showing mouth of Rio Pacatún, and the other showing the course of Rio Concepción, No sales records or present internet offerings. OCLC lists copies at the British Library and the National Library of Scotland.

     First edition. Kapp, Central America 80. Palau 140538. Not in El Territorio Mexicano or Antochiw, Historia de cartográfica de la peninsula de Yucatán (nor in his library, now at Monterrey Tech). Checking Phillips, it does not appear that the present map was issued in an atlas. According to Antochiw, this rare map has been extremely useful in research relating to Mesoamerican archaeology and anthropology.

     A little-known but important Spanish cartographer, López (1731-1802) was born in Madrid, studied geography in Paris (where he was a disciple of Dheulland), and served as official Royal Geographer to Carlos III. López was influenced by the expanding realms of scientific knowledge in his day and attempted to bring the latest methodology to his cartographic work. He wrote numerous works of geography, drew many maps, and produced several atlases in the latter half of the eighteenth century, including Atlas de España (Madrid, 1757), Atlas de la América Septentrional (Paris, 1758), Atlas geográfico (Madrid, 1758), Atlas elemental (1792), etc. ($1,500-3,000)

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323. [MAP]. LOTTER, Tobias Conrad. Mappa Geographica Regionem Mexicanam et Floridam terrasque adjacentes, ut et anteriores Americæ Insulas, cursus itidem et reditus navigantium versus flumen Missisipi et alias colonias ob oculos ponens, cura et sumptibus. Tobiæ Conradi Lotteri, Geographi et Chalcographi Augustæ Vindel. [below distance scale at upper left] Cum gratia et Privil. S.R.I. Vicariatus, in partibus Rheni, Sveviæ, et Juris Franconici. [within border at lower right] Tob. Con. Lotter Sculps. [4 inset coastal charts at upper left]; large scene at lower left (naval battle with people on shore watching while others are engaged in various activities, such as examining a treasure chest, bartering with Natives, etc.). [Augsburg, after 1758?]. Copper-engraved map, original color (outline and wash); neat line to neat line: 47.6 x 57.5 cm; map with title above: 49.6 x 57.5 cm; overall sheet size: 53.2 x 66.5 cm. A few tiny holes at top blank margin (no losses). Remains of original tab on verso. Fine, strong impression, with authentic original color.

     Undetermined Lotter version, with changes to title replacing Seutter’s name with Lotter’s; four inset maps at right (rather than vignettes of ships); retaining the statement “Admiralis Vernon Bachiam intrans d. 21. Novembr. 1739” beneath the inset map entitled “Bahia Portus Belli” (see Lowery 328). The present map is Tobias Conrad Lotter’s re-engraving of Georg Matthäus Seutter’s Latin translation of Delisle’s revised 1722 edition of his original 1703 map entitled Carte du Mexique et de la Floride (see herein). Delisle’s map was the first map to pull together several centuries of disconnected geographical knowledge and present an accurate view of the area including colonial North America and the Caribbean, with the British colonies east of the Appalachian Mountains, France’s dominion through the Mississippi Valley and Florida, and Spain’s possession of Mexico and New Mexico. Martin & Martin, Plate 18. Ryhiner Collection Ryh 7815:14. See also: Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps 137n. Phillips, Atlases 5973. Portinaro & Knirsch, The Cartography of North America, p. 236 & Plate CXX. ($700-$1,400)

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324. [MAP]. MACDONALD & MORAN. Tonopah Mining District Nevada....Photo. Lith. Britton & Rey, S.F. San Francisco: Britton & Rey, 1907. Photolithographic map on glossy calendared paper showing the silver mining district, specific tracts colored in rose, green, yellow, and blue, with titles delineating mining claims; border to border: 50.6 x 65.2 cm; overall sheet size: 52.8 x 66.9 cm; folded into original black cloth pocket covers, gilt lettering on upper cover. Excellent copy with 1906 photographic postcard of Tonopah included.

     First edition. OCLC locates five copies (Denver Public Library, University of Nevada at Las Vegas, Huntington Library, University of Nevada at Reno, and Yale). Not in Paher. The town of Tonopah began around 1900 when gold and silver were accidentally discovered there. The discovery was followed by thousands of people and millions of dollars, which turned the area into the mining Mecca shown on this map. As with many such towns, however, the boom was short-lived, and a mere twenty years later had mostly played out, although the town has struggled on to this day. At its zenith the town was known as “The Queen of the Silver Camps.” It has been said that Tonopah ignited the last big precious-metal rush in the West.($600-1,200)

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325. [MAP]. MARTÍNEZ DE CASTRO, Mariano. Mapa Oficial del estado de Sinaloa Mexico. London, 1891. Lithograph map on heavy paper, showing the Mexican state of Sinaloa and parts of Sonora, Durango, and Chihuahua, original color wash of coastlines and bodies of water in pale green and blue, boundaries pink, sectioned and mounted on contemporary cartographical linen (24 sections), marbled paper on verso of two sections. Neat line to neat line: 106.2 x 176 cm; overall sheet size: 109.2 x 181.3 cm. Very fine, fresh copy, a few contemporary pencil notes relating to 130,000 acres near Altata. The same is also marked off on the main map. Rarely found (OCLC locates one copy in this large format in the Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg Carl von Ossietzky), especially in this condition.

     First edition of the large-format version. Several versions of the map appeared at the same time, and the present version is the most elaborate and largest of the various incarnations. See El Territorio Mexicano, Vol. II, p. 550, for a version with only the central portion. The present version is the most elaborate and robust manifestation of this map, far larger than the others. This map expresses an explosion of progress and national pride promoted by President Porfirio Díaz. Numerous details fill the image, from roads to railroads. The industrial inset emphasizes the mining interests there; mining is by far the most frequently encountered industry. The main port of Mazatlán is given great prominence. Also of significant importance is the development at Topolobampo, where A.K. Owen’s proposed colony is shown ("Colonia de Topolobampo"). ($1,000-2,000)

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326. [MAP]. MATUTE [Y CAÑEDO], Juan Ignacio. Map, statistical broadside, and plans, folded into pocket folder, ivory linen over blue and brown marbled boards, contemporary hand-lettered paper label on spine. The three elements of this artifact are:

[1]  Plano geografico del Estado de Colima. Formado por Juan I. Matute; [upper center above neat line] Cuadro Geográfico Estadístico del estado del Colima No. 1;[lower center below neat line] Guadalaja. Calle del Carmen No. 17. Imp. Litog. de Gomez Delgadillo y Ca. Guadalajara, n.d. [ca. 1862?]. Lithograph map with original outline coloring. Neat line to neat line: 36.6 x 58.0 cm. [2] Double folio printed broadside containing printed statistics, entitled: Cuadro geografico estadístico, Num 2... Letterpress statistical table covering all aspects in Colima at the time. 100 x 71.3 cm. Guadalajara: Dionisio Rodriguez, 1862. [3] Lithographed plans of Colima and environs. Overall a fine copy with light outer wear to pocket folder and a few clean splits or repairs (no losses). With engraved bookplate of Frederick Starr and contemporary binding ticket of Nicolas Banda. Rare (only copy located by OCLC is at the Berlin State Library).

     First edition. Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, El Territorio de Mexicano, Vol. II, p. 113 (map illustrated, hypothesizing date of ca. 1867). Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 13 mentions lithographer Dionisio Rodríguez. The work is dedicated to Alexander von Humboldt. Colima is located in the middle of Mexico’s Pacific coast and includes the Revillagigedo Islands. ($1,000-2,000)

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327. [MAP]. MELISH, John (publisher). Map of the United States with the Contiguous British & Spanish Possessions.... Philadelphia, 1816. Copper-engraved map, original full and outline coloring by state or territory, illustration of the U.S. national symbol of eagle and shield above title; neat line to neat line: 89 x 146 cm; overall (including selvage): 91 x 149.5 cm; sectioned and mounted on contemporary cartographical linen (40 sections), original pale bluish grey silk selvages, original tan and blue marbled paper backing on verso of two sections. Other than discoloration of linen backing, the map is very fine and fresh with only a touch of barely noticeable light foxing to a few sections, with exceptionally brilliant coloring. In very worn and split original pull-off covers. With the map is the following book: MELISH, John. A Geographical Description of the United States, with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions, Intended as an accompaniment to Melish’s Map of these Countries....Third Edition. Philadelphia: Published by the Author, 1818. 4 engraved maps (Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore). 8vo, contemporary black roan over marbled boards. Very worn, fair copy only. American Imprints (1818) 44791. Howes M490.

     First edition, Ristow’s fifth state. Ristow, “John Melish and His Map of the United States” in “À la Carte, Selected Papers on Maps and Atlases”, Library of Congress, Washington, 1972, pp. 162–182. Streeter Sale 3799.Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 102–104. Edney, Matthew H., Mapping the Republic: Conflicting Concepts of the Territory and Character of the U.S.A., 1790–1900: “Melish dramatically expanded the geographical frame of the Republic. His initial concept, developed during the War of 1812, was to map the United States as far West as the Rocky Mountains. But he soon realized that it would be much better to extend the map all the way to the Pacific Ocean.... Melish foreshadowed the idea of ‘Manifest Destiny.’” Howes M490. Martin & Martin 26 (commenting that the map is “of lasting value” because of the “widespread dissemination of new information concerning Texas geography”). Rumsey 5168: “The first large scale detailed map made in the U.S. that showed the entire country from the Atlantic to the Pacific... Notwithstanding the many issues, the map has become extremely rare.” Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 322, Vol. II, pp. 62–64: “A landmark map.” This map shows a feature labeled “Southern Pass,” perhaps a reference to present-day South Pass, Wyoming (Continental Divide), which, if true, would be the earliest such reference on a separately printed map to this feature. ($50,000-75,000)

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328. [MAP]. MEXICO. MINISTERIO DE FOMENTO (Carlos Pacheco). Carta general de la Republica Mexicana formada en el Ministerio de Fomento con los datos mas recientes por disposicion del Secretario del Ramo General Carlos Pacheco 1890; [lower left below neat line] Grabado por Erhard Hermanos, 35b. Calle Denfert-Rochereau—Paris [Lower right below neat line] Imp. por Erhard Hermanos—Paris. Paris, [1890]. Oversize lithograph map on four sheets on heavy paper, original partial color (brown land masses, blue bodies of water, roads in red, railroad lines in black). Each sheet measures approximately 75 x 106 cm. If joined, border to border: 232.3 x 345.5 cm. Occasional light staining, some tears and marginal chipping due to type of paper on which map quadrants are printed (two substantial closed tears to lower right sheet, but no losses to map image or borders), several repairs on versos, the map image itself is very fine, clean and bright.

     First printing (it was only in this edition that the map was printed on heavy stock paper). Phillips, America, p. 418. This is a fine example of the image that Mexico portrayed to the world during the Porfiriate. Official, large-scale map showing cities, villages, roads, railroads, mining sites, drainage, physical features, and other sites. The map extends to western Florida (including the Gulf of Mexico) and the Borderlands are shown to San Diego. Most of Texas is demarcated (to slightly north of Dallas). Included are some quaint spellings for Texas place names, Zampasses (for Lampasas), Edinburgo (for Edinburg), etc. The southernmost point of the map is southern Guatemala. Mexico’s population is given as 11,490,830. The lowest population is Baja, California (just under 35,000). This handsome map was lithographed in Paris, but because of its accuracy was republished numerous times, such as in the Bureau of American Republics, U.S. government documents, etc. ($500-1,000)

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329. [MAP]. MILLS & CO. Mills & Co’s. New Rail Road Post Office and Sectional Map of Iowa Published by Mills & Co. Des Moines Iowa 1882. [lower left above border] Mills Co. Engravers, Stationers and Map Publishers. Des Moines, Iowa. [2 untitled vignettes at left: Uniformed soldier carrying U.S. flag and the Old Capitol at Iowa City]; [vignette at lower right] The New Capital [sic] of Iowa. [key and symbols at right: railroads completed and proposed, stations, boundaries, county seats, post offices for non-platted towns] References. Des Moines, 1882. Lithograph map on banknote paper, original full and outline color in red (Congressional districts) and green (counties), ornate border; border to border: 61.5 x 92.5 cm; overall sheet size: 63.3 x 95.2 cm; folded into publisher’s original green cloth pocket covers.Accompanied by text: Post-Office Index to Mills...Railroad and Post-office Map of Iowa. [1] 2-18, [2] pp. Map: A few minor splits at folds (no losses), overall exceptionally fine.

     First edition. Rumsey 5404. After immigrants began to pour into Iowa in the 1850s, concern for adequate transportation was a major problem, not only for passengers, but also for agricultural and other products. Given the severe winters of the region, steamboats and stagecoaches were not always reliable in the depths of winter. Iowans, like other Midwesterners, caught railroad fever, and Council Bluff was reached by 1867. In the sixties and seventies, the railroads changed the region, making it possible to have year-round shipment of agricultural products and encouraging manufacture and industrial pursuits. In the present, beautifully engraved map we see a strong network of railroads across the entire state: completed, proposed, and in progress.  ($250-500)

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330. [MAP]. [MITCHELL, Dr. John, cartographer (after) & Antonio Zatta, publisher]. RAYNAL, [Abbé Guillaume-Thomas-François]. Storia Dell’ America Settentrionale.... Venice, 1778. [i-vi] vii-xviii, 1-124, 1-6 pp., title and text vignettes, 15 double-page copper-engraved maps with original outline hand coloring and full color in cartouche. Folio, original beige paper mottled in red and green over heavy paste paper, ivory paper spine label printed in black (Raynal Storia dell’America Setten. Ven. 1778). Other than minor chipping to spine and label, a finer copy could hardly be imagined. The separate maps are often found on the market, but pristine, as-issued copies of the entire work with text and maps and original binding are always to be preferred.

     First edition of an abbreviated translation of Books 15-18 of Raynal’s Histoire Philosophique et Politique des Établissements & du Commerce des Européens dans les deux Indies, containing the first Italian edition of John Mitchell’s seminal map of North America, which many consider the most important map of North America (see Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps; Schwartz & Ehrenberg; Tooley, and others). Clark, Old South I:292:22. Echeverria & Wilkie 778/68. Portinaro & Knirsch, The Cartography of North America, 1500-1800, Plates CXLIII-CLIII. Rumsey 5007A & 5007.001-5007.016: “Contains the first edition of Zatta’s twelve-sheet version of Mitchell’s Map of North America, plus three other maps: Il Canada, Le Isole di Terra Nuova e Capo Breton, and La Baja D’ Hudson.” Sellers & Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies 1750-1789 163. Stephenson, “Table for Identifying Variant Editions and Impressions of John Mitchell’s Map of the British and French Dominions in North America” in Walter W. Ristow (editor), A la Carte, p. 113. Karpinski (Maps of Famous Cartographers Depicting North America, p. 57) provides a good overview of John Mitchell’s map and its successors, including the present Italian edition, concluding: “Various editions were published in 1778 in Holland and France, and what is really an Italian edition by Antonio Zatta in a series of twelve maps, bearing the title, Colonie Unite dell’ America Settentrionale, probably the first appearance of the equivalent of ‘United States’ on a map.” ($8,000-12,000)

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331. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S[amuel] Augustus. Map of Mexico, including Yucatan & Upper California 1846. Entered according to the Act of Congress in the Year 1846.... [inset plan at top right] The Late Battlefield. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1846 (copyright 1846). Lithograph map on thin wove paper within decorative border, original hand-coloring with bright rose outline coloring around Texas in its Emory conformation, green border, battle plan at top uncolored, Mexico and Upper California in full color. Neat line to neat line: 44.5 x 64.1 cm; overall sheet size: 46 x 65.5 cm. Folded into original blind-embossed dark green roan covers. Very lightly browned at folds, minor voids at folds which are professionally strengthened, a few small brown spots, but overall very fine with excellent color retention.

     First edition, first issue, with inset plan at top uncolored and entitled “The Late Battlefield,” without the lower “Road Between Mexico & Vera Cruz” (see next entry herein), and other variations. Rumsey 3119n (first 1847 issue). The first edition came out in 1846 and is easily identifiable because the copyright and imprint date both read 1846 (Streeter Sale 3868, Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 284); the very first issue had the inset map at upper right uncolored. The third edition (Rumsey 4594, Streeter 3869, Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #548, Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region #35) was extensively revised, including: addition of Map of the Principal Roads from Vera Cruz and Alvarado to the City of Mexico and profile below; reduction of the overall area shown to between approximately 86 and 120 degrees of longitude, thereby reducing the area by about seven degrees (here the area shown is between approximately 83 and 123 degrees of longitude); the reduction of the inset plan at top right; and the alteration of the title of the plan from The Late Battlefield to Battle Field of Monterey. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War of 1846-1848 (p. 417) list an unspecified early issue. Various incarnations of this map have passed through our hands over the years, most of which exhibit yet more evidence of persistent revision and the likelihood of a plethora of cartobibliographical variances deserving full analysis and study. ($4,000-8,000)

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332. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S. Augustus. Map of Mexico, including Yucatan & Upper California.... Philadelphia, 1847. Lithograph map within decorative border, original hand-coloring with brilliant red outline coloring around Texas (in its Emory conformation with greatly extended Panhandle), border yellow, pink shading to battle plan at top, Mexico in full color, border to border: 81.5 x 59 cm,  folded into original burgundy roan pocket covers, elaborately blind embossed on both covers, lettering in gilt on upper cover: MEXICO, printed leaf affixed to verso of upper cover: Extent and Population of Mexico. Professionally backed on thin, archival paper (a few minor losses and light browning at folds), otherwise very fine in the desirable pocket covers, with original vivid coloring, and much better condition than usually found.

     This is the expanded, most complete, and final edition of a highly popular Mexican-American War map, here with the freshest news then attainable. Mitchell quickly realized the demand for maps detailing the events in this far-off corner of the continent which was conceived as part of the United States’ “Manifest Destiny.” The map, which first came out in 1846 (Streeter 3868), was enlarged in size and detail as the war progressed (see Rumsey 3119, for 1847 “second edition”). Rumsey 4594 (“third edition”). Streeter Sale 3869. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 548. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region 35. The present map was based on Mitchell’s well-known New Map of Texas, Oregon and California with the Regions Adjoining. See Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 134-135; Martin & Martin, pp. 134-135, Color Plate XI (p. 56); Plains & Rockies IV:122b; Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 520, Vol. III, p. 35; Wheat, Maps of the Gold Region 29, pp. xv-xvi. See previous entry for an earlier edition. ($4,000-8,000)

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333. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S[amuel] Augustus. Map of the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas.... Philadelphia, 1835. Copper-engraved map on banknote paper, original vivid full and outline color, 2 decorative borders with 2 miniature engraved vignettes; neat line to neat line: 41 x 52 cm; border to border: 44.2 x 55 cm; overall sheet size: 45.3 x 57 cm; folded into original bright red roan pocket covers, title in gilt on upper cover within decorative frame. Map with a few early reinforcements of folds on verso, four small corrosion spots left of title, and very light offsetting. Pocket covers moderately worn and stained. Overall very good. An unusual Early American artifact documenting Native American history during the drive west fueled by the concept of Manifest Destiny.

     This updated edition of Mitchell’s map was the first to locate Native Americans in detail and name them by tribe. This version added multiple new locations (such as Indian Territory). American Imprints 1835:33091. Karrow 9-0778. Ristow, American Maps & Mapmakers, pp. 303-304. Rumsey 4102 (1836 edition): “Covers also parts of Oklahoma (Indian Territory) and Kansas. Derived from the Finley 1826 American Atlas map and issued originally by Mitchell in 1831, this edition has many changes topographically and a new border. The western part of the old Arkansas Territory is now called ‘Indian Territory Attached to Arkansas.’ There are many new counties in Missouri and Arkansas, and a table of steamboat routes appears in the lower right corner of the map. The detail in the surrounding states is now filled in.” See Rumsey 3884:012 for the evolution of this map. This map was made during the period following the Indian Relocation Act of 1830, the forced removal of many Native American nations from the southeastern part of the United States. The map locates the tribes at a crucial turning point in their history. ($1,500-3,000)

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334. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S[amuel] Augustus. Map of the State of New York Compiled from the Latest Authorities.... [5 inset maps, clockwise from upper left]: [1] Vicinity of the Falls of Niagara. [2] Vicinity of Rochester. [3] Map of the Hudson River from New York to Albany. [4] Vicinity of New York. [5] Vicinity of Albany. [key to transportation symbols at lower right corner above neat line] Explanation.... Philadelphia, 1838. Copper-engraved map on banknote paper, original full and outline color, piano-key border; neat line to neat line: 42.2 x 52.7 cm; overall sheet size: 43.8 x 55 cm; folded into publisher’s original green blind-embossed roan pocket covers, with gilt-lettered leather label. Very good copy with superb color.

     This popular, long-lived map appeared in Mitchell’s first atlas, A New American Atlas (1831; Rumsey 3884.005: “Mitchell purchased the plates for this atlas from Anthony Finley, who used them previously in his 1826 edition of his own atlas of the same title, New American Atlas”). Mitchell omitted the profile of the Erie Canal that appeared on his 1831 first edition and added four inset maps of New York cities. American Imprints 1838:51732. Rumsey 4055 (1832 pocket map). ($300-600)

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335. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S. Augustus. Mexico & Guatemala... [lower center above neat line] Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1846 by H.N. Burroughs...36. [inset map and explanation at lower left] Valley of Mexico [inset map at upper right] Guatemala. Philadelphia, 1846. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate, on bank note paper (showing the Transmississippi West, the Californias, Texas, New Mexico, and areas south to Costa Rica), original full hand coloring of Mexico and insets; border to border: 29.9 x 37.7 cm; folded, as issued, in original pocket covers, 12mo, original dark green roan, original black leather label on upper cover lettered in gilt. Exceedingly rare in pocket map format.

     Early issue (without the battle flags), unrecorded pocket map format. A subsequent issue appeared in a Mitchell atlas. Atlas map issue: Day, Maps of Texas, p. 43. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, p. 311. Rumsey 537.037.Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region #27. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #519 & pp. 34-35. The present map is much more than the title of Mexico & Guatemala would imply. The map is dominated by the Transmississippi West, Texas. and Mexico; Guatemala is relegated to an inset. The map was published just at the time when a large portion of what is shown on the map would be transferred from Mexico to the U.S. Wheat (#519) notes, it is based on Frémont’s important 1845 map. Texas is shown as an independent entity with its western border at the Rio Grande rather than the Nueces, and its Panhandle thrusts somewhat ambiguously all the way into northern Mexico as far as Taos, or possibly beyond Pike’s Peak. Truly, geography was in flux in that pivotal year. The map was published in Mitchell’s New Universal Atlas, the copyright to which he acquired from H.S. Tanner in 1846; the number “36” occurs on both the present pocket map and the atlas version. In Mitchell’s atlas form, the map locates the early battles of the Mexican-American War from Palo Alto to Buena Vista. However, the present pocket map shows none of those battles, thus indicating its preliminary nature as a map issued before the conflict truly heated up. ($750-1,500)

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336. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S. Augustus. Mitchell’s New National Map, Exhibiting the United States with the North American British Provinces, Sandwich Islands, Mexico and Central America, together with Cuba and other West India Islands... 1860... [population table below lower border] Population of Each County... [scenes, tables, and inset maps, clockwise from top right] Landing of the Pilgrims...; American Steamship Crossing the Atlantic; Columbus Ship Discovery of America Oct. 12th 1492; Clipper Ship Flying Cloud; Counties and County Towns in Canada... [double hemisphere map] Map of the World on the Globular Projection... [larger map] Map of the World on the Mercator Projection... [2 tables in 6 columns] Distance Tables Land Routes… Water Routes… Length of Rivers… Height of Mountains... Area in Square Miles and Population [inset map] Map of the Sandwich Islands... Philadelphia, 1860. Engraved wall map on four joined sheets, original hand coloring, ornate botanical border; border to border: 59.25 x 59.75 inches cm; top border to lower line of population table at bottom: 64 x 62 inches; overall sheet size: 64 x 65 inches. Mounted on new archival cloth and selvage, professionally washed, stabilized, and varnish removed. Fine condition with excellent color. This type of map normally shows up in a state of disarray, but the professional restoration has already been done.

     The map first came out in 1856. Various changes can be noted on the present map, such as the more bold marking of the Gadsden Purchase (labelled as “Arizona” which is shown as a thin wedge south of New Mexico), the states and territories are more boldly colored, etc. The emphasis is on the recently acquired Western territories, such as the proposed territories of Colona and Shoshone. Rumsey 564 (1860 edition but variant copyright notice). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #896n, Vol. IV, p. 49n: “The...’New National Map’ that S. Augustus Mitchell published in 1856 was an achievement.... Mitchell’s immense map was doubtless popular in many school rooms.” ($1,500-3,000)

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337. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S. Augustus & J.H. Young. Mitchell’s Travellers Guide through the United States. A Map of the Roads, Distances, Steam Boat & Canal Routes &c.... [9 inset maps of cities][above insets at lower margin] Engraved on Steel by J.H. Young & D. Haines. Philadelphia, 1832. Steel-engraved map on banknote paper, showing the United States west to eastern Mexico (i.e. Texas) and Missouri Territory, original bright outline coloring of states, borders with original pink and yellow coloring; border to border: 42.2 x 54.7 cm; overall sheet size: 44.5 x 56.1 cm, folded into original straight-grain red sheep pocket covers, decorative gilt stamping and lettering in gilt on upper cover (accompanied by folio broadside letterpress chart, same size as map folded into covers). Map fine, excellent color. Pocket covers: rubbed, otherwise very good. These little pocket road maps are difficult to find in collector’s condition because they were subject to hard use by their purchasers, who carried them on their travels.

