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THE LIBRARY

OF

BEN E. PINGENOT

AUCTION CATALOGUE NINE

J.M. Stotsenburg's original photograph of the Black Seminole Souts on their mounts, ca. 1890

TEXAS * SOUTHWEST * BORDERLANDS * MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR
MILITARY HISTORY * NATIVE AMERICANS

Auction to be Conducted
Friday, September 22, 2000

Part I: 11:00 a.m.
Part II: 3:00 p.m.

Preview

Wednesday, September 20, 2000, 11:00 a.m.-5:00 a.m.
Thursday, September 21, 2000, 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Preview & Auction
To be Held at Ceremony Hall
On the Campus of Sri Atmananda Memorial School
4100 Red River, Austin, Texas 78751
(First Structure to Left at East Entrance
North of the Hancock Golf Center)

From Lot 11: Form & Lang's original photograph of seven soldiers in a studio setting with painted backdrop. Fort Clark, ca.1885

Dorothy Sloan—Rare Books, Inc.
Box 49670 * Austin, Texas 78765-9670
Telephone: (512) 477-8442 * Fax (512) 477-8602
E-mail: auctions@dsloan.com * Web: www.dsloan.com

A selection of books in dust jackets from the Pingenot Library A selection of books from the Pingenot Library A selection of military classics from the Pingenot Library
A selection of books in dust jackets from the Pingenot Library A selection of books from the Pingenot Library A selection of military classics from the Pingenot Library

Dorothy Sloan, Texas Auctioneers License #10210

IMPORTANT

Bidder Registration Form, Absentee Bid Sheet, Conditions of Sale, and Limited Warranty are located at the end of this catalogue. You can also get the Bidder Registration Form and the Absentee Bid Sheet from the home page of this web site.


BEN E. PINGENOT
A Biographical Sketch

Ben E. Pingenot (1926–1999), former president of TSHA, died on July 7 in San Antonio after a valiant battle with cancer. A widely respected bookseller and collector of rare Texana, Ben was also a serious historian who published several outstanding scholarly books and many articles in the field of Texas and Southwestern borderlands history. He rendered long and effective service to the TSHA, serving on the Executive Council, on book awards committees and the Texana auction committee, and as president in 1980-1981. He was also honored with election as a Fellow and as a Life Member of the TSHA.

Born in Galveston on December 20, 1926, Ben was a descendant of pioneer Alsatian settlers of Castroville. He moved with his parents to Eagle Pass in 1930, graduated from Eagle Pass High School in 1945, and was immediately inducted into the military and sent to Europe to serve with the Army of Occupation in Germany. In 1950 he graduated from Texas College of Arts and Industries (later Texas A&I and now Texas A&M University–Kingsville) and for five years was a high school teacher in Eagle Pass. Ben later recalled, "It was during this period that I developed a keen interest in history that became first an avocation, and later a vocation."

In 1957 Ben founded Eagle Office Supply in one of the late-nineteenth-century buildings on Main Street in Eagle Pass, and for 27 years he maintained his business while actively participating in local civic affairs and various historical and preservation organizations, including the Maverick County Historical Society and the Maverick County Historical Commission. At the same time, he assembled a superb collection of rare Texana and avidly pursued sources on local and regional history. "I often found that my business got in the way of my historical research," he admitted. One of his most selfless contributions came in his crucial assistance to Robert S. Weddle, resulting in Weddle’s landmark book San Juan Bautista: Gateway to Spanish Texas (1967), which triggered renewed interest and archaeological work on the Spanish Colonial mission complex and presidio in Coahuila, Mexico.

As a historian and author, Ben will remain best known for his carefully annotated edition of the excellent personal memoirs of Jesse Sumpter, a mid-nineteenth-century Maverick County pioneer, titled Paso del Aguila: A Chronicle of Frontier Days on the Texas Border (1969); and an extremely well-researched and crisply written biography of the colorful Texas cowboy and Pinkerton detective Charlie Siringo, aptly titled Siringo: The True Story of Charles A. Siringo (1989). He also published a brief local history monograph, titled Historical Highlights of Eagle Pass and Maverick County (1971). Ben contributed regularly to the Southwestern Historical Quarterly and other journals, and he wrote several articles for the New Handbook of Texas. His wide-ranging knowledge and scholarly ability made him a popular speaker at historical meetings and gatherings of civic groups.

In 1984 Ben decided to sell his business and concentrate more fully on history by working for the Jenkins Rare Book Company in Austin, where he specialized in buying, selling, and appraising Texana, Western Americana, and Latin Americana. Meanwhile, his wife Rozetta moved from Eagle Pass to Fort Clark, where they acquired a nineteenth-century officer’s quarters, a large stone structure which they carefully restored to its original splendor. In 1987 Ben entered the rare book business for himself, operating at his historical home at Fort Clark until his death. Wearing several "historical hats" at once, Ben made his way back and forth easily between the apparently conflicting worlds of practical businessman, civic leader, sophisticated collector, forthright bookseller, and first-rate scholar. In this regard, he was a true Texas Renaissance man, setting a sterling example for others with his relaxed and polite manner, his refreshing humor, his levelheaded attitudes, and his honest yet humble wisdom.

Greatly beloved by many friends and colleagues, Ben Pingenot is survived by his wife of fifty years, Rozetta Howard Pingenot of Brackettville; his daughter Polly Alexis Pingenot of Uvalde; and his grandson William Dalton Pingenot.


T. Michael Parrish

Reprinted with permission, from Southwestern Historical Quarterly (CIII:2, October 1999)


RARITIES AND INTERESTING BOOKS, BROADSIDES, MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, & EPHEMERA

1. [ALAMO]. MEXICO (Republic). LAWS (April 27, 1836). [Printed decree issued by José María Tornel, establishing a military legion of honor for honoring distinguished actions in the war, especially the campaign against the Texans, with caption heading Secretaria de Guerra y Marina. Seccion central. Mesa 1a ]. Mexico, April 27, 1836. 8 pp., folio. Spine reinforced with old brown paper.
        First printing. Streeter 877 (3 loc.): "The decree is followed by the Estatuto de la Legión in twelve chapters. Chapter II provides that March 6, the date of the fall of the Alamo, shall be celebrated as the anniversary of the legion." Eberstadt, Texas 162:490-491: "The legion was quite apparently established to pay homage to the (from the Mexican viewpoint) heroes of the Alamo. No copy has been located of the first separate publication of this or of a republication." Yale Exhibition 89.
($250-500)

A MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR RARITY
SUPPRESSED BY SANTA ANNA

2. [ALCÁRAZ, Ramón et al. (editors)]. Apuntes para la historia de la guerra entre México y los Estados-Unidos. Mexico: Tipografia de Manuel Payno (Hijo), 1848. viii, 401 [3] pp., 14 lithographed portraits (including Manuel Micheltorena, the last Mexican governor of Alta California), 2 statistical tables on 1 folding plate, 13 folding lithographed maps, including a map of Palo Alto, one of the battles fought on Texas soil: Plano de la batalla de Palo-Alto el dia 8. de Mayo de 1846... [below neatline at right]: lit. de P[lácido]. Blanco 1a. Ce. Plateros No. 15.... (20.0 x 28.3 cm; 7-7/8 x 11-1/4 inches). Large 8vo, contemporary three-quarter brown morocco over brown marbled boards, spine gilt-lettered and decorated, raised bands. Other than slight foxing, an exceptionally fine copy. This copy belonged to Brantz Mayer (1809-1879), noted historian and author (see DAB and item 202 herein).
        First edition. Eberstadt 114:733: "Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 3: "An excellent source of material for the Mexican side of the war. It is generally critical of Santa Anna." Haferkorn, p. 3. Howes A105: "The original Spanish edition was suppressed by Santa Anna." Larned 2008: "Best source on the conduct of the war." Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 24 & 56. Palau 14138. Rader 75. Raines, p. 170. Sabin 1858: "Extremely rare. Gen. Santa Anna ordered the edition to be destroyed, and imprisoned the authors.... The account of the campaigns differs vastly from the American reports." Streeter Sale I:279: "This work was originally published in installments between September 1848 and May 1849 under the above general title. Each installment appeared accompanied by portraits or maps at the rate of two per number. When publication of the installments was completed, the various issues and their illustrations were sent to the binder by the subscribers. The final arrangement of the material varies from copy to copy." Tutorow 3254: "Alcaraz and about a dozen associates met in Querétaro in 1847 to write their accounts of the war. Charges the U.S. with territorial aggression in Texas and blames the U.S. for starting the war."
        Holman & Tyler in their preliminary study on Texas lithographs of the nineteenth century cite the portraits of Santa Anna, Arista, Ampudia, and Taylor. The book is important for the history of Mexican lithography. The excellent lithographs were created by Plácido Blanco, who also created the famous El Gallo Pitagórico (1845). Diccionario Porrúa (5th edition).
($5,000-10,000) Illustrated Description>>

3. [ALCÁRAZ, Ramón et al. (editors)]. The Other Side: or Notes for the History of the War Between Mexico and the United States. Written in Mexico. Translated from the Spanish, and Edited, with Notes, by Albert C. Ramsey.... New York: John Wiley, 1850. xv [1] 458 pp., 11 lithographed portraits, 13 maps and plans (mostly folding, including the two Texas battles). 12mo, original brown blind-stamped cloth, title gilt lettered on spine. One map slightly browned and one signature, otherwise a very fine copy.
        First edition in English of preceding. Holman & Tyler cite the portraits of Santa Anna, Arista, and Ampudia.
($500-1,000) Illustrated Description>>

THE GREAT WESTERN

4. [ALLEN, G. N.]. Mexican Treacheries and Cruelties. Incidents and Sufferings in the Mexican War; With Accounts of Hardships Endured; Treacheries of the Mexicans; Battles Fought, and Success of American Arms; Also, an Account of Valiant Soldiers Fallen, and the Particulars of the Death and Funeral Services in honor of Capt. George Lincoln, of Worcester. By a Volunteer Returned from the War. Boston & New York, 1847. [32] pp., wood engravings. 8vo, original tan printed upper wrapper within ornamental borders and illustration of the ‘Heroine of Fort Brown’ (The Great Western). Lacking lower wrapper, edge wear to upper wrap, loose and somewhat worn. Preserved in a brown cloth folding box.
        First edition. Christensen & Christensen, The U.S.-Mexican War, p. 72: "One hero of the bombardment of Fort Texas was a laundress and cook named Sara Borginnis, a large, capable woman whom the soldiers nicknamed ‘The Great Western’ after the world’s largest steamship. Borginnis set up a tent in the middle of Fort Texas and doled out food and coffee. She nursed the wounded and fearlessly carried water to the soldiers." Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 131 (citing the 1848 edition). Garrett, The Mexican-American War 4. Graff 39 (1848 edition). Haferkorn, p. 9 (1848 edition). Howes A140. Tutorow 3186. Pingenot: A jingoistic account of the experiences of a Massachusetts Volunteer, along with a summary of the various battles with Mexicans, anecdotal stories, and a detailed description of the funeral procession of Captain George Lincoln who was killed in the Battle of Buena Vista. Rare in the first edition.
        
This lurid, flagrantly racist pamphlet contains several engravings of scenes from the Texas theatres of the war, most notably the cover illustration (repeated in text) of The Great Western. There is scant documentation on women’s experiences in the war, and this is one of the few, albeit popular in approach. The Handbook of Texas Online (Sarah Bowman) article on the The Great Western (ca. 1816-1866?) discusses the various names by which she is known: "She acquired several husbands during the course of her travels, many without benefit of clergy, so there is considerable confusion about her surname. In various sources and at different times she is referred to as Mrs. Bourjette, Bourget, Bourdette, Davis, Bowman, Bowman-Phillips, Borginnis, and possibly Foyle." The Great Western deserves more than passing mention; therefore, following is a longer quotation from the excellent New Handbook article.

        The legends surrounding her exploits grew during the bombardment of Fort Brown in May 1846, when she refused to join the other women in an underground magazine but calmly operated her officers’ mess uninterrupted for almost a week, despite the fact that a tray was shot from her hands and a stray shell fragment pierced her sunbonnet. Her fearlessness during the siege earned her another nickname, the Heroine of Fort Brown. She traveled with the army into the interior of Mexico and opened a hotel in Saltillo, the American House, where she again demonstrated her bravery during the battle of Buena Vista by loading cartridges and even carrying some wounded soldiers from the battlefield to safety. During this period she was married to her second husband, known variously as Bourjette, Bourget, and Bourdette, a member of the Fifth Infantry. Sarah apparently remained in Saltillo as a hotelkeeper until the end of the war, but in July 1848 she asked to join a column of dragoons that had been ordered to California. By this time her husband was probably dead, and she was told that only married women could march with the army. Undaunted, she rode along the line of men asking, "Who wants a wife with fifteen thousand dollars and the biggest leg in Mexico? Come, my beauties, don’t all speak at once. Who is the lucky man?" After some hesitation a dragoon named Davis, probably David E. Davis, stepped forward, and the Great Western once again marched with the army.

In 1849 Sarah arrived in El Paso and briefly established a hotel that catered to the flood of Forty-niners traveling to the gold fields. She leased the hotel to the army when she left for Socorro, New Mexico, with a new husband, Albert J. Bowman, an upholsterer from Germany. When Bowman was discharged on November 30, 1852, the couple moved to Fort Yuma, where Sarah opened another restaurant. She lived first on the American, then the Mexican, side of the river, to protect her adopted children. By the mid-1860s she was no longer married to Bowman, but she served as company laundress and received an army ration. In 1856 she traveled to Fort Buchanan to set up a hotel ten miles below the fort. She had returned to Fort Yuma by 1861. Although Sarah was well known as a hotelkeeper and restaurateur, she probably had other business interests as well. One chronicler referred to her as "the greatest whore in the West," and Lt. Sylvester Mowry, a soldier stationed at Fort Yuma in 1856, wrote of Sarah that "among her other good qualities she is an admirable ‘pimp.’" The date of Sarah’s death, reportedly caused by a tarantula bite, is unclear, though one contemporary source indicates that she died in 1863. She was buried in the Fort Yuma post cemetery on December 23, 1866, with full military honors.
($300-600)

5. [ALLEN, William M.]. Five Years in the West; or, How an Inexperienced Young Man Finds His Occupation. With Reminiscences and Sketches of Real Life, by a Texas Preacher. Nashville: Southern Methodist Publishing House, 1884. 211 pp. 12mo, original brown embossed cloth with gilt decorated title on spine. Minor rubbing to spine extremities, else a near fine copy. Contemporary ownership inscription. Very scarce and little known.
        First edition. Rader 113. Howes, p. 203, enters the title with reference: "See Allen, Wm. M," but there is no entry under Allen. Peter Decker Cat. 35 lists an 1890 edition. No copy in Graff or Eberstadt. Pingenot: The memoirs consist of Allen’s life in Kansas (through p. 27), and his life in Texas (1856-1861), mostly in the Cross Timbers region and between the Red River and the Trinity River. He tells of teaching school in a courthouse, itinerant preaching on horseback, horse trading, dancing, and finally serving as minister to a Confederate infantry unit.
($
300-600)

6. ARMES, George A. Ups and Downs of an Army Officer. Washington, 1900. xix [1] 784 pp., engraved frontispiece portrait, numerous illustrations (some photographic). Large 8vo, original brown pictorial cloth stamped in silver. Minor shelf wear, generally fine and bright, much better condition than usually found.
        First edition. Eberstadt 115:95: "Adventures on the Colorado, Texas, and Kansas border from 1866 to 1881. Details the march from Fort Wallace to Fort Sedgwick; campaign against the Sioux; Indian campaigns on the Sabine; the great Buffalo Hunt of 1868; Fort Dodge in ’69, etc. Col. Armes spent some twenty-odd years fighting red men on his front and red tape to his rear. In both pursuits he was eminently successful. The quisquilious quibblings of the army bureaucracy are described with a minuteness and enthusiastic eclat quite in keeping with the tempo of the Colonel’s accounts of his forays against the savages further to the west. And rightly so—both were after his scalp." Graff 86. Howes A316. Nevins, Civil War Books I, p. 72. Rader 171. WLA, A Literary History of the West, p. 108: "Honors for the most unusual memoir certainly must go to George A. Armes, an officer who was court-martialed seven times....Ups and Downs gives the researcher an insight into a side of the army that is not usually exhibited." Includes Texas material from San Antonio, Abilene, Fort Stockton, Fort McKavett, Fort Concho, and other locations.
($150-300) Illustrated Description>>

7. [BALLENTINE, George]. Autobiography of an English Soldier in the United States Army. Comprising Observations and Adventures in the States and Mexico. New York: Stringer & Townsend, 1853. xii [9]-288 pp., engraved frontispiece and half title (on tinted grounds). 12mo, original green embossed cloth, gilt pictorial spine. Slightly shelf slanted, light wear to spinal extremities and corners, upper hinge weak. Contemporary and later ownership inscriptions.
        First American edition. Clark, Old South III:125: "A plainspoken account....Before being ordered to Mexico, his company was stationed in Florida—at Pensacola Bay during October, 1845, and from then until the end of the following year, at Tampa." Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 447. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 191. Haferkorn, p. 41. Howes B77. Tutorow 3692; 3625n: "Narrative of Scott’s campaign from the standpoint of an intelligent private soldier." Includes an account of Walker’s Texas Rangers.
($100-250)

8. BANCROFT, H. H. History of Mexico. San Francisco, 1883. 6 vols., complete, original tree sheep, spines extra gilt with raised bands, burgundy, blue, and black spine labels, inner gilt dentelles, a.e.g. An exceptionally fine set, with ownership spine label of Samuel Haas.
        First edition. Griffin 993: "Despite passage of time, this monumental work continues to serve as an important reference work and a gold mine of bibliographic information. It can serve as a point of departure for virtually any topic in Mexican history." Larned 3927. Palau 32185.
($250-500)

9. BANCROFT, H. H. History of the North Mexican States and Texas. 1531-1889. San Francisco: Bancroft, 1884-1889. xlviii, 751 + xvi, 888 pp., 1 folding map, illustrations. 2 vols., 8vo, original brown cloth, gilt-lettering on spine. Vol. I hinge cracked (but strong), otherwise a fine, bright set, with bookplates of the Gardner A. Sage Library on front pastedowns.
        First edition. Cowan, p. 11. Graff 155. Howes B91. Basic Texas Books 6: "One of the best single histories of Texas." Raines, pp. 20-1: "Were I restricted to a single book on Texas, I would, without hesitation, take Bancroft’s history." An invaluable, comprehensive history of Texas.
($150-300)

10. BANTA, S. E. Buckelew, the Indian Captive, or the Life Story of F. M. Bucklew [sic] while a Captive among the Lipan [Apache] Indians in the Western Wilds of Frontier Texas. Mason: Mason Herald, [1911]. 112 pp., photographic plate of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Buckelew. 12mo, upper and lower grey printed wrappers trimmed and mounted on later grey cloth. Some mild to moderate staining of covers and inner blank margins of first few leaves. Very good copy of an exceedingly rare work.
        First edition. Eberstadt, Texas 162:96: "Printed in an edition thought to have been limited to only 50 copies; we have not seen another copy in many years." Not in Ayer, Graff, Streeter, or other sales. Howes B108. Pingenot: A fine copy in original wrappers sold from my Cat. 2 for $2,000. Better known by T. S. Dennis’s Life of F. M. Buckelew, The Indian Captive, a 1925 book written by his daughter, which relates the capture of 14-year-old Buckelew by Apache Indians near Sabinal, in southwest Texas in 1866. He was taken to San Carlos near San Vicente in the Big Bend, and held captive for about a year until he managed to escape. Aided by a friendly rancher, he was taken to Fort Clark where curious officers, their wives, and soldiers viewed him as a curiosity. In this, the original work, Buckelew relates his adventures in the first person, aided by S. E. Banta.
($
1,000-3,000) Illustrated Description >>

JOSEY COPY

11. BARDE, Frederick S. (compiler). Life and Adventures of "Billy" Dixon of Adobe Walls, Texas Panhandle.... Guthrie: [Co-Operative Publishing Co., 1914]. 320 pp., photographic illustrations (including Quanah Parker). 8vo, original green cloth gilt-lettered on spine and upper cover. Binding slightly flecked, else fine and bright. Laid in is a small printed circular advertising the book. Rare in this condition, and a desirable copy with the ad card. The Josey copy with their bookplate on front pastedown. Pingenot: "An unusually fine copy of a rare book most often found in shabby condition."
        First edition. Adams, Herd 204. Dobie, p. 159: "Bully autobiography; excellent on the buffalo hunters as a type." Graff 183. Howes B135. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 3112. Pingenot: This is the first primary work to include the famous Adobe Walls fight of June 27, 1874. The Handbook of Texas Online (Adobe Walls): "The second battle of Adobe Walls...occurred...when a buffalo hunters’ camp...in what is now Hutchinson County...was attacked by a party of about 700 Plains Indians, mostly Cheyennes, Comanches, and Kiowas, under the leadership of Quanah Parker and Isa-tai....The significance of this fight is that it led to the Red River War of 1874-75, which resulted in the final relocation of the Southern Plains Indians to reservations in what is now Oklahoma."
($300-600)

12. [BARDE, Frederick S. (compiler)]. DIXON, Olive K. Life of "Billy" Dixon.... Dallas: Southwest Press, [1927]. xvi, 251 pp., photographic plates. Very fine, unopened copy in the rare red pictorial d.j. depicting the battle of Adobe Walls.
         Second edition of preceding, revised—the Southwest Press issue, revised.
($100-250)

13. [BARDE, Frederick S. (compiler)]. DIXON, Olive K. Life of "Billy" Dixon.... Dallas: P. L. Turner Company, Publishers, [1927]. xviii, 251 pp., photographic plates. Ink ownership inscription on front free endpaper, first few leaves lightly stained at top blank margin, otherwise fine, in fine yellow pictorial d.j. depicting the battle of Adobe Walls (illustration differs slightly from the one in preceding entry).
        Another issue of preceding—the Turner issue.
($100-200)

14. BARTLETT, John R. Personal Narrative of Explorations...in Texas, New Mexico, California...Connected with the Mexican Boundary Commission.... New York: Appleton, 1854. [2] xxii, 506 [6] + [2] xviii, 624 pp., folding map, 16 tinted lithographic plates (2 folding), numerous woodcut plates and woodcuts in text. 2 vols., 8vo, original green cloth, gilt pictorial spines. Occasional foxing and some rubbing but overall a very good set. Small ink stamp of former owner on Vol. 1 title-page.
        First edition. Abbey 658. Basic Texas Books 12. Cowan, p. 36. Graff 298: "An essential book for the Southwest." Hill, p. 18: "First thoroughly scholarly description of the Southwest." Howes B201. Plains & Rockies IV:234:1. Wheat, Gold Regions 252; Mapping the Transmississippi West 798: "Among the most important Western maps...excellent early map showing Gadsden Purchase Boundary." Pingenot: Bartlett arrived at Indianola, Texas, in August, 1850, with 105 scientists, artists, teamsters, and surveyors, escorted by 85 soldiers. His narrative gives a day-by-day account of their movements to San Antonio, Fredericksburg, El Paso, thence to San Diego and back to El Paso, down into Mexico, back up to Ringgold Barracks, and finally to Corpus Christi on New Year’s Day, 1853. Thomas W. Streeter called this work "the first thoroughly scholarly description of the Southwest."
($
500-1,000) Illustrated Description>>

15. [BAYARD, Samuel J.]. A Sketch of the Life of Com. Robert F. Stockton...His Correspondence with the Navy Department...Together with His Speeches.... New York: Derby & Jackson, 1856. 210, 131 [1, blank] [2, ads] pp., engraved frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original embossed brown cloth, gilt lettering and decoration on spine (rebacked, original spine preserved). Gilt lettering on spine dull, some darkening to binding, text with mild to moderate foxing (mainly affecting first signatures).
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 711. Cowan, pp. 616-17. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 192. Hill, p. 19. Howell, California 50:1460: "With an Appendix containing his official naval correspondence concerning the conquest [and] his defense of Frémont." Howes B259. Plains & Rockies IV:271b. Rocq 1667. Tutorow 3743. This book contains a chapter on Stockton’s activities in Texas. Stockton, for whom Fort Stockton, Texas, was named, is one of those figures in U.S. history who does not have a Big Name, but who had a hand in many pivotal events. As early as 1825, Stockton was politically active, delivering stirring speeches promoting liberation of America from its Spanish "oppressors" and urging colonization societies in Africa. In the 1840 election Stockton actively campaigned against Van Buren, whom he saw as a usurper of democratic principles and states’ rights.
        After Congress adopted the resolution annexing Texas to the Union on February 28, 1845, Tyler ordered Stockton to command the squadron that sailed to Texas to deliver the annexation papers and to prevent Mexican invasions while annexation was deliberated. Once in Texas, Stockton busily promoted annexation to the Texans, plotted to occupy the Rio Grande Valley with Texas volunteers, proposed that Republic President Anson Jones make war with Mexico as a prelude to annexation, and urged General Sidney Sherman to attack Matamoros, promising to support him with U.S. naval force. Stockton’s superiors warned him against rashness, and then gave him command of the Pacific fleet. Stockton sailed to California with sealed orders (to "help," however appropriate). On July 15, 1846, Stockton prematurely seized Monterey, commissioned Frémont and Gillespie as high-ranking officers of the California Battalion, captured Santa Barbara and Los Angeles without resistance, declared California to be U.S. territory, and named himself governor and commander-in-chief. Charged with exceeding his authority, he resigned his Navy commission in 1850, later serving as New Jersey Senator (1851-1853). Handbook of Texas (Robert Stockton).
($100-200)

16. BAYLIES, Francis. A Narrative of Major General Wool’s Campaign in Mexico, in the Years 1846, 1847, and 1848. Albany: Little & Company [title verso: Joel Munsell, Printer], 1851. 78 pp., lithographed frontispiece portrait of Wool. 8vo, original maize printed wrappers. Spine sympathetically reinforced with matching paper. Ink ownership stamp on verso of upper wrapper, light ink-stamped number on one interior page, light circular stain on lower wrapper. Pingenot described the condition as "relatively fine"—the wrappers are quite fresh. Preserved in a half light brown morocco and marbled boards and folding box.
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 152. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 138: "Provides the basic information on Wool’s campaign." Haferkorn, p. 41. Howes B262. Tutorow 3380. Pingenot: This is the first book publication of Baylies’ narrative after its appearance the year before in Strykers’ American Register. The author not only consulted contemporary private and official sources for his work on Wool’s campaign, but had the good fortune to interview Wool himself. His work traces the journey of Wool’s army southward from San Antonio, describing the people, towns, geography, flora, and fauna along the way. Although his 900-mile march was without incident, his forces arrived at Saltillo in time to join Taylor in one of the major battles of the war, the Battle of Buena Vista.
($
150-300)

PHOTOGRAVURES OF NEW MEXICO & ARIZONA

17. BENAVIDES, Alonso De. The Memorial of Fray Alonso de Benavides, 1630. Translated by Mrs. Edward E. Ayer, Annotated by Frederick Webb Hodge and Charles Fletcher Lummis. Chicago: Privately Printed, 1916. xiii [1] 309 [2] pp., sepia tone photogravures by Charles F. Lummis, A. C. Vroman, et al., facsimiles. 8vo, original three-quarter brown buckram over tan cloth, t.e.g. Fine copy.
        Limited edition (#124 of 300 copies). Graff 250. Rader 332. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 33n. Basic source on Arizona and New Mexico by one of the first missionaries in the Southwest, with outstanding photographs. Pingenot: Cited by Bancroft as ‘the most important authority extant.’ The Franciscans were urging the establishment of New Mexico as a bishopric and Benavides appears to have published this work partly in support of that move.
($300-600)

RARE OVERLAND FICTION

18. BENNETT, Emerson. The Bandits of the Osage. A Western Romance. Cincinnati: Robinson & Jones, 1847. [Bound with]: Kate Clarendon: Or Necromancy in the Wilderness. A Tale of the Little Miami. Cincinnati & St. Louis: Stratton & Barnard, 1848. [And]: The Prairie Flower: Or, Adventures in the Far West. Cincinnati & St. Louis: Stratton & Barnard, 1849. [7]-121 [1, blank] + [3]-135 [1, blank] + [5] 10-128 pp., all printed in double column. 3 vols. in one, 8vo, contemporary three-quarter brown sheep over dark brown cloth, spine gilt lettered, raised bands. Some wear and rubbing to binding, text foxed. Rare.
        First editions; Bandits of the Osage is the author’s first novel. BAL 1049 (Bandits of the Osage); 1052 (Kate Clarendon); 1054 (Prairie Flower). Graff 256. Howes B355("b"): "It seems probable that this romance [The Prairie Flower] was really written by Sidney W. Moss, who accompanied Hastings to California in 1842, so some of the incidents may be factual." Plains & Rockies IV:162:1: "This work [The Prairie Flower] probably first appeared in the periodical Great West in 1848, when Emerson Bennett was its editor. It describes the travels of a party of young men who crossed the Rocky Mountains to California. Sidney W. Moss, who traveled west with the party of Lansford W. Hastings in 1842, stated later that he wrote the story and gave it to Overton Johnson, who returned to the states in 1844. Moss asserted that Emerson Bennett somehow obtained the manuscript and published it as his own. H. O. Lang, in History of the Willamette Valley (Portland, 1885), recalls having heard the story read by Moss at meetings of a literary society in Oregon City in the winter of 1842-43. See also the discussion in Alfred Powers’ History of Oregon Literature (p. 195)." Wright I:295 (Bandits of the Osage); I:298 (Kate Clarendon); I:304 (Prairie Flower).
        Bennett’s novels are an important component within the genre of American frontier and western novels. Bennett’s work, with that of James Fenimore Cooper, Timothy Flint, and David H. Conyer, "provided the inspiration for the avalanche of dime novels that poured off the presses from 1860 to 1895"—WLA, A Literary History of the West, p. 136.
($400-800)

BERLANDIER WITH PORTRAIT

19. BERLANDIER, Luis & Rafael Chovel. Diario de viage de la Comisión de Límites que puso el gobierno de la República, baja la dirección del Exmo. Sr. D. Manuel de Mier y Terán. Mexico: Navarro, 1850. 298 [1, index] pp., lithographed frontispiece portrait of Mier y Terán. 8vo, original dark brown Mexican sheep gilt over rose and black mottled boards. Some external wear and rubbing to edges and extremities, bookplate removed, generally very good, with the portrait that was inserted in only a few copies.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 14: "A few copies are known with a frontispiece...the best scientific study of Texas during the colonial period. Berlandier came to Mexico to collect botanical specimens for a group of Swiss naturalists, and to accompany Gen. Manuel de Mier y Terán on his scientific expedition to Texas in 1828...he was observant, careful, and intelligent, and he left us a record that is unmatched for his era in Texas." Graff 278. Howes B379. Palau 27991. Plains & Rockies IV:178a. Raines, p. 24. Raines calls for two maps. Copies with two maps have not been found and it is doubtful that they were issued. Streeter 781n. Pingenot: Berlandier was part of the commission sent out by the Mexican government in 1827 to explore the boundaries of Texas. He spent nearly three years in the southwestern wilderness, much of the time in Texas, and this is his day-by-day journal and reports, which provide the most detailed description of Texas at the time.
($
800-1,600)

20. BIDDLE, Ellen McGowan. Reminiscences of a Soldier’s Wife. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1907. 257 [2, list of subscribers] pp., frontispiece portrait, 18 photographic plates. 8vo, original gilt-decorated blue cloth, t.e.g. Slightly shelf slanted, else fine. Author’s signed presentation copy to Mrs. Philip P. Powell "in loving remembrance of the days spent at Fort Robinson." A photo of Captain Philip Pendleton Powell is shown on p. 223. Powell came up through the ranks in the 6th Cavalry and was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant in the 9th Cavalry in 1880. He served with the 9th until his retirement in 1901.
        First edition. Graff 288: "A very good account of Army life at western posts after the Civil War." Howes B426. Myres, Following the Drum, p. 3. A Mississippi belle recounts cavalry life in Arizona, Colorado, California, Nebraska, and elsewhere. Pingenot: Biddle relates life of an army wife from post-Civil War occupation of Georgia, Alabama, and Texas to the Modoc Indian War in California. Her husband, who rose to the rank of brigadier general, served with the 1st, 5th, 6th, and 9th Cavalry Regiments. He was in Colorado and in Arizona fighting Apaches under Cochise; and the remount depot at Fort Robinson, Nebraska.
($
150-300)

21. BOLTON, Herbert E. Rim of Christendom: A Biography of Eusebio Francisco Kino. New York: Macmillan, 1936. [16] 644 pp., illustrations, 8 maps, 12 plates, 3 facsimiles. Tall 8vo, original cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. D.j. slightly chipped but very good. Presentation inscribed and signed by Bolton, dated January 28, 1937.
        First edition. Harvard Guide to American History, p. 198. Howes B587. Rader 396. Pingenot: One of Bolton’s most important works, the biography of the pioneering missionary and cartographer of Arizona and California. It was Kino who exploded the mistaken geographical notion that had persisted for nearly two centuries that California was an island. Presentation copies in the d.j. in nice collector’s condition are very uncommon.
($60-120)

22. BOLTON, Herbert E. Texas in the Middle Eighteenth Century: Studies in Spanish Colonial History and Administration. Berkeley: University of California, 1915. xii, 501 pp. 13 maps (several folding). 8vo, original navy cloth. Minor wear to extremities, otherwise very good.
        First edition. Campbell, p. 161. Clark, Old South I:1n. Howes B589. Basic Texas Books 20: "Contains the best English translation of 6 major narratives of explorations into Texas, as well as others into New Mexico, Arizona, and California. Best work of scholarship on eighteenth-century Texas." Rader 399. Rittenhouse 70. Steck, p. 54. Pingenot: One of the best scholarly studies of the period in any language, when Texas served as a buffer between the competing French and Spanish empires. Includes material on Indians, trade, ecclesiastical history, explorations, etc. Quite scarce.
($100-250)

BORDERLANDS

23. [BORDERLANDS]. ASHTON, J. Hubley. Piedras Negras Claims. In the American and Mexican Joint Commission. Pedro Tauns (No. 679) and Others vs. the United States. Argument and Evidence for the United States [wrapper title]. American and Mexican Joint Commission. No. 679... [caption title]. [Washington, 1871]. 44 pp. plus tipped in p. 40a. 8vo, original lilac printed wrappers, preserved in half dark brown calf folding box. An exceptionally fine copy.
        First edition. Not in Howes, etc. Pingenot: This rare separate is unknown save for its appearance in House Executive Doc. 277, 42nd Congress, 2nd Session, 1872, under Claims No. 40 on pp. 147-80. This group of claims, totaling an enormous sum and put forward by attorneys Bethel Coopwood and William Stone, arose from the burning of the village of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, by the Texan volunteers under Captains Callahan and Henry in 1855.
($
150-300) Illustrated Description>>

RARE MAPS OF THE BORDERLANDS

24. [BORDERLANDS]. COMISION DE LA PESQUISIDORA DE LAS FRONTERA DEL NOROESTE. Reports of the Committee of Investigation Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas. Translated from the Official Edition Made in Mexico. New York: Baker & Goodwin, Printers, 1875. viii, [3]-443 pp., 3 folding lithographed maps with colored outlining or shading: (1) A Map of the Indian Territory Northern Texas and New Mexico Showing the [G]reat Western Prairies by Josiah Gregg, 32 x 38.3 cm; 12-1/4 x 15 inches; (2) ...Mapa de S. Mc. L. Staples...especialmente le parte mas al norte i la derecha del Rio Bravo, 38.4 x 26.2 cm; 15-1/4 x 10-1/8 inches; (3) Mapa del Rio Grande desde su desembocadura en el golfo hasta San Vicente, Presidio Antiguo by M. J. Martinez, 80.4 x 72.3 cm; 32 x 28-1/2 inches (See Day, Maps of Texas, p. 87). 8vo, later full smooth tan calf, spine gilt with raised bands. Some splits to first map neatly reinforced (no losses), embossed library stamp on title, otherwise very fine.
        First American edition and first edition in English of one of the most important borderlands reports (published the same year in Mexico, in Spanish). Adams, Guns 1108; Herd 558 & 2264: "Rare. The northern frontier question and cattle and horse stealing." Decker 37:340: "Scarce and informative...of great documentary value." Graff 2765. Eberstadt 122:97 (no mention of maps). Howes I32 (see also T143). Palau 119576-8. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2469: "The Mexican government ordered publication of this English translation of an official report on Indian and bandit depredations along both sides of the Rio Grande." In response to recurring Indian depredations and increase of cattle rustling on the Texas-Mexican border, a Mexican commission was formed to investigate charges by the U.S. that the crimes were committed by Mexicans and Indians. This report, which the Mexican government ordered in an English translation, absolves the Mexicans of wrongdoing and accuses the U.S. of connivance. Pingenot: A respected southwestern scholar who examined this copy at length commented that for its period it was comparable in importance to the Pichardo treatise for the colonial period of history.
        This report can be found from time to time, but seldom with the important maps. The first map conforms to the map found in Gregg’s classic Commerce of the Prairie, with an added legend in Spanish. See Wheat, Mapping of the Transmississippi West 482 & I, p. 486: "A cartographic landmark." Also, consult John L. Allen, "Patterns of Promise" in Mapping the North American Plains (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987), p. 51 & Fig. 3. This report and the Mexican version of the Gregg map are not mentioned in Rittenhouse in his bibliography on the Santa Fe Trail. The second map, by M. J. Martinez, depicts the area of Coahuila and Nuevo Leon followed by the raiding parties. The third and largest map (dated at Monterey, December 1873) shows the Rio Grande from its mouth to the Big Bend region. This important, little-known, and rare map of portions of Texas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas is one of the most detailed maps of the region for that period, showing each state along the border, towns, rivers, mountains, roads, forts, lakes, and every Mexican and American ranch. No copy of this report has appeared at auction for the past thirty-five years.
($1,000-2,000) Illustrated Description>>

25. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO (Republic). EJÉRCITO DEL NORTE. GENERAL EN GEFE (Mariano Arista). El C. Mariano Arista, general de brigada del Egército Megicano y en gefe del cuerpo de Egército del Norte. A las tropas de mi mando y á los habitantes de la frontera e los Departamentos de oriente, hago saber: [text commences, proclaiming forbidding engaging in contraband trade across the Texan border and providing for penalties and division of captured contraband]. Sabinas [Nuevo Leon], April 13, 1841. Folio broadside. Very fine, with an English translation included.
        First printing. Streeter 966 (2 locations, Streeter copy now at Yale and TxU). Streeter Sale 373. Arista proclaims (in part): "With the wish of stemming the tide of the scandalous trade between our border residents and the Texans, who are now enemies of the Republic, with notorious disregard for the laws, ordinances, and edicts governing this activity, which trade is prejudicial not only to the public treasury and the legitimate private businesses of the border area, but even more, aids the enemy, tendering to them the goods that they need and enabling them to maintain with us relations which we ought to counteract at all costs as long as they remain separated from submission to the Supreme National Government."
($400-800)

26. [BORDERLANDS]. MEXICO (Republic). MINISTERIO DE GUERRA Y MARINA. Reglamento para el establicimiento de las colonias militares en la frontera del norte. México. - Diciembre de 1868. Mexico: Imprenta del Gobierno, 1868. [10] 118, 31 (appendix of documents, mostly printed on recto only, and including four folding tables and one large folding lithographed plan of suggested architecture for military facilities). 8vo, original yellow printed wrappers bound in later red leather over red cloth, maroon spine label. Wraps dusty and blank margins of first few leaves lightly worn and chipped.
        First edition. Not in Palau, Sabin, Porrúa, etc. An important little-known borderlands report relating to Mexico’s establishment of military colonies in the borderlands to deal with the general state of lawlessness existing between Mexico and Texas-New Mexico-Arizona-California. The other purpose of the establishment of these colonies was for the final subjugation of the Native tribes who had managed to maintain their strongholds through several centuries of Spanish rule. New treaties with the tribes are suggested, and prior treaties are reviewed. There is a wealth of military detail in this rare and excellent report.
($750-1,500) Illustrated Description>>

27. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. CONGRESS. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. Report and Accompanying Documents of the Committee on Foreign Affairs on the Relations of the United States with Mexico [and] Texas Frontier Troubles. Testimony Taken before the Committee on Foreign Affairs. Washington: HRR701, 1878. [4] 461 [1, blank]; 173 [1] blank [1, index] pp., including text illustrations of cattle brands. 8vo, new beige cloth with gilt-lettered tan leather label. Minor marginal chipping and browning to first few and last few leaves.
        First edition. Not in Adams, Howes, etc. Pingenot: A mine of information on Texas border troubles and the lawless frontier. Most of this lengthy volume is devoted to Mexican border troubles (321 pp.) and the lawlessness of the Texas frontier (175 pp.), with special sections on "Cattle-Stealing," "Indian Raids," "San Elizario Murders," etc. The final section on "Texas Frontier Troubles" is especially rich, with reports by Gen. Ord, Adjutant General Steele, John S. Ford, U.S. consul Wilson, and many other figures important for Texas history. This is one of the most readable government documents we’ve encountered. Rare.
($
200-400)

28. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. CONGRESS. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. Texas Frontier Troubles. Testimony Taken before the Committee on Foreign Affairs. [Washington, 1878]. 173 [1] blank [1, index] pp., including text illustrations of cattle brands. 8vo, new brown buckram. Short tear to blank margin of first leaf and last few leaves foxed.
        The present report, focusing specifically on Texas, also appears as the second item in the preceding entry.
($100-200)

29. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. CONGRESS. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS. Testimony Taken...in Relation to the Texas Border Troubles. Washington: HMD 64, 1878. 313 pp., 2 folding lithographed maps: (1) untitled large-scale map of the Texas-Mexico border, outlined in red, 42.0 x 60.1 cm (16-1/2 x 24 inches); (2) Extract from Carte du Mexique Dresseé au Depôt de la Guerre, par Mr. Niox...Paris 1873, shaded in terracotta, 37.0 x 61.2 cm (14-3/4 x 24-7/8 inches). 8vo, new half brown calf over marbled boards. Very fine, with two excellent, little-known maps of the Texas-Mexico borderlands.
        First edition. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2491: "An essential source of detailed reports and sworn testimony for Indian and bandit attacks in South Texas since the 1850s and the Mexican government’s failure to take action against these raiders. The report is also useful in providing information on attempts to find historical precedents for pursuing ‘renegade Indians’ across international boundaries." Not in Adams or Howes.
        Pingenot: Contains testimony by Lt. Col. Wm. Shafter and Lieut. Bullis giving accounts of their expeditions into northern Mexico in pursuit of Indians who had been marauding the Texas frontier. Map 1...shows the wagon road from Fort Clark up the Devil’s to the Pecos rivers and to the Rio Grande; also the routes followed by Shafter, Bullis, Col. Young, Capt. Keyes, and others on forays into the mountains of northern Mexico; Map 2...[shows] the entire borderland regions of Northern Mexico. A 21-page Appendix includes articles in English from Mexican newspapers as well as reports by Mexican officials showing their concerns over U.S. military intrusions into their territory. Texas Ranger Captain Lee McNelly’s fight at Las Cuevas is also included in the committee’s report. A rare and important borderland document presenting both U.S. and Mexican perspectives.
($
400-800)

UNUSUAL MAP

30. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. CONGRESS. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON TEXAS FRONTIER TROUBLES. Texas Frontier Troubles....Report: The Special Committee Who Were Appointed under a Resolution of the House of Representatives, Passed January 6, 1876.... Washington: HRR343, 1876. xxi [1] 180 pp., lithographed folding map : Map of the Lower Rio Grande, Accompanying Report of the Special Committee on Texas Frontier Troubles.... 25.7 x 34.4 cm (10 x 15-1/2 inches). 8vo, new tan cloth, gilt-lettered black calf label. Light wear and chipping to blank margins of first and last leaves (usually encountered on these government reports of the era, printed on cheap paper). Rare, especially with the map (which is fine).
        First edition. Adams, Guns 2262; Herd 2273: "Rare." Eberstadt, Texas 162:124: "Neither Adams nor Howes calls for the important map which is here present." Howes T143 (aa). Reese, Six Score 108: "An important government document dealing with cattle theft along the Mexican border. The testimony contains much on rustling problems and on cattle in South Texas generally. The Mexican government had issued a similar report a year earlier, the Informe de la Comisión Pesquisidora, 1875." The map is wonderful and detailed, locating remote Texas outposts, as Lagartoville and Charco Fandango, and with hand-written lithographed notes such as "Paso Selos Arrieros—good food." I would imagine that this map is considerably rarer than a 1598 Ortelius La Florida...or even Austin or DeCordova! Pingenot: The fine folding map of South Texas and Northern Mexico delineates Texas from the Rio Grande from its mouth to above Fort Duncan in Maverick County, indicating trails, frontier forts, Mexican outposts and towns, geographical notations, ranches, etc. An excellent chronicle of border depredations, including that of Juan N. Cortina, along with a first-hand report by Texas Ranger Captain L. H. McNelly. The Committee’s report blamed much of the problem on Mexico and urged that U.S. forces be allowed to pursue bandits across the border.
($400-800) Illustrated Description>>

31. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. DEPARTMENT OF STATE. Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of the United States, Transmitted to Congress, with the Annual Message of the President [Ulysses S. Grant], December 4, 1876, Preceded by a List of Papers and Followed by an Index of Persons and Subjects. Washington: GPO, 1876. lvi, 648 pp. 8vo, original maroon cloth. Binding faded and tape repairs, upper hinge cracked, occasional pencil underlining in text (highlighting the borderlands material). Ink stamps of the Rhode Island Historical Society on title and a few other pages; contemporary anonymous ink presentation from the State Department.
        First edition. The section of dispatches from Mexico (pp. 386-414) contain solid documentation on borderlands, especially the Kickapoo and Lipan tribes, reverberations from the turmoil of Diaz’s revolt against Juárez (including Diaz taking Matamoros), Mackenzie and his troops crossing the border without obtaining proper permission, escape of Cortina and his joining the revolutionaries (complete printing of his Pronunciamiento of May 18, 1876, plus the usual spate of depredations and border troubles. Appendix C (pp. 637-40) relates to the Mexican Claims Commission, and particularly the Piedras Negras cases. Unrelated to the borderlands directly is a notice of the death of Santa Anna, who had returned to Mexico from banishment in 1874.
($75-$150) Illustrated Description >>

32. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (Millard Fillmore). Message from the President of the United States, to the Two Houses of Congress, at the Commencement of the Second Session of the Thirty-First Congress. December 2, 1850.... Washington: HRED1, 1850. 126 pp., 4 folding charts. 8vo, modern maroon cloth with leather spine label.
        First edition. This report, complete in itself, is usually found with the large bound collection of reports that contain the Cross overland (see Plains & Rockies IV:181:3). The present report is by Secretary of War, C. M. Conrad, and provides details on the operations of the Army during the latter part of 1849 and 1850. This section of the report, often overlooked in the excitement of the well-deserving Cross-Oregon report, contains substantial material on Texas and the West that deserves more careful examination, e.g.: List of Correspondence on the Subject of Indian Hostilities in Texas, New Mexico, and California (pp. 1-83, rich in detail, including dispatches by "Rip" Ford, documentation). Also of documentary value are the reports: Civil Expenses in New Mexico (pp. 91-108, short but important series of reports documenting establishing civil government in New Mexico) and an accounting of expenses in the Western Department, including the Topographical Engineers and some details on the establishment of civil government in California.
($80-200)

33. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James Buchanan). Difficulties on Southwestern Frontier: Message from the President of the United States... Washington: HRED52, 1860. 147 pp. 8vo, new grey linen, gilt-lettered black morocco spine label. Fine.
        First edition. Not in Adams, Graff, Howes, etc. Pingenot: The most extensive and important compilation of original reports on the Cortinas War, cattle rustling, and Comanche raids in South Texas during this period. It includes reports, letters, proclamations, military orders, memorials and petitions from citizen groups, etc., from a virtual Who’s Who of Texas military on the eve of the Civil War. There are reports from Robert E. Lee, Sam Houston, John S. "Rip" Ford, H. R. Runnels, John Hemphill, Cortinas, and many others.
($
100-200)

34. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (Ulysses S. Grant). Claims on the Part of Citizens of the United States and Mexico under the Convention of July 4, 1868. Washington: SED3, 1877. 103 [1, blank] pp. [Bound with]: Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures, Civil and Miscellaneous, of the Department of State, from March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1876. Washington: SED38, 1877. 2 vols. in one, 4to, contemporary buckram, red, tan, and black leather labels (chipped). Ex-Library of Congress, with LC bookplate and deaccession ink stamp on front pastedown, small perforated LC stamp on title, and other occasional discreet library markings. Lower blank margin of first leaf chipped, small repairs to margins of first two leaves. Uncommon.
        First edition. The first report consists of the preliminary report of J. Hubley Ashton (U.S. agent for the joint U.S.-Mexico commission) followed by a detailed schedule of about 2,000 claims, mostly along the border from California to Texas and as far north as Kansas and San Francisco and Downieville in the California gold fields (lynching of the wife of José Maria Loaiza) and beyond. The claims were generated under the June 4, 1868, convention between the United Sates and Mexico. Of the 167 cases in which awards were made against the U.S., many belonged to the Piedras Negras case involving the burning of that town by Captains Callahan and Henry. Awards to U.S. citizens totaled $3,975,123.79, and among the claimants were Richard King and Mifflin Kennedy ("robbery of cattle from ranch by armed bands from Mexico"), Hamilton Bee, Charles Stillman, Parker H. French ("depredation on ranch on Rio Grande by Mexican and American robbers, and false imprisonment"), William McGarrahan (claim of $10,000,000 "injury in respect to the Panoche Grande Rancho"), the Governor of Sonora ("files documents, and reports in reference to Indian depredations"), and a host of others (from the high and mighty to the lowly). Set out are claim number, nature of claim (many for rustled and seized cattle, or Indian depredations), when, where, amount claimed, when decided, by whom decided, nature of decision, and amount of award (in U.S. currency, U.S. gold, or Mexican gold). The second report has a few references to Texas (boundary between U.S. and Texas, claims of the Republic of Texas, depredations on the frontier of Texas, etc.).
($250-500)

35. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (Rutherford B. Hayes). Mexican Border Troubles. Washington: HRED13, 1877. 244 pp. 8vo, new brown buckram. One tear and stain to p. 155 (no loss), otherwise a fine copy.
        First edition. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2487. Pingenot: An important assemblage of letters, documents, and reports regarding raids from Mexico by bandits, cattle rustler, and marauding Indians. Military reports include those from Lt. Col. Shafter at Fort Clark, and department commander E. O. C. Ord, Major Schofield, 10th Cavalry, Ft. Duncan, Lt. O. B. Boyd, 8th Cavalry, Camp on the Pinto, etc. Diplomatic correspondence includes letters from Secretary of State John W. Foster, Mexican ministers Vallarta and Mariscal, Mexican General Geronimo Trevino, Commercial Agent William Schuchardt at Piedras Negras, S. P. Heitzelman, W. R. Shafter, and many others. Excellent content with a wealth of information.
($
150-300)

36. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT. (Chester A. Arthur). Mexican Claims. Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting a Report and Accompanying Papers Relative to the Payment of Claims Specified in the Fifth Section of the Act of Congress approved June 18, 1876. Washington: HRED103, 1884. 788 pp. 8vo, original three-quarter black morocco over marbled boards, spine with gilt lettering and raised bands. Some shelf wear, hinges split (but strong), interior fine. Pastedowns with contemporary ink ownership inscription and notes. Occasional underlining and notes by a later scholar.
        First edition. Relates to the final settlement of the accrued claims since the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe, including detailed evidence and rebuttal. Much on the La Abra Mining claim and seizure of cotton during the Civil War.
($50-100)

37. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. WAR DEPARTMENT. SECRETARY OF WAR (John B. Floyd). Troubles on Texas Frontier: Letter from the Secretary of War, Communicating, in Compliance with a Resolution of the House, Information in Relation to the Trouble on the Texas Frontier... Washington: HRED81, 1860. 105 pp. Disbound. Fine copy, laid in a custom maroon gilt-stamped cloth clamshell box.
        First edition. Pingenot: Contains an extensive report by Major Heintzelman, 1st Infantry, commanding the Brownsville expedition against Cortina; letters from Governor Sam Houston to the Secretary of War; and numerous letters and reports by departmental commander Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee concerning military operations in Texas and along the Rio Grande. Included also are depositions from citizens who suffered losses from raids by Cortina and his brigands. Excellent content and a scarce government document. Not in any bibliography.
($
150-300)

38. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. WAR DEPARTMENT. SECRETARY OF WAR (William W. Belknap). Claims of the State of Texas.... Washington: HRED277, 1872. 180 pp. 8vo, new brown cloth, dark brown gilt-lettered spine label. Chipping to blank margins of a few leaves and many lower blank corners (cheap government paper is culprit).
        First edition. Not in the standard bibliographies. Pingenot: Although issued seven years after the Civil War, this entire report deals with claims against the government arising from Indian depredations in Texas, from claims of Mexican citizens against the U.S. for depredations committed by invading Texans, and from claims resulting from excesses committed by volunteer Texas companies raised to protect the frontier. Virtually all of the correspondence, from General Persifer F. Smith, Captain Sidney Burbank, Jefferson Davis, Texas governors E. M. Pease and H. R. Runnels, Robt. S. Neighbours, J. R. Baylor, Sam Houston, etc., relates to the period 1852-1860. Many of the documents deal with the raid into Mexico in 1855 by J. H. Callahan. Pp. 147-80 contain all of the depositions by claimants arising from the burning of Piedras Negras by Callahan’s men. An important report with excellent content.
($
100-200)

39. [BORDERLANDS]. UNITED STATES. WAR DEPARTMENT. SECRETARY OF WAR (George W. McCrary). Letter from the Secretary of War...His Views in Relation to the Bill (S.165) to Reimburse the State of Texas for Expenses Incurred in Repelling Invasions of Indians and Mexicans. Washington: SED19, 1878. 195 pp. 8vo, new half brown levant morocco over brown cloth, spine gilt lettered and with raised bands. Fine.
        First edition. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2441: "Texas seeks federal compensation for Indian depredations and the ongoing cost to state forces." Pingenot: Primarily concerns claims against the U.S. by Mexican citizens arising from raids made by Texan volunteer troops since 1854. Contains considerable material on the Piedras Negras claims with their fraudulent exaggeration of losses and damages. Valuable depositions by claimants and witnesses along with the roles played in the scheme by William Stone and Bethel Coopwood.
($
150-300)

40. BOURKE, John G. An Apache Campaign in the Sierra Madre. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1886. vi, 112 + [16] pp., frontispiece, 12 engraved plates. 12mo, original brick-colored pictorial cloth with gilt title on spine. Minor shelfwear and rubbing to spinal extremities, else fine.
        First edition. Graff 365. Howes B652. "[Bourke was] one of the last in the tradition of humanist-scientific military officers who recorded the American West....[His] historical work is vivid, observant, and humorous, and his ethnological studies remain invaluable to modern scholars" (Lamar, p. 117). Munk (Alliott), p. 35. Rader 424. Pingenot: A vivid account of Crook’s expedition to the Sierra Madre in 1883 to subdue the Chiricahua Apaches who were terrorizing Arizona settlers. The author, an army officer of wide experience among the Indians of New Mexico, Arizona, and northern Mexico, methodically recorded the customs of the Indians he observed. One of the scarcer Bourke titles.
($250-500)

41. BOURKE, John G. On the Border with Crook.... New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1891. xvi, 491 [1] [4, ads] pp., frontispiece portrait, 6 photographic plates. Large 8vo, original burgundy cloth decorated in silver. Hinges strengthened, otherwise a very fine, bright copy, preserved in a maroon cloth slipcase.
        First edition. Dobie, pp. 32 & 85: "A truly great book, on both Apaches and Arizona frontier." Dykes, "My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West" in Western High Spots, p. 30. Graff 367. Howes B654. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 61: "Standard account of Crook’s western military career from Arizona to Montana. Bourke was a captain in the Third Cavalry and aide-de-camp to Crook. He had been with Dodge in the Hills in 1875." 61. Luther, High Spots of Custer 31: "Part of a body of literature on Crook’s expedition that can’t be ignored." Munk (Alliott), p. 36. Rader 426. "One of the last in the tradition of humanist-scientific military officers who recorded the American West, Bourke’s historical work is vivid, observant, and humorous, and his ethnological studies remain invaluable to modern scholars" (Lamar).
($250-500)