     First edition of the foundation map for road maps of the United States, and one of the first American maps to be steel engraved. American Imprints 1832:13796. Clark, Old South, III:74n. Graff 4790n. Howes M690n. Phillips, America, p. 886. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, pp. 303-313. Rumsey 2088. Sabin 49717n. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 255: “Internal improvements coupled with the great Irish and German migrations beginning in 1827 led to the production of traveler’s guides that depicted roads and their distances, steamboat and canal routes, and lengths of principal railroads.... In 1832 Samuel Augustus Mitchell first issued his ‘Traveller’s Guide through the United States’ and complemented it two years later with ‘Tourist Pocket Maps’ of the different states. These early works and their multitudinous progeny over the next fifty years laid the foundation for the road maps of today.” Thomson, Check List of Publications on American Railroads 638. ($1,000-2,000)

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338. [MAP]. MOLL, Herman. A Map of the West-Indies or the Islands of America in the North Sea; with ye adjacent Countries; explaning [sic] what belongs to Spain, England, France, Holland &c. also ye Trade Winds, and ye several Tracts made by ye Galeons and Flota from place to place; [cartouche above title] To Wil. Paterson Esq; This Map of the West-Indies &c is most Humbly Dedicated by Her. Moll Geographer; [inset maps at top right, clockwise]: [1] La Vera Cruz; [2] Cuba Islan [sic]; [3] The Bay of Porto Bella; [4] A Draught of ye City of Cartagena its Harbour & Forts; [5] A Draught of St. Agustin and its Harbour; [key within border above bird’s-eye view] Explanation [bird’s-eye view at lower left] The City of Mexico in New Spain. [London, ca. 1708-1715]. Copper-engraved map on two joined heavy sheets of laid paper with full original color (showing the West Indies, Eastern Mexico, South Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Central America, part of northern South America); neat line to neat line: 59 x 102 cm, overall sheet size: 65 x 107 cm . Exceptionally fine, strong impression (seldom encountered thus). Separately printed and issued.

     First edition? Jackson, Flags along the Coast, pp. 54-55 (see also footnotes 126 & 158, where he suggests a date of 1715). The map is dated 1709-1720; there is no evidence the map was ever in an atlas. The bird’s-eye view of Mexico at lower left was reproduced from an important view originally painted by Trasmonte and later published by Ogilby, Montanus, and others. See Dennis Reinhartz, “Herman Moll, Geographer: An Early Eighteenth-Century European View of the American Southwest,” in Reinhartz & Colley, The Mapping of the American Southwest, p.36 & illustrated at figure 2 (uncolored). This is a particularly beautiful example in original full color of an interesting map for our region. Texas is not named, but the region is labeled Quelameloueches (Comanche Indians) and is a Country full of Beeves. ($2,000-4,000)

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339. [MAP]. MONROCQ FRÈRES. Mapa de la Península de Yucatan Comprendiendo los estados de Yucatan y Campeche y Territorio Quintana-Roo 1907 Nueva Edicion Cervera [lower right below neat line] Imp. Monrocq, 3, Rue Suger, Paris. Paris: Cervera, 1907. Large photolithograph map surrounded by portraits of President Porfirio Díaz and Minister of Development Olegario Molina (former Governor of Yucatán), seal of Mexico, and 12 vignettes all printed after photographs by Guerra or Canton (architecture, archaeological ruins, and local scenes), map with outline color, portraits in black and white, vignettes in sepia tone; overall sheet size: 100 x 130 cm. Creased where formerly folded, a few short fold splits (one minor loss), a few small light stains in left and right blank margins, overall very good with fresh color. OCLC, Antochiw, and other standard sources do not locate or list this map.

     This charming map illustrated with photolithograph vignettes is yet another example of the type of progress that was to be shown under Porfirio Díaz’s administration. Why it was printed in Paris is unknown. However, the firm of Monrocq was known for its photolithographs, including a 1908 print of dueling aviators Wilbur Wright and Alberto Santos-Dumont. The Monrocq firm was a pioneer in photolithography, with prints as early as 1850. ($400-800)

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340. [MAP]. MORTIER, Pierre. [Title in decorative cartouche at upper right] Archipelague du Mexique ou sont les Isles de Cuba, Espagnole, Iamaïque... [title above top border] Teâtre de la Guerre en Amerique telle qu’elle est à present possedée par les Espagnols, Anglois, François, et Hollandois... [inset map above cartouche, untitled map of the coast of Veracruz with the island of San Juan de Ulúa] [untitled mountain and sea scene at lower left, naval battle, Natives and Europeans in red coats examining a treasure chest on the beach]. Amsterdam, [ca. 1703?]. Copper-engraved map on two separate sheets, showing the Gulf of Mexico, Florida north to “Caroline Angloise,” Central America, Cuba, West Indies Pacific Coast from south of Michoacan to Panama, contemporary color (full in cartouche and title; outline on regions and countries); each sheet measures neat line to neat line: 57.5 x 51 cm; overall sheet size: 64 x 54 cm; overall sheet size for the 2 maps together: 64 x 108 cm. Very fine.

     First edition. Lowery 257. Phillips, Atlases 2823. Subsequent editions by Covens and Mortier added insets of Veracruz, Havanna, and Bay of Porto Bello left of the cartouche. The region of South Texas is labelled “Louisiana aux Francois” with the Mississippi river flowing through its center to the Gulf of Mexico. Along Rio Bravo is the notation: “Le Peuple des Environs de Cette River est tousjours en Guerre avec los Espagnols.” This map represents the overseas conflicts that spilled out the War of the Spanish Secession (1701-1714), which went on for years in both Europe and the Americas as European powers jockied for power in various countries and areas. ($1,000-2,000)

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341. [MAP]. NEW ORLEANS INDUSTRIAL AND COTTON CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION. HANSELL, F[rederick] F. (publisher). Exposition Map of the City of New Orleans Published by F.F. Hansell.... Plan of New Orleans with 8 views of Exposition architecture plus publisher Hansell’s building, clockwise from upper left: [1] Perspective View of the Buildings and Grounds from the North East [large bird’s-eye view of the exhibition grounds]; [2] United States and State Exhibits 885 x 565 Feet; [3] The Main Building---1378 x 905 Feet; [4] Horticultural Hall, 600 x 184 Feet; [5] Art Gallery---300 x 100 Feet; [6] Factories and Mills 350 x 120 Feet; [7] Mexican Headquarters; [8] Mexican Exhibit; [9] F.F. Hansell Law Bookseller... [publisher’s impressive multi-story building]. New Orleans: F.F. Hansell, n.d. [1884-1885, when the publisher was at this address]. Lithograph street map printed on cotton, showing New Orleans between Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, including rail and ferry routes, canals, and levees; neat line to neat line: 63.5 x 67.5 cm; overall sheet size: 70 x 73 cm. Creased where formerly folded, edges very lightly frayed, a few areas with minor light stains (mostly not affecting image). Overall fine for this exceedingly rare piece, highly unusual for being appropriately printed on cotton.

     First edition, undesignated variation. OCLC records no copies of this map but notes two copies of a reduced facsimile printed in 1976. Not listed on OCLC are the copies owned by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Mississippi Department of Archives and History. We find no sales records for our map. There are at least two other versions of this map with basic similarities but variations of individual elements, particularly the vignettes (see our Auction 20, Lot 130, and Rumsey 5324). The International Centennial was held to publicize the cotton industry and commemorate the centennial of the first shipment of cotton (six bags, or about a bale) from the United States (Charleston, South Carolina) to a foreign port (England). ($2,000-4,000)

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342. [MAP]. [NEW YORK CITY: BROADWAY]. WINDWART, H[einrich]. Map of Property Situated West of Broadway and Fourth Ave. between Fourth & Thirthieth [sic] Streets in Two Parts. Second or Northern Part from Fifteenth to Thirtieth Streets...City of New York... [lower left, printer’s device] Joseph Laing Lithographer... [above neat line at lower left] Drawn by A. Dulon City Surveyor. New York, n.d. [187-? (per New York Public Library)]. Lithograph cadastral map mounted on original cartographical linen, remains of original blue cloth selvages, original pastel coloring with estate of John Horn outlined in original rose; neat line to neat line: 97.2 x 60.2 cm. Horizontal crease with slight split (no losses), selvage chipped and mostly wanting, overall mild age toning, and a few very minor stains. Overall very good. OCLC locates one copy (NYPL).

     First edition. At the time of this map, the area of Union Square, Madison Square, and Broadway Street was the heart of American theatre. This large-scale finely lithographed map with restrained original color was used in litigation regarding the estate of John Horn on the west side of Broadway. The map shows the area north to south from 29th Street to 15th Street, and east to west from 6th Avenue to Broadway (“Formerly Bloomingdale Road”). Landmarks include parts of Union Square and Madison Square at right. Among the property owners is John Jacob Astor, grand patron of the arts and the first multi-millionaire in the United States, who made a fortune in the fur and opium trade, and went on to the more lucrative game of New York City real estate. ($750-$1,000)

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343. [MAP]. NEWBERY, F[rederick] T[homas]. New and Improved Street Map of the City of San Francisco.... N.p., 1877. Mixed media (map proper chromolithograph; ornate border, cartouche, and title steel engraved); coloring in green, yellow, pink, green, and blue; red lines indicating transportation routes; relief shown by colored contour lines; 13 concentric circles radiating from the center of downtown at Lotta’s Fountain; border to border: 52.5 x 64.4 cm. Professionally stabilized and backed (consolidating splits at some folds; a few minor losses); upper left corner missing (affecting only the border); mild toning and a few light brown spots (mostly confined to left and right margins). Overall a very good copy of a rare map.

     First edition. The map appeared the same year in larger format, with a longer title, the cartographer’s name spelled out rather than “F.T.” etc. For the large format version, see Phillips, America, p. 777, and the 1884 Catalogue of the California State Library. The present map accompanied Roman’s Tourist and Business Directory of San Francisco... (San Francisco, 1878). We locate no auction records of either the map or the guide book. OCLC lists just one record for the guide book, the Wright Howes copy in the Graff Collection at the Newberry Library. The directory is not in Quebedeaux.      This map is distinctively different from other nineteenth-century maps of San Francisco preceding and following it. Civil engineer-surveyor-cartographer Frederick Thomas Newbery took a scientific approach. What makes the map different is not merely its extreme detail, but also features such as the delineation of grades and contour using chromolithography. Newbery (1840-after 1916) was born in New South Wales to British parents and emigrated to San Francisco ca. 1869. He is listed as a licensed surveyor in official state of California publications up to 1916. He was actively engaged in land speculation, surveying, mining, and railroad ventures. ($2,500-5,000)

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344. [MAP]. NICOLOSI, Giovanni Battista. Mexicvm in hac forma in lucem edebat Ioannes Baptista Nicolosivs S.T.D. [Rome, 1660]. Copper-engraved map on laid paper with anchor watermark marked with initials “ML,” on a stereographic equatorial projection of North America on four separate sheets numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4, each measuring approximately 42 x 53.5 cm; overall, map assembles to approximately 80.5 x 101 cm. Some mild browning, otherwise very fine, large-margined copy.

     First state, Rio Grande labelled as “R. Escondido,” no mention of Drake’s landing in California, Lake Ontario unshaded and unnamed, etc. Burden 355 (State 1): Leighly, California as an Island 38. Lowery 151a. McLaughlin, California as an Island 23 (State 1). Phillips, Atlases 467 & 482. Taliaferro, pp. 9 & 27: “It is on G.B. Nicolosi’s map of North America, 1660, that the full course of the [Rio Grande] river is first identifiable on a printed map.” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast #383 (Vol. 2, p. 386): “Sanson 1652 type.” Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #53 & Vol. I, p. 41: “This map combined—even more than did those of Sanson—the old and the new, the myths of the earlier cartographers and the slowly emerging knowledge from on-the-spot experience.... Nicolosi still showed California as a great island.... If Nicolosi thus let the older geography overmaster him, it is nevertheless true that his map disclosed two important elements of progress. Foremost among these is his careful rendering of the R. del Nort [Rio Grande].... From this it might appear that this cartographer may have had at his disposal a fairly accurate Spanish map.... Nicolosi’s second contribution was the use of actual place names.” ($4,000-8,000)

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345. [MAP]. NUÑEZ DE HARO Y PERALTA, Alonso (Archbiship) & Baltasar de Andrade (cartographer). Manuscript map: “Mapa de las villas, poblados y lugares que comprende el Arzobispado; ansi como los de yndios y mestizos. Hecho por mandato del Exmo. Señor Don Alonso Nuñez de Haro y Peralta: Arzobispo de Mexico y Virrey de Nueba España para el mejor conocimiento de los mismos lo dibuxo Baltasar de Andrade cura Ro. del Sa. de la S.I.C. en Mexico. Año de 1787.” [right side, image of the Virgin of Guadalupe in frame with trailing banner] “Nuestra Sa. de Guadalupe de Mexico. A devocion de No. Senora de Guadalupe Reina de Cielos Tierra Amen.” [lower left, portrait of Archbishop Nuñez] “Exmo. Sr. Don Alonso Nuñez de Haro y Peralta. Arzobispo de Mexico y Virrey de Nueva España—1787.” Ink and watercolor on heavy wove paper, showing Mexico City and surrounding area, emphasizing churches, roads, and physical landscape features, especially mountains and the lakes around Mexico City. Overall sheet size: 29.5 x 47.5 cm. Except for some marginal fraying at upper right and left (barely touching image of Virgin) and some rubbing and fading, fine.

     Bird’s-eye view map of the Valley of Mexico and surrounding area, very nicely executed, with churches in the bishopric colored red, the city of Mexico shown in blocks colored red, and Laguna de Texcoco and Laguna de Chalco outlined in blue. Lombardo, Atlas geográfico de la ciudad de México, Vol. I, pp. 50-51. An extremely detailed and beautiful map showing the religious organization of the area with an elegant depiction of the Virgin of Guadalupe. ($4,000-8,000)

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346. [MAP]. [ORD, Edward Otho Cresap]. Topographical Sketch of the Gold & Quicksilver District of California July 25th., 1848. E.O.C.O. Lt. U.S.A.... [Washington, 1848]. Lithograph map; neat line to neat line: 54.1 x 39 cm; overall sheet size: 58 x 43 cm. Top blank margin lightly browned, several edge chips (one with loss at left just touching border), a few fold splits (some with very minor losses), creased where originally folded, overall a good copy.

     First edition (the map appeared in the government document, President’s [Polk’s] Message to the Congress of December 5, 1848 (30th Congress, 2nd Session, House Executive Document No. 1). This epochal map made several references to specific rivers in which gold had been found; even the “Low Clay Hills and Gravel Slate Sub Soil” contained gold. The implication seems to be that gold can basically be picked up off the ground at no effort, no doubt motivating thousands to go see the Elephant. California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present #29. Cowan, p. 426. Hayes, Historical Atlas of California, Map 179, p. 88. Howes P446. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, pp. 278-279. Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 30.Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 565 & Vol. III, p. 52: “Depicts almost the whole of the Central Valley in commendable detail, naming nearly all the streams, and denoting those on which gold had been found ‘as far as examined.’“ Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region 54 & pp. xxiii: “Most important of all the maps of 1848...the first which pretended to reflect actual conditions at the mines and must therefore be held to be of paramount importance in any cartographical consideration of the gold rush.” ($400-800)

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347. [MAP]. [ORTELIUS, Abraham]. Three maps on one sheet: [Left] MÉNDEZ, Diego de. Pervviae avriferæ regionis typvs. Didaco Mendezio auctore;[upper right] CHAVES, Gerónimo de. La Florida. Auctore Hieron Chiaues; [lower right] Gvastecan Reg. Overall sheet size: 47 x 57.7 cm. [Antwerp: Christopher Plantin, 1592]. Copper-engraved map with full original color, decorative cartouches, fine italic calligraphy, symbolic ornaments, ships, and stipple engraved seas. Fine copy, beautifully colored, generous margins.

     Ortelius included this map in his atlas beginning in 1584. The present map appeared in Additamentus III to a 1592 edition of Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, the first modern atlas of the world (Phillips, Atlases 392). Van den Broecke, Ortelius Atlas Maps, State 15a.1 (Peru); 15b.1 (La Florida); 15c.1 (Guastecan), horizontal hachuring along coast lines measure 1.5 cm; Text 1592L9 (signature 9, Latin text, last line with “seruentum”).Burden, The Mapping of America 57, pp. 71-73. “One of the half-dozen most important mother maps of southeastern North America. This map probably had more influence than any other map in establishing the subsequent conception of Florida as including that part of the present U.S. from the peninsula of Florida northward to about 40° north latitude and westward to or beyond the Mississippi.” Martin & Martin, pp. 18 & 75n: “Privy to all of the official reports of the Spanish explorers, Chaves’ map recorded the discoveries of Cabeza de Vaca, de Soto, and Moscoso. One of the earliest printed maps of the territory based on actual observations.” TCU, Going to Texas: Five Centuries of Texas Maps, Plate 2, p. 9. Van der Krogt, Koeman’s Atlantes Neerlandici, Vol. IIIA, 31:041 (9)9. Together, the three maps show the most significant parts of the New World in the last decades of the sixteenth century and the first half of the seventeenth century. ($1,000-2,000)

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348. [MAP]. [OTTENS, Reinier & Josua]. Two untitled sheets from Ottens’ six-sheet map: Grand Théâtre de la Guerre en Amérique suivant les plus nouvelles observations des Espagnols, Anglois, François & Hollandois: [Sheet 4]: Gulf of Mexico showing entire Texas coast, and extending east to St. Joseph Bay in Florida, and south to Cozumel; neat line to neat line: 44.5 x 55.3 cm, overall sheet size, 53.2 x 46 cm; [Sheet 5]: Southern Mexico to south of Nicaragua; neat line to neat line: 41.3 x 56 cm, overall sheet size: 46.4 x 61.6 cm; two insets (Acapulco and Veracruz). [Amsterdam, 1740-1741]. 2 copper-engraved maps with original outline and wash color. Sheet 4 lightly browned, else fine. Sheet 5 very fine. It is very difficult to find all sheets together, and since some of the sheets are untitled (as here), likely they sifted through the sands of time unrecognized.

     Ottens’ firm began selling the first sheets of Grand Théâtre de la Guerre en Amérique in October 1740. Customers purchased them as they came off the press, and the final sheets were available in June 1741. Added to that complexity is the fact that copies of Ottens’ atlas, which was always made up, vary as to the presence and number of these maps, since clients had to option of buying any number of them they wished. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, III, pp. 85-93: “The Ottens firm greatest fame comes from the voluminous atlases assembled to order.” Lowery 356 (Gulf of Mexico only). Phillips Atlases 3495:117-118. The historical impetus for Ottens’ Grand Théâtre de la Guerre en Amérique mapwas the spillover from the war of Austrian secession and Jenkins’ Ear, which spread to the Caribbean as various national interests competed in that region. Sheet 4 is especially important for its depiction of Texas, a generally neglected region in cartography before the end of the century. Few maps of the period show the Texas coast on such a large scale, or in such detail. Jack Jackson in Flags along the Coast illustrates the Texas map (Plate 44), and characterizes the Ottens production as “magnificent” (p. 125). ($1,500-3,000)

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349. [MAP]. OTTENS, R. & J. Novæ Hispaniæ, Chili, Peruviæ, et Guatimalæ Littoræ.... [Amsterdam: R. & J. Ottens, 1745]. Copper-engraved sea chart oriented with north to the left, showing the Pacific Ocean from Jalisco, Mexico, to Chili (including Yucatan, Central America, the Western Caribbean and the Galapagos), on laid paper, with contemporary color (outline, highlights on ships, cartouche full), rhumb lines, 2 compass roses, Spanish galleons at sea, and elaborate cartouche including Europeans with flag, cross, globe, putti riding a sea monster, and much more; neat line to neat line: 48.5 x 56 cm; overall sheet size 51.5 x 60 cm. Very fine, superb color, very beautiful.

     Updated and corrected sea chart by Ottens, which appearedin Atlas van Zeevart en Koophandel door de Geheele Wereldt (Amsterdam, 1745). Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, IV, p. 435, Ren 3, #27: “This edition...was published by R. en I. Ottens after a careful correction of the original plates obtained from Louis Renard. The Ottens firm had previously published a French version of the Atlas (1739) without altering the plates. In this edition...the name of Louis Renard was effaced from the plates and replaced by the names of Reinier and Iosua Ottens. Apart from that, nearly all the plates were corrected by adding place names, altering coast lines, shoals and soundings.” Kapp, Central America 33. One of the more unusual delineations of Yucatan (not in Antochiw). The Gulf of Mexico is shown from about Tampico. ($200-400)

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350. [MAP]. PECK, John Mason (compiler), John Messinger (surveyor), and A.J. Mathewson (surveyor). Colton’s Sectional Map of the State of Illinois. Compiled from the United States Surveys...Published by G.W. and C.B. Colton & Co. [inset maps of Chicago and St. Louis].New York, 1869. Lithograph map on banknote paper with original full color by county, rose and green outline color, ornate border; border to border: 105 x 71.2 cm; overall sheet size: 106 x 72 cm; folded into publishers’ original brown cloth pocket covers. Other than a few clean splits with no losses, the map is very fine and fresh. Spectacular with its intense color and grand size.

     Later edition of a map that first appeared in 1836, substantially revised in 1860, followed by additional editions to the 1870s, with constant revisions to update growth and development of the state. Phillips, America, p. 329 (1870 edition). Rumsey 4925 (1867 edition). For more on the genesis and makers of this long-lived map, see John V. Bergen (“Maps and Their Makers in Early Illinois: The Burr Map and the Peck-Messinger Map” in Western Regional Illinois Studies, Vol. X, No. 1, Spring 1987, pp. 5-32). (500-1,000)

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351. [MAP]. PELTON, C[ale]. [Title within pictorial cartouche showing images of Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, a Native American, and Columbus, American symbolism (eagle, shield, Liberty, etc.), three scenes: sawmill or mining scene, Capital Building, and one other imposing government structure] Pelton’s Outline Map of the United States, British Provinces, Mexico, Central America and the West India Islands, Constructed and Drawn from the most recent authorities by W. Williams, Philadelphia. Published by Sower & Barnes, Upper 84 Nth. Third St. Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1853...Lith. by Wagner & Mc. Guigan...Philadelphia. [inset at upper right] Map of the New-England States... [inset at lower left] Map of the Lesser Antilles. [inset key showing population] Classification of Towns and Cities. Philadelphia, 1853. Lithograph wall map within ornamental border, map divided into 86 numbered grids,, original bright color (outline and full), original varnish, on original wooden rollers; 197 x 212 cm; 77-1/2 x 83-7/8 inches. Minor selvedge separation and minor chipping at top (sometimes with slight loss), top edge separating from roller, otherwise fine, varnish uncracked and not darkened. Accompanied by a well-used copy of the publisher’s 1851 Key to Pelton’s New and Improved Series of Outline Maps (the text was partially in verse and meant to be sung).

     The map was intended for pedagogical purposes, since it is almost totally devoid of names. The teacher used a pointer asking children to name the symbol and tell where it was located. The text was in verse and meant to be sung. The Western United States is generally still divided into territories except for California. Most of the boundaries in the West are set, though the Idaho-Montana border is incorrect and Wyoming has no border with Dakota. ($1,000-2,000)

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352. [MAP]. PERRINE, Charles O. Perrine’s New Topographical War Map of the Southern States.... [Indianapolis], 1863. Lithograph map with original outline color, major battle sites indicated in red, inset map of southern Florida (Southern Part of Florida); neat line to neat line: 71 x 93 cm; overall sheet size: 76 x 98 cm, folded into publisher’s orange printed boards, with text: A Concise History of the War Designed to Accompany Perrine’s New War Map of the Southern States.... [iii-v] vi-x, [11] 12-117, i-xi pp. Map: Moderate browning and splits at some folds (no losses), otherwise fine. Covers & text: Upper cover and text separated from map and with light cover wear, overall very good considering the fragile format.

     This popular map and field guide to diurnal happenings in the Civil War were first published in 1862 (Rumsey 5412), with updated editions following in 1863, 1864 (Rumsey 706), and 1865, sometimes with more than one edition per year, and ever-enlarging text and revised map to reflect emerging war news. Nevins, Civil War Books II, p. 5 (with date 1865). Sabin 61015. Stephenson 43.6. ($100-200)

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353. [MAP]. PHELPS, Humphrey. Map of the State of New York, with the Latest Improvements... [list of entrepreneurs from whom the map could be purchased] Sold by W. Hooker... [below lower border at center (imprint partially trimmed away)] [New-York: Published] By Humphrey Phelps, 1831 [upper right, profile of Champlain Canal] Profile of the Northern Canal. [lower left, profile of Erie Canal] Profile of the Western Canal. [inset tables and text providing information on distances and routes, colleges in the state, population, and newspapers published in state]. New York, 1831. Copper-engraved map on banknote paper, original outline color; border to border: 41 x 49.7 cm, folded into publisher’s original pocket covers, terracotta boards lettered in gilt on upper cover. Trimmed close to borders, with loss of part of the imprint below lower border. This seems to be a common occurrence with the various editions of Phelps’ New York state map. Pocket covers: Rubbed and worn. Recent gilt-lined wood frame and under glass.

     This map has a lengthy history of publication before and after this 1831 edition, going back to Finley, Hooker, and perhaps others. The plate was used by S. Augustus Mitchell as late as 1850. Apparently Phelps used or copied a plate originated created by or for Anthony Finley (Rumsey 2587) and subsequently by William Hooker (NYPL). Phelps in turn used Hooker’s map, with some revisions. A good overview of the matter is presented by David Yehling Allen,“Mapping an Expanding Empire State, 1790-1830,” Chapter 9 in The Mapping of New York State: A Study in the History of Cartography http://www.dyasites.com/maps/nysbook/Title.htm: “Most of these maps are not especially interesting or innovative, and they often show a monotonous resemblance to each other. They are significant primarily as an indication that a sizable market was developing for inexpensive maps—whose purchasers included students, tourists, and business travelers. And they show that the American map publishing industry was becoming sufficiently robust to meet that demand.” ($600-900)

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354. [MAP]. POPPLE, Henry. A Map of the British Empire in America with the French and Spanish Settlements Adjacent Thereto. London, [1733 or after?]. 3 uncolored, untitled individual copper-engraved map sheets. (3 sheets of 20). Sheet 9 (northern New Mexico to Ohio river and south to northern Mexico from St. Lorenzo in Chihuahua and Santa Fe area to Pensacola, including all but the far southern tip of Texas), Sheet 13 (the Borderlands from St. Felipe in Chihuahua, to Acapulco and the Bay of Honduras, including South Texas and the lower Rio Grande), and Sheet 17 (southeast San Salvador to south of Granada, Nicaragua, including large, pictorial cartouche, in the foreground of the cartouche showing Native Americans, flora and fauna, head of a European bearded man with an arrow shot in his forehead, open treasure chest, etc.; background shows Europeans busily engaged in various activities and offshore are ships at sea). Overall size of the three: Approximately 162 x 72 cm; about 5 feet x 28.5 inches. Other than light marginal chipping and a few mainly marginal stains, fine.

     There were several issues of Popple’s great map beginning in 1733, “the first large-scale printed map of North America” (Schwartz & Ehrenberg, p. 151 & Plate 90; see also Babinski’s study on Popple). Graff 3322. Howes P481. Lowery 338. Phillips, America 569. Rumsey 2874.002 (entire 1733 map); Rumsey 2874.011 (Sheet 9); Rumsey 2874.015 (Sheet 13); Rumsey 2874.019 (Sheet 17). Sabin 64140. Streeter Sale 676: “The best map of North America issued to the time of its publication.” Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library:“Sheets 9 and 13 show the Gulf coast from Pensacola west to the Spanish settlements on the upper Rio Grande and inland to the southern parallel of Kansas.” The sheets present here are the most desirable ones for collections on Mexico and Texas. The three maps framed together would be quite handsome, especially with the large, fine cartouche and its implications. ($3,000-6,000)

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355. [MAP]. RADEFELD, [C.C.F.]. Texas Nach den besten Quellen.... Hildburghausen, 1846. Engraved map of Texas and most of the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico, neat line to neat line: 29.3 x 35.1 cm, original outline color. Upper right corner torn with loss of small triangular piece at top neat line (approximately 1.5 cm), a few light creases. A very good copy.

     This appears to be the earliest version of this map before any changes or additions of names and geographical corrections were made to the original engraving following the Mexican-American War. See full description for complete details. Our copy is like the one at the Library of Congress. See Day (p. 53), Phillips, America, p. 844; and Rumsey 4807.165. It is not surprising to find so much variation across versions of this beautiful and precisely engraved German map of Texas. The Meyer firm paid very close attention to the advancing knowledge of geography and political changes resulting in new boundaries when they published their maps. Meyer referred to their methodology with atlases as “growing atlases.” The appearance in Germany in 1846 of a map emphasizing Texas is not unexpected, given the annexation of Texas to the United States, activities of the Verein zum Schutze deutscher Einwanderer in Texas, and elevated interest in Texas as a field of emigration among many Germans. ($800-1,400)

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356. [MAP]. RANSOM, Leander & A.J. Doolittle (cartographers & surveyors); Warren Holt (publisher); Louis Nagel (lithographer). New Map of the State of California and Nevada Territory.... San Francisco, 1863. Lithograph map on banknote paper, original full color, border to border: 66 x 54.6 cm; overall sheet size: 68.5 x 57 cm; folded into original red cloth pocket covers; 4 pp. of text (Table of Distances to various mines). Professionally conserved with some folds and one short tear repaired (very minor losses), otherwise the map is very fine with vivid original coloring.  Front pocket cover abraded and lightly stained, front  endpaper lightly foxed, neatly rehinged. Overall a superb copy, with contemporary goldenrod label of bookseller George H. Bell, 611 Montgomery, San Francisco.

     This map rapidly went through several editions from 1862 to 1863, reflecting the exponential growth, development, and high interest in minerals in the California-Nevada region in the 1860s. Battles with Native Americans are indicated, marking the progress of Anglo settlement and conquest in the region. Each edition documents the area’s rapid expansion, and each is in itself valuable for the time period it shows. The life of the map extended to as late as 1881, but the stone on which this map was printed was in use only in 1862 and 1863. The present map is an unrecorded, intermediate issue between Wheat (Transmississippi West) 1070 and 1071. ($6,000-12,000)

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357. [MAP]. RICHARDSON, Willard & Charles Desilver (publishers) & Heinrich Wickeland (surveyor/engineer). Richardson’s New Map of the State of Texas.... Philadelphia, 1861. Lithograph map with original full coloring. Border to border: 63 x 82 cm; neat line to neat line: 58.2 x 77.5 cm. Very good copy, professionally washed and stabilized. Excellent color.

     This map was an optional purchase with Richardson’s Texas Almanac for 1861 (for more on Texas almanacs and their maps, see Basic Texas Books 172). Phillips, America, p. 846. Winkler 1373x (Vol. I, pp. 271-272). Cf. Winkler 1373 (citing the almanac) who notes that the publishers had the map printed in the North because it could not be printed in Texas. Rumsey (5178): “An exceptionally attractive map of Texas on the eve of the Civil War.” ($2,000-4,000)

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358. [MAP]. ROBERTSON, James. To the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, this Map of the Island of Jamaica, constructed from actual surveys, under the authority of the Hon. House of Assembly; by whom it hath been examined, and unanimously approved; is, with His Gracious Permission, most humbly inscribed by His Majesty’s most dutiful, and loyal subject and servant, James Robertson, A.M. 1804. London, Published Nov. 1 1804 by James Robertson A.M. late of Jamaica. Engraved by S.J. Neele, No. 352 Strand, London.... London, 1804. Engraved map of Jamaica on 24 sheets, sectioned and mounted on modern archival paper, original color (outline and wash) on eastern part of island; neat line to neat line: 90.1 x 188.7 cm; overall sheet size: 90.2 x 190.2 cm. (about 3 feet by 6-1/4 feet). Several vertical creases with some separation from backing and very minor losses and a few minor surfaces losses; overall age-toning; moderate spotting at lower center. Overall a very good copy of a rare survival. Three copies located by OCLC.

     First edition. Cundall, “A Chronological List of the Maps of Jamaica in the Library Institute of Jamaica” #41. An exceedingly large-scale, detailed map of Jamaica showing physical features, such as mountains, streams, and bodies of water, locations of towns and settlements, roads, mills, plantations, harbors, and offshore islands. One of Robertson’s important contributions was that he delineated the new county and parish boundaries that had been established a few years earlier. This map was used to help settle land litigation. It is among the early topographic maps to show an entire country (the earliest being the French Carte géométrique de la France). Scotsman James Robertson of Shetland (ca. 1756-1841) was Jamaica’s first real surveyor in the sense that he worked as a cartographer rather than a land surveyor. He came to Jamaica around 1778 on a commission to survey the entire island and the three counties and the entire island. He is considered the father of modern Jamaican cartography. This grandiose map has been praised since its publication. ($1,500-3,000)

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359. [MAP]. ROCK MAP COMPANY. Map of Harris Co. Texas. Rock Map Co. Houston, [pre-1911]. Lithograph map of Harris County showing existent and proposed railroads, county and shell roads, communities, and land abstracts; overall sheet size: 40.5 x 52 cm. Creased where folded, small splits at a few folds (no losses), light chipping to right blank margin, contemporary pencil notations on verso. Very good overall.

     The Houston Galveston Interurban line is indicated as a proposed rail line on the map. It was in existence from 1911 to 1936. Downtown Houston is shown as a square with five circles extending outward toward adjacent counties. The circles indicate distances from the courthouse in Houston with five, ten, fifteen, twenty, and thirty miles radii. Railroads and major roads fan out from downtown Houston. Names of original grantees are indicated, including founders and early residents, such as Samuel May Williams, William P. Harris, George B. McKinstry, Jno. M. Swisher. Houston Heights is laid out. San Jacinto and Trinity bays are at lower left. The Rock Map Company is best known for its Texas oil and gas maps, along with Texas county maps. ($100-200)

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360. [MAP]. ROESSLER, A. R. New Map of the State of Texas Prepared and Published for Albert Hanford’s Texas State Register for 1876 by A.R. Roessler, Civil and Mining Engineer 52 Beekman St. New York [below neat line lower left] Ed. W. Welcke & Bro. Photo-Lithographers, 176 Williams St. N.Y. [below neat line lower right] Entered According to Act of Congress in the Year 1875 by A.R. Roessler in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington [inset table of stations at lower left] Name of Station... [key at lower left with symbols for various minerals] Explanations... [inset colored map below left] Map of the Vicinity of Galveston City. New York, 1875. Lithograph map on banknote paper, full original color, neat line to neat line: 46.2 x 49.5 cm; overall sheet size 50.3 x 55.1 cm; accompanied by a copy of the book in which it appeared: Albert Hanford’s Texas State Register for 1876, and until July Fourth, The One Hundredth of the Independence of the United States. Galveston: Published by A. Hanford, 1876. [1-2] 3-144. [2] pp., title with engraved illustration (State House, Austin), text illustrations (mostly in ads). 12mo (19.4 x 12 cm), original pictorial wrappers, stitched. Map very fine. Fragile wraps lightly chipped and with marginal foxing, interior very good.

     First edition, first issue of Roessler’s small-format Texas map (Taliaferro 352A); this issue was reworked by Roessler in 1877 for the 1878 Burke’s Texas Almanac (Taliaferro 352B). The present issue is distinguished by the inset map of Galveston, which was replaced with an illustration of the State House in Burke’s Texas Almanac. Roessler’s large-format Texas map came out in 1874 (Taliaferro 349: “Roessler’s maps are the only printed maps that preserve the results of the Shumard survey, the state’s first geological and agricultural survey”). Raines, p. 107. Winkler 3895. This guide, which stimulated interest in emigration to Texas, describes the state in glowing terms, but not without an occasional unintentional caveat from Hanford, who in his essay on the “Character of the People of Texas” earnestly refutes as false the contention than Texans are “violent and disorderly” and that “there may be and probably are some disorderly persons in the country, but they are not more numerous than in the Northern States” (small comfort!). ($3,000-6,000)

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361. [MAP]. ROSS, E.H. (publisher), W[illiam] A. Mosberger (surveyor), and A[lexander] McLean (lithographer). Ross’ New Sectional Map of the State of Arkansas Showing the Sections, Townships, Lines, Ranges, Principal Rivers, Creeks, Post Offices, Landings, Towns, Roads, Railroads, U.S. Surveys, Lakes, & etc. Compiled & drawn by Wm A. Mosberger, Surveyor, General Office Mo. Published by E.H. Ross Western Map Emporium 313 Locust Street, St. Louis Mo. Dealer in Maps Charts, Picture Frames, Photographs, Engravings, Albums, Lithographs & Chromos. [key within shield, with symbols for townships, state and county boundaries, range & township line, etc.] Explanations [below key] A. McLean lith. St Louis | Geo F. Cram & Co 148 Lake St. Chicago. Scale of 10 miles to one inch. St. Louis, n.d. [1873 or before]. Lithograph map on banknote paper with original pale color wash for Arkansas counties; border to border: 86.3 x 73.2 cm; overall sheet size: 90 x 75.5 cm, ornate leaf border, folded into original brown blind-embossed pocket covers, gilt-lettered on upper cover: New Sectional Map of Arkansas, Published by E.H. Ross, St. Louis, broadside printed on yellow paper used as front pastedown, reading: E.H. Ross, Western Map Emporium. Map moderately stained in one panel where adhered to lower pocket cover, 9 cm tear at left margin (no losses), a few tiny separations at folds (no losses), light browning at some folds, overall very good. Pocket covers slightly bubbled in a few spots where original adhesive did not properly adhere, pastedown paper perished at gutter (not affecting text). Overall a very good copy of an exceptionally rare map.

     Undetermined edition, but 1873 or before (modern-day Baxter and Clay Counties, not shown on the map, were created on March 24, 1873). The map is not listed by Phillips or other standard sources. The emphasis of this large, detailed map is on railroads and other transportation. The map was published at a time when Arkansas was undergoing rapid change. Construction of railroads enabled more farmers to get their products to market. It also brought new development into other parts of the state, including resorts, such as Hot Springs. ($3,000-6,000)

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362. [MAP]. RUSCELLI, Girolamo. Nueva Hispania tabula nova. [Venice, 1561]. Copper-engraved map on laid paper, seas stipple engraved, with title at top, Latin text on verso. Neat line to neat line: 18 x 25.5 cm; neat line to neat line with title at top: 19 x 25.5 cm; overall sheet size: 24.1 x 32.6 cm. A few pinholes at top (only one of which touches map proper), remains of old mounting strip on verso, otherwise very fine and in a strong impression. On this copy it is possible to see where the engraver altered Yucatán so it is not shown as an island.

     First state, with Yucatán shown as a peninsula and without the added place names on subsequent editions (see next entry), plate mark running off top of page, etc. For the progenitor, see Gastaldi under maps herein. Burden 31: “There are clear signs that the engraver first cut the plate to show an island, as his error was not completely erased when corrected. No example has been found in its insular form... There are three states of the plate. This map is one of two that were engraved on the same plate, printed and then separated for the book. Evidence of this can be seen by the fact that the plate mark of the maps runs off the top of the page.” Martin & Martin Plate 3 & p. 69: “There were important innovations.... The map of New Spain was significantly improved, correctly showing Yucatán as a peninsula. The place names along the upper Gulf Coast revealed the explorations of Piñeda, Cabeza de Vaca, and Moscosso, and the Mississippi, here shown as ‘Rio de Spiritu Santo,’ was carefully depicted. The map enjoyed wide influence.” Phillips, Atlases 371, 372, etc. (the map appeared in numerous successive editions of Ptolemy). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest CoastII, p. 280 & #48. ($750-1,500)

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363. [MAP]. RUSCELLI, Girolamo. Nueva Hispania tabula nova. [Venice, ca. 1561-1573]. Copper-engraved map on laid paper, seas stipple engraved, with title at top, Italian text with historiated initial on verso (19 lines of text). Neat line to neat line: 18 x 24.6 cm; neat line to neat line with title at top: 18.6 x 24.6 cm; overall sheet size: 21.7 x 30 cm. Mild browning at centerfold and lower left and right blank margins, otherwise very fine and in a strong impression. On this copy it is possible to see where the engraver altered Yucatán so it is not shown as an island.

     Unrecorded state. The plate mark does not run off the top as in the 1561 state (see preceding); graduation marks not cross-hatched as in the 1574 State 2. For States 1, 2, 3 of the present map, see Burden 31. Burden's State 3 is our next entry. Martin & Martin, Plate 3 & p. 69. ($800-1,200)

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364. [MAP]. RUSCELLI, Girolamo. Nueva Hispania tabula nova. [Venice, 1598; date based on Burden]. Copper-engraved map on laid paper, seas stipple engraved, with title at top, running head “Descrittione dell’America | Libro Quarto 130”; on recto, Italian text with historiated initial showing equestrian figure and running head “Descrittione dell’America. | Libro Quarto 129.”  Neat line to neat line: 18 x 25.4 cm; neat line to neat line with title at top: 18.7 x 25.4 cm; overall sheet size: 23.7 x 34.3 cm. Two small holes on lower center (on ship), old mounting tabs on back of map, otherwise very fine, very strong impression.

     Burden’s third state (see previous entry), with numerous additions, including “Calmifor” (Califoria), “Siera Nevad” (Sierra Nevada), ship added in Pacific (here named “Mar del Sur”), Gulf of Mexico named (“Golfo Mexicano”), and many more additions. Burden 31. Martin & Martin Plate 3n & p. 69n. Phillips, Atlases 373, etc. (the map appeared in numerous successive editions of Ptolemy). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest CoastI, pp. 280 & II #200 (dated as 1599). This map shows a distinct knowledge of places names over its precedessors due to the advance of geographic, cartographical, and boots-on-the-ground knowledge. The extremely graceful and restrained style of mapmaking by Gastaldi and Ruscelli marks a transition from the earlier, heavier style of woodcut maps, reflecting both the lighter Italian sensibility and the use of copperplate engraving as a medium for cartography. ($600-1,200)

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365. [MAP]. [SAN FRANCISCO: ST. FRANCIS WOOD]. MASON-McDUFFIE COMPANY. St Francis Wood San Francisco’s Residence Park [above neat line, lower center] Most beautiful of all residential districts. Homes and home-sites at reasonable prices and terms. Send for large map or for descriptive literature [inset map at lower left] Map of San Francisco Showing Location of St Francis Wood. San Francisco: Mason McDuffie Company, n.d. (ca. 1918). Cerograph tract map with green toning printed on calendar paper, showing residential development; border to border: 29.2 x 27.5 cm; overall sheet size: 32 x 30.2 cm. Creased where formerly folded. Very fine, fresh copy. A few neat contemporary pencil notations on map regarding prices. UC Berkeley has a larger version, apparently one of the detail maps offered on the present map. No copies of the present map are located on OCLC.

     First edition. St. Francis Wood, in southwestern San Francisco, opened in October 1912. The development was (and is) justifiably lauded as one of the nation’s finest examples of a residence park. The 175-acre tract was from the estate of Adolph Sutro, and before then, Rancho San Miguel. The property was developed by the Mason-McDuffie Company and designed by famous architect Daniel Burnham. ($200-400)

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366. [MAP]. [SAN MATEO: HIGHLAND PARK]. BALDWIN, Archibald S., Josiah R. Howell & Joseph H.P. Howard (agents). [Title on map verso] Map of Westerly Portion of San Mateo, Showing Highland Park and Surroundings. Highland Park is a portion of the Howard Property, about one half mile from San Mateo Station. The sub divisions are from 1 to 4 acres, beautifully wooded, on gently sloping ground, overlooking El Cerrito Park, San Mateo and the Bay.-Wide Avenues, Spring Valley Water piped to all the Lots. Electric Lights.... N.p., n.d. [San Francisco, early 20th century]. Cerograph tract map with green toning printed on calendar paper, showing subdivision Highland Park and surrounding regions in San Mateo; neat line to neat line: 42.7 x 23.1 cm. A few minor light spots and creased where originally folded, overall fine.

     First edition. No copies found on OCLC. Bancroft has an 1893 Baldwin & Howell map in larger format showing more of the Rancho de San Mateo development. The San Francisco Public Library holds the Baldwin & Howell archives. Rocq lists a few Baldwin & Howell imprints, but not this one. Maps like this provide insight into residential developments and origins in the San Francisco Bay Area, documenting the transition from pastoral California. ($100-200)

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367. [MAP]. [SANSON D’ABBEVILLE, N[icolas]. Le Nouveau Mexique, et la Floride: Tirées de diverses Cartes, et Relations. Par N. Sanson d’Abbeville Geogr ordre du Roy. A Paris. Chez Pierre Mariette, Rue S. Iacque a l’Esperance Avec Privilege du Roy, pour vingt Ans. 1656. [lower right above neat line] Somer, Sculp. Paris: Pierre Mariette, 1656. Copper-engraved map showing California as an island, original outline coloring of coastlines and boundaries; neat line to neat line: 31.1 x 54.5 cm; overall sheet size: 43 x 59 cm. Vertical crease at center and remains of old mounting tab on verso, else very fine, generous margins and very fresh. Written in contemporary ink on California is a note stating that since this map was published the end of the Gulf of California has been discovered and thus California is no longer an island (“ce n’est plus une isle”).

     First edition of a cornerstone map of California and the Southwest, first state (“Chez Pierre Mariette” in imprint) of the first large-scale printed map to place strong emphasis on California as an island. Burden, Mapping of North America, Vol. I, #319, pp. 413-414: “One of the introductions is the so-called second Sanson model of California as an island.” Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 40-42 & color illustration on pp. 41-42: “With California triumphantly occupying center stage on this important map, it is easy to understand why the misconception of California-as-an-Island persisted well into the eighteenth century.” Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps, Plate 31 (detail); #49. Martin & Martin 20: “The first significant map in a printed atlas to specialize in what is now the American Southwest.” McLaughlin in California as an Island #17 (see also California 49 #10). Schwartz & Ehrenberg, pp. 111 & 121. Tooley, “California as an Island” in Mapping of America, p. 115 (#14): “An important map, the first printed in an atlas to put the greatest emphasis on California and New Mexico. A map of great influence, it became the model for the delineation of California for the next fifty years.” Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast, pp. 130-132 & #374. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #50, Vol. I, pp. 39-40. ($4,000-8,000)

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368. [MAP]. SANSON D’ABBEVILLE, Nicolas (after). BLOME, Richard. A New Mapp of America Septentrionale Designed by Mousieur Sanson Geographer to the French King, and Rendred into English... [dedication at upper right] To the Rt. Honble. Anthony Earle of Shaftesbury Baron Ashley... [lower left above neat line] Francis Lamb Sculpt. London, [1682 per Burden]. Copper-engraved map of North America with California shown as an island (includes Southwest, Mexico, Central America, Atlantic Coast, Great Lakes, and Caribbean), later color (outline, shading, cartouche, decorative elements, border); neat line to neat line: 38 x 54 cm; overall sheet size: 42 x 57 cm. Light browning to blank margins, right blank margin supplied, skillfully restored with a few repairs on verso, overall very good.

     One of the most striking depictions of California as an island, based on Sanson’s 1650 landmark map Amérique Septentrionale, with revisions and updates. Blome chose to use the best source, and even credited Sanson, a rarity then (and now). Burden, The Mapping of North America 397 (State 4, after a conjectured proof state dated 1668 and the 1669 state; the fourth state has eight family lines and the Virginia-Carolina border is moved northwards above Albemarle): “The map of North America is derived from that of Nicolas Sanson 1650, which is stated in the title. It is the first English map to depict all five of the Great Lakes and introduces some advances over the earlier one.” Kaufman, Mapping of the Great Lakes 6. Leighley, California as an Island 55. McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 669.1. McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island 42: “This is an unchanged reissue of Sanson’s 1650 ‘Amerique Septentrionale’ as regards California, except a tiny vignette of a deer appears in the north of the island.” Tooley, “California as an Island” in Mapping of America, p. 119 (#27). Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 400n. ($750-1,500)

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369. [MAP]. SAYER, R[obert] & J[ohn] Bennett (publishers) & [Thomas Jefferys (engraver)]. [Title on left sheet] Chart, containing the Coasts of California, New Albion, and Russian Discoveries to the North, with the Peninsula of Kamtschatka... [title on right sheet] North America and the West Indies, with the opposite Coasts of Europe and Africa. [below neat line, on each of the two joined sheets] Published according to Act of Parliament. 10 June 1775, by R. Sayer & J. Bennett. No. 53 in Fleet Street. [far right below neat line on Sheet II] IV. London: [Thomas Jefferys], 1775. Copper-engraved chart printed on two joined sheets of laid paper, original outline color; neat line to neat line: 42.5 x 110 cm; overall sheet size: 53 x 118 cm. Light creasing where formerly rolled (a few short splits, mainly confined to blank margins), else very fine and large chart with many interesting printed annotations.

     The map appeared in Thomas Jefferys’ The American Atlas... (London, 1776). It was the middle portion of a three-sheet map issued as six sheets (each of the three sheets is a joined pair), and each sheet has its own headings; the general title for the full map was: A Chart of North and South America.... Phillips, Atlases 1165-1166. Rumsey 346.002. Wagner. Cartography of the Northwest Coast of America, Vol. 2, p. 343, #649: “This map contains the usual Fonte and Fuca legends. No Delisle geography except the various entrances. The northwest coast to Mendocino is based on Anderson’s Spanish chart. The Strait of Juan de Fuca is nearly one degree wide and just inside near the north shore is a Pillar Island.... This map contains two interesting references to the Pérez expedition of 1774; one a legend in 55° which reads: ‘Here the Spaniards saw several white and fair Indians in 1774,’ and another in 49° which reads: ‘Coast seen by the Spaniards in 1774, with inhabitants which go naked.’” ($1,600-2,400)

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370. [MAP]. SCHENK, Petrus. Tabula Mexicae et Floridae, Terrarum Anglicarum, et anteriorum Americae Insularum; item cursuum et circuituum fluminis Mississipi dicti. Amstel. prostant apud Petrum Schenk, cum privil. [pictorial vignette at lower left showing naval battle and people onshore examining treasure]. Amsterdam, [1710, or after]. Copper-engraved map on sheet of laid paper, original outline and wash color, contemporary color added to vignette, scale, compass rose, and adjustment of boundary line between Canada and Nova Francia; neat line to neat line: 46.5 x 60.4 cm; map with title above: 48.7 x 60.4 cm; overall sheet size: 51.4 x 62.6 cm. Old mounting tabs on verso. Excellent color, dark impression, and very fine condition. Desirable copy of an uncommon map.