42. BOX, Michael James. Capt. James Box’s Adventures & Explorations in New & Old Mexico. New York: James Miller, 1869. 344 pp. 8vo, original dark green pebbled cloth, embossed sides, gilt title on spine. Two short tears to blank upper margin of title neatly mended, else a bright, crisp copy.
        First edition, second issue (same sheets as the 1861 printing but with new title-page on a cancel). Eberstadt 107:35: "Box was a Captain of the Texas Rangers, a keen and faithful observer, and his book is one of the best descriptive narratives of the southwestern country." Graff 372: "This excellent narrative is based on the author’s personal experiences, especially as a member of the Texas Rangers." Howes B671. The book is an overlooked source for documentation on borderlands ranching operations in Northern Mexico and Arizona (including Gandara, Brevoort, and others in Arizona). Mining, agriculture, and irrigation for the same regions are well covered. The Appendix contains a "Plan of a National Pacific Railroad."
($200-400)

43. BOYD, Mrs. Orsemus Bronson [Frances Anne Mullen Boyd]. Cavalry Life in Tent and Field. New York: J. Selwin Tait & Sons, 1894. 376 pp., photographic frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original gilt-lettered blue pictorial cloth. Some edge wear and moderate foxing (latter confined to first two signatures), overall very good. Presentation inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper: "O.E.H./ from/ F.A.B./ Dec. 25, 1896." Very scarce.
        First edition. Graff 374. Howes B674. Rader 437. Pingenot: One of the best accounts of army life at frontier forts from a woman’s viewpoint. Her life as the wife of a cavalry officer spanned almost twenty years, from 1867 to 1885, at posts in Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Her descriptions of Santa Fe, Fort Bayard, New Mexico, and Fort Clark near the Texas border are rich in detail and imagery.
($
200-400)

44. BRACKETT, Albert G. General Lane’s Brigade in Central Mexico. New York: H. W. Derby and Company, 1854. 336 pp., engraved frontispiece portrait. 12mo, original dark brown blind-stamped cloth, gilt pictorial spine. Minor shelf wear, first and last few leaves foxed; a near fine copy, very bright.
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 155. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 173. Haferkorn, p. 42. Howes B691. Tutorow 3749: "The author was a 1st lieutenant in Lane’s regiment. Deals with the formation of the regiment, its trip to Vera Cruz, various battles, the Mexican people, guerrilla warfare, and the journey home. Contains a list of the killed, wounded, and missing in Lane’s brigade."
($300-600)

45. BRACKETT, A. G. History of the United States Cavalry, from the Formation of the Federal Government to the 1st of June, 1863. To Which is Added a List of all of the Cavalry Regiments, with the Names of Their Commanders...in...Service since the Breaking out of the Rebellion. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1865. xii [13]-337 [1] [2, ads] pp., frontispiece, engraved plates (one Texas plate, Resaca de Palma), maps. 12mo, original brown cloth, gilt sabers on upper cover, bevelled edges. Some outer wear and staining.
        First edition. Flake 787. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 110. Graff 381. Howes B692. Plains & Rockies IV:411: "Accounts of Doniphan, Cooke, and Frémont." Rittenhouse 78. Includes much of Texas interest: Mexican-American battles fought on Texas soil, Albert Sidney Johnston and Robert E. Lee in Texas, camel experiment, Van Dorn and the 1858 Wichita Expedition, Cortina raids, Twiggs and Texas Secession, author’s participation in fights with Apaches and Comanches, etc.
($150-300)

46. BRAMAN, D. E. E. Braman’s Information about Texas. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1857. 192 pp. 12mo, original blind-stamped brown cloth, with gilt lettering on spine. Slight wear to lower extremities, else a fine, bright copy.
        First edition. Adams, Herd 305: "Rare. A chapter on stock raising in Texas." Howes B179. Rader 463. Raines, p. 30: "A good immigrants guide...especially as to land matters." Pingenot: Braman covers twenty-five Texas counties and provides valuable information concerning sheep and cattle raising, taxation, legal rights of married women, etc. Also contains material on Texas Revolution land claims and other valuable data on the Republic of Texas and early statehood. Braman was a resident of Matagorda.
($
250-500)

47. BRAZOS BRANCH RAILWAY COMPANY. Ornate engraved stock certificate with illustration of steam locomotive, cars, and station, completed in ink: Shares One Hundred Dollars Each. State of Texas. Brazos Branch Railway Company. No. [16] [30] Shares. This Certifies, That [J. M. Gibbs is] proprietor of [Thirty-five?] Share[s] in the Capital Stock of the Brazos Branch Railway Company.... Navasota, September 7, 1848. At lower left: Gray, Smallwood & Co., Printers, Houston.
        Pingenot: Originally chartered in 1854 to run from Washington-on-the-Brazos to the juncture of the Galveston & Red River Railroad, the Company was revived after the Civil War. See Reed, A History of the Texas Railroads, p. 109.
($100-200)

48. BROWN, Fred R. History of the Ninth U.S. Infantry 1799-1909. Chicago: R. R. Donnelley & Co., 1909. xiii [1], 842 pp., frontispiece (battle flags in color), numerous plates, maps, and illustrations (some folding). Small 4to, original three-quarter blind-stamped morocco gilt over marbled boards. Light wear, else very good. Tipped in at the front is a signed, typed letter from Captain Kinney of Commanding Co. K presenting the volume to F. A. Merrill of Lancaster, Texas, including the statement: "The Company desires you to accept this book as an expression of their appreciation of the kindness of both you and Mrs. Merrill to them when they halted in front of your residence on August 30, 1909, when they were almost exhausted from the heat of a long day’s march. The unlimited amount of ice water provided on this particular occasion meant more to them than anything that could have been furnished."
        First edition. Not in Howes, Eberstadt, Graff, etc. Garrett 173: Tutorow 3319: "Chapter 2 deals with the Mexican War period." Like most regimental histories, this was printed in a very small edition and is very scarce. Pingenot: The 9th Infantry was first organized in 1798 and throughout its life it had three reorganizations. This fine regimental history includes its battles on the Niagara frontier, the Battle of Lundy’s Lane, Battle of Fort Erie, the expedition to Vera Cruz in 1847 and the Mexican War battles of Cerro Gordo and Churubusco. The regiment was disbanded following the War with Mexico and was then reorganized for the fourth time for the Civil War. Post-war action included service against Indians on the Pacific coast, action in the Black Hills, Big Horn, Powder River, and gathering information on the death of Crazy Horse. The regiment was later transferred to the southwest where it served in Arizona and New Mexico. In the Spanish American War, the 9th participated in the fight for San Juan Hill.
($
600-1,200)

49. BROWN, John Henry. History of Texas from 1685 to 1892. St. Louis: L. E. Daniell, [1892-1893]. 631 + 591 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates, maps, text illustrations. 2 vols., large, thick 8vo, original grey cloth decorated in black, title in gilt on spines and upper covers. Some wear, but overall a good to very good set.
        First edition. Howes B856. Basic Texas Books 22: "The earliest comprehensive history of Texas written by an active participant...Brown’s history is replete with historical facts presented for the first time...His descriptions of events in which he participated are vivid and memorable. The set is still useful today, and forms one of the basic research sources for nineteenth-century Texas." Rader 513. Raines, p. 32. Pingenot: One of the great standard classic histories of Texas, still important and useful.
($200-400)

50. BROWN, John Henry. Indian Wars and Pioneers of Texas. Austin: L. E. Daniell, [1896]. 762 pp., 124 plates (including portraits). Large 4to, original full dark brown morocco with gilt lettering on spine and upper cover (neatly rebacked with dark brown cloth, original spine preserved). Some shelf wear, upper joint split (but strong), interior very fine.
        First edition, first issue, with the sharper images of the plates (the engraved portraits were not included in the trade edition issued at the same time). Howes B857. Basic Texas Books 23: "This is Brown’s most important book and one of the best works on Texas Indian fighters and...pioneers...The large volume contains hundreds of biographical sketches of early Texans of the nineteenth-century, with an immense amount of material that appears nowhere else. Most valuable of all are the accounts of the numerous fights and skirmishes between early Texans and Indians. Only in the works of J. W. Wilbarger and A. J. Sowell does one find a comparable amount of historical data on this facet of Texas history. Brown was himself a participant in some of the bloodiest battles." Rader 514. Pingenot: Brown come to Texas in the days of the Republic and was an eye-witness to many of the events that he describes. The first 128 pages are devoted to a history of the Indian wars with the remainder of the book being biographies of over 500 Texas pioneers and their families.
($600-1,200) Illustrated Description>>

REMINGTON ILLUSTRATION

51. BROWN, N. W. Historical Sketch of Troop "A", First Cavalry W.N.G. (Light Horse Squadron) Commemorating Its Twentieth Anniversary. Milwaukee: Burdick & Allen, 1899. 36 [2] 37-80 (ads, printed in colored inks and many illustrated) pp., numerous illustrations (on p. [4] is a full-page illustration by Frederick Remington dedicated "To Troop A 1st Cav. 1898"). Oblong 4to, original gilt pictorial yellow buckram over blue cloth, a.e.g. Some soiling to binding, first few leaves detached with minor marginal chipping.
        First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington) 666. Pingenot: Contains a history of the troop, roster of its officers, non-coms, and troopers, scenes of Camp Grant, views of the troop in the field, portraits of its officers, etc. The splendid ads by merchants subsidizing publication provide a valuable turn-of-the-century view of Milwaukee’s business and commerce. Rare.
($
150-300)

52. BROWNE, John Ross. Adventures in the Apache Country: A Tour Through Arizona and Sonora.... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1869. 535 [1, blank] [4 pp., ads] pp., 155 spirited woodcut illustrations by author. 12mo, original brown cloth with gilt lettering on spine. Fine copy, with an 1868 gift inscription.
        First edition. Eberstadt 120:24: "No other work gives so vivid or such an accurate account of the country and of the terrors which then attended border life in Arizona, where one-twentieth of the population had been swept away by the attacks of the Apaches in three years." Edwards, Desert Voices, pp. 24-25. Farquahar 26. Field 197." Graff 437. Howes B875 (aa). Munk (Alliott), p. 40 (listing the English edition and a later New York edition). Paher 218: "Among the all time great Nevada books." Rader 519. Browne, an Irishman by birth, had a varied career as a traveler, author, government servant (including a brief appointment as Minister to China) and reporter. Brown had a keen sense of humor as well as a sharp eye, and his narrative descriptions and sketches of the Southwest provide an invaluable historical record. Paher refers to the woodcuts in this volume as ‘priceless,’ remarking further that many of them are ‘the only representation of the people and places ever made.’ Pingenot: Browne accompanied Charles D. Poston on his tour as Indian agent. The book contains a sketch of the Arizona career of Sylvester Mowry; an account of S. F. Butterworth’s adventures in Arizona; the Oatman captivity, etc. Very scarce in nice collector’s condition.
($
250-500)

53. [BUFFALO]. Buffalo head. Approximately 36 inches tall, 36 inches long, and 23-1/4 inches from horn tip to horn tip. A well-preserved specimen.
        A magnificent artifact evoking a West that has long since disappeared. Ben Pingenot kept the head on the wall next to the door of his office.
($750-1,000) Illustrated Description>>

54. BURTON, Harley True. A History of the J A Ranch.... Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Company, 1928. [x] 147 pp., frontispiece portrait of Charles Goodnight, 2 plates, map. 8vo, original red cloth, gilt lettering on front cover and spine. A fine copy of this modern range rarity. Contemporary ownership inscription of M. S. Garretson.
        First edition. Adams, Herd 382. Agatha, p. 62. Dobie, p. 98. Howes B1030. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 16. Reese, Six Score 18: "One of the first ranch histories, and one of the rarest and most important. It is not known how many copies of this book were printed, but it was certainly no more than several hundred. The JA Ranch was Col. Charles Goodnight’s old ranch, and this book, issued a bit more than a year before he died was dedicated to him and done with his cooperation."
($400-800)

55. BYERS, William N. Encyclopedia of Biography of Colorado: History of Colorado. Vol. I. Chicago: Century Publishing & Engraving, 1901. 477 pp., portraits. 4to, original full decorated calf, with title in gilt on front cover and spine, a.e.g. Fine copy.
        First edition. Wilcox, p. 20. Wynar 124. Not in Adams, Herd. Pingenot: The engraved portraits are very well executed. Only volume one was published. In addition to this work’s biographical aspects, Byers has included some interesting historical material. This includes the Indian War, 1864-65, Raid of Texas Guerillas, the Second Ute War, Frémont’s Five Expeditions, the Santa Fe Trail, the State of Jefferson, Constitutional Convention, Live Stock and Dairy, Assassination of Italians, etc.
($300-600)

56. CABEZA DE VACA, Alvár Nuñez de. Relation that Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca Gave of What Befel the Armament in the Indias.... San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1929. viii, 122 [2] pp., decorations and printer’s device by Valenti Angelo. 4to, original ecru boards. Usual spine darkening. A very good copy, preserved in a terracotta cloth slipcase.
        First edition, limited edition (#154 of 300 copies) of the first book about Texas (the first edition was published at Zamora in 1542. Basic Texas Books 24V: "This is the first book relating to Texas." Grabhorn 124. Graff 3054. Library of Congress. Texas Centennial Exhibition 18. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 1n. Pingenot: This is a reissue of the Buckingham Smith translation of 1871, and the most sumptuous edition of this great work. Cabeza de Vaca was a member of the Narvaez expedition to Florida in 1528. Shipwrecked in the Gulf of Mexico, he and three companions set out across Texas eventually reaching settlements in Mexico in 1536. First published in 1542, Cabeza de Vaca’s narrative had a profound influence on the later expeditions of both Coronado and DeSoto. Cabeza de Vaca was the first European to travel across the North American continent.
($
250-500)

57. C[ALDERON] DE LA B[ARCA], Madame [F. E.]. Life in Mexico, During a Residence of Two Years...with a Preface by W. H. Prescott. London: Chapman and Hall, 1843. xvi, 437 pp. 8vo, late nineteenth three-quarter burgundy morocco over maroon cloth, spine with gilt lettering and raised bands. Slight shelf wear, generally fine.
        First English edition. BAL 16338n. Dobie, p. 38: "Among books on Mexican life to be ranked first both in readability and revealing qualities." Griffin 4174. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 639: "Letters by the Scottish-American wife of the first Spanish ambassador, describing their life in the capital 1839-1842." Hill, p. 43: "One of the classic writings of nineteenth century travel; written by the Scottish wife of the Spanish minister to the U.S.A. On a special mission to Mexico she accompanied her husband and, due to her position, was able to become intimately acquainted with Mexican society and had access to any information she sought...Probably the most important record of the social life of the country at that time." Palau 39761.
($200-400)

RARE BANDO ON THE CALIFORNIA PIOUS FUND

58. [CALIFORNIA PIOUS FUND]. MEXICO (Republic). VICE PRESIDENT (Anastasio Bustamante). [Bando announcing a decree of May 25, 1832, on the Pious Fund, commencing]: Miguel Cervantes, general de brigada, y gobernador del distrito federal. Por la secretaría de relaciones se ha comunicado al gobierno del distrito el siguiente decreto...El Escmo. Sr. Vice-Presidente...se ha servido dirigirme el decreto que sigue. El Vice-Presidente...à los habitantes de la república, sabed...Art. 1. El gobierno procederá al arrendamiento de las fincas rústicas pertenecientes al fondo piadoso de Californias, por término que no pase de siete años.... Mexico, June 1, 1832. Double folio bando. Very fine, with only two slight original voids at left blank margin. Official seals on verso. Provenance: Roberto Valles-Eberstadt-Jenkins-Pingenot.
        First edition, Mexico City issue of a rare and important bando on the California Pious Fund. These large folio bando issues are rare, because they were printed in oversize format on recto only, in order to be posted in public places. Eberstadt 158:288. Not in Cowan. Miguel Cervantes, Governor of the Federal District, announces the decree by Vice President Bustamante authorizing the Mexican government to proceed with liquidation of the great properties belonging to the California Pious Fund over a seven-year period. The Pious Fund had been created in the seventeenth century to fund the work of the Catholic missions. Secularization of the missions radically changed California. The seizure of the rich, cultivated monastery lands resulted in the empresario system, which allowed Mexican and Anglo colonizers to settle on Native American lands. Mexican authorities, by regulations such as this, intended to replace the old monastico-missionary regime in California. The importance of this decree may be inferred by the fact that it was one of the decrees presented as evidence in the Pious Fund case that came before the International Court of Arbitration in 1899. This decree makes a most excellent accompaniment to Zamorano Eighty, Carillo’s Exposición dirigida á la Cámara de Diputados del Congreso de la Unión por el Sr. D. Carlos Antonio Carrillo, diputado por la Alta California, sobre arreglo y administración del Fondo Piadoso [Mexico, 1831].
($500-1,000)

CAMELS IN THE WEST

59. [CAMELS]. Lot of 9 titles:

BONSAL, Stephen. Edward Fitzgerald Beale. A Pioneer in the Path of Empire. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1912. xii [1] 312 pp., frontispiece, illustrations. 8vo, original dark blue cloth with gilt title on spine. Slight wear else a near fine copy. Presentation inscribed by Beale’s son, Truxtun Beale, on front pastedown.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 237: "Contains some material on Joaquin Murieta and Three-fingered Jack Garcia. Bonsal says that the head of Murieta and the hand of Three-fingered Jack were brought to his camp ‘but a few hours after these scoundrels were shot.’" Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 497. Cowan, p. 62. Flake 591. Howes B608. Tutorow 3748. Pingenot: Beale was an officer under Commodore Stockton and fought with the army at San Pasqual with Kit Carson; he carried to Stockton at San Diego the news of General Kearny’s desperate situation. Beale also carried the first gold east; later became a noted explorer, surveyor, and builder of roads. This work also contains a narrative of Beale’s trip across the plains in 1853 and his Camel Corp expedition from Texas to California in 1857.

Camels in Texas [cover title]. [San Jacinto Monument: San Jacinto Museum of History Association, 1956]. 12 pp., illustrations. Oblong 8vo, original stiff pictorial wrappers. Very fine.

DAVIS, Jefferson. Report of the Secretary of War...Respecting the Purchase of Camels for the Purpose of Military Transportation. Washington: HRED62, 1857. 238 pp., numerous plates, folding diagram. 8vo, original embossed cloth, gilt lettering on spine. Very good to fine.
        First edition. Graff 4436. Plains & Rockies III:297n: "The first official camel report...containing letters from members of the two parties sent to the Near East to purchase camels, and drawing by G. H. Heap." Pingenot: Chronicles one of the more unusual chapters of western history—the introduction of camels as pack-train animals in Texas and the Southwest. See The Handbook of Texas Online (Camels).

ECHOLS, William H. [Camel Report]. N.p., n.d. 47, 11, 2 leaves. 4to, stiff wrappers. Mimeographed typescript of the report of William H. Echols of the Topographical Engineers, transcribed from the Senate Report, 36th Congress 2nd Session (1860).

EMMETT, Chris. Texas Camel Tales.... San Antonio, 1932. xv, 275 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, fuzzy gray cloth simulating camel hide. Very good to fine. Printed list of limited edition subscribers laid in. Signed by the author.
        First edition, limited edition (300 copies). Agatha, p. 65. Basic Texas Books 55: "The best account of the famous camel experiment in Texas, this is also a successful blend of the numerous official records with memoirs and anecdotes of the people involved." Campbell, p. 172. Rader 1305.

LESLEY, Lewis B. (editor). Uncle Sam’s Camels: The Journal of May Humphreys Stacey Supplemented by the Report of Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1857-58). Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1929. 298 pp., frontispiece, portraits, illustrations, folding map at rear. 8vo, original cloth in a fine d.j.
        First edition. Pingenot: Journal of 19-year-old May Humphreys Stacey, who accompanied Lieut. Edward F. Beale on the camel expedition of 1857. Published for the first time, Stacey’s journal, written during the experience, stands as a vivid testament of adventure for a brave youth. Supplemented by Beale’s report, this work represents a major contribution to the story of the army’s use of camels in the Southwest.

PERRINE, Fred S. "Uncle Sam’s Camel Corps." Pp. 434-444 in: New Mexico Historical Review (October 1926). [Albuquerque]. Reprint.

SCOBEE, Barry. Old Fort Davis. San Antonio: Naylor, 1947. ix [1] 101 pp., illustrations, map. 8vo, cloth. Fine copy in a fine pictorial d.j.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 1965; Herd 2025. The author’s first book on this historic west Texas frontier fort.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James B. Buchanan). Message from the President of the United States...35th Congress, 2nd Session.... Volume II. Washington: James B. Steedman, Printer, HRED2, 1858. 670 pp. 8vo, original cloth, gilt title on spine. Considerable wear. Good.
        Edwin DeLeon’s report on the dromedary: pp. 454-491.
(9 vols.)
($600-900)

60. CARLETON, James Henry. The Battle of Buena Vista, with The Operations of the "Army of Occupation" for One Month. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1848. vii, 238 pp., 2 folding maps, 12mo, original dark blue cloth, gilt. Very fine.
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 281: "Carleton was an intelligent observer...and collected other eye-witness accounts....Carleton remained in the army and latter had a distinguished career in the West." Haferkorn, p. 43. Tutorow 3397: "Carleton was a captain in the 1st Regiment of Dragoons. He combines personal observations with a study of official documents to give what is still probably the best account of the battle of Buena Vista. Appendices contain letters and reports from Americans as well as Mexicans and reproduce in part or in whole letters to and from Carleton, Marcy, Taylor, Santa Anna, and Colonel Roger S. Dix. Lists casualties and gives information about prisoners."
($250-500)

61. CARRINGTON, Margaret. Ab-Sa-Ra-Ka Home of the Crows: Being the Experience of an Officer’s Wife on the Plains.... Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1868. 284 pp., illustrations, folding map. 8vo, original cloth, blind fillet borders on sides, title in gilt on backstrip. A very fine copy.
        First edition. Field 244: "The most valuable portion of the book is that in which she gives the personal narrations of some restored captives, scarcely to be deemed happy in surviving the awful massacres of their families. They were all married women, who, having witnessed the slaughter of their husbands and children, were reserved by the savages for a worse fate. It is now well know, that although the Algonquin and Iroquois tribes never violated their female captives, the Indians of the Plains almost as invariably subject them to the most horrible personal outrages." Graff 596: "An excellent personal account fortified by invaluable additional material from the author’s husband, Colonel Henry B. Carrington." Howes C175. Jones 1504. Field 244. Malone, p. 2. Myres, Following the Drum, p. 6: "An extensive description of the flora, fauna, and native peoples of the northern plains along with an eye-witness account of the events leading up to and following the Fetterman ‘massacre’ at Fort Phil Kearny, 1866. Carrington expressed sympathy for the Indians involved in the affair." Smith 1536. One of the best army wife accounts of the West.
($150-300)

62. CARTER, Robert G. The Old Sergeant’s Story. Winning the West from the Indians and Bad Men in 1870 to 1876. New York: Frederick H. Hitchcock, 1926. 220 pp., frontispiece portrait, 7 plates. 8vo, original red cloth. Fine copy. Laid in is an Annual Occupation Tax Receipt made out to Charlton and dated at Brackett in Kinney County April 30, 1894.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 383. Howes C194. Rader 610. Pingenot: The story of John B. Charlton, Sergeant, "F" Troop, 4th Cavalry, this work contains much on the campaigns in West Texas, and contains much on Indian fighting and outlaws. In 1920, Charlton, then a retired stock raiser living in Uvalde, Texas wrote Captain Carter, his former commander, beginning a correspondence and friendship that lasted until the sergeant’s death.
($150-300)

SUPERB COPY OF ON THE BORDER WITH MACKENZIE

63. CARTER, Robert G. On the Border with Mackenzie or Winning West Texas from the Comanches. Washington: Eynon Printing Company, 1935. xviii, 542 pp., frontispiece portrait. Thick 8vo, original red cloth with gilt title on cover and backstrip. Original owner’s name in ink on front paste-down. Slight edge wear, else a fine, crisp copy, preserved in red cloth slipcase.
        First edition of a great modern military rarity. Basic Texas Books 25: "One of the best sources on the Federal cavalry campaigns against the Indians in the 1870s. Jeff Dykes described it as ‘the most complete account of the Indian wars of the Texas frontier in the seventies.’ John M. Carroll wrote that ‘Carter’s enormously important writings on frontier military history will be recognized as source material for all future historians.’ L. F. Sheffy called it ‘a splendid contribution to the early frontier history of West Texas....It is a story filled with humor and pathos, tragedies and triumphs, hunger and thirst, war and adventure’....[Carter] pulls no punches in this outspoken narrative....This is best exemplified in his vilification of his old enemy, Quanah Parker....Some chapters of the book...were printed as separate pamphlets in 1919-1920, each limited to 100 copies for private distribution to friends [these pamphlets are now very rare and costly]." Campbell, p. 177.
        Decker 48:45: "This important historical work, the original edition of which was issued in a very limited number, has been most elusive since its first publication in 1935." Dykes, Western High Spots ("Western Movement—Its Literature"), p. 18. Howes C195. Rader 611. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 3002: "Perhaps the best first-hand description of Texas military life and campaigns against Comanches and Kiowas during the turbulent 1870s. As a captain in Ranald Mackenzie’s Fourth Cavalry, Carter participated in some of the most important events, and he describes these in great detail. No one researching this phase of Comanche and Kiowa history can afford to overlook this source." Pingenot: Forty years ago, the late J. Marvin Hunter told me that when he met Captain Carter in early 1935, Carter told him he was going to have 500 copies printed. Hunter counted himself lucky to own the copy in his own collection and doubted that more than 200 copies were actually produced. See Jeff Dykes’ foreword to the reprint edition for an interesting account of this book’s publishing history.
($1,500-$3,000)

64. CARTER, William H. From Yorktown to Santiago with the Sixth U.S. Cavalry. Baltimore: Lord Baltimore Press, 1900. [vii] [1] 317 pp., illustrations. 8vo, original yellow pictorial cloth, t.e.g. Gilt title on spine faded. Front hinge broken (easily repaired). Moderate wear but still a near fine copy for this book. Signed on the front inside paste-down: "Wm Hemsley Emory."
        First edition. Graff 614. Munk (Alliott), p. 39. Nicholson, p. 139. The plates are by Remington, Larned, Zogbaum, and others. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington) 461 and (Zogbaum) 24. Pingenot: Admiral Emory was a nephew of Willim Helmsley Emory, who originally organized the Six Cavalry. The unit served with Phil Sheridan to the end of the Civil War. At the close of the war, the regiment was ordered to Texas, then after serving in Texas, to Arizona, New Mexico, and ultimately the Plains and the entire Rocky Mountain region. Carter describes the regiment’s experiences in great detail. In a succeeding work, the author states that the greater part of this edition was destroyed by a Baltimore fire. Not in Howes or Nevins. A fine work and a little-known military rarity.
($150-300)

65. CARTER, William H. The Life of Lieutenant General Chaffee. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, [1917]. vii, 296 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates. Large 8vo, original blue cloth, gilt. Some wear to corners and rubbing, previous owner’s bookplate, but yet a very good plus copy.
        First edition. Pingenot: Carter is better known bibliographically for his From Yorktown to Santiago and Frontier Army Sketches but his biography of General Adna R. Chaffee ranks along with the best of frontier army memoirs. Chaffee saw much action in the Civil War, including Gettysburg, Antietam, Fredericksburg, etc.; was with Sheridan in the Shenandoah. Following the war, he saw frontier service in Texas with action against the Comanches, and later was with Crook’s expedition against the Apaches. He also saw action in the Boxer Rebellion, China, and Santiago. A fine life-story of a great frontier army officer. Nice copies of this work are becoming increasingly scarce.
($75-150)

66. CASHIN, Herschel V., et al. Under Fire with the Tenth U.S. Cavalry, Being a Brief...Review of the Negro’s Participation in the Wars of the United States.... Chicago: American Publishing House, [1902]. 361 pp., numerous illustrations. 8vo, original pictorial cloth with some wear but a very good copy.
         Best edition, revised from the 1899 original. Pingenot: An increasingly rare and desirable account of the most famous unit of black soldiers, the 10th U.S. Cavalry, covering service in the Indian campaigns of the post-Civil War era, with most attention given to fighting in Cuba during the Spanish American War. Also includes chapters on the 9th Cavalry, and the 24th and 25th Infantry Regiments. Afro-Americana 2112. Venzon 744. Work, p. 401.
($150-300)

67. CASTAÑEDA, Carlos E. Our Catholic Heritage in Texas 1519-1936. Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1936-58. Frontispiece portraits, maps, plates. 7 vols., large 8vo, original decorated blue cloth. Ownership inscription in some volumes. A very fine set.
        First edition. A complete set of the first edition, including the elusive seventh volume, which was not published until 1958. Vol. VI frontispiece is by artist José Cisneros. Basic Texas Books 27: "[It is] the best history of the three centuries of Spanish and Mexican Texas...[giving us] the first detailed account of literally dozens of expeditions and settlements in Texas...Opens up a world of entirely new history for the Big Bend region and for South Texas...[with] by far the most complete account of the missions in the San Antonio-Goliad region." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 1705: "Invaluable source of information on all phases of Catholic influence in Texas. Detailed information on Indian tribes from the coastal and eastern sections of the state is extremely valuable, especially in the first four volumes. No researcher can afford to overlook this seminal work." Pingenot: The first complete scholarly history of Spanish Texas, and one of the foundation works on the Spanish Southwest, based on a bibliography of original sources.
($1,000-1,500)

68. CASTAÑEDA, Pedro de, et al. The Journey of Francisco Vázquez de Coronado, 1540-1542. Translated & Edited by George Parker Winship. San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1933. xxvii, 134 [12] pp., illustrations and decorations by Arvilla Parker, initials in red by Fred Glauser. Folio, original cloth. Spine slightly rubbed. Bookplate of Joseph M. Gleason.
        First edition, limited edition (550 copies). Basic Texas Books 28E: "The best account of Coronado’s famous expedition in search of the seven cities of gold, much of which occurred in Texas." Clark, Old South I:5: "Of monumental importance in the history of the American Southwest." Grabhorn 195. Howes W571. Pingenot: Castañeda, a soldier in Coronado’s retinue, kept a journal of the expedition. He prefaced his narrative by saying "I believe that the result cannot fail to be an account which...will be so remarkable that it will seem incredible." Winship agreed that it was "one of the most remarkable explorations recorded in the annals of American history." Although Coronado found no gold, nor the fabled Seven Cities of Cibola, his expedition did uncover a wealth of information about the Plains and Pueblo Indians, as well as new geographical information on the vast area they traversed.
($100-200)

69. CATLIN, George. North American Indians: Being Letters and Notes on Their Manners, Customs, and Conditions, Written during Eight Years’ Travel amongst the Wildest Tribes of Indians in North American, 1832-1839.... Edinburgh: John Grant, 1926. ix [3] 298 + xii 303 [1] pp., 320 colored illustrations of American Indians, folding map of U.S. locating the Native American tribes. Royal 8vo, original elaborate gilt pictorial maroon cloth, t.e.g. Very mild foxing to endpapers, else a very fine, fresh, tight, sparkling set in the beautiful bindings. This is the best set we have seen.
        Handsome English reprint of the original edition published in London in 1841, under title Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians. Howes C241. McCrackin 8n. Pilling 689n. Plains & Rockies IV:84:1n. Raines, p. 46n. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2142: "Includes information and drawings by Catlin following his 1834 journey with the Dodge-Leavenworth Expedition. His dramatic descriptions and sketches of mounted Comanches have been continuously cited by later historians, and the entire account of the Comanche camps is worth a close reading by the researcher." Tyler, Prints of the American West, pp. 46-55: "The basis for much Plains ethnology.... Today [Catlin’s] work is criticized for its unrelenting Romanticism, but it is treasured by historians and anthropologists alike, who value his attention to details and brave dedication to his task" (Tyler, Prints of the American West, pp. 46-55). Included among the plates is a portrait of Red Jacket and illustrations of the Dodge expedition to the Comanche country north of the Red River at the Texas border. See The Handbook of Texas Online (George Catlin).
(2 vols.)
($900-1,800) Illustrated Description>>

70. [CAZNEAU, Jane M. McManus Storms]. Eagle Pass; or, Life on the Border by Cora Montgomery. New York: Putnam, 1852. 188 pp. 12mo, original stiff printed wrappers repaired, else near fine. Preserved in a half calf and marbled boards clamshell case. Presentation inscribed on the title-page: "To Charles Frederickson, Esq. from his friend, the author." Very rare.
        First edition, first issue, wrapper dated September 29, 1852. Graff 2873. Howes C251. Raines, p. 252: "An unpleasant picture of maladministration on the Rio Grande." Wallace (Destiny and Glory, Chapter 12) states that the author "was the most adventurous of any American woman on record and deserves far more than the oblivion which has been her fate." Pingenot: An interesting account of life along the recently acquired Rio Grande frontier by one of the first settlers of Eagle Pass. Contains much on Fort Duncan, the Seminoles including Wild Cat and Gopher John, Indian raids, Capt. Harry Love’s exploration of the Rio Grande, peon slavery, etc. The author, who wrote under the pseudonym, Cora Montgomery, was one of the most adventuresome women of the nineteenth century. See Handbook of Texas, Streeter (1572), and Winegarten, Texas Women’s History Project Bibliography, p. 107.
($200-400) Illustrated Description>>

A TEXAS LIVESTOCK AGENT'S WALLET & DIARY

71. [CATTLE INDUSTRY]. GIBBS, J. M. Collection of materials relating to the sale and transportation of cattle and other activities of Livestock Agent, J. M. Gibbs. Various places in Texas, 1860s-1880s. About twenty manuscript and printed items, condition varies, good to very fine. All enclosed in Gibbs original worn leather wallet with compartments.
         Gibbs line of work was overseeing the management of stock being transported on the railways, and he seems to have combined those activities with a some stock-trading on his own. Among the items in the wallet are:

DIARY. Narrow 24mo diary in pencil, over 50 pp., gilt-stamped on upper cover: "Jas. H. Campbell & Co., Union Stock Yards, Ills. National Stock Yards, Ills. Kansas City Stock Yards, Mo." Various places, ca. 1889. Roughly written notes (a few notes in others’ hands) relating to stock and travels by rail; references to various cattle available and stockraisers (including Kokernot of Alpine, George B. Loving, S. G. Wood, et al.); activities (such as tending to repair of stockpens at depots; leads for purchasing cattle; recipe for making 100 pounds of pickled beef; recipe for screw worm medication concoction (chloroform, alcohol & asafetida); personal shopping lists and expenses; etc.

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RR. PASS. Gibbs’ complimentary printed railway pass for traveling between Eagle Pass and Houston. 1888.

NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. Includes some relating to Gibbs, e.g. clipped ad for Jep. M. Gibbs, Dealer in Produce, Groceries, Liquors, Hardware, &c. Navasota, Texas. Will keep constantly on hand and for sale a complete assortment of every thing in this life. Consignments solicited from his friends in Galveston and Houston; clipping relating the SPRR time table, with reference to the Eagle Pass Brass Band (listing member Pasqual DeBona—see Item 97 herein); clipping referring to Gibbs as Sheriff and Colonel of the 4th Regiment of Texas State Militia; etc.

SLAVERY. Manuscript receipt (1 p., 12mo) whereby Ira M. Camp acknowledges receipt from Jeptha Gibbs for "the following Negroes to witt: Negro Woman Harriet & her Daughter Parisa, Harriet aged about 40 years & Parisa about 5 years old and Terry a Negro boy about 28 years)." Navasota, May 29, 1865.

CALVERT, TEXAS. Printed orders: Headquarters Post of Calvert. (Department of Civil Affairs,) Calvert, Texas, November 10, 1869. General Orders, No. 5. 1. As considerable misunderstandings and ignorance of law appears to prevail in regard to the priority of liens upon crops cultivated by freedmen and other laborers, under contracts with planters and land owners, the following extracts from the Acts of the Legislature of Texas, are published for the information of all concerned....Max Wesendorff, 1st Lieut., U.S.A., Post Adjutant. 1 p., 12mo.

BRAZOS BRANCH RAILWAY COMPANY. Stock certificate made out to Gibbs. November 19, 1868.

ELECTION TICKET. Conservative Ticket. For State Senator, 16th District. J. M. Gibbs. 1 p., narrow 12mo.

(20 items in leather wallet)
($200-400)

72. CLAY, John. My Life on the Range. Chicago: Privately printed, [1924]. [viii] 366 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original dark green cloth with title in gilt on front cover and spine, t.e.g. A very fine, bright copy.
        First edition. Adams, Herd 475: "One of the most sought after cattle books"; Guns 434: "He relates many incidents of the Johnson County War and tells about Tom Horn...His picture of ranch life is authentic." Athearn, Westward the Briton, p. 191. Campbell, p. 22. Dobie, pp. 98-99: "His book is the best of all sources on British-owned ranches. It is just as good on cowboys and sheepherders...He appreciated the beautiful and had a sense of style." Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 12. Graff 748. Harvard Guide to American History p. 428. Howes C478. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 153. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cattle Country, p. 16. Rader 841. Reese, Six Score 19: "Clay represents a banker’s view of the range cattle industry better than any other writer....He played an important part in financing several large companies, and was instrumental in the reorganization of the failed Swan Land and Cattle Co. The book is best on the Wyoming ranges, where British investment was heaviest." Vandale, Texianameter 34.
($&150-300)

COAHUILA Y TEJAS ON THE EVE OF DIVISION

73. COAHUILA Y TEXAS (Mexican State). GOVERNOR (Juan Martin de Veramendi). Memoria en que el Gobernador del estado libre de Coahuila y Tejas...leida en la Sesión Publica de 2 de enero de 1833. Leona Vicario [Saltillo]: Ciudadano Sisto González, 1833. 7 pp., 15 tables (some folding, with varying typographical borders). Folio, original white printed wrappers (title with bold typographical border and engraved allegorical vignette), stitched. A superb copy, clean and crisp. Preserved in a half tan levant morocco and beige cloth folding box. Rare.
        First edition. Eberstadt, Texas 162:875: "An extremely important document, crammed with vital statistical and historical information." Howes C505. Streeter 788 (3 locations: Texas State Library, Saltillo Archives, Yale): "In this interesting annual message the Governor comments severely on the disregard for the laws of the state in the Department at San Felipe de Austin in October, 1832. Though the new ayuntamiento of González in the ‘Grent Dewit’ colony was established during the year, their figures were not received in time to be included in the schedules."
         This important and rare Cohuilatecan imprint is a very handsome example of borderlands printing. In 1830 Samuel Bangs (first printer in Texas and several Northern Mexican states—see The Handbook of Texas Online: Samuel Bangs) left his post at Saltillo as government printer for Coahuila y Tejas to travel to Texas to try to finalize his land grant. In his absence, official printing began to pile up, and printer González took charge of Bangs’ press and fonts. This is not a Bangs’ imprint, but his taste and technique can be clearly seen in its beauty. In Streeter’s introduction to the section of his Texas bibliography on Mexican imprints, he discusses the items most important for a Texas collection, pointing out the importance of the series of imprints of which this is part (p. 217): "Another interesting lot in this period is made up of the Nota Estadisticas, reporting to the Central Government on the events in the state, and the Memorias of state governors on the same subject." This imprint migrated from the Eberstadts to Jenkins to Sloan to Pingenot and back to Sloan. It is high time that some sophisticated collector or institution give this worthy imprint the refuge it deserves.
         Pingenot: When the Governor comments severely on the lack of regard for the laws of the state in the department of Bexar, he actually means Texas in general. Included are reports on public education, smallpox vaccination, agriculture (noting that this has been difficult in Bexar because of the hostile Indians), colonization, taxes, etc. A beautiful example of an early Northern Mexican imprint.
($500-1,000)

74. CONKLING, Roscoe P. and Margaret B. Conkling. The Butterfield Overland Mail, 1857-1869. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1947. Text: 412 + 446 pp., maps, illustrations, portraits. Atlas: 8 [2] pp., 76 plates, 3 large folding maps. 3 vols., 8vo, original red cloth, t.e.g. Signed on the front endpaper by both authors. Very fine set.
        First edition. Clark & Brunet 50: "With its detailed information on routes, the various stations, and the personnel, it is constantly in demand, and the book’s value has appreciated dramatically over the years." Dobie, p. 78. Rocq 16779. Pingenot: The definitive study of this extraordinary trail which stretched from El Paso to St. Louis, then to St. Joseph and west to Sacramento and San Francisco, and back to El Paso. It is based on original research in public and private archives throughout the country, as well as the authors’ own retracing of the original routes mile by mile.
($500-750)

75. COOK, John R. The Border and the Buffalo, An Untold Story of the Southwest Plains.... Topeka, Kansas: Crane & Company, 1907. [12] 352 pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original pictorial cloth. Laid in is a 4-page leaflet, which, according to Graff, may have been written by Cook. The exceptionally fine Littell copy with his bookplate.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 487: "Contains some information on the Benders of Kansas I have not seen elsewhere." Dobie, p. 159. Graff 864. Howes C730. Rader 909. Saunders 2836. Pingenot: Much on Kansas history, including the Dull Knife Raid of 1878, eye-witness accounts of buffalo slaughter on the plains, etc. Milo Milton Quaife, who edited the 1938 reprint said: "For unadorned realism, the narrative...has seldom, if ever, been surpassed...[It is the] clearest first-hand recital ever written of the wholesale destruction of earth’s grandest ruminant."
($75-150)

76. COOKE, Philip St. George. Scenes and Adventures in the Army. Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston, 1857. 432 pp. 12mo, original dark green cloth with gilt title on spine. A few flecks on front cover and slight shelf wear, front hinge cracked, else very good.
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 76. Field 359: "The author was personally engaged in several battles with the Comanches and the Sacs and Foxes, and nearly half his volume is composed of narratives of events connected with Indian warfare." Graff 871. Haferkorn, p. 79. Howes C740: "Personal narrative of service in the West...escorting Santa Fe traders and Oregon emigrants." Plains & Rockies 288a: "Cooke’s career in the west began in 1829, with his tour as a lieutenant in the military escort commanded by Major Bennet Riley to guard the Santa Fe traders from depredations. In 1831 he was stationed at Fort Atkinson on the Missouri. In 1845 he set out from Fort Leavenworth (with a command) to escort emigrants bound for Oregon and he returned to Fort Leavenworth by way of Bent’s Fort in the latter part of August, when the book ends....Cooke wrote ably about his own adventures, and stories that he heard from others as well." Rittenhouse 132: "Cooke’s first book about his Western experiences, describing his service with the 2nd Dragoons along the Santa Fe Trail." Pingenot: Cooke’s career was largely in the West, beginning as an escort for a Santa Fe caravan in 1829, and including service at Ft. Atkinson in 1831 and on the Oregon Trail in 1845, which is as far as this volume carries his story. An interesting military memoir. He gives a long account of Hugh Glass’s adventures, and there is much interesting material on Walker, Fitzpatrick, and others of the old plainsmen. Very scarce in the first edition in which the author’s rank is given as Lieut. Colonel.
($300-600)

77. COOKE, Philip St. George. Scenes and Adventures in the Army. Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston, 1859. 432 pp. Small 8vo, original green cloth with gilt title on spine. Minor wear but fine for this book. The Littell copy with his bookplate. Laid in is an autograph letter, signed, from Cooke dated Belmead, Jan. 30, 1860.
         Second edition. Pingenot: This issue gives the author’s rank as colonel, but from the same plates and otherwise identical to the 1857 printing. Cooke’s letter, dated Belmead, Jan. 30, 1860, is addressed to Gov. John Letcher of Virginia. Cooke accepts a state appointment on a commission authorized by the "Armory bill" because "a sense of duty to the State prompts me to accept." A remarkable letter because within a year Cooke would refuse a generalship in the Army of Northern Virginia and become, instead, a Union general.
($250-500)

MILITARY HYGIENE 1856

78. COOLIDGE, Richard H. Statistical Report on the Sickness and Mortality in the Army of the United States...From January, 1839, to January, 1855. Washington: SED96, 1856. 703 pp., tables, folding map at rear. Large 4to, original brown cloth with gilt lettering on spine. Upper spine area repaired where chipped and split. A beautiful, bright copy in fine condition.
        First edition. Pingenot: According to Asst. Surgeon Coolidge, this report on sickness and mortality in the army, ordered by Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, was the first since 1840. The report is divided into divisions including Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, and Washington and Oregon territories. Also the report contains a consideration of the vital statistics of the War with Mexico. A large segment, pp. 349-401 treats the forts in Texas including Ft. Ewell, Ft. Merrill, Ringold Barracks, Ft. McIntosh, Ft. Duncan, Ft. Graham, Ft. Belknap, Ft. Davis, Ft. Inge, Ft. Clark, etc. Not in Howes or Graff. Rare.
($75-150)

79. COOTES, Harry N. & Ralph C. Diebert (editors). A History of the Third United States Cavalry.... Harrisburg: [Telegraph Press, 1933]. [ix] [1] 143 [1] pp., colored plate of regimental coat of arms, numerous photographic portraits and illustrations. 8vo, original gilt-decorated green cloth. Occasional mild foxing, otherwise fine.
        First edition. Controvich 2807. Tutorow 3060. Not in Garrett, The Mexican-American War. In addition to the chapter on the Mexican-American War, there is a chapter that includes the Big Horn Expedition in 1876. The list of engagements includes many in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Pingenot: Historical narrative of the combat roles of the Third U.S. Cavalry Regiment of Mounted Riflemen (later changed to the 3rd Cavalry), from its activation in 1846 to service in France in 1917-1918. During this extensive period the regiment fought at Vera Cruz (1847), Sherman’s Georgian campaign (1864), Indian Wars in New Mexico and the Dakotas against Comanches and Cheyennes (1876), Cuba (1898) and France (1917-18). Part II of the volume provides short biographies of the honored officers and men of the regiment.
($
200-500)

80. CRANE, Charles Judson. The Experiences of a Colonel of Infantry. New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1923. 578 pp. 12mo, original dark blue cloth with title in gilt on front cover and spine. Very fine copy preserved in a custom blue slipcase. Presentation copy, signed by the author.
        First and only edition. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 9: "Crane’s [book was] issued in New York in an edition of 100 copies in 1923—Colonel Crane was a Texas cowboy and trail driver before making the army his career. He was recalled to active duty in WWI and headed the ROTC staff at Texas A&M in 1917-18." Howes C858. Pingenot: A superb military autobiography that rivals R. G. Carter’s On the Border with Mackenzie in rarity. Adams, Herd 602 calls it "scarce," which is a gross understatement. Crane herded cattle in Kansas, assisted in teaching small boys at Baylor, was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1872. Five years later, in December, 1877, he reported for duty at Fort Clark, Texas. He later served at Fort Duncan and Fort Ringgold, Texas, and was commandant of Cadets at Texas A&M College. He made two trips with his regiment to Greer County, then in Texas, but now part of Oklahoma, and in 1888 served with the cavalry at the San Carlos Indian Agency. Later, with the 24th Infantry, Crane was sent to Utah. His memoirs include his involvement in the Spanish-American War during which he raised a regiment of colored "immunes" at New Orleans. Crane provides a fine insight into Army life and is a vital contribution to borderlands as well as Western military history. A very rare and little-known work.
($750-1,200)

81. CRAWFORD, Lewis F. Rekindling Camp Fires. The Exploits of Ben Arnold (Connor)...An Authentic Narrative of Sixty Years in the Old West as Indian Fighter, Gold Miner, Cowboy, Hunter and Army Scout. Bismarck: Capital Book Co., 1926. 324 pp., frontispiece, portrait, map, plate. 8vo, original three-quarter morocco over cloth, gilt lettered spine, t.e.g. A lovely copy in publisher’s board slipcase.
        First edition, limited edition (#14 of 100 copies, signed by the author). Adams, Guns 509; Herd 607. Dobie, p. 101: "[Arnold] was squaw man, scout, trapper, soldier, deserter, prospector, and actor in other occupations as well as cowboy. He had a fierce sense of justice that extended to Indians. His outlook was wider than...the average ranch hand." Graff 912. Howes C872. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 95. Luther 40: "the experiences Crook’s messenger, Ben Arnold (Connor)...[who] carried the news of Custer’s defeat to Crook." Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 17. Rader 959. Smith 2100. Crawford was the father of late Western Americana bookseller Ken Crawford.
($300-600)

82. CREMONY, John C. Life Among the Apaches. San Francisco: A. Roman & Company, 1868. 322 pp. Small 8vo, original cloth with margins stamped in blind; gilt lettering on spine. Slight wear to extremities. Light foxing to endpapers and preliminary leaves, overall a very good copy.
        First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 112. Edwards, Desert Voices, p. 45. Field 387: "The Apache was more closely approached and studied by him during his twenty years of border life, than by any other writer." Graff 915: "A cavalry officer’s adventures in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas told with dash and a fine sense of humor." Howes C879. Munk (Alliot), p. 58. Raines, p. 57: "Thrilling incidents and interesting facts." Saunders 716. Pingenot: Cremony’s work is a dependable authority and remains one of the best on the Apache and his aboriginal neighbors. Cremony served as interpreter to Bartlett on the southern border boundary survey.
($150-300)

83. CROSS, Osborne. "A Report in the Form of a Journal, to the Quartermaster General, of the March of the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen to Oregon, from May 18, to October 5, 1849." Pp. 126-240, in: UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (Millard Fillmore). Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress at the Commencement of the Second Session of the Thirty-First Congress. Washington: SED1, 1851. 444 [Part 1]; 490 pp. [Part 2], 36 lithographic plates (some folding) of scenes from the Oregon expedition (by Weber et al.), charts and other icongraphy not related to Cross expedition in remainder of vol. Thick 8vo, original black sheep over marbled boards. Binding with shelf worn, intermittent foxing.
         This is the Senate edition of the Cross report, which was issued in at least four formats (the information found in Howes and Plains & Rockies does not fully cover the various incarnations of this report). Graff 4415. Howes C923. Mintz, The Trail 112. Plains & Rockies IV:181:3: "Detailed description of the emigrant trail to Oregon with thirty-six lithographed views of scenes along the route from Fort Laramie to The Dalles." This report is historically important, and the marvelous plates are among the earliest of the Oregon Trail. There are many other valuable reports in this volume, including progress of the Mexican Boundary Survey, border troubles, reports from Maj. Van Horne on Ben Leaton and activities of the Glanton gang, Capt. S. G. French’s "Report of Captain S. G. French, United States Army, Descriptive of the Route from San Antonio to El Paso," Capt. Harry Love’s exploration of the Rio Grande, Native Americans, affairs in New Mexico and California, etc.
($400-800)

CUSTER HIGHSPOTS

84. CUSTER, Elizabeth A. Tenting on the Plains; or General Custer in Kansas and Texas. New York: Charles L. Webster Co., 1889. xvi, 702 pp., engraved plates, map. Large 8vo, original gilt pictorial cloth. Minor shelf wear to spinal extremities and lower edge, a bright, beautiful copy.
        First edition. Dary, Kanzana 235. Dustin 77. Luther, High Spots of Custer 5: "The writings of Elizabeth Custer are well worth reading for their picture of frontier army life and for tracing Custer’s career on the western plains. Mrs. Custer was a charming and talented woman who idolized her husband." Myres, Following the Drum, p. 7. Rader 1009. Raines, p. 60: "An interesting account of army life on the Indian border." Pingenot: Although written by Custer’s widow to defend her husband’s honor, she succeeds more in giving a wonderful picture of life in Western army posts from a woman’s point of view. Included are several chapters on her stay in Austin and commentary on the state of lawlessness in Texas at that time.
($100-200)

85. CUSTER, George A. My Life on the Plains; or, Personal Experiences with Indians. New York: Sheldon and Company, 1874. 256 pp., frontispiece portrait, 7 plates. 8vo, original dark blue gilt-pictorial cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. With only a trace of wear, this is one of the finest copies of this work to be offered for sale.
        First edition. Dustin 81. Graff 961. Howes C981. Jones 1566. Luther, High Spots of Custer 7: "George Armstrong Custer described his own western experiences in the true first printing of this material. Custer wrote in an entertaining style and Benteen referred to this book as ‘My Lie on the Plains.’" Smith 2188. Rader 1011. Pingenot: Campaigns against the Indians in the region between the Missouri and the Rocky Mountains. An important volume for any Custer collection and rare in choice collector’s condition.
($400-800)

86. DAVIS, W[illiam] W. H. El Gringo; or, New Mexico and Her People. New York: Harper, 1857. 432 pp., frontispiece, 12 wood engraved plates. Small 8vo, original blindstamped cloth, gilt title on spine. Shelf slanted, some rubbing and discoloration of endpapers. "Library of C. H. Hubbell," written on front free endpaper. A penciled note at top of t.p. says "see page 355." On p. 355 the author mentions "Judge H., my old traveling companion," identified out to the side as "Judge Hubbell," the book’s original owner.
        First edition of one of the earliest full-length books on New Mexico in English. Munk (Alliot), p. 63. Plains & Rockies IV:289: "Davis traveled the Santa Fe Trail from Independence to Santa Fe in 1853 and made an excursion to the Navajo country in 1855." Dobie, p. 76: "Excellent on manners and customs." Graff 1021. Howes D139. Larned 2026: "Few narratives of any period are more interestingly written." Raines, p. 64: "Touches somewhat on the early exploration of the Rio Grande region of Texas." Rittenhouse 153. Saunders 4013. Streeter Sale 437. Pingenot: The plates are from drawings by Bvt. Lt. Col. Eaton and F. A. Percy, Esq., of El Paso. Davis was a U.S. Attorney and later acting governor who was one of the first writers to gain access to the archives in Santa Fe.
($150-300)

87. DAVIS, W[illiam] W. H. The Spanish Conquest of New Mexico. Doylestown: Privately published, 1869. 438 pp., steel-engraved frontispiece portrait. Tall 8vo, original blind-embossed green cloth, gilt title. Minimal rubbing and extremity wear. Bookplate of former owner. Very light foxing mostly affecting preliminary leaves, otherwise a near fine copy.
        First edition. Field 406: "His narrative of the prolonged hostilities between the Spaniards and the Indians, the religious rites, methods of warfare, and peculiar ceremonies of the latter, is fresh, vigorous and highly interesting." Graff 1023. Howes D141. Rader 1075. Raines, p. 64-65. Saunders 2488. Pingenot: Davis, who also wrote El Gringo: New Mexico and Her People (New York, 1857), was acting governor of New Mexico in the 1850s and had access to a great deal of previously unexamined original source material, which he relied upon heavily in preparing this hard-to-find history of early New Mexico. The period covered (1527-1703) is rich with stirring events including the wanderings of Cabeza de Vaca, the search for the Seven Cities of Cibola, the expedition of conquest by Coronado, Oñate’s first permanent colonization in 1591, the Indian rebellion of 1680 and the Spanish re-conquest by Diego de Vargas in 1694. This work is uncommon in any condition, and quite scarce in this near fine condition.
($300-500)

88. DE CORDOVA, Jacob. Texas: Her Resources and Her Public Men. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1858. 375 pp. Small 8vo, original blindstamped brown cloth, gilt. Slightly rubbed and worn at spinal extremities, else fine
        First edition, second issue, with the added index (first issue came out same year). Basic Texas Books 38A: "The first attempt at an encyclopedia of Texas, this work contains a wealth of still-useful material....DeCordova, a native of Jamaica...[and] one of the earliest Jewish settlers in Texas...did some of the first genuine scholarly research ever done in Texas while compiling the book, interviewing leading men, researching newspaper files, searching county court records....The volume includes biographies, land laws, climatology, statistics, articles on railroads, the cotton industry, sheep raising, geology, schools, farming, slavery, churches, cattle, the lumber industry, gambling, and other subjects." Dykes, Western High Spots ("Western Movement—Its Literature"), pp. 12-13. Howes D201. Rader 1097. Raines, p. 68.
($400-800)