     Here we have Schenk’s version of Delisle’s 1703 Carte du Mexique et de la Floride (see herein). The Schenk firm was active from ca. 1695-1785, and sometimes the surname is spelled Schenck (see Koemann, Atlantes Neerlandici, Vol. I, 1969, pp. 107-121). Antochiw, Historia cartográfica de la Península de Yucatán, Figure 13 (p. 170). Bornholt, Cuatro Siglos de Expresiones Geográficas del Istmo Centroamericano, Plate 63 (p. 123). Jackson, Flags along the Coast, p. 44. Lowery 198. Martin & Martin 16 (identical to present map, and dated 1722). Phillips, Atlases 462 & 4257.Virga, Texas: Mapping the Lone Star State through History, p. 4. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #107 & p. 70: “During this period many European maps labeled the lower Mississippi Valley ‘Florida,’ extending this from its peninsula on the east to the Rio Grande on the west. An excellent example of such cartography is the map of Mexico and Florida published in Amsterdam by Peter Schenk.” This very attractive map shows the extent of New Spain and Florida, New France, the American colonies, and the West Indies, rivers, towns, and trade. The Southwest includes missions and many native villages and landmarks, including Taos, Santa Fe, Acoma, Casas Grandes, etc. ($800-1,600)

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371. [MAP]. [SCHERER, Heinrich]. [Pictorial title in rectangle at upper right, showing the Virgin of Atocha with child and a cloud above with a figure at left symbolizing America] B.V. Mexicana. America Borealis multis in locis dei matrem colit & honorat, et hæc fuis Cultoribus multos favores & Beneficia præstat. 1699. [Scale at lower left in German, French, and Italian, with Jesuit symbol above], ships and sea monsters. [Augsburg & Frankfurt, 1702-1710]. Copper-engraved map (California as an Island; North America, the Great Lakes, Strait of Anian, Central America, and the northern coast of South America) on two joined sheets of laid paper; neat line to neat line: 22.7 x 34.7 cm; overall sheet size: 26.9 x 38.5 cm. Very fine, a firm impression with superb contrast.

     First edition. Leighly, California as an Island 150. McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island 129. Tooley, “California as an Island” in Mapping of America, p. 131 (#85): “California as an Island after the G. Sanson model. The interior shown as mountainous and wooded. Coastal names only, save in the south where towns are marked, St. Jago, S. Bruno and N.S. de Guadeloupe.” The map appeared in Heinrich Scherer’s Atlas novus exhibens orbem terraqueum (Augsburg: Dillingen & Frankfurt: J.C. Bencard, 1702-1710) in Part III, following p. 10. This very rare atlas and encyclopedia was written by Father Kino’s erudite teacher, Heinrich Scherer, Jesuit cartographer, geographer, and mathematician. The maps of California as an island were based on Kino’s explorations and cartography, See Burrus (Kino and the Cartography of Northwestern New Spain, esp. pp. 62-63) where Burrus discusses the relationship between Kino’s explorations and Scherer’s maps of New Spain. ($500-1,000)

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372. [MAP]. SCHOLFIELD, Nathan. Map of Southern Oregon and Northern California...exhibiting a reliable view of the rich Gold Region of the North, as well as the mineral region of middle California, Embracing also a corrected chart of the coast from San Francisco Bay, to the Columbia River.... San Francisco: Marvin & Hitchcock, 1851. Lithograph map showing the California Gold Regions and Oregon; neat line to neat line: 60.4 x 44.1 cm; overall sheet size: 61.1 x 45.8 cm. Formerly folded, splits at folds neatly reinforced with archival paper (no losses), scattered mild to moderate foxing and browning, otherwise a very good copy of an exceedingly rare, important Western map. Preserved in a recent dark brown morocco and dark blue folding box and chemise. OCLC locates four copies: Huntington Library, Oregon Historical Society, University of California at Santa Cruz, and Yale.

     First edition. Streeter Sale 2685: “This is the first map of what is now Oregon to be lithographed west of the Rockies, and is one of the first, if not the first to show the new town of Portland, the new settlements on the Umpqua, and the road to California up the Willamette Valley. This and the Butler map, San Francisco, 1851, (copy in TWS) are among the few maps of California, lithographed there in 1850 and 1851 which have survived.” Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region, pp. xxxii-xxxiii & 206: “One of the most interesting, as well as one of the earliest attempts to represent the newly explored Trinity and Klamath River diggings.” Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 734 & Vol. III, pp. 147-148. ($10,000-20,000)

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373. [MAP]. SCHOYER, Solomon. Map of the United States Drawn from the Most Approved Surveys...Engraved by G.W. Merchant.... Albany, 1826. Copper-engraved map on banknote paper, large vignette of Eagle from the U.S. seal, original outline coloring (boundaries of states and territories); neat line to neat line: 41 x 51 cm; overall sheet size: 44.2 x 53 cm, folded into publisher’s stiff textured terracotta boards (15.5 x 10 cm), lettered on upper pocket cover. Some splits at folds (a few minor losses), fragile boards worn with contemporary ink notes.

     First edition. Karpinski, Maps of Famous Cartographers Depicting North America (“Maps of the United States Naming Michigan” #84, p. 235) dates the map 1825, but the first imprint for the map listed by OCLC is 1826.Graff 3706. Rumsey 2201 (suggesting that the map is a slightly reduced copy of Finley’s map of the United States that appeared in pocket form and in Finley’s 1826 atlas). Not in American Imprints under 1825 or 1826. The map shows the Young Republic with its twenty-three states and the territories of Arkansas, Northwest, Michigan, and Missouri, the latter of which extends beyond the Rockies and to the present Canadian border. The map shows the area beyond Rio del Norte (Rio Grande), but the geography of Texas remains distorted and vacant for the most part. Locations and notations in Texas include Pass of Cavallo, Galveston Bay, I. of St. Luis, I. St. Fernando, Carancaways, Arcaquisas, the river system, and only a few interior towns, such as San Antonio. The Big Bend of the Rio Grande is reduced to a little bump. ($300-600)

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374. [MAP]. SMALL HOPES CONSOLIDATED MINING COMPANY. Map of Property Belonging to the Small Hopes Cons’d Mining Co. Showing the Underground Workings. Yankee Hill Lake Co. Col. [color key below title with records for prior to April 1, 1885; between April 1, 1885 and April 1, 1886; between April 1, 1886 and June 1, 1887] Workings previous of April 1st. 1885... [color key upper right] Upper Working Hatched... [untitled map of shafts at lower left, color coded and lettered to key] Blaine Shaft... Forest Shaft... Cary Shaft... Smithy... Elkins Shaft... Kerens Shaft... Denman Shaft.... N.p., n.d. [June 1887]. Lithograph map on bank note paper; colored by hand; border to border: 58 x 119.1 cm; overall sheet size: 60.7 x 122.5 cm. Small light marginal wear and chipping (not affecting border or map proper). Moderately creased from having been rolled, but overall very good.

     First edition. OCLC locates no copies of this map. Only one entry is found for any map relating to the Small Hopes Company, and that is a smaller sketch map (photocopy blue line held by Colorado School of Mines, and titled: Sketch map of the Small Hopes Group of mining claims, comprising the Great Western, Little Ester, Lillie, Harbour, Small Hopes, Owls Roost, Jewel, Gem, Emelia, and Big Elephant claims, Gold Hill Mining District, Boulder Co., Colo.). There is an essay on the Small Hopes Consolidated Mining Company in Griswold’s History of Leadville (1951) that was copied from the January 1, 1888, issue of the Leadville Herald Democrat newspaper. The article is very enthusiastic and calls the Company’s property at the “center to the vast mineral fields surrounding Leadville” and makes numerous references to the four claims shown as separate areas on the map, Forest City, Result, Robert Emmet, Ranchero, the six mining shafts shown and the “Denver City line” (i.e. Denver City claim). Apparently “the Small Hopes is the third greatest dividend-paying mine in the world, and has been declaring regular monthly dividends since February 14, 1884. The total amount paid to its stockholders up to the present date is $3,112,500.” ($600-1,200)

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375. [MAP]. STANFORD, Edward. Mexico, Guatemala, Salvador and British Honduras. Scale, 1: 5,274,720, 83·25 English Miles to 1 Inch. English Statute Miles 68·83=1º Lat. [scales] The Mexican States are separated by Red Lines. Railways...Submarine Telegraph Cables.... [below neat line] London Atlas Service | 1612 | London: Edward Stanford, 12, 13, & 14, Long Acre. W.C. | Stanford’s Geogl. Estabt., London. [table at lower left inside neat line] Table of Altitudes in English Feet above sea level. London, n.d. [January 16, 1902]. Lithograph map with full original color, neat line to neat line: 50 x 64.5 cm; overall sheet size: 52 x 70 cm, sectioned and mounted on original cartographical linen (18 sections), folded into pocket covers, original dark green cloth, maize printed label on upper cover (London Atlas Map of Mexico, &c. London, Edward Stanford, Geographer to His Majesty the King. 12, 13, 14, Long Acre, W.C.), broadside printed on pale yellow paper affixed to verso of front board with publisher’s ads (Stanfords’ Library Maps. New and Revised Editions, Reduced in Price...). Absolutely superb condition. Very rare. The map also appeared in Stanford’s atlas (London Atlas of Universal Geography), but this separate pocket map format is very rare.

     First edition, first issue, published January 16, 1902, according to Francis Herbert’s explanation of Stanford’s dating practices (“The ‘London Atlas of Universal Geography’ from John Arrowsmith to Edward Stanford: Origin, Development and Dissolution of a British World Atlas from the 1830s to the 1930s” in Imago Mundi, Vol. 41, 1989, pp. 98-123). Subsequently the map appeared in Stanford’s third edition of the firm’s London Atlas of Universal Geography published by the Stanford firm in 1904 et seq. ($400-600)

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376. [MAP]. STIMPSON, Charles (publisher) & [Hazen Morse] (engraver). Plan of the City Boston...1832. [Boston, 1832]. Copper-engraved street map of Boston, original hand coloring (yellow, pale green, and light blue denoting city wards); neat line to neat line: 21.4 x 35.2 cm; overall sheet size: 22.7 x 36.5 cm; folded into original miniature red roan covers, gilt ruling and lettering on upper cover. The map has been unfolded (folds not flattened) and loosely affixed to acid-free tan mat board. Very light discoloration at folds. Pocket covers mildly rubbed and with small stain on upper cover. A fine copy. With 1833 signature of Julia E. Lyman.

     A beautiful copy of a diminutive pocket map that was continuously edited and corrected for many years. American Imprints 1832:14858. In A Report of the Record Commissioners of the City of Boston, Containing Miscellaneous Papers (Boston: Rockwell, 1886, pp. 168-169) there is a brief history of Stimpson’s Boston directory and the maps in them: “In 1828 a totally new map was engraved for the directory by Hazen Morse, and with the necessary changes, it appeared annually through 1838.” This tiny pocket map is a genre of map seldom encountered. “In the United States, a miniature book is usually considered to be one which is no more than three inches in height, width, or thickness. Some aficionados collect slightly larger books while others specialize in even smaller sizes. Outside of the United States, books up to four inches are often considered miniature” (from the website of the Miniature Book Society). The pocket covers of our map measure 3-1/3 x 2-1/2 inches. ($200-400)

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377. [MAP]. TEXAS LAND & CATTLE COMPANY. Map of the Lands Belonging to the Texas Land & Cattle Co. Situated in Wharton, Matagorda and Jackson County, Texas. W.C. Moore & Co. and C.C. Duson, Exclusive Agents, Houston and El Campo Texas. Lands Indicated in Red for Sale.... Chicago, n.d. [1890s-very early 20th century]. Lithograph map showing company lands for sale in coral, neat line to neat line: 55.2 x 74.2 cm; overall sheet size: 60 x 96 cm. Professionally stabilized, flattened and mounted on acid-free tissue. A few minor losses at old folds, otherwise fine. With the map are warranty deeds dated 1904. No copies recorded in OCLC or other standard sources.

     First edition. Handbook of Texas Online (Texas Land and Cattle Company): “The Texas Land and Cattle Company, Limited, was a syndicate in Dundee, Scotland, organized to take advantage of the American Southwest’s ‘Beef Bonanza’ in the early 1880s. Robert Fleming was among its wealthy British shareholders... Early in 1882 the syndicate purchased Mifflin Kenedy’s Laureles Ranch, south of Corpus Christi, for $1.1 million. It also bought the Horseshoe Ranch, on Lake Creek in southeastern Hemphill County, and a portion of the Gunter-Munson survey along the Canadian River valley. By 1883 the Texas Land and Cattle Company controlled 80,000 acres of land.... At its peak the company owned at least thirteen ranches in Texas and Indian Territory. However, its prosperity was short-lived. The price of beef fell. Also, range records revealed discrepancies in the inventories of purchasing agents, and the investors actually owned far fewer cattle than was supposed. Although new agents were sent from Scotland to try to mend the situation, that action came too late.... In the winter of 1886–87, after several thousand cattle had been driven to the Panhandle from South Texas, severe blizzards destroyed close to 75 percent of them. Consequently...the Laureles property went back to the King and Kenedy families by 1906.” ($500-1,000)

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378. [MAP]. THOMAS, COWPERTHWAIT & CO. (publisher). Map of Mexico including Yucatan. [below neat line at lower left] Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846.... [inset map at upper right] Fields of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma... [inset map at lower left] Valley of Mexico including the Federal District. Lithograph map on bank note paper, Mexico and New Mexico in original full color and the inset maps with original outline color and gesso highlights. Neat line to neat line: 19.8 x 26.5 cm. Folded into original pocket covers and pasted to rear cover, original dark green roan, matching leather label on upper cover, both covers elaborately blind-embossed. Pasted to front cover is a pamphlet entitled: Description of the Republic of Mexico, Including its Physical and Moral Features, Geography, Agriculture, Products, Manufacturers, Etc. Illustrated by a Map.... Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1846. [i-iii] iv, [3] 4-83 [1, blank] pp., wood-engraved text illustrations. Spine slightly chipped at head, corners lightly bumped. Moderate staining to first and last few leaves and fore-edges. Other than small stains at lower center, map fine, with bright color. OCLC locates copies at UT Arlington and Yale.

     First edition of a very early Mexican-American War map and guide. Not in Howes, Wheat, Palau, Garrett & Goodwin’s Mexican-American War, etc. This very rare pocket map and guide to Mexico, published in the first flush of war, has good coverage of the two battles fought on Texas soil. It was probably put out in haste to satisfy the appetite for news from the front and for the men going to war. The news is so fresh, that the map includes a route from Matamoros to Mexico which “Gen. Taylor most probably will take, should he be directed to march on the capital.” ($2,000-$4,000)

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379. [MAP]. TRONCOSO, Diego. Californias: Antigua y Nueva Notas. En èsta Carta no se escribn. los nombrs. de tods. las Yslas, Ptos. Rios, y demàs, pr.ser hecha pa. solo demostrar lo qe. andubo, y Misions. qe. fundò en la Nvã. Califa. el V.P. Fr. Junipero Sèrra, Presidte. de èllas...Diego Tronoso Sc. Mexco. ao. 1787 [title at upper right in decorative cartouche of strap work topped with crown].Mexico, 1787. Copper-engraved map on heavy laid paper; neat line to neat line: 25.7 x 35 cm; overall sheet size: 28.5 x 43.5 cm Lightly soiled, three small sepia stains at lower right (only one of which affects map image), two creases and old folds.   

     First issue (without “Mar Pacifico”) of “one of the earliest known maps to show a boundary between the two Californias” (Newman, California 49). The map appeared in Francisco Paloú’s Relación histórica de la vida y apostólicas tareas del Venerable Padre Fray Junípero Serra... (Mexico: Felipe de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1787). Barrett 1946. Cowan II, p. 472. Graff 3179. Hill 1289 (presuming copies with “Mar Pacifico are first issue). Howell 50, California 180. Howes P56. Libros Californianos (Wagner & Hanna lists), pp. 24, 67. Medina, México 7731. Newman in California 49: Forty-Nine Maps of California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present #17, illustrated p. 35): “One of the earliest known maps to show a boundary between the two Californias.” Wagner, Spanish Southwest 168. Weber, The California Missions, p. 77. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #208 & I, p. 128 (incorrect transcription “Francoso” rather than “Troncoso”): “While [the map’s] main purpose was to trace the travels of Father Serra during his years of service along the western coast, it is of interest here because it seems to be the first on which a boundary line was drawn between Lower and Upper California.” Zamorano 80 #59. ($1,000-2,000)

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380. [MAP]. UNION PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY (Eastern Division). The Union Pacific Railway Company Offers for sale several Hundred Thousand Acres of very valuable Lands, situated along the Line of Road from State Line to Fort Riley, in the Valley of the Kansas River... [below lower border] Sage, Sons & Co., Lithographers and Steam Printers, Buffalo, N.Y. [verso with panels of text that fold down to 10 pp.] Union Pacific Railway. Eastern Division. New Route by Steamer and Railway, to Lawrence and all Central, Southern and Western Kansas New Mexico and Colorado... [text on second panel continues] New Route Passengers Going West via North Missouri, Hannibal & St. Joseph & Platte Country R. Rs.... New York, n.d. [1865]. Lithograph map showing the main route from Quincy and St. Louis to Santa Fe, Fort Laramie, and Denver, and subsidiary route from Rock Island to Fort Kearney; border to border: 25.5 x 41 cm; overall sheet size: 27.8 x 43 cm. Other than a few minor fox marks, very fine. OCLC locates one holding (University of Iowa).

     First edition of an early promotional for the Kansas Pacific and adjacent lands (the name Kansas Pacific was not adopted until 1869).Not in Modelski and other standard sources. The territory covered ranges from Southeast Dakota to slightly east of the Mississippi (Rock Island-Quincy-St. Louis), and Santa Fe, “Gold and Silver Region” in Colorado to Upper Arkansas. The date is based on two passages of text, one stating “this year (1865)” and a reference to the Quantrell raid on Lawrence Kansas “during the present rebellion” and the map showing that only the Wyandotte/Kansas City to Topeka section of the railroad was completed at time of publication. The railroad reached Topeka in November/December 1865. The promotional focuses on Kansas in most glowing terms, including a stock raising and the mild winters of Kansas. ($300-600)

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381. [MAP]. UNITED STATES. ARMY. CORPS OF TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS. EMORY, W.H. Map of Texas and the Countries Adjacent.... Washington, 1844. Lithographic map, original pink outline color of Texas borders, neat line to neat line: 53.5 x 83.3 cm. Professionally flattened and deacidified. A few miniscule holes at former folds (no loss of text or image). Faintest pale tanning in a few spots where formerly folded, barely discernable on face of map. Overall very fine.

     First edition, large format edition; a fundamental map in the historical cartography of Texas and the Southwest—the first map published by the United States government officially recognizing the boundaries of the Republic of Texas, thus identifying Texas as a separate political entity. Goetzmann, Exploration and Empire, p. 77: “Master map of the Southwest in 1844.” Martin & Martin, #33 & p. 37: “A landmark map.... The map represented the best available topographical description of the region at the time of its publication in 1844.” Rumsey 02620. Streeter 1543. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 478. Emory’s map was part of the annexation treaty between the U.S. and Texas in 1844. The map is a political-legal document of great historical significance. ($7,500-15,000)

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382. [MAP]. UNITED STATES. GENERAL LAND OFFICE. GARDINER, John. Map of the Bounty Lands in Illinois Territory... [above lower right neat line] C Schwarz sc: Washn. [detail map of fractional township at lower left] Township of Range [below plat] Description of the [blank] of Section in Township [blank] Range from the Surveyors Returns. N.p., n.d. [Washington, D.C.: General Land Office, ca. 1818 (per Newberry)]. Copper-engraved map of part of Western Illinois between the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, original hand coloring in grey, yellow, red, light green, and blue on map identifying owners and the type of land; neat line to neat line: 47 x 36.7 cm. With ink rubric of John Gardiner at lower left and numerous contemporary pencil and ink notes and contemporary newspaper clipping with headline “Land Agency in Illinois” advertising the services of James M. Duncan. Overall a fascinating copy of a well-used working map. Split at folds with minor losses, significant loss at lower center, edges chipped with minor losses, map separated into several sections with old tape stains along folds.

     First edition, second issue, with the added printed grid at lower left. American Imprints (1812) 27202 (dating 1812?). Graff 1505. Phillips, America, p. 326 (suggesting date of 1812-1818). Streeter 1430: “This is the first map that Phillips lists under Illinois, and it is perhaps the first map showing a considerable part of Illinois with ‘Illinois’ in the title.” ($2,000-4,000)

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383. [MAP]. [VANDERMAELEN, Philippe Marie Guillaume]. Collection of nine lithograph maps with original color, each measures approximately: border to border: 48 x 56.5 cm. Other than an occasional chip to blank margin, a bit of mild age toning, and a few minor stains, all maps are generally fine and fresh. The maps focus on the Western U.S., California, Texas, and Mexico and are from “the most remarkable world atlases ever made” (Koeman). Vandermaelen’s grand atlas was the first printed atlas of the world on a uniform scale, the first major lithographed atlas, and noteworthy for its large scale. Koeman (Vander Maelen 1) III, pp. 141-144. Rumsey 2212. Wheat, Transmississippi West #378 & p. 94.

     [1] Tableau Provisoire d’Assemblage d’une Partie de l’Amérique seple. & d’une partie de l’Amérique Meridionale. Rumsey 2212.204. Silvestre 79 f.46 (p. 146). General assembly map. [2] Amér. Sep. Nouvelle Californie. No. 46. California from its northern border near Pt. St. George to slightly south of Monterey. Rumsey 2212.251. Silvestre 75 f.47 (p. 130) & AMS 46 (p. 45). First issue. [3] Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 47. Tribal lands; parts of Colorado, Utah, Arizona, etc. Rumsey 2212.252. Cf. Silvestre 75 f.48 (p. 130) & AMS 47 (p. 45). Third issue. [4] Amér. Sep. Partie de la Nouvle. Californie. No. 52. California coast showing the Santa Barbara Channel with profile of Pacific coast. Rumsey 2212.257. Silvestre 75 f.53 (p. 131) & AMS 52 (p. 46). First issue, with the Humboldt profile of mountains, but not seen by Silvestre. [5] Amér. Sep. Partie de la Vieille Californie. No. 53. Southern Arizona, northern Sonora, northern Baja, upper California. Rumsey 2212.258. Silvestre 75 f.54 (p. 131). Only issue. [6] Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 54. Shows El Paso, Big Bend, Guadalupe Mountains, various tribes; parts of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Sonora and Chihuahua. Rumsey 2212.259. Streeter 1095. Silvestre 75 f.55 (pp. 131-132). Only issue. [7] Amér. Sep. Partie de la Vielle Californie. No. 58. Parts of Baja California, Sonora, Sinaloa and Chihuahua. Rumsey 2212.264. Silvestre 75 f.60 (pp. 132-133). Only issue. [8] Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 59. The very tip of far South Texas and parts of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, Zacatecas, Durango, and Sinaloa. Rumsey 2212.265. Silvestre 75 f.61 (p. 133). Only issue. [9] Amér. Sep. Partie du Mexique. No. 60. Exceptionally fine, strong color. The Texas coast from the mouth of the Rio Grande. Martin & Martin, p. 32. Rumsey 2212.266. Silvestre 75 f.62 (p. 133). Only issue. Streeter 1095. Taliaferro 219: “The only printed map from the colonial period devoted specifically to the Texas coast.” ($1,500-3,000)

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384. [MAP]. VON FRANKENBERG, E. (delineator) & William Kierski & Brother (publishers). Map of the City of Stockton and San Joaquin Valley... [right of title, at bottom of map, inset map of the San Joaquin Valley showing relative position of Stockton] [Stockton, 1870? (per University of the Pacific); 1872? (per Bancroft)]. Lithograph town map, varnished and mounted on original cartographic linen; border to border: 56 x 43 cm. This map is in poor condition, and only its rarity allows us to offer it. Waterstained, browned from varnish, chipped and some splits at old folds. OCLC locates two institutions holding copies. The Bancroft Library has two copies, one of which is from the papers of Captain Charles Weber, founder of Stockton. The other copy is at the University of the Pacific at Stockton.