89. De PEYSTER, John Watts. Personal and Military History of Philip Kearny, Major-General United States Volunteers. New York: Rice and Gage, 1869. xii, [13]-512 pp., engraved pictorial title, engraved portraits, illustrations. Large 8vo, original gilt pictorial terracotta cloth. Fine copy.
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 189: "Kearny, a true military adventurer, served as Scott’s personal bodyguard. He lost an arm leading a charge at Churusbusco. Scott called him ‘the bravest man I ever knew.’" Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains & Rockies 128. Garrett, Mexican-American War, p. 205. Haferkorn, p. 59. Harvard Guide to American History, p. 198. Nevins, Civil War Books II:152: "Lavish in its praise, but contains many excerpts from pertinent documents." Tutorow 3788. Kearny participated in several campaigns against Native Americans (including the Black Hawk War and Rogue River), and accompanied the Dragoon Expedition with his uncle from Fort Leavenworth over the South Pass in 1845. He also served in the Italian War, and despite the loss of an arm, is said to have taken part in every Cavalry charge at Magenta and Solferino, with the reins clenched in his teeth. Pingenot: Biography of Stephen Watts Kearny’s nephew. Both Haferkorn and Tutorow confused Philip Kearney’s Mexican War service with his better known uncle’s role in the conquest of New Mexico and California.
($100-200)

PRINTED BY ANREW HOYEM AT ARION PRESS

90. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children. Tales of Lost Mines & Buried Treasure of the Southwest. Dallas: [Printed and designed by Andrew Hoyem at the Arion Press in San Francisco], Neiman-Marcus, 1980. xiv, 270 [1] pp., folding colored map of the Southwest, portrait of Dobie, colored text charts, title and chapter headings in red, gold initial letters. Folio, original tan goatskin over handmade Mexican bark paper. Mint in publisher’s slip case with printed paper label.
        Limited edition (300 copies printed) of this lavish production. Adams, Guns 600n. Basic Texas Books 45K: "Best book ever written on hidden treasure, and one of the most fascinating books on any subject to come out of Texas." Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. [7]n. Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 9: "This is the book that made it possible for a Texas writer to stay home and make a living." Howes D374n. McVicker (A2).
($400-800)

91. DODGE, Richard Irving. The Black Hills. A Minute Description of the Routes, Scenery, Soil, Climate, Timber, Gold, Geology, Zoology, etc.... New York: James Miller, Publisher, 1876. 151 [4, ads] pp., folding map: The Black Hills of the Cheyenne Map of Explorations and Surveys.... New York: American Photo-Lithographic Co., 1875. 50.5 x 35.9 cm (19-7/8 x 14-1/8 inches), foldout plate, 3 text drawings, and 10 lithographed plates of scenery and places. 8vo, original embossed cloth, gilt. Slight shelf wear, near fine. Presentation copy, inscribed and signed by Dodge.
        First edition. Graff 1111. Howes D401. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 59. Pingenot: A handsome color plate book on the Black Hills, published hurriedly after gold was discovered in the area, and before Custer’s last fight. The work contains much on the Dakotas, Wyoming, Montana, and includes a discussion of gold, miners, Indians, and routes. The plates detail attractive and interesting views with the folding map entitled "The Black Hills of the Cheyenne."
($200-400)

92. DODGE, Richard Irving. Our Wild Indians: Thirty-three Years’ Personal Experience Among the Red Men of the Great West.... Hartford: A. D. Worthington & Co., 1882. 654 pp., 24 plates (6 in color). Thick 8vo, original bright gilt pictorial brown cloth. Fine bright copy.
        First edition. Introduction by Gen. W. T. Sherman, in which he says: "The best description extant of the habits, manners, customs, usages, ceremonies, etc., of the American Indian, as he now is." Graff 1114. Howes D403. Luther, High Spots of Custer 120: "Suggests that possibly Custer committed suicide." Rader 1172. Raines, p. 68: "The Texas Indians come in for a share of treatment, and some incidents occur in Texas." Saunders 2143. An important work on the Plains Indians by a sympathetic army officer.
($100-200)

93. DODGE, Richard Irving. The Plains of the Great West and Their Inhabitants: Being a Description of the Plains...of the Great North American Desert. New York, 1877. 448 pp., folding map and 19 plates. Large 8vo, fine bright copy in original gilt pictorial cloth.
        First edition. With an introduction by William Blackmore. Dobie, p. 151: "Outstanding survey of outstanding wild creatures." Howes D404. Rader 1173. Pingenot: Dodge, a West Point graduate, class of 1848, spent his entire adult life in the American West. Part III of this work, consisting of nearly half the book, is devoted to Indians, their ways of life, customs, etc.
($100-200)

EARLY CARTOGRAPHIC MENTION OF PIKE’S PEAK

94. [DODGE EXPEDITION (1835)]. [KINGSBURY, GAINES P.]. [Caption title]: Colonel Dodge’s Journal...A Report of the Expedition of the Dragoons, Under the Command of Colonel Henry Dodge, to the Rocky Mountains, During the Summer of 1835. Washington: HRD181, 1835. 37 pp., 2 engraved folding maps with original outline coloring: (1) [STEEN, Enoch]. Map Showing the Land Assigned to Emigrant Indians West of Arkansas & Missouri (47.2 x 45.1 cm; 18-1/2 x 17-3/4 inches); (2) [Untitled map showing location of Native American tribes and "Route of the Dragoons under the command of Col. Dodge in 1835"] Estimated Distance 1645 Miles by Lieut. Steen United States Dragoons (49.4 x 86.6 cm; 19-1/2 x 34 inches). 8vo, modern half brown levant morocco over marbled boards. Very fine, maps superb.
        First edition, House issue. Claussen & Friis 127 & 128. Graff 2335. Howes K161. Jones 985. Matthews, p. 274. Plains & Rockies III:63: "The maps are of great rarity"; IV:63: "The expedition left Fort Leavenworth on May 29, 1835, proceeding up the South Platte River to the Rocky Mountains, thence to Fountain Creek and Bent’s Fort; they returned down the Arkansas River to the Santa Fe Trail and back to Fort Leavenworth, arriving there September 16. The detachment visited the Omaha, Pawnee, Arikara, and other tribes along the upper Platte and Arkansas rivers during a march of sixteen hundred miles." Rittenhouse 348. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 418 & 421, & pp. 149-51: "Early cartographic mention [of Pike’s Peak]....[Steen’s map 2] is well executed...Steen had a long and interesting career in the army. He was post commandant at Fort Belknap, Texas, in 1854 when R. B. Marcy was there on the survey of lands for Texas Indian Reservations [see The Handbook of Texas Online: Fort Belknap]." John L. Allen ("Patterns of Promise: Mapping the Plains and Prairies, 1800-1860" in Mapping the North American Plains [Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1983], p. 49) designates Steen’s map (map 1 above) as "one of the three most important maps of the decade" and comments: "In the summer of 1835, a detachment of dragoons under the command of Col. Henry Dodge was sent westward across the plains to the Rockies with a mission of locating tribal patterns. Accompanying this expedition was Lt. Enoch Steen. His manuscript map [source of the first printed map, listed above] of the dragoons’ route shows both the state of geographical knowledge on the plains and tribal patterns on the frontier in the mid-thirties" & (p. 118 & Fig. 7.4): "Steen’s map [second map above] was perhaps the first published map to label major tributaries of the Arkansas River which the Santa Fe Road crossed and to identify the general locations of the Pawnee and Otoe villages on the Platte River, Bent’s newly established trading house on the upper Arkansas, and Council Grove and Pawnee Rock along the Santa Fe route. The map showed general locations of the Kiowa, Comanche, and Cheyenne Plains Indians tribes....While Steen erred in several instances, he did portray a number of cultural features on the landscape as well as identify important physical features....Secretary of War Lewis Cass wrote in his 1835 report that ‘The regiment of dragoons has been usefully employed in penetrating into the Indian country...and in adding to our geographical knowledge of those remote regions."
($600-1,000)

FOLDING MAP BASED ON DE CORDOVA

95. DOMENECH, E. Missionary Adventures in Texas and Mexico, a Personal Narrative of Six Years Sojourn.... London: Longman, et al., 1858. xvi, 336 [24] pp., large folding map: Map of Texas Illustrating the Missions & Journeys of the Abbé Em. Domenech. London: Longman & Co. 44 x 34.8 cm (17-1/4 x 14 inches) with mission areas tinted in pink. 8vo, original embossed pebble cloth, gilt title on spine. A very fine choice copy.
        First edition in English after the French printing published in Paris the year before. Bradford 1350. Field 443. Graff 1120. Howes D408. Plains & Rockies III:356an. Rader 1176. Raines, pp. 69-70. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2040: "Describes the 1840 Council House Fight as a plot by the Texans." The Handbook of Texas Online (Domenech): "[Domenech] may have been the first priest to be ordained in Texas....The book describes the trials of early Catholic missionaries and is filled with vivid sketches of the Texas frontier and anecdotes about its people. He found Houston ‘infested with Methodists and ants’ and dismissed Austin, ‘the seat of the Texian legislature,’ as ‘a small dirty town’ with ‘only one wretched hotel.’ His colorfully detailed narrative of the establishment of the Catholic hierarchy in Texas, amid the tensions of the boundary disputes with Mexico and the devastation of an epidemic of cholera, has no counterpart." See Horgan’s comments in The Great River (II, p. 793). The excellent map, which is not listed by Wheat, follows De Cordova’s conformation.
($300-500)

96. DYER, Mrs. D. B. "Fort Reno" or Picturesque "Cheyenne and Arrapahoe Army Life," Before the Opening of "Oklahoma." New York: G. W. Dillingham, 1896. 216 pp., frontispiece, 10 photographic plates. 12mo, original dark blue cloth, stamped in black and gilt. Minor shelf rubbing, otherwise fine. The Josey copy with their bookplate.
        First edition. Eberstadt 114:601: "One of the few authoritative narratives of army-post life in Indian Territory and among the Indians in the early days. The author was the wife of the first mayor of Oklahoma City. Her book, printed in a small edition is a desideratum." Graff 1191: "The author’s husband...resented certain allusions to his conduct and succeeded in destroying many copies." Graff 1191. Howes D619. Rader 1250. Pingenot: The experiences of an Indian agent’s wife. Mrs. Dyer’s husband, Colonel Dyer, the first mayor of Oklahoma City, so resented his wife’s allusions to his conduct in her book that he divorced her and succeeded in having most of the books destroyed; thus creating a rarity. Mrs. Dyer was the daughter of Dr. N. R. Casey of Illinois.($150-300)

PINGENOT'S EAGLE PASS ARCHIVE

97. [EAGLE PASS, TEXAS]. An eclectic collection of documents, photographs, and printed materials related to Eagle Pass. A highlight of the collection is a voluminous file of late-nineteenth-century business papers of L. de Bona, an Eagle Pass merchant. Another strength is an extensive file of photographs assembled over years of scouting and research by Ben Pingenot. Printed materials on the history, architecture, military presence in Eagle Pass, and area development round out the collection.

Examples of materials in the collection include:

DE BONA, L. (Eagle Pass Merchant). Approximately 500 business letters, invoices, and other business papers addressed to L. De Bona at Eagle Pass. Dates range from 1889 to 1895, but virtually all are from 1889. The correspondence embraces the usual business concerns—orders, receipt and non-receipt of goods, payment and non-payment of invoices, threats of legal action, etc. A voluminous record of a year’s business in Eagle Pass. De Bona dealt in foodstuffs, tobacco, coffee, and similar commodities. Correspondents are mostly from Texas and nearby Mexico, but a few are from as far away as the Atlantic seaboard.

HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS. A rich and varied file of approximately 175 historic photographs related to Eagle Pass and environs. About one-fifth are original late-nineteenth-century (mostly albumen) or early-twentieth-century photographs, and the balance are modern prints of old photographs. Subjects and examples include:

Eagle Pass Views: Street scenes, homes, businesses, and buildings, including original early photographs of the railroad station (one of a train of recruits departing for World War I), Courthouse, interior of Ladner’s Hardware, Eagle Pass High School 1910 Southwest Texas champion football team (original silver print), an early grade school class photograph, stagecoach with passengers arriving at Dolch Hotel, First National Bank Building (about 1893 with several persons in photograph identified on reverse).

International Bridge: Original photographs of inauguration festivities (1885) and early views of the bridge. Later photos include the bridge and the river during various floods.

Military: Two original group photographs of members of the Eagle Pass Rifles (1891), early photograph of a military band at Fort Duncan (ca. 1918?), bird’s-eye view of the encampment of the 30th Infantry at Eagle Pass (1918), 23rd Infantry in formation in front of its barracks at Fort Duncan (ca. 1896), a set of 20 original negatives (ca. 1918) of Fort Duncan with accompanying modern prints.

Personalities, etc.: Original early photographs of Jesse Sumpter and family, undated early photograph of a Mexican shepherd with sheep, cabinet card of Pasquale De Bona, photograph of four members of the De Bona family with bicycles in their front yard, La Piedra Parada Saloon with group standing in front (including photos of the same building as it appeared in the 1950s), four gentlemen in top hats seated on a buckboard pulled by four burros, identified "Season’s Greeting, Jan’y 1st, 1893" (celebrants are identified on the reverse and the location is given as "Jagge’s Camp Yard, Corner Ford & Washington"), street scene in Piedras Negras, Mexico "where the Market House now stands."

EAGLE PASS FLOOD. Portfolio of 21 photographs of the Eagle Pass flood of June 1954, when the normally knee deep Rio Grande rose past the 45 foot mark. The pictures range from small snapshots to large format professional photographs. A few are stamped on the reverse "Rojas, Eagle Pass, Texas."

EAGLE PASS VIEWS. A gathering of almost 100 postcards of Eagle Pass: homes, street views, business, office, and bank buildings, schools, an Armistice Day Parade float, International Bridge, Post Office and Custom House, "Mexican Generals" [Pancho Villa and companions], Mexican side of the border, U.S. Army troops and encampments, etc. Mostly black-and-white, a few hand-colored, and some early printed color. The cards are largely unused, used cards bear postmarks from the first three decades of the twentieth century. The group includes a fan-fold card "Views of National Guard on the Rio Grande" with 18 photographs (dated 1917) and a "Souvenir Folder of Eagle Pass" with 10 photographs.

EAGLE PASS BUSINESS DISTRICT PLAN. SOUTH/WEST PLANNING ASSOCIATES. Eagle Pass Comprehensive Plan: Central Business District Plan. Bryan, Texas, 1972. [8] 19 pp., plans (some folding), charts, tables. 4to, beige pictorial wrappers, spiral bound. A comprehensive plan for the Eagle Pass business district to carry the city forward to 1991.

KOCH, Augustus. Bird’s Eye View of Eagle Pass Maverick Co. Texas 1887. Purple-tone reproduction of the 1887 Koch view.

[MAPS]. Four large-scale manuscript maps of mid-nineteenth-century Eagle Pass and vicinity. Drawn for publication, with corrections and blue lines.

SELLERS, Rosella R. The History of Fort Duncan, Eagle Pass, Texas. El Paso, 1960. 134 leaves. 4to., orange wrappers. Master’s thesis presented to the Graduate Council of Sul Ross College.

FICTION. STANDISH, Hal. Fred Fearnot’s Quick Work! Or The Hold Up at Eagle Pass. New York: Frank Tousey, 1915. 30 [2, ads] pp. 4to, original pictorial wrappers. Remarkably fine. Published as an issue of Work and Win; an Interesting Weekly for Young America, no. 876, September 17, 1915. Frontier adventure and pulp fiction at its finest.

U.S. ARMY AIR FORCES. Wings Over America. [Baton Rouge: Army and Navy Publishing Co. of Louisiana, ca. 1943]. 100 pp., photographic illustrations and portraits. Large 4to, blue pictorial cloth embellished with the coat of arms of the Army Air Forces Flying Training Command and embossed with a resplendent American eagle. A profusely illustrated graduation "yearbook" for a large class of World War II cadets at the Army Air Forces Advanced Flying School (Single Engine) at Eagle Pass Army Air Field. Among the graduates are 36 cadets of the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps.

MILITARY MENUS. Two 16mo holiday menus for U.S. Army troops stationed in Eagle Pass: (1) Machine Gun Company, 3rd U.S. Infantry. Thanksgiving Day Nineteen Hundred and Sixteen. Eagle Pass, 1916. Original beige gilt pictorial wrappers. (2) Christmas 1927. Troop "G" Fifth Cavalry. Eagle Pass, 1927. Original cream wrappers decorated with a Christmas holly border.

CALDERÓN, Roberto, R. (compiler). South Texas Coal Mining: A Community History. [Eagle Pass: Ramirez Printing, 1984]. 152 [10] pp., photographic illustrations, map. 4to, original tan pictorial wrappers. Fine. A comprehensive work on the bituminous coal industry of Maverick County.

BORDERLANDS ARCHITECTURE. Report on the Architectural Survey of Villa Guerrero, Coahuila, Mexico, and Eagle Pass, Texas, United States. N.p., 1973-76. vi, 80 pp., maps, 55 plates of architectural drawings + [3] [230, architectural survey sheets] pp. 2 vols., 4to, original wrappers. Excellent study of historic borderlands architecture, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and an international cooperative effort involving the Texas Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the Texas Architectural Foundation, and the Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia. Volume I has excellent architectural drawings of historic structures in the area of the study. Volume II publishes architectural survey sheets, with photographs, for the entire village of Guerrero.

Plus approximately 20 additional pamphlets and other ephemera.
($2,000-4,000)

EXCELLENT MAP OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO & CHIHUAHUA

98. EDWARDS, Frank S. A Campaign in New Mexico with Colonel Doniphan...With a Map of the Route, and a Table of the Distances Traversed. London: James S. Hodson, 1848. [2] iv, 134 [2 ads] pp., folding lithographed map: Map Shewing Col. A. W. Doniphan’s Route through the States of New Mexico, Chihuahua and Coahuila (38.2 x 33 cm; 15 x 13 inches). 12mo, original blind-stamped green cloth, gilt title on front cover. Slightly rubbed, upper hinge split (but strong), one short tear to lower blank margin of map. Contemporary engraved armorial bookplate of George Anthony Legh Keck. Light ex-library, with two small ink stamps on front pastedown.
        First English edition (the U.S. edition came out the prior year). Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 432. Eberstadt 137:170: "Contains much important material concerning General Houston and the Western reaches of Texas." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, pp. 146-47. Graff 1211. Haferkorn, p. 44. Howes E52. Munk (Alliott), p. 81. Plains & Rockies IV:132:2: "Wagner believed Edwards’ narrative to be one of the most interesting accounts published about the expedition." Raines, p. 75: "Doniphan’s march from Santa Fe to Chihuahua...[is] one of the most memorable in military history." Rittenhouse 184. Saunders 2874. Tutorow 3516: "Topics... include the author’s enlistment at St. Louis, rendezvous of the army near Bent’s Fort, recreation, Indian houses...the daily lives of soldiers, various people encountered along the way, Bent’s murder, Chihuahua orders from Taylor and Wool." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 543 & III, p. 9n (citing the map in the U.S. edition, which is slightly reworked in this edition): "[The map] covers the entire route of the Colonel and his command from Independence and Fort Leavenworth to Santa Fe, thence south down the Rio Grande to Paso del Norte (the present Juarez, Mexico), west of the Rio Grande to Chihuahua, and finally to the coast at Brazos Santiago, near the mouth of the Rio Grande. The map is an excellent representation of the region covered." The attractive and important map shows all of Texas on a generous scale. The Cross Timbers are shown as a swath of miniature trees.
($400-800) Illustrated Description>>

99. EGGENHOFER, Nick. Wagons, Mules and Men. How the Frontier Moved West.... New York: Hastings House, [1961]. 184 pp., illustrations by the author. Small 4to, half-calf and decorated cloth, gilt. Very fine in publisher’s slipcase.
        First edition, limited edition (#17 of a special edition limited to 215 copies containing an original signed watercolor). Pingenot: This superbly illustrated book, with an original water color sketch, by the late, great Western artist, has hundreds of line drawings and many wonderful double-page illustrations. Not only was Eggenhofer an outstanding Western artist, he was an expert on Western wheeled vehicles. The trade edition was not very large, and the limited with an original sketch by the artist is rare. The watercolor sketch bound into this copy is a fine illustration of a frontier cowboy on horseback.
($700-1,000)

100. ELLIOTT, Richard Smith. Notes Taken in Sixty Years. St. Louis: R. P. Studley & Co., 1883. [4] 336 pp., frontispiece portrait (photogravure). 8vo, original tan cloth, gilt lettered and decorated spine. Binding rubbed, upper hinge weak, title partially detached. Author’s signed presentation copy dated in 1884.
        First edition, first issue (with the portrait present). Bradford 1634. Eberstadt 114:291: "Chapters on old-time mining, railroads of long ago, the first locomotive in Illinois, Indians, early California, etc."; Eberstadt, Modern Overlands 156. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 210. Graff 1236. Howes E111: "Port[rait] not in later issues." Rittenhouse 186: "Elliott spent many years in Saint Louis and also went up the Missouri. He describes his trip over the Santa Fe Trail with Doniphan’s column during the Mexican War and his return east over the Trail in 1847." Tutorow 3642. Elliott includes a very humorous account of his aborted attempt to emigrate from Pittsburgh to Texas in 1837 when he encountered the fine and large steamer Constellation with a lone star flag with a German captain recruiting emigrants (or more probably, soldiers). This lively little episode should be reprinted. Pingenot: Scarce in the first edition. Elliott was an Indian agent in Council Bluffs in the 1830s and was a member of Doniphan’s expedition. Three chapters are devoted to the expedition and newspaper editor in St. Louis, friend of the Indian and promoter of Western railroads. There are accounts of visits to Presidents Harrison and Tyler and the presentation of a delegation of Pottowatime chiefs to President Polk. Very scarce.
($100-300)

"IMPORTANT MILESTONE IN THE CARTOGRAPHIC DEVELOPMENT &
ACCURATE DELINEATION OF THE SOUTHWEST" (WHEAT)

101. EMORY, W. H. Notes of a Military Reconnaissance, from Fort Leavenworth, in Missouri, to San Diego, in California, Including Part of the Arkansas, Del Norte, and Gila Rivers.... Washington: HRED41, 1848. 614 pp., 64 lithographed plates (views, Native Americans, natural history), 3 battle plans, 3 folding lithographed maps, including the large-scale Military Reconnaissance of the Arkansas, Rio del Norte and Rio Gila by W. H. Emory...Assisted by...J. W. Abert and W. G., and...W. H. Warner and Mr. Norman Bestor.... (77.1 x 139.1 cm; 30-1/4 x 64-3/4 inches). Thick 8vo, original brown cloth, printed paper spine label. Other than occasional mild foxing (much less than usual), an exceptionally fine copy, the binding wonderfully well-preserved, plates in the preferred state. The large map (frequently wanting and here supplied from another copy) is in excellent condition. Preserved in a dark brown cloth slipcase. Pingenot purchased this book from the Dudley R. Dobie auction.
        First edition, House issue, best edition (additional reports by Abert, Cooke, and Johnston; plates in the Abert report unattributed and in superior style). Cowan, p. 195. Edwards, Desert Voices, pp. 54-55; Enduring Desert, pp. 76-77. Graff 1249. Howes E145: "The plates of scenery in the Senate edition were lithographed by Weber & Co.; in the House edition these are usually all done by Graham, though in some copies, the 24 plates in Abert’s report were executed, in a superior manner, anonymously." McKelvey, Botanical Explorations of the Trans-Mississippi West, pp. 990-1018. Munk (Alliott), p. 73. Plains & Rockies IV:148. Rittenhouse 188. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, p. 278: "[Contains the] first view of the Southwest." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 505, 532, & 544: "Since Emory was meticulous in his astronomical observations and because of his extreme care not to include mere ‘imaginary geography,’ the map possesses an importance much greater than many of the more showy performances of the period. Its carefully fixed points enabled other mapmakers to orientate entire regions not hitherto properly tied into known geographic positions. In many respects, Emory’s map was the most important milestone in the cartographic development and accurate delineation of the Southwest." Zamorano Eighty 33: "A library of Western Americana is incomplete without it."
         There are myriad issues and variants of this epochal report, but an important consideration for the collector is the quality of the plates, which in the present copy are in their preferred superior state. Perhaps more important is the presence and condition of Emory’s grand map—the first printed map to show the Southern route. With the discovery of gold in California, Emory’s report and map became immensely popular, supplying detailed information on the entire route relative to watering places, roads, deserts, landmarks, Indians, plant and animal life. This was the map of the day—for both the armchair traveller and many an actual emigrant, who carried it on the long trek to California. Though these intrepid overlanders discarded many a prized possession in the struggle across the treacherous desert, Emory’s map was among the last material possessions to be abandoned.
($750-1,500) Illustrated Description>>

102. EMORY, William H. Report of the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey by William H. Emory, Major First Cavalry & U.S. Commissioner. Washington: Cornelius Wendell, Printer, 1857. xvi, 258, viii, 174 pp., 2 maps (1 folding): (1) Map of the United States and Their Territories Between the Mississippi and the Pacific Ocean and Part of Mexico.... Washington: Selmar Siebert (50 x 87 cm: 19-5/8 x 34-1/4 inches); (2) untitled map showing magnetic variation, 12 colored lithograph plates, 73 steel engravings on 41 plates, 20 woodcut illustrations (Part 1), and 21 engraved plates (paleontology), 25 engraved and woodcut illustrations (Part 2). Large 4to, original pictorial embossed cloth, gilt title on spine. Minor chipping at spinal extremities and slight shelf wear. Some foxing to only a few of the lithographs. As is often the case, the colored geological map for part 2, which was inserted loosely into the volume at publication, is not present. A beautiful copy of an important book.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 57: "One of the most significant of all government reports on western and southern Texas." Bennett, American Nineteenth Century Color Plate Books, p. 41. Field 500. Howes E146. Plains & Rockies IV:291. Raines, p. 76. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, IV, pp. 84-91. Pingenot: An exhaustive and important source of information on the natural history of the Southwest from Texas to California, with descriptions of the Indians and the geographical and geological features of the boundary region. Contains numerous maps and beautiful lithograph plates. The technical sections of the work were prepared by distinguished scientists and scholars.
($250-500)

103. EMORY, William H. Report on the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey.... Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1987. xxx, 1,022 pp. 4to, 3 vols., blue cloth in publisher’s slipcase. New as issued. Over 300 plates and illustrations (37 in color), maps, charts. New, as issued.
        Limited edition (750 copies); a facsimile of the original edition published in Washington, 1857-1859, with a splendid comprehensive introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian William H. Goetzmann. Field 500. Howes E146. Basic Texas Books 57. Plains & Rockies IV:291. Raines, p. 76. "Emory’s Report was perhaps the most complete scientific description ever made of the lands, the people, and the border country...[It] recalls the whole incredible history of the United States-Mexican Boundary Survey" (Goetzmann).
($150-250)

A DIVERSE EPHEMERA LOT
Illustrated Description of this Lot>>

103A. [EPHEMERA]. Lot of approximately 40 miscellaneous titles, images, and artifacts, including:

ANGUS, James. Calling card for James Angus, Co. A, 2nd Kansas Cavalry, with his engraved portrait from an 1860 photograph. Reverse with his poem "G. A. R. Badge." 2 x 3 inches.

BATTLE OF MANILA BAY MEDAL. Commemorative bronze medallion, 7.5 cm (3 inches) in diameter. Obverse: "U.S.S. Olympia" with a likeness of the ship. Reverse: "Made from propeller of Admiral Dewey’s Flagship which served in the Battle of Manila Bay May 1, 1898."

[BUSINESS CARD]. "Doc W. M. Goldie Painless Tooth Extractor. I make a Specialty of Painless Tootj Extracting and I Positively use no Poisonous Drugs. Office on Church Street (Rhodesville) Putnam Conn." 5.9 x 10 cm (2-1/4 x 4 inches) card printed on yellow stock.
         On the reverse Doc Goldie offers to extract one tooth for free if you buy 25 cents worth of his Sawankee Indian Medicine. Particular attention is paid to ladies and children’s teeth.

KICKAPOO INDIAN REMEDIES. Six colorful 5 x 7.5 cm (2 x 3 inch) lithographed cards advertising the virtues of Kickapoo Indian Remedies. Late-nineteenth century. Each card has an exciting, if somewhat romanticized artist’s rendition of Plains Indian life (based on Catlin): "Buffalo Hunt Chase"; "Attacking the Grizzly Bear"; "Buffalo Hunt under the White Wolf Skin"; "White Wolves attacking a Buffalo Bull"; "Catching the wild Horse"; and "Antelope Shooting." Reverse with advertising copy.

[MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. Veterans - Mexican War. Attention!!! Worthy Comrade, The regular annual meeting of the Central Missouri Association, V.M.W.... N.p., 1886. 1 p. 8vo leaflet.
        Announces the annual meeting of the veterans association to be held at Sedalia, September 22, 1886. The leaflet has been used as stationery by J. K. Kidd whose autograph letter, signed, from Jefferson City explains at length that age and infirmity will prevent his attending the meeting.

[MEXICAN REVOLUTION]. Set of 6 color postcards with general title: Tarjeta Postal Conmemorativa del Primer Centenario de la Independencia. Mexico: Buznego, [1910]. Subjects are artists renditions of: Hidalgo proclaiming independence in Dolores; Pípila burning the doors granary; insurgent army celebrating mass on Monte de las Cruces; capture of General de Allende; General Guerrero rejecting the viceroyal pardon given by his father; Iturbide’s triumphal entry into Mexico City. Plus one additional color photographic postcard of the National Palace in Mexico City.

[MEXICAN REVOLUTION]. Set of 9 black-and-white photographic postcards with general title: Recuerdos del Centenario.—¡16 de Septiembre de 1810! ¡16 de Septiembre de 1610! Subjects are: Pedro Aranda’s house in Monclova; Acatita de Bajan; Cathedral at Monclova; Ruins of the "Buena Fé" factory at Monclova; House in Monclova where Governor Aranda held a ball on the night of his arrest; Hospital at Monclova; Ruins of the house at Acatita de Bajan where Hidalgo was imprisoned (2 copies); Alameda at Monclova (2 copies).

[MEXICO]. Vista Gral. del Puente Internacional. Piedras Negras, Coah. Mexico. Black-and-white photographic postcard. N.p., n.d.

MISSOURI KANSAS AND TEXAS RAILWAY COMPANY. 2 ornate engraved bonds for stock in the MK&T Railway. Engraved vignettes of pastoral scene and cherubs. 20 x 29.5 cm (7-7/8 x 11-5/8 inches). (1) 100 share bond, printed in green, completed in manuscript December 8, 1879, and cancelled December 17, 1879. (2) 10 share bond printed in purple, completed in manuscript December 9, 1886, and cancelled June 28, 1890.

[MUZQUIZ, COAHUILA: FIESTA POSTER]. "Festivales de Homenaje a la Bandera Nacional Simbolo de la Mas Elevada Espiritualidad del Pueblo mexicano. 24 de Febrero de 1943." Folio broadside, printed in red and green with the complete program for the festival. Creased where folded. Very fine.
        With a lapel pin for the occasion.

NATIONAL CAPITAL SESQUICENTENNIAL MEDAL. Bronze medallion commemorating establishment of Washington, D.C., as the capital. Obverse: Standing liberty with legend "National Capital Sesquicentennial 1800 Washington 1950." Reverse: John Adams addressing Congress with legend "Sixth Congress 1800 81st Congress 1950 150th Anniversary Establishment of Permanent National Capital." 4.1 cm (1-5/8 inches) diameter.

NEVADA. State Controller’s Warrant. Seat of Government, Carson, Nevada. Controller’s Office. The Treasurer of State will pay out of the Orphan Home Fund to the order of.... Dated March 31 and April 5, 1880. 13.5 x 26.3 cm (5-1/4 x 10-3/8 inches).

POSTCARDS. Five miscellaneous color postcards from about 1920 [postmarks of 1920 & 1923]: (1) Custom House in Ciudad Juarez. (2) International Bridge between El Paso and Ciudad Juarez. (3) Soldiers’ Barracks at Fort Bliss, El Paso. (4) Pillars of Hercules, Estes Park, Colorado. (5) New Troutdale Hotel, Bear Creek Canyon, Colorado.

RAILWAY PASS. San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railway. No. 583. Expiry date: December 31, 1906. Manila card stock.

RAILWAY PASS. Texas & Pacific Railway. No. 241. Expiry date: December 31, 1880. Blue card stock.

[SEALED PAPER].COAHUILA Y TEJAS (Mexican state). Original sealed paper for use in Coahuila y Tejas, printed at top: Sello cuarto: Una cuartilla habiltado por el estado de Coahuila y Texas para el bieno de 1828 y 1829 [with manuscript ink notation furthering the time period to 1830-1831]: Havilitado pr. el Estado de Coahuila y Texas pa. el vienio de 1830 y 31, signed and rubricated by a Mexican official (Perez?). 1 p., folio. A few minor stains, otherwise a fine example of an esoteric Coahuilatecan ephemeron.

Sealed paper was required in Latin American countries to give validity to legal documents. Its required use was a considerable source of revenue to Mexico, and at times, an irritating, expensive, bureaucratic vexation to far-flung colonists in Texas, California, and elsewhere. Such paper for use in the provinces was originally supplied from Mexico and was available for purchase from Mexican officials. When shipments of this paper from Mexico failed to arrive, citizens were sometimes forced to supply their needs locally. Before printing equipment was available, this was done by writing the prescribed formula on blank sheets of paper. We have seen examples like this from California, and interestingly, some of the first imprints for California were sealed paper. The present imprint completed in manuscript is a melding of the two forms of provincial sealed paper. It would be imprudent to attribute this printing to Samuel Bangs, who was the first printer in Texas and three Mexican states (including Coahuila). However, that possibility exists. Bangs created the first Coahuila imprints in 1822 and after a trip to the United States and other parts of Mexico, Bangs returned to Saltillo in the middle of 1828, where he remained until mid-1830, where he handled the official printing requirements of the Coahuilatecan government. See The Handbook of Texas Online (Samuel Bangs). Whether printed by Bangs or another printer, this sealed paper is an early Northern Mexican imprint. Needs further research.

[SPANISH AMERICAN WAR]. Souvenir ribbon, commemorating the War in Cuba. White silk ribbon with 2 embroidered U.S. flags and the printed legend: "Souvenir, U.S. Army. America and Americans Can Americanize the World. 1899 Cuba, West Indies." 14.8 x 5.1 cm (5-7/8 x 2 inches). Very fine.

[SPANISH AMERICAN WAR]. U.S. ARMY. ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE. General Orders No. 26. Washington, February 9, 1899. 2 pp. [with] General Orders No. 37. Washington, March 9, 1899. 2 pp. [with] General Orders No. 4. Washington, January 19, 1899. 1 p. [with] General Orders No. 10. Washington, January 17, 1899. 5 pp. [with] General Orders No. 49. Washington, November 16, 1898. 1 p. 1 vol., 12mo. Set of 5 orders relating to the provisioning for and conduct of the war in Cuba.

[TELEGRAPH]. U.S. ARMY. ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE. General Orders No. 79. Washington, August 20, 1875. 2 pp. 12mo. [and] General Orders No. 88. Washington, October 14, 1875. 1 p. 12mo.
        Two orders relating to telegraphic communications, the newest technology for long distance messaging. The first establishes the rate for all telegraphic "signal-service" messages at one cent per word per 250 miles. The second directs disbursing officers not to pay for any messages which appear to have been sent on private business.

[TEXAS HISTORY]. 2 newspapers carrying reports of historical events in the Republic of Texas:

(1) Daily Albany Argus. Albany, New York, June 9, 1837. With a notice on p. 2 of the seizure of the ship Julius Ceasar and the capture of two American citizens [John Sharp and William Wharton].

(2) Daily National Intelligencer. Washington, July 28, 1842. With a report of the battle between 200 Texians (under James Davis) and 700 Mexicans (under Antonio Canales).

[TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA]. Bank draft drawn on the Pima County Bank of Tombstone, dated January 10, 1881.

UNITED STATES ARMY. 13th INFANTRY. Regimental Day Program. May 18, 1923 [New Bedford: Reynolds], 1923. 21 pp., illustrations, portraits. 16mo, original pictorial wrappers with regimental arms and their motto: "First at Vicksburg." Lightly soiled, else fine.
        The regiment earned the motto in 1863 when, with a casualty loss of 43%, it planted and maintained its colors on the parapet at the assault of Vicksburg.

[U.S. ARMY. CAVALRY]. Cav. Horses. Original photograph of a remuda of cavalry horses with mounted guard in foreground. N.p., n.d. (early 20th century). The location is unidentified, but is probably South Texas.

(35 pieces)
($300-600)

ONE OF THE FIFTY TEXAS RARITIES

THE APOSTLE OF TEXAS

104. ESPINOSA, Isidro Felix de. El Peregrino Septentrional Atlante: Delineado en la Exemplarissima Vida del Venerable Padre F. Antonio Margil de Jesús. Mexico: Joseph Bernardo de Hogal, 1737. [38] 456 [4] pp., title printed in red and black within typographical border, copper-engraved plate of Margil preaching to Native Americans, text engraving of St. Anthony of Padua, occasional engraved text ornamentation. Small 4to, full modern crimson morocco, spine gilt lettered, raised bands, black calf doublures with ornate gold-tooled borders, gilt dentelles, a.e.g. Trifling wear to right margin of engraved plate (expertly restored, not affecting image and barely touching only one small spot on the line border). Corners slightly bumped. A beautiful copy, with brief contemporary ink note on title. Preserved in red slipcase.
        First edition, the preferred variant with the titlepage printed in red and black. There are two settings of the titlepage, the priority of which has not been determined. The present copy has Sto. Officio on line 10, and Impressa con Licencia on line 5 from the bottom. Pages 426-27 are uncensored (unlike most copies) by the Inquisition (because of references to the apocalyptic cherub Uriel). Another edition of this work was printed in Spain in 1742. This Mexican edition is preferred—in addition to being the first edition and an American imprint, the Mexican edition was created by master printer Hogal, considered to be the Ibarra of Mexico. Basic Texas Books 59A: "This is the life of the man known as 'the Apostle of Texas,' written by a friend who accompanied him in his travels.... Margil and Espinosa were involved in the founding of several missions in Texas in the early eighteenth century, and Margil is credited with the conversion of Texas Indians." Fifty Texas Rarities 5. Graff 1260. Harper XIV:338: "One of the most important books ever issued for the study of Southwestern history." Howes E84. Jones 444. Leclerc 1129. Library of Congress, Texas Centennial Exhibition 40. Medina 3461. Palau 82703. Raines, p. 78. Wagner, Spanish Southwest 102. Tate (The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography) does not cite the original edition of this work, but in a reference to a modern printing of one of Espinosa's reports, Tate comments: "Describes in great detail numerous cultural and material aspects of the Tejas people who resided in the vicinity of present Nacogdoches. An absolutely essential primary source for researchers."
         Pingenot: Rare and important account by a leading participant in the founding of the first mission settlements in East Texas. Padres Antonio Margil and Isidro Felix de Espinosa, the author, accompanied the Domingo Ramón expedition in 1716 from Presidio de San Juan Bautista on the Rio Grande to establish a mission base in East Texas. Margil’s labors not only resulted in the first permanent civil settlement of Texas but vitiated possible French encroachment into Spanish Territory. Of equal importance for a collection on Guatemala, where Margil is known as the Apostle of Guatemala. "Arguably the most famous missionary to serve in Texas, Antonio Margil de Jesús remains under consideration for sainthood by the Vatican" (The Handbook of Texas Online (Antonio Margil de Jesús; Isidro Felix de Espinosa).
($1,500-3,000) Illustrated Description>>

105. FARROW, Edward S. Mountain Scouting: A Hand-Book for Officers and Soldiers on the Frontiers... New York: Published by the author, 1881. 248, 36 [10] pp., profusely illustrated. 8vo, original blue pictorial gilt-lettered cloth. Light wear to extremities, otherwise near fine.
        First edition of this privately printed and distributed how-to-do-it book. Howes F56. Not in Graff, Eberstadt, Streeter Sale, etc. Pingenot: Profusely illustrated and containing numerous notes on the methods of travel. Fascinating content dealing with the frontier requirements of the military; also contains a guide to the Chinook Jargon. Farrow was a lieutenant and captain in the Nez Percé and other Indian campaigns in the Northwest where he served as chief of scouts. The book is dedicated to General O. O. Howard who had commended him for gallant conduct. Rare.
($150-250)

BEST EDITION FOR MILITARY HISTORY OF THE TEXAN CAMPAIGN

106. FILISOLA, Vicente. Memorias para la historia de la guerra de Tejas.... Mexico: Ignacio Cumplido, 1849. 511 [1] [2] + 267 pp. 2 vols., 8vo, contemporary half black Mexican calf over rose mottled boards, spines lettered and decorated in gilt. Superb condition, crisp and fresh, in a handsome Mexican binding of the period.
        First edition of the Cumplido edition of Filisola’s memoirs (Rafael published an edition in Mexico in 1848 and 1849). Basic Texas Books 62: "The best account by a Mexican contemporary of the American conquest of Texas. Eugene C. Barker called it ‘the only comprehensive history of the colonization of Texas and the Texas Revolution from the Mexican point of view.’ This work—or works—is bibliographically confusing. It is actually composed of two different works of two volumes each, both with the same title.... The Cumplido edition...is basically an entirely new work...neither a reprint of the Rafael nor a continuation.... The Rafael and Cumplido editions each stand on their own as separate works but complement each other so much that both are necessary to have a complete account." Howes F126. Palau 91612. Rader 1381. Raines, p. 82.
        Streeter 853n: "Filisola, in two quite different works...gives, especially in the Cumplido work, a much fuller account of the Texas campaign in 1836 and of the attempts of a Texas campaign in 1837.... The Cumplido imprint reports in detail upon the military operations from the taking of the Alamo in March 1836, to about August 1, 1837. The account for the period from the taking of the Alamo to shortly after the Battle of San Jacinto is much fuller than in...the Raphael imprint.... What Filisola calls the second campaign against Texas began in October, 1836, and is covered in the remaining pages, 397-511, of Volume I and the 267 pages of Volume II. This work printed by Cumplido is largely made up of army orders issued during the period.... One of the most important sources on Texas from the 1820s through 1837...enriched with scores of original documents and military orders unavailable elsewhere." Filisola received a colonization grant in Texas in 1831, and in November of 1835 he was appointed second in command to Santa Anna on the Mexican campaign to put down the rebellious Texans. See The New Handbook of Texas Online (Filisola). With this set, we include a copy of the 2-vol. English translation of the Raphael edition, published by Eakin Press in 1985 (very fine in dust jackets).

(4 vols.)
($900-1,800)

FILISOLA'S 1836 ACCOUNT OF THE MEXICAN RETREAT FROM TEXAS—ORIGINAL WRAPPERS

107. FILISOLA, Vicente. Representación dirigida al Supremo Gobierno por el General Vicente Filisola, en defensa de su honor y aclaración de sus operaciones como General en Gefe del Ejército sobre Tejas. Mexico: Ignacio Cumplido, 1836. 82 pp. 8vo, original brown printed wrappers within ornamental border, stitched. Fragile wraps with very slight wear and a few light spots, occasional light foxing to text, still a fine copy, in the rare wraps. Contemporary ink ownership inscription on upper wrapper. Preserved in dark brown morocco and marbled boards folding case.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 61: "The best contemporary account of the Mexican retreat from Texas after the defeat of Santa Anna." Eberstadt, Texas 162:293: "Seldom found with the printed wrappers." Fifty Texas Rarities 17n (citing the English edition printed in Columbia, Texas, a copy of which will be offered in our Auction 11). Graff 1321. Howes F127. Palau 91610. Raines, p. 82. Streeter 853: "The classic account of the retreat of the Mexicans through Texas after the battle of San Jacinto and a masterly defense by Filisola of his acts in ordering and conducting the retreat. In an order dated May 31, 1836, Tornel, the Secretary of War had relieved Filisola of his command, replacing him with Urrea, and...after the news of the public treaty made by Santa Anna at Velasco...he was commanded to return to Mexico and stand trial for his conduct.... Here he gives a detailed account of the retreat, in which the charges against him made by his former subordinate Urrea, and others, are shown up in beautiful fashion. That Filisola's reply struck home is shown by Urrea's statement [in] his Diario...Militares...that Filisola's Representación 'insults me, abuses me, satirizes me, and belittles me.'... At his trial [Filisola] was exonerated." Vandale 66.
        Pingenot: One of the primary accounts of the Texas Revolution from the Mexican point of view. Filisola, a native of Italy who participated in many battles of the Napoleonic wars, received a colonization grant in Texas in 1831, and served as second in command to Santa Anna during the Texas campaign.
        See Handbook of Texas Online (Vicente Filisola). With the original edition, we include a copy of the 1965 Texian Press edition in English (mint in d.j.).
(2 vols.)
($1,500-3,000) Illustrated Description>>

108. FINERTY, John F. War-Path and Bivouac, or the Conquest of the Sioux; A Narrative of Stirring Personal Experiences and Adventures in the Big Horn and Yellowstone Expedition of 1876.... Chicago: Donohue & Henneberry, 1890. xxi, 460 pp., folding map. 8vo, original gilt pictorial dark blue cloth. A superlative copy.
        First edition. Dustin 105: "Contains much on the Custer battle; reliable; has lists of killed and wounded." Graff 1325. Howes F136. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 62. Larned 636: "Contains a very good map of the scene of operations, and several portraits of notable participants." Luther, High Spots of Custer 38: "A newspaper correspondent’s account of expeditions and campaigns that cannot be overlooked." Rader 1384. Smith, Pacific Northwest Americana 3064. Pingenot: Irish born John F. Finerty came to the U.S. in 1864 and served with Union forces in the Civil War. He moved to Chicago after the war where he worked as a reporter for several newspapers. In 1876 the Chicago Times editor assigned him to accompany General Crook’s army in the Sioux campaign. Finerty said he preferred going with General Custer’s 7th Cavalry but was overruled by his editor.
($200-400)

109. [FISKE, J., (attrib.)]. A Visit to Texas: Being the Journal of a Traveller Through Those Parts Most Interesting to American Settlers...with an Appendix, Containing a Sketch of the Late War. New York: Van Nostrand and Dwight; Mobile: Woodruff, Fiske & McGuire, 1836. xi [1] 262 pp. 16mo, original green floral cloth. Binding worn (covers almost detached), intermittent mild to moderate foxing, contemporary ownership inscription.
        Second edition, with the added appendix containing an account of the Texan Revolution that did not appear in the first edition (1834). The first edition had a map, which was not issued with the present edition. This second edition makes a useful adjunct to the first edition, because of the augmented text. Basic Texas Books 209A: "One of the most important accounts of Texas during a critical period in its history." Clark, Old South III:114. Graff 1336. Howes T145. Raines, pp. 83 & 210. Streeter 1155A: "A fresh and interesting picture of life in Texas at that time."
($150-300)

110. FOOTE, Henry S. Texas and Texans. Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1841. 314 + 403 pp. 2 vols., small 8vo, original green cloth with blind embossed sides, gilt titles on spines, and large gilt star at the foot of each volume. Virtually free of foxing. A very fine set.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 63: "One of the most influential books on Texas in its time, this work is still of considerable value and interest. It suffers from the intense prejudices of the author and from his too-frequent digressions, but it nevertheless provides material on numerous aspects of Texas history not available elsewhere." Graff 1376. Howes F238. Raines, p. 84: "One of the best histories of Texas for the period covered." Streeter 1377: "There is a wonderful story about James Long, who headed the so-called Long expedition into Texas in 1819, and interesting sketches of W. H. Wharton, David Burnet, Lorenzo Zavala, and Benjamin H. Smith."
($500-800)

PINGENOT'S FORT CLARK ARCHIVE

INCLUDING OUTSTANDING PHOTOGRAPHS AND TRADE TOKENS

111. [FORT CLARK, TEXAS]. An outstanding collection of photographs, pamphlets, postcards, tokens, ephemera, and scholarly material documenting Fort Clark (The Handbook of Texas Online: Fort Clark) during its days as a military post. 1880s to the 1990s (but mostly from 1880s to the 1940s). The collection contains several extreme rarities, the high spot being the only known nineteenth-century photograph of the Black Seminole Scouts riding on their mounts, a fine group of token coins for use at the post, and the discharge papers of John L. Bullis, who commanded the Seminole Scouts of Fort Clark during the Mackenzie expedition of 1873, the Red River War, and other Indian campaigns of the 1870s. Condition very good to very fine. This collection is remarkable for its comprehensive nature—a real mine of research and exhibit material collected by Pingenot over several decades. Illustrated Description>>

The collection includes:

A special archive on the Black Seminole Scouts, with several original early photographs (and some modern reprints) plus the Bullis discharge:

STOTSENBURG, J. M. (photographer). Original albumen photograph of a troop of 18 Black Seminole Indian Scouts on their horses, taken at Fort Clark, ca. 1890. (11.5 x 19.1 cm; 4-1/2 x 7-1/2 inches). This is purported to be the only known nineteenth-century photograph of Black Seminole soldiers on their mounts. Pingenot considered this photograph to be one of the greatest treasures of his collection, and rightly so. See illustration on upper cover of this catalogue. The Handbook of Texas Online (Black Seminole Indians).

CURTIS, C. D. (photographer). "Seminole Camp Fort Clark Reservation." Fort Clark, ca. 1895. Original albumen photograph (11.5 x 19.1 cm; 4-1/2 x 7-1/2 inches). Black families, the men in civilian clothes, outside their jacales at Fort Clark.

MYERS (photographer). "Indian Scouts." N.p., early twentieth-century photographic postcard signed "Myers" on the negative. Showing a man standing in the space between two log houses.

BLACK SEMINOLE SCOUTS. 4 modern reproductions of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photographs of Seminole Scouts.

BULLIS, Lt. John L. Original Discharge Certificate of Bullis dated October 1, 1895. Bullis was a highly respected commander of the Black Seminole Scouts during the years of the Indian campaigns. Saving Bullis life during a battle with the Comanches in 1875 won three Scouts the Medal of Honor. See The Handbook of Texas Online (John L. Bullis).

MILITARY TRADE TOKENS (Fort Clark use). 31 coins in different denominations, materials and shapes, and designated for different purposes. Among the tokens are: "5 Rations Bread Fort Clark Post Treas," "5¢ Military Barber Shop," "1 Dollar Military Barber Shop," "$1.00 12th Cavalry Post Exchange," "5 23 Inf H," "One Game Troop H 10th Cavalry," "25 Post Canteen Ft Clark Tex," "5¢ Q. M. Good for Pocket Billiards," "$1.00 K Club 13," etc. This is a remarkable collection, possibly the most comprehensive collection of these ephemeral and colorful tokens.

FORT CLARK. A collection of photographs of Fort Clark and its troops, assembled by Ben Pingenot over many years of collecting. It would be very difficult to assemble a collection anything like this today. The photographs are as follows:

Nineteenth-century albumen photographs:

CURTIS, C. D. (photographer). 2 original photographs of the Fort Clark parade grounds and surrounding buildings taken from a rooftop. [Fort Clark, ca. 1895]. 15.2 x 21 cm; 6 x 8-1/4 inches. One of the photographs bears the rubber stamp of Curtis on verso.

CURTIS, C. D. (photographer). "23rd Infantry." Original photograph of troops in marching formation. Fort Clark, ca. 1895. 15.9 x 21.0 cm; 6-1/4 x 8-1/4 inches. Rubber stamp of photographer on verso.

FORM & LANG (photographer). "‘F’ Troop, 8th Cavalry." Fort Clark, ca. 1895. Original photo of mounted troops. 19.1 x 23.8 cm; 7-1/2 x 9-3/8 inches.

BLACK SEMINOLE SOLDIERS. Original photograph of Black soldiers formally seated and standing on a porch. N.p., ca. 1888-1895. 18.4 x 23.5 cm; 7-1/4 x 9-1/4 inches. All of the soldiers in the group are wearing the Army-Navy medal, established in 1888 (example of original medal in this collection).

FORM, H. & LANG (photographer). "Camp of Company of 19th Infy near Langtry, Texas." Original cabinet card. Bivouac showing tents, troops, and livestock in a barren field. Fort Clark, late nineteenth century. 11.1 x 18.7 cm; 4-3/8 x 7-3/8 inches. Though identified as Langtry, the photo shows the Fort Clark troops on maneuvers.

FORM, H. & LANG (photographer). Group of seven men in a studio setting with painted backdrop. Fort Clark, ca. 1885. Original cabinet card. 10.2 x 16.2 cm; 4 x 6-3/8 inches. This is a colorful shot capturing the personalities of these young bucks. Each of the subjects is holding a shot of schnapps to the camera (one has the half-empty bottle). Charles Downing’s note for the photograph says that one of the men is wearing the cap insignia of the 8th Cavalry, G Troop.

STOTSENBURG, J. M. (photographer). "Brackett from Fort Clark, Looking North." [Fort Clark, ca. 1885]. Original photograph. 11.4 x 19.1 cm; 4-1/2 x 7-1/2 inches. Taken from a rooftop with Brackettville in the distance and troops, livestock, and fort buildings in the near distance. Brackettville of a century ago is appreciably larger than the present-day town.

CURTIS, C. D. (photographer). Studio portrait of an unidentified seated woman. Fort Clark, ca. 1897. Original cabinet card. 14.0 x 19.8 cm; 5-1/2 x 3-7/8 inches. In pencil on reverse "March 19, ’97." In the imprint at the lower edge of the card, Curtis identifies himself as "U.S. Army photographer."

FORT CLARK. Original panoramic photograph of the parade grounds at Fort Clark. [Fort Clark, late nineteenth century]. 8.9 x 30.8 cm; 3-1/2 x 12-1/8 inches. Numbered "31" on the negative.

Twentieth-century photographs and photographic postcards:

FORT CLARK. Over 100 postcards preserved in sleeves in a three-ring binder, mostly black-and-white photographs of buildings and other scenes of Fort Clark. Postmarks from over fifty years, from the 1900s to the 1950s (dates based on postal cancels on used cards). Subjects include almost every conceivable building at the fort: several pictures of snow at Fort Clark, machine gun barracks, post hospital, troop quarters, officers’ quarters, hospital, officers’ mess, bachelors’ hall, stables, Las Moras Creek, "A Salute" [soldier firing an old-fashioned canon], troops on parade, troops at work, etc.

EKMARK, C. and other unidentified photographers. 15 original photographs of Fort Clark from the 1930s. 7.6 x 12.7 cm (3 x 5 inches) to 12.7 x 17.8 cm (5 x 7 inches). Subjects include: officers’ homes, 1st Cavalry Brigade Review (May 1939), 5th Cavalry, Main Headquarters building, 5th Cavalry Headquarters, Guard House, Bird’s Eye View, Post Hospital, Post Theatre, 1st Cavalry Troop Quarters, etc.

Additional materials include:

SHAFTER, William Rufus. The William Rufus Shafter Papers 1861-1938. 7 reels of microfilm plus 6 modern photographic reproductions of related maps from the National Archives. "Shafter served as lieutenant colonel of the all-black Twenty-fourth United States Infantry along the Rio Grande until 1868, when he moved to Fort Clark in West Texas." (The Handbook of Texas Online: William Rufus Shafter).

ROSTER. Roster of Non-Commissioned Officers of the Nineteenth U. S. Infantry...Headquarters, Fort Clark, Texas. [Fort Clark]: Regimental Print, 1885. 7 pp. 16mo fanfold brochure.

MENUS. Five printed Christmas Dinner Menus of troops at Ft. Clark: (1) Troop D, 1st Cavalry, 1907 (with original photograph of Troop D tipped in). (2) Troop "D", 14th Cavalry and Machine Gun Platoon, 1912. (3) Headquarters Troop, 5th Cavalry, 1925 (printed in the shape and with the cover design of the troop’s guidon). (4) Headquarters Troop, 1st Cavalry Brigade, 1934. (5) Station Complement, 8th Service Command, 1942.

BATEMAN, Cephas C. Modernized Outpost of the Old Frontier, at Present Headquarters of the 13th U.S. Cavalry. Fort Clark: [13th Cavalry Printing Office], 1920. 9 pp. 8vo, printed wrappers.

CAVALRY. History of the 5th United States Cavalry From 1855 to 1927, Fort Clark, Texas [cover title]. N.p., 1927]. 24 pp., photographic illustrations, integral advertisements. Tall 4to, mustard printed wrappers.

FORT CLARK. Statement Concerning Fort Clark, Texas. N.p., ca. 1933. 10 pp. 8vo, original pale blue printed wrappers. Pamphlet giving reasons "to substantiate the contention that Fort Clark, Texas, should be retained as a permanent military post." Foremost among the reasons is "protection from bandits from the Republic of Mexico." Excellent and interesting.

RODERTS, T. Horsemanship. Fort Clark, ca. 1935. [158] pp., stenciled typescript. Tall 4to, original mustard printed wrappers. A well-read (but still in respectable condition) manual on military horsemanship written by a sergeant in Troop B, 5th Cavalry at Fort Clark. Very ephemeral. Pingenot had a wonderful scouting ability!

FORT CLARK. Fort Clark, Texas [cover title]. San Antonio: Universal Press, ca. 1943. [32] pp. 4to, original pictorial wrappers. A souvenir photo book of Fort Clark showing army life, at work and at play, of Black troops during World War II. With a brief history of Fort Clark on inner front wrap.

CAVALRY. Activation Program of 2nd Cavalry Division, U.S. Army at Fort Clark, Texas. February 25, 1943. [5] pp. 12mo, original yellow printed wrappers.

MILITARY EPHEMERA. Two military ribbons, one an example of the Army-Navy ribbon mentioned above in the formal photograph of Black soldiers (red, white, yellow, and blue fabric with a five-pointed brass medallion and brass eagle clasp pin); the other, for Grand Army of the Republic Veterans, W. H. Lewis Post No. 17, Ft. Clark, Texas, a mourning memorial ribbon (black fabric printed in silver and U.S. red, white, and blue flag mounted, metal clasp at top engraved "G.A.R."

Plus about 15 articles on Fort Clark and the Seminole Scouts published in Smithsonian, National Geographic Magazine, Texas Highways, The Brackett Mail (and other newspapers), Kinney County Chamber of Commerce publications, etc. The archive also has additional modern photographs of Fort Clark and fort life near the end of its history as a military post.
($5,000-$10,000)

112. [FORT MERRILL]. McRAE, Alexander. Autograph letter, signed, dated at Fort Merrill, Texas, July 12, 1853, to Brevet Major J. S. Simonson, Mounted Rifles, commanding Fort Ewell, Texas. 1 p. [on 4 pp. folder], original ink notes regarding receipt and content on p. [4], 4to, written in ink on blue-lined paper. Very fine.
        McRae write from Fort Merrill on the Nueces River in present Live Oak County, to Simonson, commanding Fort Ewell on the Nueces in southern LaSalle County. McRae states that he is taking "advantage of the return of the wagons to Fort Ewell to send the following men of the Detachment of Company "E" now at this Post, viz.: Sergeant Lawler and Privates Carter, Fry, Johnson, Stanley, Weaver. McRae graduated from West Point in 1847 and was commissioned Brevet 2nd Lieut. in the Mounted Rifles. Companies I and E of the Rifle Regiment were posted at Fort Merrill until April 26, 1853, when they were transferred to Fort Ewell, leaving only two non-commissioned officers and thirteen men, a force only large enough for night sentinel duty. These six men of E Company, having accompanied supply wagons from Fort Ewell, were being returned with McRae’s authorization letter. McRae was promoted to captain in 1861 with the 3rd Cavalry. He was killed February 21, 1862, at the Battle of Valverde, New Mexico.
($100-200)

AN ENGLISH SYMPATHIZER IN THE CONFEDERATE STATES

113. FREMANTLE, Lieut.-Col. [Arthur J.]. Three Months in the Southern States, April-June 1863. Edinburgh & London: William Blackwood & Sons, 1863. x, 316, 20 (ads) pp., 6 portraits engraved from photographs. 12mo, original blue pebbled cloth, spine gilt lettered and ruled. A bit shelf slanted and spine slightly darkened, upper hinge neatly strengthened, mild to moderate foxing to first and last signatures. Engraved armorial bookplate of Cuthbert Burnup. Uncommon.
        First edition (editions followed in New York and Mobile the following year). Coulter, Travels in the Confederate States 175: "Coming to American in 1863 to observe the Civil War, he landed at Brownsville, Texas, and leisurely crossed the state, passing through San Antonio, Houston, Galveston, Houston against and into Louisiana by way of Shreveport.... He was much impressed by what he saw in Texas, as shown by the large amount of attention he gave the Texans in his book. He had great admiration for the Confederate soldiers and spoke with respect of the Confederate leaders whom he met, such s Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, Brag, Beauregard, Ewell, Longstreet, and others. He observed not only the military situation, but was also impressed by the patriotism of the masses, especially the women.... This is a well-considered, reliable account of what an observant and intelligent Englishman saw during a three-months journey from one end of the Confederacy to the other." Eberstadt 123:74 (citing the edition printed at Mobile in 1864): "One of the esteemed narratives of travel in the South during the war. Fremantle arrived in Texas from England, and journeyed through Texas & the Trans-Mississippi region." Confederate Hundred 33; In Tall Cotton 64. Nevins, Civil War Books 191: "Fully deserving of its reputation as the best commentary on the wartime South by an English visitor." Howes F361.
($
200-400)

114. FREMANTLE, Lieut. Col. [Arthur J.]. Three Months in the Southern States, April-June 1863. New York: John Bradburn, 1864. 309 pp., engraved frontispiece of Jefferson Davis. 12mo, original brown blind-stamped cloth, spine with gilt lettering and ruling. Slightly shelf slanted and intermittent mild foxing, generally fine. Contemporary ink ownership inscription.
        First American edition of preceding. "By the end of 1861, 25,000 Texans were in the Confederate army. Two-thirds of these were in the cavalry, the branch of service preferred by Texans. Lt. Col. Arthur Fremantle of the British Coldstream Guards, who visited Texas during the war, observed this fondness for cavalry service: ‘It was found very difficult to raise infantry in Texas,’ he said, ‘as no Texan walks a yard if he can help it’" (Handbook of Texas Online: Civil War).
($150-250)

FRÉMONT IN ORIGINAL CLOTH & THE LARGE FOLDING MAP

115. FRÉMONT, John C. Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the Year 1842, and to Oregon and North California in the Years 1843-’44. Washington: Gales and Seaton, SED174, 1845. 693 pp., 22 lithographic plates (views, fossils, botany, some by Weber), 5 lithographed maps (including large folding map in rear pocket: Map of an Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the year 1842 and to Oregon & North California in the years 1843-44.... 80 x 129.6 cm; 31-1/2 x 51 inches). 8vo, original dark brown blind-stamped cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Light shelf wear, hinges neatly strengthened with matching paper, occasional foxing. Large folding map present and in fine condition (seldom encountered thus).
        First edition, the Senate issue, with astronomical and meteorological observations omitted from subsequent editions. Cowan, p. 223. Edwards, pp. 89-90. Graff 1436. Grolier American Hundred 49. Howes F370. Plains & Rockies IV:115:1. The maps are one of the outstanding features of this pivotal report. Wheat, Gold Region 21; Mapping the Transmississippi West 497 & II, 194-200: "[Frémont’s] report and the Frémont (Preuss) map which accompanied it, changed the entire picture of the West and made a lasting contribution to cartography....An altogether memorable document in the cartographic history of the West, and for it alone Fremont would deserve to be remembered in history." Zamorano Eighty 39.
($700-1,400)

116. FRÉMONT, John C. and Jessie B. Memoirs of My Life...Including in the Narrative Five Journeys of Western Exploration.... Chicago & New York: Belford, Clark, 1887. xx, 655 pp., 82 plates including steel & wood engravings, photogravures, 1 chromolithograph and 7 maps (2 colored, 4 folding). Large 4to. A splendid copy in original half-morocco presentation binding, elaborate endpapers, spine extra gilt, preserved in a tan cloth slipcase.
        First edition. Cowan, p. 224. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains & Rockies 171. Howes F367: "Embraces his first 3 exploring expeditions and the part played by him in the conquest of California." Larned 2035. Rittenhouse 228. Pingenot: The great Pathfinder’s own story of his first three exploring expeditions and his role in the conquest of California, at least partly ghostwritten by his talented wife Jessie, who also provides a "sketch of the life of Senator Benton in connection with Western expansion." Excellent illustrations by Darley, Hamilton, and other leading artists, plus unique daguerreotype photos of the West, and a color plate engraved by Frank Key. The large folding map (often lacking) is tipped to the inner rear cover. A second volume was contemplated but never issued. This work is becoming quite scarce in decent condition.
($500-800)

"ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING BOOKS OF TRAVEL
THROUGH THE SOUTHWEST"—CAMP

117. FROEBEL, Julius. Seven Years’ Travel in Central America, Northern Mexico, and the Far West of the United States. London: Richard Bentley, 1859. xiv [2] 587 pp., engraved plates, text illustrations. 8vo, original embossed blue cloth, spine gilt lettered and decorated. Spinal extremities and hinges skillfully reinforced with matching cloth. Fine, clean condition, the plates unfoxed. Contemporary ownership inscription on half-title. Preserved in a blue cloth slipcase.
        First edition in English (first edition, Leipzig, 1857-58). Alliot, p. 84. Clark, Old South III:316: "A significant travel account." Cowan, p. 225. Graff 1448. Howes F390: "Describes several trips over the Santa Fe Trail and a journey from Tucson and the Gila to Los Angeles." Palau 95117. Parker, Travels in Central America, p. 322. Plains & Rockies IV:292:2: "Camp considered this work to be one of the most interesting books of travel through the Southwest. In 1852 Froebel traveled to Chihuahua and returned by way of the Santa Fe Trail. In 1853 and again in 1854, he travelled the same route, to Chihuahua, and then to California, arriving at Los Angeles on September 6, 1854." Raines, p. 85. Rittenhouse 231. The author includes an account of his journey from Galveston to El Paso via San Antonio, Fort Inge, Fort Clark, etc. (pp. 431-69). One of the lovely engraved plates is a Texas scene, Watering Place, called the Dead Man’s Hole, signed J. W. Whymper (opposite p. 451). Other plates of Southwestern and borderlands interests include Deserted Mission of San Xavier del Bac; Sierra de los Organos; Valley of the Rio Grande, Near Mesilla; and Saguarro Trees. Froebel’s account is excellent, evincing his keen interest in politics, science, mining, natural history, and archaeological remains.
($600-1,200)

118. FRY, James B. Army Sacrifices; or, Briefs from Official Pigeon-Holes. New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1879. 254 [2] ads pp. 12mo, original red cloth, decorated in gilt and black. Front endpaper scuffed where bookplate removed, otherwise an outstanding copy.
        First edition and the true first issue without the illustrations that were later added. Cowan, p. 227. Decker, Forty-four 152: "A very elusive little book with probably the best and most accurate appraisal of the Indian fights and fighters on the American frontier." Graff 1458. Howes F399. Pingenot: Contains chapters on the Fetterman Massacre, Forsyth’s Fight, the Grattan Massacre, the Canby Massacre (Modoc War), Gunnison’s Massacre, the Penitentes, a voyage to Oregon in 1848, etc.
($125-250)

THE TWELVE MONTHS VOLUNTEER

119. FURBER, George C. The Twelve Months Volunteer; or, Journal of a Private in the Tennessee Regiment of Cavalry, in the Campaign in Mexico, 1846-7; Comprising Four General Subjects I. A Soldier's Life in Camp; Amusements; Duties; Hardships; II. A Description of Texas and Mexico, as Seen on the March; III. Manners, Customs; Religious Ceremonies of the Mexicans; IV. The Operations of All the Twelve Months Volunteers.... Cincinnati: J. A. & U. P. James, 1848. xii [1, blank] 14-624 pp., 20 wood-engraved plates and plans, three text illustrations, folding engraved map: A New Map of Mexico, California & Oregon Published by J.A. & U.P. James, Cincinnati, 1848 (32.3 x 24.2 cm; 12-7/8 x 9-1/2 inches). Thick 8vo, original blind-stamped dark brown gilt pictorial, gilt title and decoration on spine. Binding worn, repaired, and cloth soiled, text foxed. Contemporary gift inscription on front free endpaper dated June 15, 1848.
        First edition. Connor & Faulk, North American Divided 80: "This is one of the best contemporary works. It emphasizes four topics: camp life, physical description of the country, manners and customs of Mexicans as Furber saw them, and military operations." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 214: "Has been referred to as 'a veritable encyclopedia of the military and civil side of the war.'" Haferkorn, p. 44. Howes F420. Tutorow 3610: "One of the best contemporary accounts of Scott’s campaign." Wheat (Mapping the Transmississippi West 546 & III, pp. 9-10) notes that the map is the same which appears in the book edition of Hughes' account of the Doniphan expedition, also published by J. A. and U. P. James (item 145 herein). However, the publishers note that the map has been "expressly corrected for this work."
        The plates, after Furber's own drawings, are at once primitive and charming, including two of Texas interest (Camp Ringgold. Ten. Reg. Cavalry, Near Matamoras (sic); Plan of Matamoras (sic), and Vicinity, from the Survey by Captain M. A. Haynes... [locates on the north side of the Rio Grande, Fort Brown, Palo Alto, and Resaca de Palma, but mostly dense "Chapparal"]. Hamilton (Early American Book Illustrators 769) cites Furber's work and comments: "A practicing lawyer of Germantown, Tennessee, [Furber] determined, at the outbreak of the Mexican War, 'to throw aside Blackstone and Chitty and take up the sword and carbine.' He enlisted in Company G of the Tennessee Cavalry regiment and, as a result of his experiences, produced [this] book.... The drawings are distinctly amateurish but have some historical interest." Pingenot: The author, a soldier in Company G, gives an account of his march through Texas, as well as a fine description of camp life, hardships, customs of the Mexicans, etc. Although this work was republished in several later editions, the first edition is quite rare. No copies of the first edition have appeared at auction, and only two copies appear in the Morrison guides (the Pingenot copy being one of them).
($400-800)

ORIGINS OF NATIVE AMERICANS

120. GARCÍA, Gregorio. Origen de los Indios de el Nuevo Mundo, e Indias Occidentales.... Madrid: Francisco Martínez Abad, 1729. [32] 336 [80] pp. (printed in double column, numerous side notes), engraved vignette on title depicting Native Americans greeting European ships, large engraving of St. Thomas of Aquinas and another small engraving in preliminaries, several text engravings, numerous woodcut vignettes, initials. Small folio, contemporary full vellum over thick boards, gilt spine with raised bands and tan morocco label. Other than slight marginal worming at end (mainly affecting upper blank margins), otherwise a very very, crisp copy, the beautiful binding in an excellent state of preservation. Terracotta cloth slipcase.
         Second and best edition, with considerable additions and notes by the learned González Barcia (the original edition printed at Valencia in 1607 is a great rarity). Borba de Moraes I:295. Cowan, p. 229. Field 586: "Author spent 20 years as a missionary among the Indians of America, and applied himself with the greatest zeal to the study of the antiquities of the country." JCB (3)2:44 (quoting Charlevoix): "All that has ever been imagined as to the origin of the American, and the manner in which this New World was peopled, is gathered here." Medina 2713. Palau 93007. Pilling 1404: "Numerous Mexican words throughout, particularly pp. 232-316, where the manners, customs, languages, &c., of various nations of the Old World are compared with those of the Mexicans and Peruvians." Streeter Sale I:33n: "Garcia epitomized all the contemporary theories on the origin of the aboriginal Americans, supplying in great detail the various arguments in the great philosophical speculation that was produced by the discovery of America." See also, Wagner, Spanish Southwest, p. 184 (includes Native Americans of the Spanish Southwest and California). Book V contains the various native accounts of their origins.
($
750-1,500)

RANGER'S PRESENTATION COPY

121. GILLETT, James B. Six Years with the Texas Rangers. Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1921. 332 pp., frontispiece, illustrations. Small 8vo, original dark green cloth. Gilt-lettered title on front cover and spine. Very fine. Signed by the author "Sincerely yours, J. B. Gillett." Tipped-in on the front paste-down is a post card: "Marfa, Texas, Oct 29th 1928. Gentelmen; I am sending you the last copy of "six Years with the Texas Rangers" that I have to spair. In exchange for Vigilantes of Montana that you are sending me. Very truly yours J. B. Gillett."
        First edition. "Perhaps the best account of the rangers ever published"—Peter Decker. Adams, Guns 829; One-Fifty 62. Basic Texas Books 76. Clark, New South I:83A: "Gillett’s service with the Rangers was in the western and northwestern part of Texas, an area that was real frontier in the 1870s....An excellent account of frontier lawless society." Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. [9]. Dobie, p. 59-60: "I regard Gillett as the strongest and straightest of all ranger narrators." Dykes, Western High Spots ("My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West") p. 20; ("Ranger Reading"), p. 116. Graff 1553. Greene, Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 73: "Gillett joined the Rangers in 1875 at age 18, but he never succumbs to the deification process so many other writers (including Webb) stumble through when they recall those gods of the frontier." Howes G177.
($150-250)

122. GILLIAM, Albert M. Travels Over the Table Lands and Cordilleras of Mexico, During the Years 1843 and 44; Including a Description of California... Philadelphia: John W. Moore, 1846. 455 pp., 10 lithographic plates, 3 folding maps: (1) Map of Gilliam’s Travels in Mexico Including Texas and Part of the United States. Philadelphia: T. Sinclair (49.1 x 47.1 cm; 19-3/8 x 18-1/2 inches); (2) Map of the Valley of Mexico. Philadelphia: T. Sinclair (20.6 x 18.9 cm; 8-1/8 x 7-3/8 inches); (3) Map of Oregon Upper & Lower California, with Part of British-America, The United States and Mexico. Philadelphia: T. Sinclair (45.1 x 42.9 cm (17-3/4 x 16-7/8 inches). Tall 8vo, original blindstamped cloth, gilt. Some water stains on upper cover, very good copy.
        First edition. Barrett 975. Cowan, p. 238. Howes G179. Graff 1554. Munk (Alliott), p. 87. Plains & Rockies IV:120c:1: "Of particular interest...are the parts dealing with Oregon, California, and the Texan Revolution and subsequent annexation by the U.S." Raines, p. 94. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 510-511; Gold Region 24-25. Pingenot: Although Gilliam was appointed the first United States consul to California, he never seems to have made it to his post at San Francisco. The travel portion of this books is devoted to Mexico, which he seems to have surveyed quite thoroughly. His work contains considerable material about Oregon, California, Texas, the Texas Revolution, the annexation of Texas, etc. One of the maps, purporting to show his route, gives a detailed picture of Texas. The other map is of Oregon and the Californias. The plates of Mexico are interesting.
($200-400)

RARE BLACK CAVALRY UNIT HISTORY

123. GLASS, E. L. N. The History of the Tenth Cavalry 1866-1921. Tucson: Acme Printing Company, 1921. 145 pp., tipped-in frontispiece, illustrations. 8vo, original black flexible cloth with gilt title and embossed buffalo crest on front cover. Very fine.
        First edition. Frontispiece in color of 10th Cavalry buffalo crest with motto "Ready and Forward" on a ribbon underneath. See Lamar, p. 468 and 819. Graff 1571. Not in Decker, Eberstadt, Howes, etc. Pingenot: After the Civil War, the 10th Cavalry was organized when Congress provided for four black regiments, two cavalry and two infantry, in the reorganization bill of 1866. The two cavalry regiments, to be composed of Negro privates and noncommissioned officers under white commissioned officers, were primarily for service against hostile Indians of the western plains. Colonel Benjamin Grierson formed and trained the 10th Cavalry Regiment at Fort Leavenworth at a time when many white officers were opposed to Negro troops. Headquartered at Fort Riley, the Tenth compiled an excellent record in Kansas against the Cheyennes. Later, operating out of Fort Sill, the "buffalo soldiers" fought the Kiowas and Comanche Indians in Texas. The Tenth played an important role in Arizona and New Mexico in the campaign to capture the Apache chief, Victorio. Glass, himself an officer with the Tenth, also records the regiment’s combat service in Cuba and the Philippines, along with its participation in the Punitive Expedition in Mexico in 1916. In all, six members of the Tenth were awarded the Medal of Honor. Appendix A lists the engagements of the regiment and brief extracts from the Regimental Returns. A little-known and very rare regimental history, and especially important for studies of the military contributions of blacks in the cavalry.
($900-1,800)

124. GLISAN, Rodney. Journal of Army Life. San Francisco: A. L. Bancroft and Company, 1874. xii, 511 pp., 21 engraved plates, 1 folding table. 8vo, original gilt pictorial embossed cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. Spine faded and with slight edge wear; overall a very good copy.
        First edition. Cowan, p. 239. Eberstadt 114:336: "Glisan’s Journal was written as the events transpired." Graff 1575: "Glisan served in Oklahoma, Washington, and Oregon among other areas." Howes G209. Munk (Alliott), p. 88. Rader 1609. Smith 3611. Pingenot: An important contemporary account of the Indian wars in the Pacific Northwest. The author joined the army as a surgeon in 1850. He visited California in 1855.
($150-300)

MAPS SHOWING THE BOUNDARY DISCREPANCY

125. GRAHAM, J. D. Report of the Secretary of War, Communicating...the Report of Lieutenant Colonel Graham on the Subject of the Boundary Line Between the United States and Mexico. Washington: SED 121, 1852. 250 pp., foldout lithographed barometric profile from San Antonio to Santa Rita, New Mexico), 2 folding lithographed maps (1) Mexican Boundary B. Extract from the Treaty Map of Disturnell of 1847.... (23 x 39.2 cm; 9 x 15-1/2 inches); (2) Mexican Boundary. Sketch A. Referred to in Colonel Graham’s Report.... (13.6 x 46.9 cm; 5-1/4 x 18-1/2 inches). 8vo, original blind-stamped plum cloth. Binding worn, especially at spine and extremities, spine slightly faded.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 57n. Garrett, Mexican-American War, p. 298, 413, 414. Graff 1609. Howes G296. Martin & Martin 40: "The history of the Mexican Boundary Survey was, perhaps more than any other episode in the American West, colored by ineptitude, personal animosity, ambition, and political interference. It was to have a significant effect on the final shape of the region." Meisel III, p. 100. Munk (Alliott), p. 89. Plains & Rockies IV:212: "In addition to reporting his troubles with John R. Bartlett, Graham included information and reports on southern New Mexico." Raines, p. 96. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 717-18 & pp. 225-27; III:227: "This Document contains Graham’s elaborate defense of his conduct while detailed to the Boundary Commission."
        The map entitled Mexican Boundary B (see Plate 40 in Martin & Martin) delineates the boundary difference which would result from the two different interpretations of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo vis-à-vis the Disturnell map. The first interpretation was based on strict reference to the lines of longitude and latitude on the map; the second on actual reference to the landmarks of El Paso and the Rio Grande. The Disturnell map had placed El Paso too far north and west of actual position. Graham’s maps show that the two interpretations would result in a difference of 5,950 square miles to U.S. territory in an area strategic to mining and railroads.
($200-400)

126. GRAVES, H. A. Andrew Jackson Potter, The Fighting Parson of the Texan Frontier. Six Years of Indian Warfare in New Mexico and Arizona. Nashville: Southern Methodist Pub. House, 1881. 471 pp., frontispiece portrait. Small 8vo, original green cloth, gilt decorated spine. Near fine copy.
        First edition. Dobie, p. 66. Graff 1618 (citing the 1883 reprint). Howes C321. Raines, p. 97 (also citing the 1883 edition): "Potter was an Indian fighter, race rider, common soldier in the U.S. army, chaplain in C.S. army, and circuit rider on the Texas frontier at a time when it required courage and judgment." Rader 1649. Pingenot: Potter (1830-95) came to San Antonio as early as 1852, drove a herd to Kansas in 1861, organized frontier churches, and helped lay out the Potter and Blocker Trail (Handbook of Texas, II, 400-401). During the Civil War, Potter was the chaplain in Debray’s regiment. The first edition is very rare.
($350-600)

BLACK BEANS

127. GREEN, Thomas J. Journal of the Texian Expedition Against Mier... New York: Harper, 1845. 487 pp., 13 engraved plates, folding map. Tall 8vo, original embossed cloth with gilt title on spine. A very fine, bright, and unfoxed copy, preserved in a tan cloth slipcase. Rare thus.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 80: "The most important account of the tragic Texan expedition against Mier and the drawing of the black beans, this is also one of the most vitriolic Texas books." Dobie, p. 55: "He lived in wrath and wrote with fire." Graff 1643: "One of the most exciting accounts...As a participant Green was able to write a vivid and terrifying tale." Library of Congress. Texas Centennial Exhibition 123 citing the plate "Escape from the Castle of Perote." Howes G371. Rader 1670. Raines, p. 98: "One of the best war histories of that period, and as fascinating as a romance, with incidents of soldier life on the march, in the battle, and in prison, and drawings from life by Charles McLaughlin, a fellow prisoner. Bitter towards President Houston, but gives the reasons, and the reader must judge for himself." Streeter 1581.
($600-800)

128. GREER, James K. (editor). A Texas Ranger and Frontiersman: The Days of Buck Barry in Texas, 1845-1906. Dallas: Southwest Press, 1932. xi [1] 254 pp., frontispiece, 5 plates. 8vo, cloth. A beautiful, crisp, almost mint copy in an equally superb d.j.
        First edition. Dobie, p. 60. Howes G398. Basic Texas Books 11: "The best memoir of a Texas Ranger during the mid-nineteenth century." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2512: "Barry provides...descriptions of numerous confrontations between Texas Rangers and Indians (especially Comanches), and expresses the general anti-biases of the period....His discussion of the 1858-1859 Reservation War, near Ft. Belknap, is especially valuable. Overlooked by North America Divided and Tutorow. Pingenot: Barry fought in the Mexican War with the Texas Rangers (he was wounded at Monterrey), fought in the border Indian wars, served as a spy among the Indians, demanded removal of the Indians across the Red River and escorted them there in 1859, and under commission from Sam Houston, raised a company for frontier defense. A modern rarity, especially in choice collector’s condition.
($250-400)

129. GREGORY, Samuel. Gregory’s History of Mexico: From the Earliest Times to the Present; Giving an Account of the...Texian Revolution...Exhaustless Mines of Gold and Silver; Population, Heterogeneous Races; Religion, Prodigious Wealth of the Churches; State of Society, Mexican Beauties, Etiquette, Amusements, Gaming, Cock-Fights, Bull-Fights.... Boston: Published by F. Gleason at the Flag of our Union Office, 1847. [5] 10-100 pp. (printed in double column), engraved full-page illustration of Great Temple Dedicated to the Sun, Destroyed by Cortez in 1521. 8vo, original beige pictorial wrappers, sewn. Fragile wraps with some wear and light foxing and soiling, interior fine.
        First edition. Eberstadt 110:254. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, pp. 26-27. Written to feed the frenzy for news of Mexico during the Mexican-American War, the account is surprisingly even-handed. Gregory cites as some of his sources Humboldt, Ward, Poinsett, Prescott, Mayer, Niles, Madam Calderon de la Barca, et al. Pingenot: Printed in the summer of 1847, during the time of General Scott’s invasion of Mexico, in order to satisfy public curiosity and demand for information about a country that seemed so far off to most Americans. The Texas material includes the Moses Austin Land Grant, colonization, the campaign of 1835, fall of the Alamo, Goliad affair and the Fanin Massacre, the battle of San Jacinto, defeat and capture of Santa Anna, the Perote prisoners, etc.
($100-300)

130. HALE, Edward Everett. Kanzas and Nebraska: The History, Geographical and Physical Characteristics...An Account of the Emigrant Aid Companies.... Boston: Philips, Sampson and Company, 1854. 256 [4, adv.] pp., folding map. Small 8vo, original blindstamped cloth with gilt title on spine. Near fine.
        First edition. Bradford 2037. Dary, Kanzana 1: "The first book written about Kansas. Hale was director of the Kansas League....He compiled the book to encourage the emigration to Kansas Territory of northerners who opposed slavery." Graff 1709. Howes (1954 ed.) 4371 [It was omitted erroneously in the 1962 reprint]. Plains & Rockies IV:239a. Sabin 29624. Pingenot: This book covers the early explorers of the region, the Indians, the soil and face of the country, projected cities, political history, and the act to organize Kansas and Nebraska. In 1854, present Colorado was still part of Kansas. Contains material on the Santa Fe Trail (overlooked by Rittenhouse).
($150-300)

131. HALEY, J. Evetts. Charles Goodnight, Cowman & Plainsman. Boston & New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1936. xvi, 485 pp., illustrated by Bugbee. 8vo, original tan cloth. Fine in good d.j. Presentation copy to Ben Pingenot, signed by Haley.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 890; Herd 960. Basic Texas Books 81. Greene, The 50 Best Books on Texas 35: "The best Texas biography I've read." Howes H36. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 18. Reese, Six-Score 53: "Best biography of a cowman ever written....Haley's beautifully written biography, perhaps his best book, is an ample vehicle for a mighty figure, and is a classic of American biography." Robinson 62.
($150-300)

132. HALEY, J. Evetts. Fort Concho and the Texas Frontier. San Angelo: [Designed and produced by Carl Hertzog for] San Angelo Standard-Times, 1952. [12] 352 pp., maps by José Cisneros, illustrated by Bugbee. 8vo, original gilt-lettered rose cloth. Very fine in d.j. and slipcase, specially printed bookmark laid in. Presentation copy "For Bill Morrow, J. Evetts Haley. Signed at Fort Concho Oct. 18, 1952, Carl Hertzog."
        First edition, limited edition (the San Angelo Edition, #128 of 185 copies). Basic Texas Books 83: "One of the best books about any of the vital string of federal forts established in West Texas to tame the frontier." Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. [10]. Dobie, pp. 57 & 79. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bugbee) 84. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 79A. Robinson 23b. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2935: "Considerable detailed information on military conflicts with Comanches across West Texas from the 1850s through 1870s. Book carries a decidedly anti-Indian tone in presenting the settler's and army's viewpiont."
($150-300)

133. HALEY, J. Evetts. Some Southwestern Trails. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1948. [29] pp., title and other full-page illustrations by Bugbee. Oblong 4to, original tan pictorial cloth illustrated by Lea. Very fine, in slipcase.
        First edition. Adams, Herd 2125. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bugbee) 91; (Lea) 164; Western High Spots ("High Spots of Western Illustrating"), p. 71. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 54C. Robinson 162: "In this book projected by Haley and sponsored by Shamrock Oil and Gas Corp., seven talented writers noted for their authentic books of the West contributed one-page essays describing eleven prominent trails of the Southwest....Each essay is illustrated with an outstanding full-page drawing."
($100-300)

134. HALEY, J. Evetts. The XIT Ranch of Texas, and the Early Days of the Llano Estacado. Chicago: Lakeside Press, 1929. xvi, 261 pp., frontispiece, portraits, folding map, Small 4to, original pictorial cloth, gilt title. Very fine copy. Presentation copy: "Inscribed to my good friend Ben E. Pingenot who loves books about Texas, and who stands for the sturdy virtues that made her. With admiration, J. Evetts Haley December 9, 1963."
        First edition. Howes H39. Reese, Six Score 54. Robinson 3. Merrill. Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 19. Pingenot: Haley’s first full length book, 1380 copies were printed; most were withdrawn because of a threatened lawsuit. History of the famous Panhandle ranch in Texas, launched when a group offered to erect the Texas capitol building in the 1880s in return for three million acres of land. The XIT ran along the Texas-New Mexico line for almost the full north-south length of the Panhandle. It would be difficult to find a nicer, cleaner copy.
($300-600)

HALEY'S PRESENTATION COPIES TO PINGENOT

135. HALEY, J. Evetts. Lot of 8 titles, all presentation copies to Ben Pingenot, signed by J. Evetts Haley. All are very fine to mint, most in dust jackets:

Earl Vandale on the Trail of Texas Books. Canyon: Palo Duro Press, 1965. "For my friend Ben E. Pingenot in appreciation...."