     First edition. Not in standard sources. The names of Captain Charles Weber and Major Richard P. Hammond are not printed on this map, but their survey and mapping of Stockton in 1848-1850 were the basis for the present map. Hammond was an officer in the Mexican-American War and became Weber’s business partner in the development of Stockton. Captain Charles David Maria Weber (1814-1881) emigrated to California with the Bartleson-Bidwell Party in 1841, and in 1845 obtained the 50,000-acre land grant El Campo de los Franceses. Weber mined gold, raised cattle, and created a booming commercial depot for the southern mines, selling tools and goods to eager prospectors at Gold Rush prices. In 1849 Weber and Hammond surveyed and drew plans for Weber’s vision of Stockton. Floods, fires, and claims required Weber to modify his original town plan of 1849-1850, and these modifications were achieved in increments between 1850 and 1880. The present map from the early 1870s was part of that process. The mapmaker and its publisher are not recorded in standard cartographical references. For more on Kierski, see Palmquist, Pioneer Photographers of the Far West, p. 349. The delineator of the map, E. von Frankenberg, remains a mystery. ($3,000-4,000)

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385. [MAP]. WASHINGTON, T.A. (engineer), Cha[rle]s F. White (real estate agent) & Strickland, M[iles] (publisher). Map of Galveston & Vicinity...from Actual Surveys and Soundings, and Arrangement of Wards under the Charter of 1876. [upper left of map, text re churches, cotton presses, etc.]; References...Churches...Cemeteries...Public Squares...Hotels...Hospitals...Cotton Presses...Banks & Bankers...Railroads.... [lower left] Remarks. Bath Avenue and Streets Parallel Thereto.... [below Remarks table showing elevations and streets] Surface Elevations.... [below Surface Elevations table, untitled map of Galveston Bay area]; [lower center, untitled plat showing layout of city plots]; surrounding entire map are 69 advertisements for local merchants (11 of which are illustrations of mercantile architecture). Galveston, 1876. Lithograph map printed on two joined sheets with original hand coloring, mounted on original cartographical linen attached to brown wooden rollers, original varnish; line border of map proper: 109 x 69 cm; neat line to neat line: 127.5 cm x 86.8 cm; overall sheet size: 129 x 90 cm. Varnish moderately darkened on right side, edges chipped (with slightly losses on right side mainly affecting neat line but also slightly affecting small portions of map), lower portion 10 cm of map chipped with some loss of text and images (due to contact with lower wooden roller), remains of original selvedge. Overall a decent copy of a fragile, rare survival. No copies located by OCLC, but Rosenberg Library has a copy of this issue with entire lower pictorial border trimmed away. UT Austin a copy of the version without surrounding ads.

     First edition, best issue, with the surrounding illustrated ads documenting architecture and business history. See Taliaferro, Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library 356A, 356B & 356C. A copy of the third issue sold at the TSHA benefit auction in 2006 @$16,500. The map is the first to record the devastation of the eastern tip of the island by the 1875 hurricane. Speaking of Galveston maps in his introduction (p. 19), Taliaferro remarks: “It is the ephemeral quality of the city and its environs in the face of ongoing natural events that makes the study of old maps of Galveston especially rewarding for insight into the important currents of the city’s history.” ($7,500-15,000)

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386. [MAP]. WEBER, C[harles] F. Untitled lithograph map of Contra Costa County, California. [Title on upper pocket wrapper] Weber’s Map of Contra Costa County California Showing Towns, Steam and Electric Railroads, Wagon and Automobile Roads, Township and Section Lines, Rivers, Creeks, Reclamation and Irrigation Districts, Etc. Compiled from the Latest Official and Private Sources. [above lower border at right] Copyright 1914 by Punnett Brothers [box at lower right, key and publisher information] Explanation... Published by C.F. Weber & Co.... San Francisco & Los Angeles, 1914. Lithograph map with county name and boundaries in pink; border to border: 48 x 66 x 47 cm; overall sheet size: 50.6 x 68.6 cm., folded into original printed brown paper covers. Except for a few minor clean splits to map (no losses), fine.

     First edition. OCLC locates copies at the Huntington Library, University of California at Berkeley, and University of California at Davis. The map includes eastern San Francisco, San Bruno Mountain, Oakland, Angel Island, southern Solano County, western San Joaquin County, and northern Alameda County. Some of the old ranches are shown, such as Rancho las Positas, Rancho Valle, Rancho San Lorenzo, Rancho Canada de Los Vaqueros, etc. ($200-400)

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387. [MAP]. WEBSTER, James. Map of the United States...Engraved by Wm. Chapin... [lower right, between title and copyright: large portrait of George Washington within oval decorative border]. [New York, 1836]. Engraved map, original outline color, piano-key border; neat line to neat line: 41 x 50.2 cm; foldout letterpress broadside: Travellers Guide and Statistical View of the United States (45.5 x 56.3 cm), folded into original pocket covers, original black leather over stiff boards covered with black paper. Minor spotting to pocket covers, a few splits at folds of maps neatly mended, broadside slightly trimmed at upper left corner with very small loss of decorative border. Overall a very good, fresh copy.

     American Imprints 42373. Rumsey 3450. Sabin 102324. The makers of such pocket maps extensively borrowed, stole, traded, and legitimately purchased from one another the information found in such guides. Webster’s guide is no exception, and Mitchell and Phelps are among the conjectured sources for the present work. Of special interest is the exuberantly engraved and charmingly executed portrait of George Washington done with a variety of engraving techniques (including stipple and line engraving). Fielding (p. 145) states: “Chapin’s large map of the United States is said to be the first map engraved upon steel in this country” (see American Imprints 54885 & Phillips, America, p. 892). This map and guide show the young Republic west of the Missouri Territory and includes Long’s Peak. The territories of tribes are located, such as the Comanche, Black Foot, Sioux, Iowa, and Cheyenne. Most of present-day Texas is shown, although still designated as part of Mexico. ($600-1,200)

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388. [MAP]. WEISHAMPEL, John F[rederick], Jr. (publisher) & William Sides (surveyor). [Original printed title] Map of Baltimore...1859. [Title on printed pasteover cancel slip] Map of Baltimore... The Blue Lines indicate the Route of the City Passenger Railway. The Red Lines are not to be regarded... [above neat line] Wm. Sides Surveyor Balto. Lith. by A. Hoen... [3 printed pasteover slips].Baltimore, 1859. Lithograph map, printed colored lines (red for old wards), contemporary blue hand-color (as issued) indicating city railway passenger lines; neat line to neat line: 33 x 36.5 cm; overall sheet size: 36.5 x 48 cm; folded into publisher’s purple cloth pocket covers, printed goldenrod label on upper cover. Fine copy.

     First edition, later issue of a map that was distributed several times, each version in a different configuration. The original apparently lacked indication of the railroad lines and the pasted-on materials found here. Intermediate variants may be found; however, all are dated 1859. The street railway opened in 1859 with horse-drawn conveyances and expanded tremendously after that. This issue of the map probably dates from later than 1859, judging from the extent of the system. This serviceable map was clearly updated from time to time as developments required but never fundamentally altered. The same lithograph map was used, and the changes were indicated through pasteovers and manuscript alterations. ($300-600)

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389. [MAP]. WELLS, J[ohn] G[aylord]. Wells’ New Rail Road and Township Map of Missouri and Eastern Kansas from the Latest Government Surveys. J.G. Wells, 11 Beekman St. New York. 1857. Scale of Miles... Explanation [with symbols] State Capital. County Towns. Rail Roads. Proposed Rail Roads... Lith. V. Keil 181 William St. N.Y. [centered below lower ornamental border] Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1857, by J.G. Wells, in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York. New York, 1857. Lithograph map of Eastern Kansas, all of Missouri, and parts of Indian Territory, Nebraska, Iowa, Arkansas, and Illinois, printed on bank note paper, full hand coloring, borders in bright rose pink, ornate border of grapes, grape leaves, Native American portrait in oval at each corner; neat line to neat line: 42.8 x 63 cm; border to border: 51 x 71 cm; overall sheet size: 60 x 79 cm; folded into original green embossed cloth, title lettered in gilt on upper cover (Wells’ New Map of Missouri and Eastern Kansas), printed yellow endpaper affixed to inside upper cover (Wells’ List of New Publications). Mild age toning to map, a few stains at top left, clean splits at a few folds (no losses), overall a fine copy with brilliant color. Uncommon (one copy of the 1858 edition located by OCLC, University of Virginia at Charlottesville). Very rare pocket map showing the early stage of railroad development in Missouri and eastern Kansas.

     First edition. Not in Modelski’s railroad bibliographies, or other standard sources. Railroads began to be important in the region in the late 1850s, but ironically, the only railroad shown on this map is the Pacific Railroad Line between St. Louis (“The Gateway to the West”) and Jefferson City, with shorter trunk lines to the north and south of St. Louis. On the other hand, several proposed lines are indicated, such as one from Jefferson City to Kansas City, and another from Keosauqua, Iowa, to Kansas City. The mysterious Wells’ cartographic output was short-lived and vigorous, and all his maps are very rare. ($2,500-5,000)

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390. [MAP]. WHITSETT, W.P. (real estate developer) & V.J. Rowan (Surveyor). Van Nuys-Lankershim 47000-Acre Subdivision [at upper right] Suburban Los Angeles Homes...Rancho Ex Mission de San Fernando Los Angeles County California—V.J. Rowan Surveyor Nov. 1910 [along lower margin] Bdwy. 3525 Phones Home F 2369. W.P. Whitsett.... Los Angeles, 1910. Lithograph map with numbered lots and named streets (circled lot numbers indicating lots sold), overall sheet size: 61 x 97 cm. Creased where folded, upper edge lightly chipped, small void at right blank margin (not affecting image); overall fine.

     Three versions of the basic map are known to exist. They are identified by the presence of the developer’s name, in our case, W.P. Whitsett. Two other versions bear the names of developer J.M. Johnson and the Janss Investment Company. For more on Whitsett (1875-1965), see Merle Armitage, Success is No Accident: the Biography of William Paul Whitsett (Manzanita Press, 1959). The subdivision shown was from the lands of Rancho Ex-San Fernando. The grant derived its name from the secularized Mission San Fernando Rey de España, but was called ex-Mission because of the division of the lands held in the name of the Mission. The grant encompassed a great deal of present-day San Fernando Valley. The San Fernando Valley was a series of booms and busts from the time it was explored in 1769 by the Portola expedition until it was annexed by the city of Los Angeles in 1915. The present map documents the final transition of the area before it became part of the city. The factors that spurred development were increased regional transportation, the promise of availability of water from Owens Valley, and real estate development ventures, as documented in the present map. ($250-500)

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391. [MAP]. WILLIAMS, C.S. Map of Texas from the Most Recent Authorities. Philadelphia: Published by C.S. Williams N.E. corner of Market & 7th. Streets...1845 [inset map at lower left] Texas North of Red River. [Philadelphia, 1846]. Lithograph map with original full coloring of counties and regions, ornate border, border to border: 30.8 x 38.3 cm. Except for light marginal browning, very fine copy of an early county map of Texas from an atlas. ($300-600)

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392. [MAP]. ZÚÑIGA Y ONTIVEROS, Felipe de. Manuscript map: “El presente Mapa Demuestra la cituacion, plano, y repartimiento, que en la actualidad tienen los Arroyos que bajan de Sierra Nevada, y giran entre Poniente, y Sur respecto de ella para la Provincia de Chalco, juntandose todos frente del Pueblo de Santiago Ayapanco...Fecho para mayor claridad, e instruccion de la Y. Archicofradia del SSmo Sacramento de esta Sta Iglecia en la vista de ojos qe. extrajudicialmte. practicò D. Phelipe de Zuñiga y Ontiveros, Philo-Mathemco. de esta Corte Agrimensor por S.M. de Tierras, Aguas y Minas del Reyño, en lo 18 [de] Mayo de 1768. De cu[y]o original salió este ala letra y tamaño Mexico 31 de Agosto de 1770.” Mexico, 1770. Bird’s-eye view (southeastern region of the Valley of Mexico, whimsical sun with face rising between the snow-capped volcanoes Iztaccíhuatl and Popocatépetl at top; located are bodies of water, roads, villages, towns, churches), in sepia ink and watercolor wash on paper mounted on cartographic linen; overall sheet size: 85.4 x 32.5 cm. Except for old folds and closed tear at left, very fine.

     This extremely fine and historically important manuscript was made as part of an irrigation and flood control project for the Valley of Mexico around 1770. What we have in the present artifact is the Bourbon approach to solving the drainage and flooding problem that continued to plague the world’s greatest city. The idea was to change the course of a river by constructing a dam shown on the map southwest of the Hacienda de Alculco. The present map is not only a splendid artifact with great aesthetic appeal, but an important one for the history of irrigation, flood control, engineering, land use, and geography in America. See Ola Apenes (Mapas Antiguos del Valle de Mexico, Mexico: Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Instituto de Historia) Plate 23 for a reproduction, and Entry 25, where the map is described and ownership is listed as private. ($25,000-50,000)

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393. [MAP: BLUEBACK]. BLUNT, E. & G. W. Chart of the Gulf of Mexico, West Indies, and Spanish Main.... Entered According to Act of Congress, in the Year 1845, by E & G.W. Blunt in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York. 1845. [at far left] The Survey of the Coast of Texas is by Comr. E.W. Moore, T.N. [7 insets of harbors]. New York, 1845. Engraved blueback chart on three sheets joined, mounted on customary blue paper, overall sheet size: 67 x 216.5 cm. Rolled, as used (with light creasing with a few slight tears, but no losses), one modern reinforcement closing a tear, overall fine, a few red markings (probably for lighthouses). On verso is original printed pictorial label (22 x 14 cm) of Hagger & Brothers of Baltimore. Label moderately insect damaged with some loss. Housed in contemporary oak box with original brass hinges and original hook and eye, stenciled in ink on lid “N. Young.” Box lightly worn.

     The present map is an example of a very interesting, colorful, and rare type of sailing chart that was in use for decades. The name comes from the sturdy blue paper backing to make sailing charts more durable during voyages. The buyer could buy the sheets of the map needed for a voyage; thus the present blueback’s area is the northern sheet of the next map (see next lot). There are two reasons the blueback charts are ephemeral. The charts received hard use at sea, and as soon as new discoveries were made, the old charts were dangerous to keep on hand. The present chart shows the entirety of the Texas coast and the Gulf Mexico from Florida to the tip of Yucatán and northern Cuba. This chart has two interesting Texas connections: at upper left is the reference to Commodore E.W. Moore of the Texas Navy, and some of the insets are the work of W. Hooker, who engraved the Texas maps that accompany the two editions of Mary Austin Holley’s famous book on Texas, and Fiske’s A Visit to Texas. Streeter in his entry (1408) for William Blunt’s North Coast of the Gulf of Mexico, from St. Marks to Galveston (1842) mentions the present chart and describes it as “a huge affair.” ($3,000-6,000)

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394. [MAP: BLUEBACK]. BLUNT, E. & G.W.Chart of the Gulf of Mexico, West Indies, and Spanish Main...Entered According to Act of Congress, in the Year 1845, by E & G.W. Blunt in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York. 1845. Additions to 1852... [12 insets of harbors]. New York, [1852 or after]. Engraved blueback chart mounted on customary heavy blue paper, with original tan cloth selvages, approximately 38-1/4 x 84-1/2 inches. Rolled, as used (with resultant crinkling and creasing with a few slight tears), a few modern reinforcements on verso, overall a very good copy of a genre of map that saw much usage and was often destroyed. Contemporary ink label on verso (West Indies), chipped with loss of a few letters. A rare survival of an American blueback. This type of chart was available for purchase in sheets of the geographic region to be sailed, and there is no exact equivalent to it in OCLC.

     The present map is an example of a very interesting, colorful, and rare type of sailing chart that was in use for decades. The name comes from the sturdy blue paper backing to make sailing charts more durable during voyages. There are two reasons the blueback charts are ephemeral. They received hard use at sea, and as soon as new discoveries were made, the old charts were dangerous to keep on hand. This huge map shows the entirety of the Texas coast and the Gulf Mexico from Florida to Yucatán. This blueback sailing chart has two interesting Texas connections. There is a reference to Commodore E.W. Moore of the Texas Navy, and some of the insets are the work of W. Hooker, who engraved the Texas maps that accompany the two editions of Mary Austin Holley’s famous book on Texas, and Fiske’s A Visit to Texas. Streeter in his entry (1408) for William Blunt’s North Coast of the Gulf of Mexico, from St. Marks to Galveston (1842) mentions the present chart and describes it as “a huge affair.” ($3,000-6,000)

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395. [MAP: BLUEBACK]. BLUNT, E. & G.W. The North Coast of the Gulf of Mexico, from St. Marks to Galveston...1844. Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1842...Additions to 1865 including the Surveys of Comr. Powell, Lt. Simmes, & Profr. Coffin, U.S. Navy. [inset at upper right] Bar & Entrance of Mobile Bay, Surveyed under the direction of Major J. Kearney; Topogl. Engr. [tide table below inset]. New York, 1865 or after. Lithograph blueback chart, with a few contemporary yellow and red manuscript markings at various places, scale about 12 miles to the inch; neat line to neat line: 62.7 x 98.5 cm; overall sheet size: 65.7 x 100.5 cm. Rolled as used (resulting in two light vertical creases), slightly scorched at top blank margin. Overall very good, much better than these bluebacks are usually found. OCLC locates two editions (1852 and 1864 with sparse holdings, but none for this 1865 edition).

     This impressive blueback chart shows shows cities, towns, military posts, islands, and coastal formations along the Gulf of Mexico from the mouth of the Mississippi River to Appalachee Bay. Phillips, America (p. 253) lists an 1842 edition. Streeter (1408) lists an 1851 edition: “The western boundary of this chart is at the 90th meridian, or that of New Orleans and Barataria Bay, so it does not show any part of Texas. It is included only because of its title.” See preceding entry for information on the firm of E. & G.W. Blunt. ($1,500-3,000)

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396. [MAP: TEXAS CATTLE TRAIL]. KANSAS PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. [Pictorial title at lower left of map, with illustration of a longhorn head] Kansas Pacific Railway. The Best and Shortest Cattle Trail from Texas 1872. Lithograph map on banknote paper showing Texas and parts of Indian Territory, Arkansas Territory, Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico, neat line to neat line: 56.5 x 40.5 cm; folded into original yellow printed wrappers, stitched; title on upper wrapper: Guide Map of the Great Texas Cattle Trail...1873 [title page] Guide Map of the Best and Shortest Cattle Trail to the Kansas Pacific Railway.... St. Louis, Missouri: Levison & Blythe, 1873. [1-3] 4-15 [1, blank] pp. Wrappers slightly stained and repaired, spine reinforced with matching paper tape obscuring a small amount of text, hinge weak, interior fine except for very light age-toning. Map with a few minor, light stains, but overall the map is very fine. The Thomas W. Streeter-Alexander Dienst copy, with notes by both.

     Second separate edition(?), map dated 1872 and pamphlet dated 1873. Adams, Herd 1256 (this copy). Howes W293n. Streeter Sale 2364 (this copy): “This little map and guide to the ‘Great Texas Cattle Trail’ though issued gratuitously has become one of the great prizes for collectors, and substantial sums have been paid even for the later issue of the map and guide, dated 1875. The map shows various cattle routes from points in Texas to Camp Concho, where the L.B. Harris Trail begins, and to Red River Station, which is shown as the beginning of the Ellsworth Trail.” For other editions and appearances of the map in general, including its appearance in Weston’s Guide, see Adams (Herd 1255, 1257, 2496, 2497); Baughman, Kansas in Maps, pp. 80-81; Eberstadt, Texas 162:126; Fifty Texas Rarities (44); Graff 2275; Howes (W293 & W294); Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, pp. 10-11, 20 & 26;Rader 2139; Reese, Six Score 113 (“one of the first depictions of the Texas trails”); and Streeter Sale 2028. ($6,000-10,000)

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397. [MAP: TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO SEQUENCE]. DISTURNELL, John. Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico....1847. New York, 1847. Copper-engraved map on two joined sheets, original hand coloring, neat line to neat line: 74.5 x 103.4 cm, folded into original bright red cloth pocket covers. Minimal age-toning along some folds and at center (as usual), otherwise an exceptionally fine, fresh copy, as issued.

     “Eighth edition,” according to Col. Lawrence Martin’s “Disturnell’s Map” in Treaties and Other International Acts of the United States of America, Edited by Hunter Miller, pp. 351-352. Martin & Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 1513-1900, pp. 37-38, 137-139, Color Plate XII & Plate 38: “Disturnell issued this map in twenty-three separate editions between 1846 and 1858. Because it was the most available map of Mexico, it assumed a lasting place in history when Nicholas P. Trist, the American plenipotentiary, used Disturnell’s map in negotiating the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which ended the U.S.-Mexican War and extended the western boundary of the United States to the Pacific Ocean. Differences soon arose over the wording of the treaty vis-à-vis the actual depiction on Disturnell’s map of the Rio Grande and the position of the city of El Paso. The lands in question were particularly important to the prospective railroad route to California and its newly discovered gold mines, a controversy which resulted in the United States purchase in 1854 of the Gadsden Territory, which rounded out the new U.S. boundaries.” See also: Cohen, Mapping the West, pp. 142-144. Ristow, “John Disturnell’s Map of the United Mexican States,” in A la Carte, pp. 204-221. Rittenhouse, Disturnell’s Treaty Map, pp. 5, 15-18: “Few maps in United States history have had a role as interesting as that of the Disturnell Map.” Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Plate 170 & p. 276. Streeter Sale 254, 255, 256, 257, 278. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 507, 540, 556, 606, 669; Vol. III, pp. 35-37, 45, 51-52, 77-78, 141. Wheat, Maps of the California Gold Region 33, 37, pp. 20 & 24. ($20,000-40,000)

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398. [MAP: TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO SEQUENCE]. TANNER, Henry Schenck. A Map of the United States of Mexico....Second Edition, 1837....Entered According to Act of Congress, the 2nd. day of April, 1832. Philadelphia, 1837. Copper-engraved map on bank note paper, original color (outline color for boundaries, full color for Texas and Mexico including the latter’s territories in California, New Mexico, etc.); neat line to neat line: 57.4 x 73.6 cm. Original purple cloth pocket covers lettered in gilt on upper cover: Mexico. Thomas W. Streeter’s copy with his distinctive pencil notes. Map backed with archival tissue. A bit of very mild age-toning where formerly folded, a few neat repairs and very minor losses at folds, overall fine with good, strong color. Exceedingly rare in commerce and in institutional holdings (none listed in OCLC or American Imprints).

     “Second edition,” first published in 1825, and the genesis of the subsequent boundary dispute involving Disturnell’s map. The present edition is not listed by Col. Martin, but it is an intermediary version between Col. Martin’s (d) and (e). Not in other standard sources, but see: Ristow, “John Disturnell’s Map of the United Mexican States,” in A la Carte, pp. 207. Jackson, Shooting the Sun, pp. 387-389 & Plate 87. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 364, & Vol. II, pp. 229-230. Stephen F. Austin’s surveys are shown in Texas, and Tanner was the engraver-publisher for Austin’s cornerstone map of Texas. Shown on the map are the Alamo and the Battle of San Jacinto (Bat. 21. Apl. 1836 next to Lynchburg). This 1837 edition is the earliest of the Tanner sequence maps to show the Alamo and the Battle of San Jacinto, which Tanner first engraved on Stephen F. Austin’s 1836 map of Texas. ($10,000-20,000)

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399. [MAP: TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO SEQUENCE]. WHITE, [Elihu], [William] Gallaher & [Norman] White. Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico.... New York, 1828. Copper-engraved map, original outline hand coloring; neat line to neat line: 72.5 x 103 cm; overall sheet size: 72.9 x 103.4 cm. Splits at folds consolidated by archival tissue backing (a few instances of slight overlapping, affecting a river or name), mild foxing and offsetting. Margins trimmed close, affecting copyright notice at lower right below neat line. Overall a very good copy of a notoriously rare map, difficult to find in fine condition.

     First edition of a map that became pivotal to American expansion into the West. Martin, “Disturnell’s Map” in Treaties and Other International Acts of the United States of America, p. 344: “There were twenty-four editions of the ‘Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico,’ one published by White, Gallaher & White [in 1828] and twenty-three published by Disturnell.” Cohen, Mapping the West, p. 144. Martin & Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 1513-1900, Plate 37 & p. 137. Martin & Ristow, “John Disturnell’s Map of the United Mexican States” in Ristow’s A la Carte,pp. 206-212 (first bibliographical entry in “Table for Identifying Variant Editions of John Disturnell’s Mapa de los Estados de Méjico). Raines, p. 250. Rittenhouse, Disturnell’s Treaty Map, pp. 13-16 (#1). Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 276. Streeter Sale 222. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West #384, Vol. II, pp. 95-96 & Vol. III, p. 36. ($25,000-35,000)

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400. [MAP: TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO SEQUENCE]. ROSA. Mapa de los Estados Unidos Mejicanos.... Paris, 1851. Engraved map with original outline coloring, sectioned and mounted on cartographical linen (18 sections); neat line to neat line: 57.7 x 72 cm. Light to moderate browning and staining, a few pinholes in blank margins. Professionally conserved and remounted on linen. Fine copy of an extremely rare map.

     Second edition of the Rosa version of the Treaty map. The Rosa map was first published in 1837. This 1851 edition is identical to Rosa’s 1837 edition except for the changed date in the title and the hand-colored boundary lines. Martin, “Disturnell’s Map” in Treaties and Other International Acts of the United States of America Edited by Hunter Miller (Vol. V, pp. 343-344): “An independent plagiarism of Tanner’s map of Mexico.... This map was brought into the argument concerning the boundary marking in 1853.” ($5,000-10,000)

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401. [MAP & GUIDE]. COLTON, J[oseph] H[utchins]. Colton’s Traveler and Tourist’s Route-Book through the United States...by Railroads, Stage-Roads, Canals, Lakes and Rivers.... New York, 1851. [i-ii, blank] [iii-iv, title & copyright notice], [v] vi-xi [index to routes] [1, blank], 13-134, 1-16 (publishers’ catalogue), [2, publisher’s note, verso blank] pp., 2 lithograph maps with original color, the second map being a fine, handsome, oversize production. 12mo, original brown ribbed cloth, upper cover with elaborate gilt-embossed scene illustrated with train and steamboat within ornate botanical border and title in gilt. End leaves and first and last leaves moderately foxed, remainder of text with only occasional light foxing, both maps very fine with brilliant original color. Overall an excellent copy, given the hard use of such guides.

     Second edition (the first edition was the prior year, and the guide went through many subsequent editions). Howes C624: “Includes material on California, Oregon, and Texas, with overland routes, etc.” Rumsey 172 (1852 edition). Sabin 14793. Routes by steamboat and stage within Texas and beyond are on pp. 88-89. Routes for Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Utah are included. Two of the inset maps relate to the California Gold Rush: the upper inset of the proposed line of the Panama Railroad; and the inset of the U.S. showing the gold regions in California and the two overland routes from Independence, the northern route going to San Francisco via Salt Lake City, and the southern route going to San Diego via Santa Fe. No wonder Colton was such a successful entrepreneur. It would be difficult to find a better, more complete guide for a rapidly changing nation on the move. ($750-1,500)

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402. [MAP REFERENCE]. BECKER, Robert H. Designs on the Land. Diseños of California Ranchos and Their Makers with Text by Robert H. Becker. San Francisco: [Grabhorn-Hoyem for] The Book Club of California, 1969. [143] pp., 65 sepia-tone and full-color maps of ranchos, two of which are folded. Oblong folio, original half tan suede over brown cloth, title branded on spine. A superb copy.

     First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Book Club of California 133. Grabhorn-Hoyem (1966-1973) 29. Reese, Six Score 9: “This book depicts contemporary maps of ranchos in California from the Mexican period. A beautiful book, designed by the Grabhorns and printed in an edition of 500.” Zamorano Select 7: “Understanding how California was mapped is crucial to fully grasping the history of the state.” David Hornbeck, “Patenting of California’s Private Land Claims, 1851-1885” in Geographical Review, Vol. 69, No. 4, October, 1979, pp. 434-435: “The acquisition of California by the United States in 1848 and the subsequent rapid immigration of American settlers and miners provide an example of a contact situation in which the incoming group quickly assumed political and economic dominance. The conflict was further exacerbated because of the proviso in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, in which the United States agreed to protect property rights of Mexican citizens.... The most pressing problem was to distinguish Mexican land grants from public domain. The resolution of that controversy was of paramount importance to the settlement and the economic growth of California after 1850.” ($200-400)

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403. [MAP REFERENCE]. COLTON, J.H. Catalogue of Maps, Charts, Books, &c., Published by J.H. Colton & Co., 172 William Street, Corner of Beekman, New-York: Pudney’s & Russell, Printers, 79 John-Street [wrapper title]. New York, n.d. [1855?]. 36 pp. 12mo (15 x 8.5 cm), original pale green wrappers, title within ornate border on upper cover, stitched. Light wear and mild staining to wraps, interior very fine.     OCLC locates one copy of a Colton catalogue with 36 pp.; the copy is at Duke University with an attributed date of 1855.

     First edition. A most useful and detailed cartobibliographical tool for the study of Colton’s maps. For instance, on p. 23, Colton lists Jacob de Cordova’s great map of Texas in both large and medium format. The large format map is priced at $3.50 mounted and $2.00 in case. Colton remarks: “These are the only correct, reliable maps of Texas. They exhibit minutely and with distinctness the natural features of the State and the several political divisions.” ($300-600)

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404. [MAP REFERENCE]. SILVESTRE, Marguerite. Inventaire raisonné des collections cartographiques Vandermaelen conservées a la Biblothèque Royale de Belgique. V. L’Atlas Universel (1825-1827). Brussels: Belgium Royal Library, 2011. [1-4] 5-681 [1, colophon] pp., color and black & white text illustrations. 4to, publisher’s black cloth, gilt-lettered on upper cover and spine. Brand new, still in original shipping materials; never opened.

     First edition. A stupendous tour-de-force of cartographic scholarship describing in detail various issues and editions of Philippe Vandermaelen’s atlas, beautifully and carefully printed in a substantial volume. Part of a continuing series describing the library’s superb map and atlas collection. (See Vandermaelen’ maps herein.) ($60-120)

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405. [MAP REFERENCE]. WHEAT, Carl I[rving]. Mapping the Transmississippi West.... San Francisco: Grabhorn Press for the Institute of Historical Cartography, 1957-1963. Copious maps illustrated, some folding and/or in color. 5 vols in 6, folio (37 x 26.5 cm), original green textured cloth over tan linen, gilt-lettered spines. Other than a few very inconsequential spots to a couple of the bindings, an exceptionally fine, complete set, interior pristine. Laid in is original prospectus with small blue label of International Booksellers on first leaf, and their blue ink stamp at end. Original plain brown dust jackets present.

     First edition (1,000 sets printed). Grabhorn 590. Hill II:1850. Howell, California 50:1655. Rittenhouse 640. Streeter Sale 4416. From Archibald Hanna’s review of Vol. I only, in The American Historical Review, Vol. 63, No. 4 (July, 1958), pp. 1000-1001: “‘For as Geography without History seemeth a carkasse without motion; so History without Geography wandreth as a Vagrant without a certaine Habitation.’ This quotation from Captain John Smith, which serves as an introduction to the first section of Mr. Wheat’s bibliography, is a truth that has all too often been neglected by historians.... To say that this work fills a gap would be an understatement.... The fruit of twenty years of painstaking scholarship, Wheat’s work is one which no reference library can do without and which no historian of the West can afford to ignore. To add delight to solid worth, it has been handsomely printed by the Grabhorn Press.” ($2,000-4,000)

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406. MARYSVILLE APPEAL (publisher). [DIRECTORY] McKENNEY, L.M. (compiler). The Marysville Appeal Directory of Northern California! for 1878, Embracing a Complete Directory of Residents in the Counties of Butte, Colusa, Nevada, Placer, Sutter, Tehama and Yuba, including the Cities and Towns, with Historical and Statistical Sketch of Each. A New and Prominent Feature of This Directory, is the fact that Every Resident Land Owner in these Seven Counties Appears, with the Number of Acres and Post Office Address. It is Invaluable to Business Men, Merchants, Manufacturers. Professional Men and Artisans are Included in the Work, Containing Over 25,000 Names. Price $3.00. Marysville: Lockwood & Dawson, Publishers, 1878. [i-iv, ads], [1-9] 10-50, [2, colored ads on card stock for Marysville Appeal], 51-104 [2, ad for Heald’s Business College on colored paper], [105-428 pp., text illustrations (ads), printed ads on pastedowns. 8vo (22.2 x 14.5), original gilt-lettered black sheep over grey printed boards. Binding slightly chipped and stained, page 7 wanting lower right corner costing a few letters, uniform light age toning, otherwise a very good copy of a rare directory.

     First edition. Rocq 1293. Quebedeaux, Prime Sources of California and Nevada Local History, 151 Rare and Important City, County and State Directories 133 (locates six copies, two of which are in private collections): “Extremely rare. This directory was L.M. McKenney’s attempt to link seven north central California counties, all rural, most agricultural, some mountainous—from Butte and Tehama in the north to Placer in the south.” ($400-800)

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407. MATTHEWS, Sallie [Ann] Reynolds. Interwoven, a Pioneer Chronicle. Houston, 1936. [i-vi] vii-x, [2], [1-2] 3-234 pp. 8vo, original orange suede cloth stamped in brown. Except for minor rubbing to the fragile binding, very fine. The suede cloth binding variant is difficult to find in collector’s condition. Front flyleaf with contemporary ink note: “Presented to me by Robt. T. Neal so that I may learn more about Texas.”

     First edition. Adams, Guns 1463: “Rare.” Adams, Herd 1454: “Good picture of early Texas ranch life and trail driving.” Basic Texas Books 139. CBC 4060. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 6. Dykes, Western High Spots, pp. 80 & 103. Howes M426. King, Women on the Cattle Trail and in the Roundup, p. 17. Reese, Six Score 78: “One of the best portraits of ranch life from a woman’s point of view.” ($600-1,200)

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408. MATTHEWS, Sallie [Ann] Reynolds. Interwoven, a Pioneer Chronicle. Houston, 1936. x, [2], 234 pp. 8vo, original tan cloth stamped in black. Light wear to edges and joints of binding, front hinge cracked (but holding), ink inscription on front fly leaf: “To Dr and Mrs Wagner from Gile and Gussie (Reynolds) Connell 1936,” in homemade craft paper d.j., else very good.

     First edition. Adams, Guns 1463: “Rare.” Adams, Herd 1454: “Good picture of early Texas ranch life and trail driving.” Basic Texas Books 139. CBC 4060. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 6. Dykes, Western High Spots, pp. 80 & 103. Howes M426. King, Women on the Cattle Trail and in the Roundup, p. 17. Reese, Six Score 78: “One of the best portraits of ranch life from a woman’s point of view.” ($600-1,200)

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409. MAUDSLAY, Anne Cary & Alfred P. Maudslay. A Glimpse at Guatemala, and Some Notes on the Ancient Monuments of Central America.... London, 1899. [i-iv] [2, inserted dedication leaf, verso blank] [v]-xvii [1, blank] [2, map and plate list, verso blank], [1] 2-289 [1, blank] pp., 57 leaves of plates, maps, and plans: Plates: 44 plates (mostly sepia tone photogravures, but including two chromolithographs of textiles and 4 line drawings; Map & plans: 13 maps, elevations, and plans (some double-page and colored or tinted), numerous text illustrations, many of which are photogravures and/or toned (iconography includes scenes, views, plans, archaeology, ethnic types). 4to, original ivory linen over boards. Outer wear and moderate soiling, as usual. The interior is exceptionally fine, the text untrimmed, and all the illustrations pristine. The high-quality photogravures are the most beautiful ever done of Central America.

     First edition. Griffin 1189. Larned 40n: “This volume is easily worth all the other books which have appeared or are likely to be published for many years, as a guide to the things which make Central America of general world interest.” Palau 158504. ($800-1,600)

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410. MAVERICK, Mary A[nn Adams]. Memoirs of Mary A. Maverick Arranged by Mary A. Maverick and Her Son Geo. Madison Maverick. Edited by Rena Maverick Green (Illustrated). San Antonio: Alamo Printing Co., 1921. [1-7] 8-136 pp., title with portrait, 16 photographic plates. 8vo (23 x 15 cm), original cream pictorial wrappers. A fine and tight copy of a book difficult to find in acceptable condition.

     First edition, first issue, line 5 on p. 64 ending “of the blacksmith shop” and line 24 of page 69 beginning “in the yard.” Adams, Herd 1460: “Gives the history of her husband’s experiences in his cattle venture, and the true origin of the term ‘maverick’ as applied to unbranded cattle.” Basic Texas Books 140: “One of the most interesting and important narratives of life in Texas during the 1830s and 1840s.... The memoirs are engrossing and colorful.... Insights into the lives of famous Texans are numerous.” CBC 351. Dobie, pp. 57, 62: “Essential.” Eberstadt, Texas 162:529. Graff 2727. Howes M443: “First woman from the States to settle in San Antonio.” King, Women on the Cattle Trail, p. 17: “Good account of early days in the Austin and San Antonio area.” Tate, The Indians of Texas 2089. ($100-200)

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411. MEGARGEE, Lon. The Cowboy Builds a Loop. Pictures by Lon Megargee. Text by Roy George. [Phoenix], 1933. [122] pp., 28 wood block plates. 4to, original stamped tan boards. Light wear to board edges, previous owner’s book plate and ink markings on inside upper board, tape stain on front free end sheet, text unopened, else fine. Personal letter from Lon Megargee affixed to front free end sheet. Unopened.

     First edition, limited edition. Megargee is considered's Arizona's first cowboy artist. ($250-500)

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412. [MEMORY GAME]. Untitled, unattributed lithograph images with captions. N.p., n.d. [Mexico, 1855]. 2 sets of 24 images each mounted on contemporary heavy card stock. Each card measures approximately 7 x 4 cm. Except for soiling and fading, very good, old adhesive stains on rectos.

     These unusual miniature Mexican lithographs are a memory game intended to teach children the alphabet. Each letter is accompanied by a word, an illustration, and a two-line verse, some of which teach moral lessons in a humorous way. For example, for clock, the verse reads, “El relox y la muger | cuerda y llave han menester.” The verse for the dentist is: “Que oficio tan hechicero | Sacar dientes y...dinero!” The game was played by randomly placing all cards face down in a rectangular pattern. Then the first player turned over two cards. If the cards matched, the player removed and kept the cards; if not, the two cards were turned face down again, and the other player took a turn. The winner was the one who had the most cards when all had been removed. This item fits with the genre of types and costumes, illustrating occupations and pastimes such as newlyweds, drunks, pickpockets, alms givers, fandango, dentist, etc. According to Quiñónez (Mexicanos en su Tinta: Calendarios, p. 143, #62), these lithos were issued as part of the Calendario de Murguía for 1855 on a single sheet meant to be cut apart, as here. The lithos are illustrated at p. 82 (Plate 62) in Quiñónez. ($600-1,200)

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413. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. Oaxaqueños: El honor de nuestras armas no se ha manchado en Veracruz.... Oaxaca: Ignacio Rincon, 1847. Broadside. Professionally restored. Mild stain at horizontal crease, minor loss of a few letters at center, occasional small wormholes touching a few letters, otherwise a very good copy of a highly unusual statement, and a rare survival.

     This broadside is a Oaxaca printing of a fervent report on the surrender of Mexican forces in Veracruz to General Scott on March 28, 1847. Not in Garrett & Goodwin, or other standard sources; no copies reported on OCLC. The text graphically describes the horrors of the Siege of Veracruz and praises Mexican forces and officials for their conduct during the battle, while criticizing the U.S. for the viciousness of the bombardment. Especially singled out are the Mexican doctors, who stayed at their posts even under heavy shelling. In conclusion, the Mexican conduct under the circumstances filled the writer with admiration. In lofty and furious language, the writer compares the brave Mexican soldiers to the ancient Numantians, and General Scott to Scipio. The Siege of Veracruz was the very first large-scale amphibious assault conducted by U.S. military forces and ended with the surrender and occupation of the city. ($400-600)

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414. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. El Sonorense. Periodico Oficial del Gobierno de Sonora. [At end] Hermosillo, Enero 20 de 1847...Imprenta del Gobierno de Sonora, dirigida por Jesus P. Siqueires, [1847]. Vol. 1, No. 27 (18 February 1847). [1] 2-4 pp., printed in double columns. Folio. Mild overall age toning, small piece missing from upper left corner, two small wormholes at lower right blank margin and one in center (the latter affecting one letter), lower blank margin slightly dusty; overall very good copy of an issue of a rare Borderlands newspaper.

     First edition. About half of this issue is devoted to up-to-the-minute news on the Mexican-American War. Page 4 has a report dated at Encarnacíon January 23, 1847, by General José Vicente Miñon, who was leading one of Santa Anna’s cavalry brigades in the Army of the North and threatening General Taylor’s supply lines. Miñon reports that he has captured an American Army advance column at Encarnación [de Guzmán], a reference to the taking of belligerent Major Solon Borland and his Mounted Arkansas Rifles at an area just south of Saltillo. Two chiefs, four officers, and seventy-six were taken prisoners of war, according to this report. Miguel Galindo, a Mexican who was scouting for the column, was executed on the spot as a traitor. ($300-600)

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415. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. [ALCARAZ, Ramón, Guillermo Prieto, et al]. Apuntes para la historia de la guerra entre México y los Estados-Unidos. Mexico: Tipografía de Manuel Payno (Hijo), calle de Santa Clara, N. 23 [and Ignacio Cumplido], 1848 [-1849]. [i-iii] iv-v [1, blank], [2, verso blank], [1] 2-401 [3] pp., 2 statistical tables on recto and verso of folding leaf, 27 lithograph plates: 13 maps and plans (folding), plus 14 portraits. 8vo, contemporary half green leather over green mottled boards, spine gilt-lettered and decorated (binding chafed but professionally recased and restored). Light to moderate waterstaining (sometimes touching text or images).

     First edition of the primary first-hand account of the Mexican-American War written by the Mexicans themselves; suppressed by Santa-Anna, who ordered that all copies be rounded up and burned. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, p. 3: “An excellent source of material for the Mexican side of the war. It is generally critical of Santa-Anna.” Haferkorn, p. 8. Howes A105: “The original Spanish edition was suppressed by Santa-Anna.” Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 24 & 56. Palau 14138. Rader 74. Raines, p. 170. Sabin 1858 & 48281: “Extremely rare.” Streeter Sale 279. Tutorow 3254: “Alcaraz and about a dozen associates met in Querétaro in 1847 to write their accounts of the war. Charges the U.S. with territorial aggression in Texas and blames the U.S. for starting the war.” ($1,000-2,000)

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416. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. CURRIER, Nathaniel. Battle of Cerro Gordo April 18th 1847;[followed by three-line text describing the battle] The troops ascended the long and difficult slope of Cerro Gordo...; [below lower neat line] [Lith. & Pub. by N. Currier, | Entered according to the Act of Congress in the year 1847 by N. Currier, in the Clerk’s office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York;[at left and right of title] American Loss 43 Killed 164 Missing | Mexican Loss 2000 Killed & Wounded; | [at very bottom center margin] 464. Lithograph with original hand coloring (vivid battle scene filled with action and clouds of smoke). Neat line to neat line: 21.1 x 32.4 cm. Marginal browning (especially at bottom, from former framing), tape repairs on verso, large closed tear (12 cm) at left (no loss to image).

     Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, pp. 23-24; Figure 12 (showing a different version of print, without text below). Tyler, The Mexican War, A Lithographic Record, pp. 37-39, 52 (illustrated Plate 32), noting the inaccuracy of the view and suggested it was based on other sources. Cerro Gordo lay between the already conquered Veracruz and now vulnerable Mexico City. Army Corps of Engineers Captain Robert E. Lee discovered a mountain trail around Santa-Anna’s position. General Scott quickly moved the main body of his command along the trail, out-flanking the Mexicans. A sharp action on April 18, 1847, resulted in the retreat of Santa-Anna’s forces. ($100-200)

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417. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. CURRIER, Nathaniel. Bombardment of Vera Cruz | March 25th. 1847; [below neat line] Lith. & Pub. by N. Currier | Entered according to the Act of Congress in the year 1847 by N. Currier, in the Clerk’s office of the District Court of the Southern District of N.Y. | 152 Nassau St. Cor. of Spruce N.Y.; [left of title] American Army under Genl. Scott 12,100;[right of title] American Loss 15 Killed, 50 Wounded;[text below title] The bombardment commenced on the 22nd of March at 4 1/4 o’clock P.M. and was incessant day and night until the morning of the 26th, at which time overtures were made by the enemy for a capitulation of the City and also of the Castle of San Juan de Ulloa (the Gibraltar of America) and the city... [below text at lower center] 458. Lithograph with original hand coloring (battle scene with “Old Rough & Ready” at left on his horse giving instructions to soldiers, one of whom is maneuvering a cannon toward the castle of San Juan de Ulúa in the faint distance). Neat line to neat line: 21.1 x 32.4 cm; image & text below: 24.2 x 32.4 cm; overall sheet size: 25.4 x 35.6 cm. Moderate foxing, old mounts on verso, edges ragged in a few places. Image fine and bright.

     Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, pp. 21-22; Figure 8 (showing a different version of print, without text below). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 188. Tyler, The Mexican War, A Lithographic Record, pp. 32 (illustrated p. 45). After a twenty-day siege (March 9-29), the first large-scale amphibious assault by U.S. forces, Veracruz, then considered the strongest fortress in the Western Hemisphere, fell to U.S. forces under major General Scott. On the 25th, the Mexicans called for a cease-fire to discuss surrender terms. Scott lost more men to yellow fever than bullets in this pivotal battle. ($100-200)

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418. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. [Assault] at Contreras;[below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.8 x 42.5 cm; overall sheet size: 38.4 x 53.5 cm. Old offsetting in blank margins touching image along top, moderate staining in upper blank margin, verso heavily browned, title scrubbed with minor loss, image fine.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 195. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 17 (p. 91), No. 134 (p. 308): “Artist Carl Nebel, working in Mexico City during the American occupation, probably visited all of the nearby battlefields. One would thus expect a certain accuracy of topographical detail in his works depicting those battles, since he could check any details of which he was not certain. In his view of the battle of Contreras, Nebel chose a vantage point from behind Valencia’s camp, looking north-northeast across the Valley of Mexico.... Ironically, American printmakers paid little attention to this overwhelming victory.” It was immediately after this battle that Robert E. Lee was brevetted to Lieutenant Colonel for bravery. ($350-700)

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419. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Battle of Buena Vista; [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area; 27.5 x 42.5 cm; overall sheet size: 40.5 x 55.7 cm. Mild to moderate foxing (heavier in margins), otherwise very good.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 195. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 9 (p. 83), No. 38 (p. 163): “Kendall was not present at the battle and never visited the battlefield of Buena Vista, in a remote part of Northern Mexico. There is no evidence that Nebel visited the area either; that his rendering is so convincing is due to his artistic and research skills.... Kendall acknowledged his and Nebel’s particular debt to the account of the battle by Captain James H. Carleton of the First Dragoons. The moment Nebel chose to depict was one that Carleton saw as particularly momentous, ‘the moment when O’Brien was so gallantly striving to hold the Mexicans in check during their last attack upon the great plateau.... The obstinate holding out of O’Brien was deemed the most important of all the varied struggles which made up the battle of Buena Vista.... By the time O’Brien’s guns finally were captured, nearly all his battery had been killed or wounded. But they held on just long enough: Bragg, Davis, and Lane and their troops arrived to repel this last Mexican assault.” The Battle of Buena Vista, also known as the Battle of Angostura, left the U.S. forces in control of northeastern Mexico. ($400-800)

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420. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Battle of Churubusco;[below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.7 x 42.6 cm; overall sheet size: 38.5 x 53 cm. Light scattered foxing, confined almost totally to blank margins, verso with moderately scattered foxing, image fine.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 195. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 18 (p. 92), No. 136 (p. 312): “At the end of his account of the battle of Churubusco, Kendall gave a short key to Nebel’s picture: ‘It being found impossible to take a general view of the battle of Churubusco, the artist chose, as the principal subject for his drawings, Worth’s attack upon the tête-de-pont. In the centre of the picture may be seen the rear of the church and convent of San Pablo, Twiggs being at the same time warmly engaged in front. On the right beyond the taller trees, is the position attacked by Shields. The low ground are those which rise to the south of Contreras’.... Nebel’s view shows the moment of scaling its walls. Throughout the engagement, Kendall was with Colonel James Duncan’s battery.” ($400-800)

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421. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Battle of Palo=Alto; [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in each image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored toned lithographs on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.8 x 42.2 c; overall sheet size: 38.5 x 53.5 cm. Mild to moderate foxing and small chip at lower right blank margin, overall very good.

     First printing of “probably the finest lithographic view of Texas produced in the nineteenth century”—Ron Tyler. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 148 (discussing the album): “The most brilliant and famous published views of the major battles”; p. 195 (citing present print). Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 2 (p. 76), No. 5 (p. 109). The Battle of Palo Alto (May 8, 1846), fought on Texas soil north of Brownsville, was the first major engagement of the Mexican-American War and the first U.S. victory (Handbook of Texas Online: Battle of Palo Alto). The image, which shows the action from the perspective of a viewer behind the U.S. lines looking south toward the Mexican positions, has been praised for its artistic beauty and historical verisimilitude. Tyler comments: “Nebel adopted a practice in the Palo Alto print, that also turns up in later ones, of picturing the road as it continues behind the Mexican lines through a pass in the fictitious hills, suggesting that another segment in the road to Mexico City—this one the route to Fort Texas and Matamoros—will be open as soon as the American troops have cleared the way.” ($1,000-2,000)

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422. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Bombardment of Vera=Cruz;[below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith.; [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.3 x 42.3 cm; overall sheet size: 38.7 x 51.5 cm. Except for mild browning print is fine; recto stained from old framing.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 196. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 13 (p. 87), No. 115 (p. 275): “Nebel chose the naval battery as his viewpoint from which to illustrate the siege of Veracruz. Kendall explains: ‘The reasons which induced the artist to select the navy battery as the point from which to sketch his picture were numerous—among the most important its high and commanding position, the importance it had in its reduction, and to pay a compliment, well-merited, if poor, to the spirited officers and sailors of the American squadron.’ Kendall should have added another reason, namely the availability of Henry Walker’s 1848 print of the same subject, from which Nebel could borrow.” The twenty-day siege of Mexico’s key beachhead seaport was the first large-scale amphibious assault by U.S. military forces and ended with the surrender and occupation of the city. Taking Veracruz would provide the U.S. a point for an advance inland. ($500-1,000)

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423. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Capture of Monterey; [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.5 x 42.5 cm; overall sheet size: 40.5 x 55.7 cm. Mild to moderate foxing, otherwise very good.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 196. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 7 (p. 81), No. 16 (p. 129): “George Wilkins Kendall had gone to Monterrey with McCulloch’s Texas Rangers to report firsthand for the Picayune.... Nebel apparently reconstructed the scene in his studio after the war, and no doubt his best source must have been Kendall’s own account..... The activities of the figures in the foreground demonstrate not only Nebel’s knowledge of American uniforms and military operations, but his superior technical skills.” ($400-800)

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424. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Genl. Scott’s entrance into Mexico;[below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith. [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 28 x 43.2 cm; overall sheet size: 39 x 52 cm. Except for dark browning on verso, very fine.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 196. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 24 (p. 98), No. 159 (pp. 345-347): “Nebel’s version of Scott’s entrance sticks closer to the truth and is packed with psychological drama. There is no doubt here that the war is still on. Loaded cannons are posted to sweep the streets, while a body of dragoons in the foreground gathers tensely with drawn sabers near General Scott and his staff. In a particularly effective narrative detail, one of the dragoon officers, on a white horse in the center foreground, glares at a lepero on the left who is preparing to throw a stone. From the street or from doorways and partially closed windows, other citizens watch with fear, curiosity, apprehension, indignation, and in the case of the lepero with the stone and the armed men on the roof, open hostility, an allusion to the violence that broke out shortly thereafter.” Gen. Winfield Scott rides into Mexico City’s national square—”the halls of Montezuma,” in the words of the Marine Corps Hymn—to seize power and raise the flag. He followed the same invasion route as the sixteenth-century Spanish conquerors of Mexico. ($750-1,500)

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425. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Molina del Rey—attack upon the molina [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith. [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.3 x 42.5 cm; overall sheet size: 38.5 x 51.3 cm. Verso slightly browned, else very fine.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 197. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 19 (p. 93), No. 140 (p. 317): “Few prints, or images of any kind, depict the battle of Molina del Rey, which was fought just outside Mexico City on September 8, 1847. Although Scott originally planned it to be little more than a raid by Worth’s division, it became one of the bloodiest fights of the war. Many Americans wondered if it should have been fought at all, which may explain why so few images were made of it. However, because of the controversial aspect of the battle, Carl Nebel did two separate renderings of it, recording different aspects of the struggle. Kendall was both an eyewitness and a participant.... Nebel’s first view of the battle shows the action opposite the American center and right.” ($500-1,000)

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426. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Molino del Rey—attack upon the cas[a] mata [below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.4 x 42.3 cm; overall sheet size: 38.5 x 53 cm. Except for light scattered foxing (mostly confined to margin), image fine. Moderate foxing on verso.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 196. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 20 (p. 94), No. 141 (pp. 318-319): “While the American right was still engaged in the attack on the molino, General Worth ordered the brigade on his left, under Colonel McIntosh, to assault the Casa Mata. This building, instead of being an ordinary stone house, as had been supposed by the engineers, proved to be a citadel, surrounded with bastion entrenchments, and impassable ditches—an old Spanish work, recently repaired and enlarged.... Worse yet for the Americans, General Francisco Pérez and a fresh force of Mexican regulars lay completely hidden behind the banks of the ditch in front of the building and within its rampart.... McIntosh’s fatal assault is the subject of this print.” ($450-900)

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427. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. NEBEL, Carl. Storming of Chapultepec—Pillow’s attack;[below image] C. Nebel fecit. | Bayot lith; [lower left in image within oval] Entered according to act of Congress. [New York: D. Appleton; Philadelphia: George Appleton; Paris: Plon Brothers, 1851.] Original full colored and toned lithograph on handmade paper, finished by hand applying gum arabic highlights (after art work by Nebel, printed and lithographed by Lemercier and Adolphe Jean Baptiste Bayot). Image area: 27.3 x 42.5 cm. Overall sheet size: 40.3 x 55.5 cm. Light scattered foxing, confined almost totally to blank margin, verso with moderately scattered foxing to blank margins, image very fine.

     First printing. The plate is from Kendall & Nebel’s folio book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated... (see Kendall herein for the complete album). Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, p. 195. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, Plate 21 (p. 95), No. 146 (p. 326): “Nebel’s illustration for Kendall was apparently the first contemporary print to depict with any accuracy the attack by Major General Gideon Pillow’s division on Chapultepec’s western side.... Major General Nicolás Bravo, the commander of Chapultepec, had only 832 infantry plus some artillerymen and engineers to defend extensive works that needed at least 2,000 men. The buildings of the castle were not as strong as they looked, and the incessant American bombardment had a serious effect on the defenders’ already low morale.... Among Bravo’s defenders were a handful of cadets from the Military College. Of these, six died defending the castle and are remembered as Los Niños Héroes in Mexican patriotic lore.” ($400-800)

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428. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. PEÑA Y PEÑA, Manuel de la. Manifiesto del exmo. Sr. Presidente provisional D. Manuel de la Peña y Peña, á la Republica Mejicana publicado á su entrada en la capital del estado soberano de Queretaro el dia 13 de Octobre de 1847 [wrapper title]. [Wrapper imprint]: Queretaro: I. de Frias, [dated at end: October 13, 1847]. [1] 2-8 pp. 12mo, original blue printed wrappers, typographical border, sewn. Aside from small separation at foot of spine, very fine.

     First edition. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, p. 88. Harper 12:365. Palau 217560. After the Mexican government was driven from the capital city by the conquering United States forces, they took refuge in the city of Querétaro, where from then until the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Congress held its sessions. Peña y Peña became president eleven days after the U.S. occupation of Mexico City; Santa Anna relinquished the office on September 16. Peña y Peña presented this inaugural address upon arrival in Querétaro on October 13. ($100-200)

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429. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. [SHANNON, James Thomas (attributed)]. Castle de Perote, Mexico. | Surrendered April 22nd. 1847 to the U.S. Army, Commanded by Genl. Winfield Scott. | Col. F.M. Winkoop, 1st. Regt. Penna. Vol. Civil & Military Governor. | Garrisoned by F.L. Bowman | A. Co. 3d. Artillery, Capt. G. Taylor U.S.A. | B. Co. Capt Nagle Co. | C. Mounted Rifle. Capt. Walker. | E. “ ” Binder | F. Co. Capt. Bennett. | H. “ ” Scott. N.p., n.d. [U.S., 1847 or after]. Chromolithograph on maize ground, in black, shades of grey, white highlights (interior of Perote Fort architecture, with soldiers on review, and onlookers). Image dimensions: 34.8 x 59.5 cm; overall sheet size (trimmed): 43.5 x 59.5 cm. Trimmed to image, with possible loss of legend at lower left and lower right. Moderate waterstaining to upper left. Several closed tears neatly repaired on verso (minor losses in sky area). Right side has been reattached and two voids in sky area have been in-filled (one is minor, but the other is 9 x 5 cm). The lower edge in text area has been expertly reattached. Light uniform browning. We find no copies on OCLC or in sales records.

     Here the military scene shows the mighty fortress in the state of Veracruz surrendered to Major General Scott on his white steed. The architecture is well delineated, and in addition to the parading regiment with rifles and bayonets, are many bystanders, such as ladies selling food and/or drink. Various soldiers and civilians lounge around, including one soldier resting his leg on a spent cannon. Atop the iconic Mexican castle waves the flag of the United States. The print bears striking resemblance both in printing and artistic technique to James T. Shannon’s Siege of Puebla (see following item herein). It is possible the present litho was a trial print that was never published. The information about the occupying U.S. force concerns the First Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, which was the one to which Shannon belonged. Shannon’s original notebook with art work of sketches during the Mexico campaign (now owned by University of Texas at Arlington) was described by Sotheby Parke Bernet Sale 3982:125 as “a rare and historical item possibly being a ‘missing link in the Mexican War.’” ($2,000-4,000)

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430. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. SHANNON, James Thomas. Siege of Puebla, Began Sept. 13th. ended Oct. 12th. 1847; [below image] A B C D E F | From a Drawing on the Spot by J.T. Shannon. | G. Warren Smith. Direxet | Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1850 by J.T. Shannon in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of Western Pennsylvania. | Lith. & Printed in Colors by Sarony & Major N. York;[below main title] Position of the American Troops, American force 384 Men, Col. Thos. Childs Military and Civil Governor. | Mexican force, 8000, Men, Commanded by Genl. Santa Anna. | Published by G. Warren Smith & Co. for J.T. Shannon; [below neat line] [two lettered keys to left and right of title, first identifying locations and second identifying regiments]. New York, 1850. Chromolithograph on maize ground, in black, shades of grey, white highlights (hectic, smoky battle scene including dead and injured, with fine rendering of architecture and landscape, U.S. flag flying on a building at right). Image dimensions: 33.5 x 51.7 cm; overall sheet size including title and text: 40.7 x 51.7 cm. Trimmed close to image and text area. Waterstained at right quadrant. Top edge has closed tears and some small voids (filled). The lower edge in text area has been expertly reattached. Light uniform browning. No copies located on OCLC, but held by Amon Carter and Aztec Club.

     Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, pp. 347-350, Entry No. 160 (illustrated p. 348). This view is based on a less detailed sketch made by Shannon during the siege of Puebla. It depicts the siege that was begun by the Mexicans on the small contingent of U.S. troops left behind to secure Puebla. The lithographer has added many details and somewhat rearranged others in an effort to portray more of the scene than would actually have been visible. On the whole, however, the rendition is considered fairly accurate and is probably one of the few, if not the only, depiction done from behind U.S. lines by an eye-witness. See preceding entry.  ($2,000-4,000)

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431. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. [TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO]. REJÓN, Manuel Crecencio. Observaciones...contra los Tratados de Paz, Firmados en la Ciudad De Guadalupe El 2 Del Proximo Pasado Febrero.... Queretaro: Imprenta de J. M. Lara, c. del Chirimoyo n. 15, 1848. [1-3] 4-62, [2] pp. 8vo, original buff printed wrappers. Fine. Rare.

     First edition. Eberstadt, Texas: 162:850. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, p. 98: “Critical of the provisions of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.” Howell, California 50:166. Howes R186. Sabin 69161 & 56444. Tutorow 4139. A reasoned diatribe against the treaty that cost Mexico nearly half her territory. As is often the case, Rejón traces the causes of the Mexican-American War back to the troubles and revolt in Texas and lays the reason for the war to U.S. scheming to acquire the territory. He also declares in the strongest terms that this treaty will be the death of Mexico. ($750-1,500)

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432. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. WHITING, Daniel Powers. Heights of Monterey, from the Saltillo road looking towards the City. (from the West.) [“]Worth’s Division” moving into position under the guns of the enemy, after the action of “St. Jeronimo”, on the morning of 21st. Sepr. 1846 Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1847 by D.P. Whiting in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Southern district of New York. G. & W. Endicott Lit. N. York; [below neat line at left] D.P. Whiting Capt. 7th Inf; [below neat line at right] On Stone by F. Swinton; [numbered key to locations to left and right of title]; [lower right]: No. 2. New York, 1847. Lithograph on light grey, pale blue, and olive green ground (battle scene in Monterrey with U.S. troops on the march). Image dimensions: 32.5 x 49.5 cm; image with text: 37.3 x 49.5 cm; entire sheet: 48.2 x 61 cm. 28 cm closed tear at left extending into image showing sky (infilled and restored; barely visible on image which is very clean), small section of upper right blank corner almost detached, otherwise excellent, professionally conserved and stabilized, strong impression.

     First printing. Christensen, The U.S.-Mexican War, p. 130 (illustrated). Eberstadt 162:910. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, pp. 579-580. Peters, America on Stone, p. 175. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman,  Eyewitness to War, pp. 122-123, Entry 11, Plate 3, p. 77. Streeter Sale 275. Tyler, The Mexican War, A Lithographic Record, pp. 24-25). Tutorow 4393. This view is from the first edition of Whiting’s Army Portfolio (New York: G. & W. Endicott, 1847). The stone was drawn by Frederick Swinton. A note at the end of the key states that the Texas Rangers composed part of the U.S. military force during this operation. ($1,000-2,000)

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433. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. WHITING, Daniel Powers. Monterey, As seen from a house-top in the main-Plaza, (to the west.) October, 1846. Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1847 by D.P. Whiting in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York. G. & W. Endicott Lit. N.Y.; [below neat line at left] D.P. Whiting, Del. Caft. [sic] 7th Inf.; [numbered key to locations to left and right of title]; [lower right] No. 1. of a Series. New York, 1847. Lithograph on light grey ground (view of Monterrey looking toward Saltillo, taken after U.S. occupation of the city). Image dimensions: 33 x 47.8 cm; image with text: 39 x 47.8 cm; entire sheet: 48.5 x 61 cm. Closed tear (approximately 18 cm) at right extending into image (no loss); another 6 cm closed tear in left margin. Otherwise excellent, professionally conserved and stabilized, strong impression.

     First printing. Christensen, The U.S.-Mexican War, p. 130. Eberstadt 162:910. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, pp. 579-580. Peters, America on Stone, p. 175. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman,  Eyewitness to War, pp. 124-125, Entry 12, Plate 4, p. 78. Streeter Sale 275. Tyler, The Mexican War, A Lithographic Record, pp. 24-25. Tutorow 4393. This view is from the first edition of Whiting’s Army Portfolio (New York: G. & W. Endicott, 1847), one of the primary visual records of the Mexican-American War. Whiting’s views are considered some of the more accurate, rare, and desirable eyewitness depictions of U.S. occupation of Mexico. Tyler states that Whiting’s views are “the rarest lithographs of the war.” For additional views by Whiting, see following entries. ($1,000-2,000)

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434. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. WHITING, Daniel Powers. Monterey, from Independence Hill, in the rear of the Bishop's-Palace. As it appeared on 23d. September, 1846. (Looking East.) Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1847 by D.P. Whiting in the Clerks Office of the district Court of the Southern District of New York. G. & W. Endicott Lith; [below neat line at left] D.P. Whiting del Capt. 7th. Inf; [below neat line at right] On Stone By F. Swinton; [numbered key to locations to left and right of title]; [lower right] No. 4. New York, 1847. Lithograph on light slate grey and olive green ground (three uniformed men on horseback in foreground overlook troop activities and an imposing fortress-like stone structure at right, over which floats a large U.S. flag). 31.7 x 49.5 cm; image with text: 35.6 x 49.5 cm; entire sheet dimensions: 48.5 x 61 cm. A few short closed tears in blank margins (not affecting image), otherwise excellent, professionally conserved and stabilized, strong impression.

     First printing. Eberstadt Texas 162:910. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, pp. 579-580. Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, pp. 199. Peters, America on Stone, p. 175. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War, p. 126, Entry 144, Plate 6, p. 80. Streeter Sale 275. Tyler, The Mexican War, A Lithographic Record, pp. 24-25. Tutorow 4393. This view is from the first edition of Whiting’s Army Portfolio (New York: G. & W. Endicott, 1847). The stone was drawn by Frederick Swinton. ($1,000-2,000)

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435. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. WHITING, Daniel Powers. Valley towards Saltillo, from near the base of “Palace Hill,” at Monterey. (Looking to the S. West.) Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1847 by D.P. Whiting in the Clerks Office of the district Court of the Southern district of New York. G. & W. Endicott Lith. N.Y.; [below neat line at left] D.P. Whiting Capt. 7th Inf; [below neat line at right] On Stone By C. Parsons [numbered key to locations to left and right of title]; [lower right] No. 3. New York, 1847. Lithograph on light slate grey, pale blue, maize, and olive green ground (view with column of troops). Image dimensions: 31.7 x 49.5 cm; image with text: 36.8 x 49.5 cm; entire sheet: 48.5 x 60.7 cm. Short closed tears in blank margins, filled void near upper blank corner (neither affects image). 11.5 cm tear at upper left (in sky area). Overall excellent, professionally conserved and stabilized, strong impression.

     First printing. Eberstadt 162:910. Garrett & Goodwin, The Mexican-American War, pp. 579-580. Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War, pp. 199-200. Peters, America on Stone, p. 175. Sandweiss, Stewart & Huseman, Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848, p. 125, Entry 13, Plate 5, p. 79. Streeter Sale 275. Tyler, The Mexican War, A Lithographic Record, pp. 24-25. Tutorow 4393. This view is from the first edition of Whiting’s Army Portfolio (New York: G. & W. Endicott, 1847). This is the first state of the plate (in No. 4 of the key Village misspelled “Villag”). The stone was drawn by C. Parsons. See preceding entries and following for other prints in the series. This is a bird’s-eye view of mountain-and-valley landscape and road between Monterrey and Saltillo. On the road is a very long column of tiny soldiers and wagons. Ironically, this is a beautiful, peaceful scene for a military view. ($1,000-2,000)

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436. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. BLANQUEL, Simon. Nueva Cocinera Mexicana.... Mexico: Luis Heredia, 1841. [1-3] 4-136, 127-134, 137-256 pp. (text complete), 2 wood-engraved plates illustrating carving and trussing. 8vo, contemporary Mexican tree sheep, gilt-lettered and decorated morocco spine label. Binding lightly rubbed, hinges starting but firm; except for some very minor fraying of last leaves, interior is fine. With two contemporary recipes written on flyleaves and two more tipped to back pastedown.    

     Second edition of the first indigenous Mexican cookbook. Not in Palau or other standard sources. See Puig and Stoopen, section 1. Rare; only three copies on OCLC. The first edition (1831) had a title beginning with Novísimo arte de cocina (see Cagle, et al, American Books on Food & Drink, 1739–1950 #1197). Divided into eight “tratados,” this text is a fairly comprehensive recipe book with both international and traditional Mexican dishes using Mexican ingredients and methods. ($500-1,000)

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437. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. “Diario de Cuentas Para Guisar Año de 1807.” Manuscript in ink. 26 leaves written on both sides followed by 24 blank leaves. Small 8vo, original wrappers with original rawhide stitching. Wrappers moderately chipped with some losses and stained. Except for scattered minor staining, the interior is very fine and written in a neat, legible hand.

     Highly unusual and rare early Mexican manuscript cookbook comprising dozens of recipes for various dishes described in varying degrees of detail. As might be expected for a cookbook composed at the time, all the recipes are indigenous, and many employ chiles, although there are limits. Judging from the careful style, tight organization, and occasional corrections, one assumes this was a text copied by a younger woman from another source or sources. As several scholars have pointed out, the art of cooking was transmitted from mother to daughter for hundreds of years, and the present manuscript may be an example of just such a situation. The manuscript predates the first published Mexican cookbook by nearly twenty-five years. ($500-1,000)

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438. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. El Cocinero y Cocinera Mexicanos.... Mexico: Antonio Diaz [Vol. 2 published by Luis Heredia], 1851. [Vol. 1]: [4], [1] 2-211, [1] 2-8 pp.; [Vol. 2]: [1-3] 4-48, [1-2] 3-16 pp. 2 vols. in one, 8vo, original half sheep over new red and gold paper-covered boards, spine gilt-lettered and decorated. Spine worn with loss of most gilt, new pastedowns and flyleaves, light edge wear, portions of text lightly browned and stained, one index leaf torn with loss of a few letters. Ink signature of Teresa Solórzano on title page verso. Overall, a good copy.

     First edition. Pilcher, “¡Vivan Tamales! The Creation of a Mexican National Cuisine,” p. 258. Not in Bitting, Cagle, Palau, Vicaire, etc. The anonymous author states that this book is intended to be a simple, straightforward guide and that it therefore does not include such trappings as engraved plates or directions for setting tables since those matters fall outside the proper scope of the text and would overly complicate it. The author further remarks that this book is intended to satisfy Mexican palates and food ways without recourse to outside influences, such as those from European cooking. An interesting example of a thoroughly Mexican cookbook. ($300-600)

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439. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. La Cocinera de todo el mundo, o La Cocina sin Cocinera.... Puebla: Juan Nepomuceno del Valle, 1843-1844. 2 vols. in 1. Vol. I: [1-3] 4-254 pp.; Vol II: [1-3] 4-247 [1, blank], [4] pp., 1 untitled folded lithograph plate (table service and methods of properly carving various cuts of meat, fish, and fowl). 12mo, full contemporary red and black mottled sheep, spine gilt decorated and with two gilt-lettered labels, covers rolled in gilt, red and blue marbled endpapers and edges. Binding slightly rubbed, upper right corner of upper cover bent and supported by old paper repair on front pastedown; both hinges open but holding, very scattered light foxing, otherwise an excellent, well-treated copy in an unusual binding for the genre.

     First edition of a very early Mexican provincial cookbook. Not in Palau, Cagle, Biting, or Vicaire. OCLC lists only a single copy of the 1844 edition (UC San Diego). This highly unusual cookbook contains hundreds of recipes for everything from soup to nuts, some presented as Continental dishes, others as purely Mexican dishes, and others modified to combine the two styles. In an age when refrigeration was a constant concern, the recipe for “Adobo de España que dura tres ó cuatro meses” (I:23) might have been of some interest. Included also are the must-have Native dishes “Mole poblano” (I:55) and nearly two dozen recipes for various salsas (I:108-113). Foreign recipes are given their due when appropriate, such as “Leche inglesa muy gustosa” (I:252). The culinary text of the book closes with a chapter on carving and another on various alcoholic drinks, part of which is in an unusual question and answer format. One of the sections of the latter part is a discussion of filtering liquids, one of which involves using a beaver skin procured from a milliner (2: 128). ($400-800)

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440. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. La Cocinera Poblana y el libro de las familias, Novísimo manual práctico de cocina española, francesa, inglesa y mexicana higiene y economía doméstica Contiene mas de dos mil formulas de ejecución sencilla y facil Tratados especiales de Pastelería, Confitería y Repostería diversas recetas de tocador y medicina doméstica para conservar la salud y prolongar la vida. Tercera edición, corregida y aumentada. Mexico: Tip. de J. F. Jens. San José de Real, núm. 22, 1887-1888. 2 vols. in 1. Vol. I: [1-5] 484 [i.e., 436] pp; Vol. II: [1-5] 6-331 [1 blank] pp. 8vo, contemporary quarter red sheep over blue and black mottled boards, spine gilt lettered and decorated. Mild scuffing to boards, shelfwear, corners bumped, front hinge open but holding; interior fine, 1:433-434 bound out of order. Rare. OCLC lists only three copies. The only copy at auction in the past thirty years was sold by us in 2007.

     Third edition of a cookbook that apparently went through many editions (see Palau 55878). Not in standard sources. This work concentrates heavily on recipes, formulas, and methods that would be available and easy to use for a domestic Mexican household of ordinary means, despite the international pretensions embodied in its title. Reflecting the nineteenth-century linking of medicine and gastronomy, numerous items concern alimentation as it affects health, disease prevention, and treatment. More than a mere cookbook, this manual also ventures into the area of manners and domestic economy. ($200-400)

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441. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. [“Libro de cosina”]. [43] leaves written in ink on both sides on unwatermarked laid paper. Mexico, ca. 1800? 8vo, original wallpaper wrappers, with original leather and cord stitching. Spine perished, wrappers wrinkled, upper wrapper chipped at bottom missing a 2 x 2 cm piece. Caption title on p. [1] obliterated, light scattered staining and water staining, ink light and somewhat faded in places. One recipe is crossed out. Handwriting generally legible.

     Consisting of about a hundred recipes, this is a traditional Mexican cookbook containing dishes comprised of ingredients readily available in the country, along with a healthy helping of recipes for stews and others showing foreign influence. Among some of them are instructions for guisado de leches, guisado italiano, tortas reales, guisado de sopa francesa (two recipes), guisado de popa morisca, guisado de leche, guisado de torta italiana, guisado de pescado verde, huebos moles, huebos de mantequilla, huebos de italia, and leche quemada. Found with this cookbook are two fragments of manuscript cookbooks of the same time period. ($100-200)

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442. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. MONTES DE OCA, Juanita. “Libro de cocina para el uso de Da. Juanita Montes de Oca Año de 1844.” [9] leaves written in ink on both sides. 8vo, original wrappers and stitching. Wrappers moderately foxed and stained. Except for light to moderate foxing, interior is very good and written in a legible hand. Last page ends in mid-sentence, but that recipe is in another hand.

     A nice example of a mid-nineteenth century Mexican cookbook emphasizing traditional recipes. ($200-400)

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443. [MEXICAN COOKBOOK]. TORRES DE RUBIO, Vicenta. Cocina Michoacana por Vicenta T. de Rubio.... Zamora: Imprenta Moderna, 1896. [4], [i-iii] iv-vi, [7] 8-796, [i] ii-xxxii pp., 6 lithograph plates (5 on tinted grounds). 8vo (22 x 16.5 cm), original quarter brown sheep over red cloth, spine gilt lettered and gilt ruled, both covers gilt lettered and/or gilt decorated. Spine slightly rubbed, cloth moderately waterstained and faded, corners bumped, hinges open but strong; first few and last leaves (including title page and lithograph half title) partly stained red from bleeding dye. Other than the dye staining, the interior is fine, with plates fine except for red staining to first plate. With oval purple ink stamp of Florentino Diaz Mercada, Mayo 1900 Mexico on printed half title and his pencil signature and address on the front pastedown. Pencil doodle on front flyleaf.

     First edition, of the first cookbook published in Mexico by a Mexican Woman. Pilcher, “Vivan Tamales,” pp. 260-261. Not in other standard sources. No copies at auction in the past thirty-five years. Pilcher, ¡Que Vivan los tamales!, comments: “By printing recipes from throughout Mexico, Torres provided the first genuine forum for uniting regional cuisines into a national repertoire. Contributors exchanged recipes with middle-class counterparts they had never met, and began to experiment with regional dishes, combining them in new ways that transcended oral traditions. In this way women began to imagine their own national community in the familiar terms of the kitchen, rather than as an alien political entity formulated by men and served up to them in didactic literature” (p. 67).     This important book has several noteworthy features, including a substantial section, “El sistema metrico décimal” (pp. 515-545), explaining the metric system and providing several tables to calculate equivalencies with traditional measuring systems (e.g., pounds to grams). As the author explains, this section is necessary because the government has ordered the metric system be used instead of “el antiguo que nos enseñaron los españoles” (p. 515). This is one of the larger and more important Mexican cookbooks published up until this time and remains a respected classic to this day. ($500-1,000)

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444. [MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE]. Two extras to the official government newspaper of Spanish Mexico, documenting the end of Spanish rule in Mexico: Tom. XII. 859. Suplemento a la Gaceta del Gobierno de México del sabado 18 de agosto de 1821. [Colophon] En la imprenta de D. Juan Bautista de Arizpe. Pp. 859-862. 8vo, folded as issued. Staining and slight tears to left margin (no losses). Proclamation of Viceroy Juan O’Donojú exhorting peace and order on his arrival at Veracruz, August 3, 1821. His policies of peaceful solutions to the insurgency led to the Treaty of Córdoba with Agustín de Iturbide on August 24, declaring independence and the establishment of the Mexican Empire. [With] Tom. XII. 863. Alcance al Suplemento de la Gaceta del Gobierno de México del 18 de agosto de 1821. [Colophon] En la imprenta de D. Juan Bautista de Arizpe. Page 863 (verso blank). 8vo. Left margin trimmed (no loss). Commandant General Francisco Novella reports that his agents were prevented from meeting with O’Donojú by Iturbide on August 18. Permission for free passage to persons who wish to meet with O’Donojú directed to Novella by Iturbide, August 15.

     Charno, pp. 348-351 (noting publication from January 2, 1810, to September 29, 1821, but not locating copies of these extras). Mathes, “La Imprenta en el Imperio Mexicano 1821-1823” #4073 (at press). Palau 96361. These two extras document the last moments of Spanish rule in Mexico. O’Donojú arrived at Veracruz as the new Viceroy only to discover that just a few major cities were actually under Spanish control. Smelling the coffee, he drank of reality and handed over control of Mexico to Iturbide and withdrew Spanish troops. His diplomacy and tact no doubt prevented a great deal of bloodshed. He was the last Viceroy of Mexico and eventually joined the new government. This Gaceta was almost immediately replaced by the Gaceta del Gobierno Imperial de México, which began publication on October 2, 1821. Very rare documentation capturing the immediacy of a fluid and dangerous situation. ($100-200)

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445. [MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE]. CATHOLIC CHURCH. ARCHBISHOP (Pedro José de Fonte y Hernández Miravete). Pastoral message with heading: Suplemento Al Noticioso General, Num. 127. Del Lunes 22 De Octubre de 1821. [Text begins] Don Pedro Jose de Fonte.... Al venerable Clero Secular y Regular de esta diócesis.... En todos tiempos he recomendado mis respectables y estimados súbditos, el deber sagrado que tenemos de obedecer á la potestad pública.... [Colophon] México: Imprenta de D. Celestino de la Torre. Signed and dated in type, Pedro, México, October 19, 1821. Broadside, printed in double column, on laid, watermarked paper. Horizontal crease where formerly folded, moderate stains at center left, otherwise very good.

     Second edition, preceded by broadside printing noted in Garritz, Impresos Novohispanos, 1808-1821 #4625. Mathes, “La Imprenta en el Imperio Mexicano 1821-1823” #4091 (at press). Palau 194287 (citing periodical). Not in Medina, Sabin, or other standard sources. In this apostolic message, Fonte urges all his clergy to submit to the newly independent government of Mexico, pointing out that the Catholic religion is permanent and immutable, surpassing in its existence, faith, and practices any and all secular governments, which come and go. ($75-150)

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446. [MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE]. UN CIUDADANO DE LA AMÉRICA MERIDIONAL. Resumen histórico de la insurreccion de Nueva España, desde su origen hasta el desembarco del Señor D. Francisco Xavier de Mina. Escrito por un ciudadano de la America meridional, y traducido del Frances por D.M.C. Mexico: M.DCCC.XXI. Primero de la Independencia. Imprenta de D. Mariano de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, calle del Espíritu Santo, 1821. [Colophon] Se vende en la librería de D. Mariano Galvan portal de Agustinos. [1-3] 4-32 pp. 8vo, sewn (but disbound). A few scattered original printer’s ink smudges (including on title page), occasional spotting and light stains, overall a good copy, untrimmed.

     First edition? Garritz, Impresos Novohispanos, 1808-1821 #4466. Mathes, “La Imprenta en el Imperio Mexicano 1821-1823” #334 (at press). Palau 262957. Sabin 49187. Sutro, p. 144 (supplement). Not in Medina. Some sources attribute the translation to Miguel Copin as author or translator. Supposedly this work was translated from French, as indicated by the title, but no French edition has been identified. On the other hand, such convoluted publication history would seem to be an excellent and secure smokescreen for a pro-Independence tract. The imprint contains a contemporary resumé of the War of Independence in New Spain from 1810 to 1817 and diplomatic dispatches relating thereto, including notice of the reverberations of the war in Coahuila y Tejas (p. 13) and the Mina expedition to the Gulf of Mexico, recruitment of more men in the United States, arrival in Matagorda, and Mina’s collaboration with Louis Michel Aury and his corsairs. ($200-400)

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447. [MEXICAN LITHOGRAPHY]. Two lithographs: [1] BRÉBAN, C. (artist). Bautismo de Magiscatzin, Rey de Tlascala; [below neat line] Julio Michaud y Thomas Mexico; [2] BRÉBAN, C. (artist). Moteuczoma emperador mejicano; [above print] Historia mexicana 1; [below neat line] Julio Michaud y Thomas Mexico;[signed in print at lower left] C. Bréban. Mexico, n.d. [ca. 1860]. 2 brightly hand-colored lithographs with gesso highlights. Each sheet measures 25.5 x 33 cm and has text below. Foxed, small wormhole in each, tape in margins. Pretty rough, though the images themselves are clean and bright.

     The first print shows the baptism by Catholic priests of the King of Tlaxcala, who was considered by some to be a traitor for acquiescing to the Spanish. The second print shows Malinche acting as interpreter between Montezuma and Cortez. Malinche is also considered by some to be a traitor. In this second print, one of the fanciful features is Native Americans with beards. For more on the lithography firm of Michaud y Thomas, see Mathes (Mexico on Stone, p. 28) discussing the lithographers’ large-format album, but not mentioning this series of prints. This print may have been a series publication for popular consumption, perhaps sold without text to be framed and hung. Or possibly the plates are from a general history of Mexico (see Palau 115207), an anonymous book entitled Historia de México published around 1860 in oblong format; according to Palau, Quarich sold a copy in 1895 with 21 of 37 plates. ($100-200)

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448. [MEXICAN LITHOGRAPHY]. [IRIARTE, Hesiquio (artist & lithographer), Andrés Campillo (artist)]. Los Mexicanos Pintados por si mismos. Tipos y Costumbres Nacionales, por varios Autores. Mexico: Imprenta de M. Murguia y Comp., 1854-[1855]. [2], [1] 2-290 [2, verso blank] pp., 35 lithograph plates: tinted pictorial half title + 34 uncolored plates (Mexican types). 4to, contemporary red sheep over mottled boards, spine gilt lettered and decorated, raised bands. Binding worn and chipped at head of spine, edge wear, corners bumped, upper hinge broken, lower hinge starting, title page browned, text with light scattered foxing and browning, plates generally very fine, overall a good, complete copy.

     First edition (published in parts 1854-1855). Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 28: “The year 1854 marked the revival of major lithographic albums with Murguía’s printing of the great classic of types and customs, Los mexicanos pintados por sí mismos.” Palau 167479: “Edición rara.” Sabin 48577. Toussaint, La Litografía en México, p. xix. For more on the evolution of this work, see María Esther Pérez Salas C., “Genealogía de ‘Los mexicanos pintados por sí mismos’“ in Historia Mexicana, Vol. 48, No. 2, October-December, 1998, pp. 167-207: “The model imposed by England, France, and Spain, where image and text became an indissoluble binomial in the treatment of popular groups, was applied in our country with certain changes, which gave the 1854 Mexican edition a specificity that distinguishes it from its previous homologues.” This rare book is much more than a mere picture book. William H. Beezley, Mexican National Identity... (University of Arizona Press, 2008), p. 149: “These illustrators and writers showed their fellow men and women as familiar, if little known, members of their national community. This liberalism that recognized the diversity of ethnic, social, and economic groups created a frame in which popular nationalism emerged.” ($4,000-8,000)

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449. [MEXICAN LITHOGRAPHY]. [SALAZAR, Hipólito (lithographer)]. ALHOY, Maurice & Louis Huart. Los Ciento Uno Roberto Macario.... Mexico: Imp. de J.M. Lara, 1860. [204] pp. (text within double printed border), 50 lithograph plates by Hipólito Salazar (after Honoré Daumier's caricatures illustrating scenes from the stories). 4to, later three-quarter crimson sheep over red cloth, spine gilt lettered and with raised bands, edges sprinkled, red silk bookmark. Lower end of spine rubbed, but otherwise in excellent condition, with a few light stains to two leaves and second plate. Overall fine. Very rare.

     First Mexican edition (first edition, Paris, 1839, in French with 101 plates), first appearance of Daumier's work in Mexico. The lithographs are extremely well drawn and detailed, paying great honor to their originals and to the Mexican lithographer Hipólito Salazar. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, p. 30. Toussaint, La Litografía en Mexico, Plate 50 & p. xx. Not in Palau or in OCLC. Roberto Macario is a dissolute picaroon, whose various adventures are here recounted and who embodies all that is wrong with society, albeit in this case French society under Louis Philippe’s reign. He roams through society in various roles, each of which is depicted in a lithograph and satirized in the text (e.g., banker, investment salesman, lawyer, teacher, father, e ditor, diplomat, gambler, etc.) (Macario was resurrected almost immediately the next year as the fictitious editor of the satiric magazine La Orquesta.) ($750-1,500)

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450. [MEXICAN MINING]. MEXICO. REAL TRIBUNAL DE MINERÍA. Representaciones del Real Tribunal de Mineria a favor du su importante cuerpo, y declaracion del Exmô. Señor Virrey de estos Reynos sobre los utensilios, peltrechos, y demás efectos que inmediata, ó indirectamente conducen a laborio de las Minas no causen Alcabala. Mexico: D. Felipe de Zúñiga y Ontiveros, 1781. [2], 1-57 [1, blank] pp., woodcut device on title, decorative headpiece, and initial letters. Folio, contemporary gold embossed patterned wallpaper wrappers. Very fine with wide margins and wonderful wrappers. Rare in commerce.

     First edition. Beristáin de Souza, Biblioteca Hispano Americana Setentrional (1883), Vol. III, p 258. Medina, México 7201. Sabin 69992. The Tribunal complains vigorously but politely about the fact that its operations and equipment are being overly taxed, to the detriment of mining operations. The government’s answer, however, is noncommittal. But this matter was soon followed by the introduction in 1783 of a completely revised mining code that did much to settle such controversies and lighten the tax burden on the mining industry and its entrepreneurs. The discussion and ensuing reforms had particular importance at the time when Mexico was approaching its peak output of precious metals, especially silver. The documents were prepared by some of the more prominent Mexican mining figures of the time. ($800-1,200)

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451. [MEXICAN PERIODICALS]. ALZATE RAMÍREZ, José Antonio. Gacetas de literatura de Mexico.... Puebla, 1831. Complete, with 28 copper-engraved plates, including map of the Valley of Mexico by Siguënza y Góngora. 4 vols., 8vo, new brown cloth, over marbled boards. Portion of Vol. II title in good facsimile, otherwise excellent, plates and map very fine. Lehigh duplicate with their purple ink stamp and pencil call numbers.

     Second edition of the exceedingly rare original work (1788-1795; Medina, México 7750 & Sabin 989), a reissue of various articles written and edited by Creole polymath Alzate y Ramírez (1737-1799) that appeared primarily in the original Gacetas de literatura de México, but here augmented with material from some other sources and more illustrations. The supplement on the antiquities of Xochicalco, the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, were first brought to European attention by Alzate in a 1791 in a supplement to his Gazeta de Literatura (see Medina, México 8026). Apenes, Mapas antiguos del Valle de Mexico, p. 24n. Palau 10139. Sabin 990. ($1,000-2,000)

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452. [MEXICAN PORTRAITS]. PRUDHOMME, C.L. (editor). [Album méjicano. Tributo de gratitud al civismo nacional. Retratos de las personages ilustres de la primera y segunda época de la independencia Mejicana y notabilidades de la presente. Mexico: C.L. Prudhomme, editor, 2a. Calle de los Plateros No. 12, 1843]. 39 leaves of lithograph plates (each with 4 portraits per leaf, together 156 portraits) almost all attributed to Thierry Frères in Paris (21 uncolored sheets of lithographs, with 18 duplicated with original hand coloring). First plate entitled “Heroes que Proclamaron La Independencia.” Folio, new dark brown half calf over dark brown cloth, red leather gilt-lettered spine label. Wants title page, “Advertencia,” and index page, moderately foxed and stained, some leaves slightly chipped. Title from scholarly facsimile reprint entitled Album Méjicano (Mexico, 1974). A special copy with 18 duplicate plates in color. Rare in commerce. No copies at auction in over thirty years.

     First edition of the first Mexican lithographic portrait gallery, and among the fairly early entirely lithographed books. These images are iconic, and versions of them were used for decades afterwards and even to the present. Kelsey, Engraved Prints of Texas, 1554-1900 listing portraits of those important to Texas history (Filisola, Ramos Arizpe, Iturbide, Santa-Anna, Mier y Terán, Zavala). Palau 5398. Porrúa (1949) 5841 (noting that his copy with twenty-one leaves is one of the few complete copies he ever handled). Sabin 48260. This album is one of the genuinely rare lithograph plate books on Mexico, and among the earliest lithographic albums devoted exclusively to Mexican subjects. ($2,000-4,000)

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453. MEXICO. ARMY. Toques de corneta para saber las operaciones del enemigo. Sacados de la ordenanza de nuestro egercito. Precio 1. rr. | P. de E. [Prensa del Ejército?]. [México, 1846-1847?]. [4] pp (p. [4] blank), with illustration of uniformed bugler on p. [1]. 8vo. Small, moderate stain at upper right and scattered foxing, creased where formerly folded, small fold splits. Three small, light ink stamps reading “M.V.” on p. [4]. Very rare. No copies on OCLC and no copies at auction in over thirty years. (A similar publication was issued in 1825 in Mexico.)

     First edition? This lithograph sheet music was meant to inform military members of the meaning of various bugle calls, the music and meaning of which are given here, although the printed price implies that the general public could also obtain copies. Supposedly the bugler would be trained on their performance, and the troops would be instructed about what each meant, which would be crucial for them to be effective. Twenty-three calls are printed, the majority of them having to do with battle situations and relaying information about the enemy’s movement. Among them are signals indicating right or left, cavalry or infantry (or both at the same time), artillery, stating the enemy is advancing, a small force or a large force, etc. (One call that the Mexican army probably rarely heard during the war was “El enemigo se retira.”) The last three entries are for bugle orders given in camp. This sheet music probably dates from the Mexican-American War, the advent of which would have made its subject matter more urgent. ($750-1,500)

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454. MEXICO (Republic). “Estado que manifta d no. de Españoles expelidos de la Republica, y de los q se han declarado poder permanecer en ella Conforme a la Ley de 20 de Deciembre de 1827.” [Mexico, ca. 1828]. Original manuscript in sepia and gold ink on laid paper watermarked Varenna Ghigliottj. Folio. Creased where formerly folded, otherwise very fine.

     A beautiful, highly legible document with gold highlights recording the number of Spanish citizens, according to their legal status, who were either expelled from Mexico or allowed to stay. Among the details listed are the one person allowed to stay in Coahuila y Tejas and seven people expelled and five exempt from the law in New Mexico. A note at the conclusion of the documents states that there is no information to report from California—an indication of the vast distance, politically and otherwise, between Mexico and far-flung pastoral California. The entire document covers twenty-three Mexican states and jurisdictions. In its 1827 law, Mexico expelled most Spaniards who had entered the country, with or without passports, since 1821. ($200-400)

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455. [MEXICO (Republic). CONSTITUTION, 1824]. Constitucion Federal de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, Sancionada por el Congreso General Constituyente, el 4. de Octubre de 1824. Imprenta del Supremo Gobierno de los Estados unidos mexicanos, en Palacio. [Mexico, 1824]. [4], [i] ii-xviii, 1-62, [4], [i] ii-iii [1, blank], [2], 1-12 pp., 1 plate (untitled copperplate engraving by Torreblanca depicting the Mexican eagle on a cactus with each Mexican state shown, including Nuevo Mexico, Alta California, and Coahuila y Tejas). 12mo (14 x 9.5 cm), original maize wrappers (wants upper wrapper; text complete), original stitching. Title page lightly waterstained and wanting lower blank corners, next leaf holed at lower right blank margin, several leaves wrinkled at corners, minor scattered staining; plate with small hole in lower right blank margin and wanting upper right blank corner. Overall, a good copy of a fragile item. Preserved in a dark blue cloth clamshell case, spine gilt lettered.

     First public edition, preceded by privately printed edition for distribution to government members (see Graff 2766). Graff 2767. Howes E197 (“anr. ed.”). Sabin 48379. Streeter Sale 211 (quarter leather, much worn; illustrated Vol. I, p. 165; collation matches TWS copy except his copy lacks the two leaves between the first and second part, preceding Acta, and has a quite different engraving). The final section is Acta Constitutiva de la federación Mexicana. First constitution of Mexico as a sovereign state; first Mexican constitution to include the Southwest; and important for Texas history. According to the Texas Declaration of Independence and popular Texas mythology, this was the constitution the Texans fought for at the Alamo since it did not recognize the centralized, dictatorial government favored by Santa-Anna, but rather embodied decentralized government, freedom of the press, and a bicameral legislature. For more on Mexican engraver Torreblanca, see: Mathes, La Ilustración en México colonial, p. 139: “Fine, delicate line exemplified the work of José Mariano Torreblanca.” Romero de Terreros, Grabados y grabadores in la Nueva España, pp. 543-544 (Torreblanca). ($500-1,000)

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456. MICHAUD, Julio (publisher). Encuentro en la Garita de Sn. Lazaro. | El dia 20 de Julio de 1840; [below neat line] Julio Michaud editor Almacen de Estampas junto al Correo. | Lito. callejon Clara No. 8. N.p., n.d. [Mexico, 1840?]. Lithograph view of battle scene with tall stone structures all around the fighting. Neat line to neat line: 26.4 x 38.3 cm; overall sheet size: 34.1 x 46.2 cm. Overall light browning and mild foxing (heavier in a few spots) a few light spots, one small tear at lower right in blank margin, slightly wrinkled, overall fair. Very rare. Not in OCLC, but UT Austin has a copy.

     This scene represents an incident in Mexico City in resistance by Anastasio Bustamante and others against the power grab by Valentíno Gómez Farías, who arrested Governor Bustamante and his entourage in July 1840. Although not signed by Pietro Gualdi, the large format is typical of his work at the time, as is the style, with excellent architectural rendering and less expertise in depicting figures. The address of the lithographer at Santa Clara No. 8 would seem to indicate Massé and/or Decaen ca. 1840-1843. (See Mathes, Mexico on Stone, and Museo Nacional de Arte, Nación de imágenes: La Litografía mexicana del siglo XIX, p. 157.) Massé and Decaen did other work with Gualdi during that period. ($400-800)

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457. MICHAUD Y THOMAS (publishers). Album pintoresco de la Republica Mexicana. Mexico, [ca. 1850]. [2, uncolored lithograph title] plus 45 lithograph plates, 12 of which are full color with gum arabic highlights, 33 on tinted grounds (views, Mexican-American War battle scenes, costume groups, interiors, pastimes, by Lehnert, Bastin, et al after Nebel, Gualdi, et al.). Oblong folio, later three-quarter dark green cloth over original green printed boards (recased). Boards chipped and stained, plates with some marginal soiling and neat repairs, plate images superb.

     First edition. The best study of this work is the Condumex reprint edited by W. Michael Mathes in 2000. Hispanic Society Library, Vol. I, p. 200 (dated 1853). Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 28: “Possibly printed outside of Mexico [according to Toussaint]”; 56 (cited in bibliography); 64 (Michaud). Palau 5417. Not in standard Mexican-American War bibliographies, but Ben W. Huseman in the Amon Carter exhibit, Eyewitness to War, p. 127 comments: “The largest single source of printed images based on the Mexican view of the war is contained in Album Pintoresco de la República Méxicana... Of these forty-five lithographed plates...six depict battle scenes from the war.” ($8,000-12,000)

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458. [MICHIGAN]. GRAND RAPIDS & INDIANA RAILROAD COMPANY. HUGHART, W.O. (Commissioner). 1,000,000 Acres of Splendid Michigan Lands. Where?... The lands are North of the flourishing City Grand Rapids... The part of Michigan in which these lands are found is Not a Wilderness by Any Means But Contains a Population of 200,000 Souls! And is rapidly filling up with Settlers from Canada, Sweden, Norway, Holland, and from almost every State in the Union.... N.B.—Persons on application at the Office in Grand Rapids, by Letters in advance, will be furnished with a “Land Ticket,” which will entitle them to a Refund of Fares...in the event of Purchasing Farming Lands. Also, during the years 1874 and 1875, any purchaser of not less than eighty acres of Farming Land, paying one-quarter Down, who will go upon it for settlement within Six Months after purchase, will be furnished with Free Passes for himself and family.... Lands from $4 to $8 & $10 Per Acre. Well Watered, Good Markets. Strong Soil. Maple, Beach, Oak, and other good Timber... [below lower border] Detroit Daily Post Print. [at center, untitled engraved scene of well-appointed homestead and farm lands]. Detroit, n.d. [ca. 1874-1884]. Broadside (window card on heavy board) within green border, text printed in black, red, and green (some in large wood type); border to border: 53.5 x 32.5 cm; overall sheet size: 56 x 35 cm. Uniform browning due to wood pulp paper, moderate chipping to blank margins. Overall a very good copy of an ephemeral survival.

     Unrecorded early immigration promotional, a very colorful, animated window card meant to capture the attention of passersby. In the most appealing terms, including free train fare, the promoters promise a good life in the newly opened areas, alluding specifically to the fact that the area is not an uninhabited wilderness. The Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad came into operation in January 1873, and promotional material of this type exerted a strong spur to the growth and development of Michigan. ($600-1,200)

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459. MIJANGOS, Juan de. Espeio divino en lengva Mexicana, en qvue pveden verse los padres, y tomar documento para acertar a doctrinar bien a sus hijos, y aficionarlos a las virtudes.... Mexico: Diego López Dávalos, 1607. [16], 1-72, 77-562, [2 (of 6)] pp., wood-engraved emblem of arms of the Augustinian Order; 4 full-page wood-engraved portraits in text: Saint Augustine with City of God in background (p. [8]), the Blessed Virgin (p. [16]); Bishop’s arms (p. 2), and Santa Monica (last leaf verso); large woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces, woodcut on colophon. 4to, nineteenth-century three-quarter calf over marbled boards, spine gilt lettered and decorated. Light scuffing and binding wear. Wants final two leaves of index. Title soiled, trimmed, and mounted, some light browning and staining, worming throughout mostly in gutter margin (some losses of letters), some side notes trimmed. Legendary bibliophile Sir Thomas Phillipps’ copy, inscribed MHC in pencil on front pastedown.

     First edition of the largest work in Nahuatl in the seventeenth century. Andrade 28. Ayer N155. Bibliotheca Mejicana 1138 (this copy). JCB I (2, 1600-1658), p. 46.Garcia Icazbalceta, Lenguas 45. Harmsworth 28:8510 (this copy). Medina, México 238. Palau 168872. Pilling 2581 (noting that Icazbalceta calls for three final leaves, an assertion confirmed by the collation of his copy now in UT-Austin). Ramírez Sale 552. Sabin 48908: “Extremely rare.” Ugarte 236. Viñaza 119. According to notes provided to the consignor, this copy was acquired for Sir Thomas Phillipps by Cole, and was at one time in the Gavito collection. Author Mijangos was born in Oaxaca and joined the Augustinian order and taught philosophy and theology in the University of Mexico. He preached and taught Natives in their own language, in which he was the leading expert of his time. ($3,000-6,000)

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460. M’ILVAINE, William, Jr. Sketches of Scenery and Notes of Personal Adventure, in California and Mexico.... Philadelphia, 1850. [1-2] 3, 5-44 pp., 16 lithograph plates after author’s original art work. 4to, original blind-embossed dark brown cloth, gilt lettered on upper cover. Expertly rebacked in sympathetic cloth, new endpapers. Text and plates gently washed and stabilized. Two minor spots on Acapulco plate. A conserved copy, plates and text fine and fresh. Very rare.

     First edition, limited edition (400 copies) of one of the earliest (and bes