Fort Concho and the Texas Frontier. San Angelo: San Angelo Standard-Times, 1952. "For my fine firend Ben E. Pingenot who has done his part to dispel the false frontiers that march to engulf us...."

George W. Littlefield: Texan. Norman: U. Oklahoma Press, 1943. "This copy is for Ben Pingenot...."

Jeff Milton: A Good Man with a Gun. Norman: U. Oklahoma Press, [1948]. "For Ben E. Pingenot who loves the literature and traditions of Texas, and does his part to support them...."

The Heraldry of the Range. Canyon: Panhandle Plains Historical Society, 1949. "For my fine friend Ben Pingenot....

Life on the Texas Range. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1952. "This reminder of [Life on the Texas Range] is for a fine American and a rugged individualist Ben E. Pingenot...."

Men of Fibre. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1963. "For my friend Ben E. Pingenot imaginative scout for Texas books and forthright American...."

PRICE, B. Byron. Crafting a Southwetern Masterpiece: J. Evetts Haley and Charles Goodnight: Cowman & Plainsman. Midland: Nita Stewart Haley Memorial Library, [1986]. Very fine. "For my friend Ben Pingenot in appreciation of a master student of Texas books— J. Evetts Haley...." Also with presentation from Price.
($400-800)

136. [HERTZOG, Carl (printer)]. Lot of 5 titles:

HALLENBECK, Cleve. The Journey of Fray Marcos de Niza. Dallas: [Carl Hertzog for] University Press in Dallas, 1949. [xii] 115 pp., illustrations and map by José Cisneros. 4to, original gilt-decorated cloth; mostly unopened. Fine. Some edge wear to upper portion of d.j. Signed by Hertzog and Cisneros.
        First edition, limited edition (1,065 copies) of a book described by Bill Holman as "one of the most beautiful and well-proportioned page layouts ever achieved by a designer" (Lowman, Printer at the Pass, p. 27). Dobie, p. 39: "The most dramatic and important aftermatter of Cabeza de Vaca’s twisted walk across the continent was Coronado’s search for the Seven Cities of Cíbola....One of the most beautiful books in format published in America." Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros) 88. Holman, Hertzog Dozen: "One of the most beautiful and well-proportioned page layouts ever achieved by any designer." Lowman, Printer at the Pass 64. Pingenot: This is a period piece with type and paper selected to reflect the 16th century, with lettering and drawings by José Cisneros in the Spanish medieval manner, cloth to resemble the Franciscan habit; gold on the dust jacket represents the "Seven Cities." Cisneros’s title vignettes for each chapter provide a bookish elegance.

HAWKINS, Walace. El Sal del Rey. Austin: [Carl Hertzog for] Texas State Historical Association, 1947. ix [3] 68 pp., facsimiles, illustrations and maps by José Cisneros. 8vo, original cream cloth. Very fine in d.j.
        First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros) 90. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 47: "This book recounts the historical development of Spanish and Texan mineral law and the role played by this famed salt lake. The dust jacket is a dim facsimile of an old Republic of Texas land patent. The red lettered title might imply that Texas won lands only by force of battle....The title-page, featuring a five color coat of arms, is highly ornate, but in keeping with the subject....That the end result avoids garishness is a tribute to the skill and artistry of the designer."

LOWMAN, Al. Remembering Carl Hertzog: A Texas Printer and His Books. Dallas: Still Point Press, [1985]. 46 pp., illustrations, facsimiles. Folio, original gilt-stamped cloth and boards, printed paper label on spine. Mint.
First edition (#140 of 300 numbered copies). Pingenot: The bibliographer of         Printer at the Pass recounts personal experiences with the late Carl Hertzog and provides insight into the characteristics that contributed to the achievements of the legendary El Paso printer. Lowman described Hertzog as a "tireless crusader for beauty in print." This tribute is designed by David Holman at Wind River Press, who is another master of the beautiful in print.

NICHOLS, James W. Now You Hear My Horn: The Journal of James Wilson Nichols, 1820-1887. Austin: Carl Hertzog, 1967. 212 pp., illustrations, maps, facsimiles, endpaper maps. 8vo, green cloth. About mint in the original slipcase with Bowie knife and sheath. Signed by the editor.
        First edition, limited edition (#137 of 250 numbered copies, signed by the editor), with the original Bowie knife and sheath (usually lost from most limited edition copies). Edited by Catherine McDowell. Basic Texas Books 152A: "This most spirited and forthright of all Texas memoirs is one of the most delightful American frontier narratives ever written, and a valuable contribution not only to our knowledge of events in Texas history but to our understanding of the frontier spirit as well. Nichols gives us an unvarnished account of life in frontier Texas, with no holds barred. His narrative is humorous, bold, gruesome, opinionated, and revealing." Lowman, Printer at the Pass 218A. Pingenot: Contains material on the Texas Revolution, Republic of Texas, Indian fighting under Jack Hays in the Texas Rangers, Mexican War service, and Civil War, the latter providing us with one of the best accounts of unionists in Texas.

WALKER, Dale L. Death Was the Black Horse: The Story of Rough Rider Bucky O’Neill. Austin: Madrona Press, 1975. 200 pp., illustrations by José Cisneros, photos, map. 8vo, original cloth in pictorial d.j. Near mint.
        First edition. Foreword by Barry Goldwater. Typography by Carl Hertzog. O’Neill’s love of glory led him into newspaper wars and political donnybrooks, and to ride at the head of the Rough Riders. He eventually became sheriff of Yavapai County and Mayor of Prescott, Arizona.

(5 vols.)
($300-600)

137. HOLLISTER, U. S. The Navajo and His Blanket. Denver, 1903. 144 pp., numerous illustrations including 10 color plates of Navajo blankets. Small 4to, original red gilt-lettered cloth with photo tipped on, bevelled edges. A beautiful copy, one very small chip to paper spine label and almost no wear. Bookplate of previous owner on front pastedown.
        First edition. Pingenot: A fascinating and classic study of the Navajo blanket, illustrated with photographs of Indians’ daily life and ten colored reproductions of blankets in the author’s private collection. Graff 1939. Howes H603. Munk (Alliott), p. 107. Saunders 1014. Yager 1663.
($150-300)

HOLMAN LOT WITH THE LIMITED BUCKSKIN AND HOMESPUN

138. [HOLMAN, DAVID (printer)]. Lot of 6 titles:

CARLETON, Don E. Who Shot the Bear? J. Evetts Haley and the Eugene C. Barker Texas History Center. [Austin]: Wind River Press, [1984]. 31 [2] pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic illustrations. 4to, original maroon cloth over patterned boards. Very fine in lightly worn d.j.
        First edition, limited edition (#127 of 295 copies).

ERSKINE, Michael. The Diary of Robert Erskine Describing His Cattle Drive from Texas to California Together with Correspondence From the Gold Fields 1854-1859. Edited with Notes and Historical Introduction by J. Evetts Haley. [Midland: David Holman for]: Nita Stewart Haley Memorial Library, [1979]. 173 [1] pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Tall 8vo, original pictorial linen. Very fine in original mylar d.j.
        First edition, limited edition (975 copies). Illustrated with images from the Army exploration reports, California letter sheets, etc.

HOLMAN, David (compiler). Letters of Hard Times in Texas 1840-1890. Austin: Beacham (William R. Holman), 1974. 56 [1] pp., title vignette. 4to, original cloth over marbled boards on special paper, printed label on spine. Minor blemish to front cover corner, but a fine copy. Colophon page signed by David Holman.
        First edition, limited edition (#60 of 295 copies; 1 of 120 copies of large format design). Introduction by Joe B. Frantz. Fine press book containing an interesting series of letters from Texas during the last half century of the frontier period, drawn from a broad cross-section of would-be Texans and disenchanted Texans. The letters, including some from Isaac Van Zandt, were written between 1841 and 1889.

HOLMAN, David and Billie Persons. Buckskin and Homespun: Frontier Texas Clothing, 1820-1870. Austin: Wind River Press, 1979. 130 pp., text drawings and tipped in illustrations, fabric samples. Tall 4to, original dark calf spine with woven beige and white cloth boards. Very fine.
        First edition, limited edition ("deluxe variant" of 50 copies, numbered and signed by David Holman). Pingenot: This handsomely printed book is the only major study on the evolution of the frontier dress in Texas. An outstanding Southwestern fine press book, exhibiting taste and originality in design and with a genuine scholarly contribution. The limited edition, with 13 swatches of actual nineteenth-century pioneer Texas homespun tipped in, sold out upon publication. This copy, which is unnumbered, is labeled "deluxe variant" and signed by David Holman. Unlike the 50 numbered copies, this copy along with a few others is actually bound in nineteenth-century homespun. Laid in is a letter from bookseller Michael Heaston relating Holman’s account of how these cloth samples were acquired. These variant copies were reserved for the authors, their family, and a few friends. These variants are unique and destined to appreciate even more than the much sought after numbered limiteds. Illustrated Description>>

LOWMAN, Al. Printing Arts in Texas. [Austin]: Roger Beacham Publisher, 1975. 107 pp., profusely illustrated by Barbara Holman. Tall folio, cloth with printed paper label. A mint copy of a beautiful book.

GARZA, José, Angel Navarro, et al. Troubles in Texas, 1832: A Tejano Viewpoint from San Antonio.... Austin: Wind River Press, 1983. viii, 60 pp., endpaper maps, facsimiles. Small 4to, original patterned boards, cloth spine, paper label. Mint.
        First edition in English, limited edition (400 numbered copies signed by the editor and the translator); annotated facsimile reprint of the original edition published in Brazoria, Texas in 1833. Printed by David Holman for the DeGolyer Library. Translated by Conchita Hassell Winn and David J. Weber. Streeter, Texas 37n (locating only his copy of the original edition, now at Yale; SMU also has a copy): "This important state paper...is a vigorous statement of the ills from which Texas was suffering because of the alleged neglect and indifference of the central government with fourteen specific demands for relief."
(6 vols.)
($1,600-2,200)

139. HORGAN, Paul. Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History. New York: 1954. 1020 pp., maps, illustrations, 2 vols., 8vo, original maize buckram, gilt title on spines, t.e.g., pictorial endpapers, in publisher’s board slipcase. Very fine set.
        First edition, deluxe limited edition (1000 copies signed by Horgan, and with 17 watercolor sketches by the author, not included in the trade edition). Adams, Herd 1065. Basic Texas Books 95A: "The most thorough and most civilized account of the vast region draining into the river that forms 900 miles of Texas border." Powell, Southwestern Century 48. 1955 Pulitzer prize-winner in history. Carl Carmen called it "one of the major masterpieces in American historical writing. It deserves to stand with the works of Motley, Prescott, and Bancroft."
($150-250)

LITHOS OF CUBA & TEXAS, INCLUDING ALPINE HOUSTON

PUBLISHER’S ORIGINAL WRAPPERS

140. HOUSTOUN, Matilda C. Texas and the Gulf of Mexico; or Yachting in the New World, or Yachting in the New World. London: John Murray, 1844. viii, 314 + viii, 360 pp., 10 lithographed and wood-engraved plates, including city views of Galveston, Houston, and Havana, portraits of Sam Houston and Santa Anna, etc. 2 vols., 8vo, publisher’s original plain mauve wrappers, original dark green gilt-lettered cloth backstrips. An exceptionally fine copy of this work, the plates and text wonderfully fresh. Preserved in a maroon cloth slipcase.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 97: "This sprightly account was written by a wealthy English lady who visited Texas in 1842 in her husband’s private yacht. Her view of the Texans is surprisingly free of snobbery, although she viewed them with the same paternalism that the English of her day viewed all non-Englishmen. Moreover, she had that rare gift of intellect and character that enabled her to perceive the idiosyncrasies of the Texans without the bitterness and mockery of Dickens or Mrs. Trollope. Her narrative is so light and breezy that it is easy to shrug it off as superficial; in fact, she gives us some exceptional insights into Texas of the 1840s." Clark III:182. Howes H693. Raines, p. 230. Streeter 1506: "Mrs. Houstoun, accompanied by her husband, Captain Houstoun of the 10th Hussars, sailed from England...on their yacht the Dolphin in September, 1843, and after stops at the Azores, Barbados, Jamaica and New Orleans, entered Galveston Harbor....This is a pleasant and quite readable account of life at Galveston, with an excursion to the ‘up country’ of a wealthy English couple in the winter of 1843-1844." Winegarten, Texas Women’s History Project Bibliography, p. 221.
        The Texas lithographs are included in Holman and Tyler’s preliminary research on nineteenth-century Texas lithographs. They are beautifully executed by the excellent English firm of Day and Haghe, Lithographers to the Queen. The "Alpine" Houston view, while apocryphal, may well be the first published view of the city, and served as the prototype for several later views showing the city in the midst of mountains.
(2 vols.)
($1,000-$2,000) Illustrated Description>>

141. HOWARD, O[liver] O. My Life and Experiences Among our Hostile Indians.... Hartford: A. D. Worthington & Company, [1907]. 570 pp., illustrations, including 10 chromolithographic plates. 8vo, original dark blue embossed cloth, gilt. Fine copy, preserved in a custom slipcase. Laid in is a holograph letter from Gen. Howard.
        First edition. Graff 1981. Howes H710. Munk (Alliott), p. 109. Saunders 2967. Smith 4699. Pingenot: Autobiography of General Howard, who lost an arm in the Civil War, served on the western frontier, and accepted the surrender of Chief Joseph of the Nez Percé.
($100-250)

142. HOWARD, O[liver] O. Nez Perce Joseph: An Account of His Ancestors, His Lands, His Confederates, His Enemies...His War, His Pursuit and Capture. Boston: Lee & Shepard, 1881. xii, 274 pp., 2 portraits, 2 maps (1 folding). 8vo, original cloth with gilt lettering on spine. A near fine copy showing only minimal wear. Autographed by General Howard on the frontispiece portrait.
        First edition. Graff 1982. Howes H711. Jones 1611. Rader 1956. Smith 4700. Pingenot: General Howard led the campaign against Chief Joseph in the Nez Percé War of 1877. The rarest and most sought of O. O. Howard’s books.
($250-450)

LITHOS OF THE ALAMO AFTER EDWARD EVERETT’S WATERCOLORS

143. HUGHES, G. W. Report of the Secretary of War, Communicating...Operations of the Army of the United States in Texas and the Adjacent Mexican States on the Rio Grande... [half-title]: Memoir Descriptive of the March of a Division of the United States Army, under the Command of Brigadier General John E. Wool, from San Antonio de Bexar, in Texas, to Saltillo, in Mexico...1846. Washington: SED32, 1850. 67 pp., 8 lithographs after watercolors by Edward Everett (Mission San José, Mission Concepción, San Antonio, 3 views of the Alamo, Monclova Tower, Monclova Church), 2 large folding maps: (1) Map Showing the Route of the Arkansas Regiment from Shreveport La. to San Antonio de Bexar, Texas. (30.1 x 43.8 cm; 11-7/8 x 17-3/8 inches); (2) Map Showing the Line of March of the Center Division, Army of Mexico, under the Command of Brigr. Genl. John E. Wool, from San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, to Saltillo, Mexico...1846 (46.1 x 48.2 cm; 18 x 19 inches). 8vo, new half tan smooth calf over tan, terracotta and grey marbled boards. Occasional very mild foxing, overall very fine.
        First edition (often this report is described by dealers as a limited edition of 250 copies, but in reality, the statement on the document is that 250 additional copies were printed for the use of the Topographical Bureau). Holman & Tyler, Texas Lithographs 1818-1900: "The lithograph of the Alamo façade made after Everett’s watercolor was not the first published picture of the famous structure, but it was the first to be lithographed from an eyewitness drawing....The Everett watercolors, and lithographs made from them, are a substantial document of the missions at a time of considerable neglect." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 296. Howes H767. Raines, p. 121. Tutorow 1634. Artist Edward Everett (1818-1903) was born in London, and came to the U.S. in 1840. He served in the Mormon War and the Mexican-American War. "His landscape sketches resemble those produced by the Hudson River School artists. Despite definite artistic ability, Everett identified himself as a ‘mechanical engineer’" (The Handbook of Texas Online: Edward Everett).
($500-1,000)

144. HUGHES, John T. Doniphan’s Expedition; Containing an Account of the Conquest of New Mexico; General Kearney’s Overland Expedition ot California; Doniphan’s Campaign against the Navajos; His Unparalleled March upon Chihuahua and Durango; and the Operations of General Price at Santa Fé: With a Sketch of the Life of Col. Doniphan. Illustrated with Plans of Battle-fields and Fine Engravings. Cincinnati: U. P. James, n.d. [1848]. 144 pp., engraved frontispiece, text illustrations, 3 maps within text: (1) Plan of Santa Fe and Its Environs; (2) Plan of the Battle of Brazito; (3) Plan of the Battle of Sacramento. 8vo, original pale green pictorial wrappers with the spirited engraving Reid’s Charge at Sacramento, sewn (expertly rebacked with matching archival paper). Original price notice (Price Twenty Five Cents) mostly removed at top of wrap, two small chips from blank margins of first two leaves, occasional light foxing. Despite the flaws, this is a very desirable copy, the wrappers and bright and crisp, the text cleaner than usually found. This was an immensely popular book that people really read, and consequently, finding a copy in collector’s condition is difficult. Preserved in a grey cloth folding box with black leather label.
        First edition, "cheap edition" issue, early, mixed state (without the "List of Embellishments" added to the copyright page, without the footnote on p. 25, etc., etc.). The first issue has the date 1847 on the title-page (only a few copies of the first issue are extant). Bennett, American Book Collecting, p. 97. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 434. Cowan, p. 295. Edwards, p. 80. Fifty Texas Rarities 32 (citing the 1847 issue): "The expedition described by Hughes was led by Alexander William Doniphan, a Kentuckian who turned Missouri lawyer and finally became a soldier. ‘This expedition, which ended by land at Matamoros, is still considered one of the most brilliant long marches ever made; the force, with no quartermaster, paymaster, commissary, uniforms, tents, or even military discipline, covered 3,600 miles by land and over 2,000 by water, all in the course of twelve months.’ (S. M. Drumm)." Munk (Alliott), p. 111. Bibliographers long doubted that this book was issued in 1847, although it was copyrighted in that year, until the present copy with the date 1847 on the title-page came onto the market. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 149. Graff 2006. Hill, p. 452. Haferkorn, p. 35. Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators 999a (Maclean) & p. 214 (Tisdale). Howes H769: "Doniphan’s and Kearny’s conquest gave the U.S. its claim to New Mexico and Arizona." Jones 1151. Larned 2002. Plains & Rockies IV:134:6: "Recount[s] the adventures of the First Regiment of Missouri Cavalry in New Mexico and Chihuahua.... Hughes brightly-written account of the regiment proved popular; by 1851 the Jameses reported more than 14,000, and it remained in print for many years thereafter. Despite the quantity, and the many printings, it is now rare and avidly sought." Rittenhouse 311: "A classic work." Saunders 2972. Tutorow 3589.
($200-400) Illustrated Description>>

145. HUGHES, John T. Doniphan’s Expedition.... Cincinnati: J. A. & U. P. James, 1848. 407 pp., two engraved frontispiece portraits (Doniphan and Price), engraved illustrations and plans in text (including the ones listed above preceding entry), folding engraved map: A New Map of Mexico, California & Oregon Published by J.A. & U.P. James, Cincinnati, 1848 (32.3 x 24.2 cm; 12-7/8 x 9-1/2 inches). 12mo, original dark brown gilt pcitorial cltoh, spine gilt-lettered. Minor shelf wear at extremities, upper right corner of folding map torn away (affecting only a small section of the border), mild intermittent foxing, still a very good to fine copy, with original tissue guards. Early bookplate of Chas. E. Rickes. Preserved in a green cloth slipcase.
         Second edition of preceding—the "book issue"—revised and enlarged. Howes calls this edition the best, but both editions have their merits. Eberstadt: "The narrative is a valuable adjunct to the literature of overland travel. Doniphan’s march being one of the most famous in history and the author an actual participant. The chapters on the march to California of Kearny’s Army of the West, the battles en route and there, and of affairs on the West Coast during the Revolution, contain one of the earliest accounts of these world-shaking events to appear in print." Plains & Rockies IV:134:3. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 546.
($250-500)

146. HUGHES, Thomas. G.T.T. Gone to Texas: Letters from our Boys. New York: Macmillan, 1884. xiii, 228 pp. 8vo, original dark green cloth, gilt lettering. One small edge nick to front cover. With original bookplate presentation from a Baptist Sunday school.
        First edition. First American edition, printed at Oxford, England, simultaneously with the English edition, but with the title showing an American imprint. Adams, Herd 1091. Basic Texas Books 98A: "A valuable and entertaining account of three young English immigrants to Texas...edited by the author of Tom Brown’s School Days. Raines, p. 121. Pingenot: These letters were written by three of Hughes’ sons and other family members between 1878 and 1883 and describe their ranching activities in Texas.
($100-200)

UNCOMMON MODERN OVERLAND

147. [HUGHES, W. E.]. The Journal of a Grandfather by W. E. H. Gramp. [St. Louis: Nixon-Jones Printing Co., 1912]. 239 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates. 8vo, original half maize cloth over boards. t.e.g. Gift inscription by former owner. Very fine.
        First edition. Privately printed in an edition of 100 copies, and, perhaps because of its rarity, it is largely unknown to bibliographers. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 9: "Very rare." Dornbusch II: 1042: "Hughes served in the 1st Texas artillery and as a Colonel of the 16th Confederate states cavalry." Graff 2007. Howes C856 includes this work but has misplaced it due to a spelling error. Pingenot: He served with Ben McCulloch in the Confederate Army and later settled in Young County, Texas. His narrative contains a wealth of information about the author’s life as a soldier, cowboy, ranchman, and stagecoach driver in the West. It includes his experiences in the cattle business, a general appraisal of the cattle industry in Texas in the late nineteenth century, with information on such noted ranchers as King, Kennedy, Goodnight, etc. There is a chapter on Indian depredations, especially Kiowa, and includes accounts of his hunting trips in the West. This uncommon work is packed with choice material covering almost every facet of Western Americana.
($500-1,000)

148. INMAN, Henry. Buffalo Jones’ Forty Years of Adventure. A Volume of Facts Gathered from Experience by Hon. C. J. Jones... Topeka: Crane & Company, 1899. 469 pp., portrait, plates. Royal 8vo, original pictorial gray cloth, gilt title on spine. A spectacular copy preserved in a custom slipcase.
        First edition. Dary, Kanzana 274: "The story of Charles J. "Buffalo Jones," one of several men who sought to save the buffalo (bison) from extinction during the late nineteenth century." Howes I54: "Authoritative plains narrative." Pingenot: Fine account of thrilling experiences and observations in the Middle and Far West taken directly from Jone’s carefully kept journal.
($100-200)

A GRAND CANYON CLASSIC

149. IVES, Joseph C. Report Upon the Colorado River of the West, Explored in 1857 and 1858.... Washington: SED, 1861. [367] pp., 32 lithographed plates (including 8 folding panoramic views and 8 color lithographs from sketches by Baldwin Möllhausen), 2 large folding lithographed maps drawn by F. W. von Egloffstein (one professionally repaired), 1 profile. 4to, original black blind-stamped gilt pictorial cloth with depiction of the iron steamer Explorer. Expertly rebacked (original spine retained). Intermittent foxing. Very good condition.
        First edition, the Senate issue and the preferred issue. Farquhar, Books of the Colorado River & Grand Canyon 21: "One of the most desirable books in the Colorado River field...[and] the first that deals specifically with the river itself. Moreover, the illustrations are remarkable...two from photographs represent perhaps the first use of the camera in Arizona, certainly on the Colorado River." Goetzmann, Army Exploration in the American West, pp. 394-95: "Ives [report is] a lasting monument...one of the representative pieces of nineteenth-century American literature. [In it] all of the mannerisms of the romantic imagination are there, skillfully handled, so as to present in terms of human experience just what it was like to go where no white man had ever gone before." Howes I92. Plains & Rockies IV:375. Taft, Artists & Illustrators of the Old West, pp. 30-35: "First pictorial records of the Grand Canyon." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 947 & 948, pp. pp. 98-101. Pingenot: Ives led the first scientific exploration of the Grand Canyon, and his party was the first in recorded history to explore the floor of the canyon.
($500-1,000)

150. JAMES, Vinton Lee. Frontier and Pioneer Recollections of Early Days in San Antonio and West Texas. San Antonio: Artes Graficas, 1938. 210 pp., portraits, illustrations. 8vo, original gilt decorated embossed cloth. Very fine.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 1158: "The author tells about King Fisher and makes some mention of Billy the Kid"; Herd 1148. Much on Southwest Texas from San Antonio to Del Rio. Very scarce borderlands book.
($150-300)

151. JAVELINA. Mounted specimen of a javelina pig, wearing a navy blue bandana. Fine condition.
        Haley gave the bandana to Pingenot, who accorded it a special place of honor by placing it around the neck of this fiercely fanged creature. Pingenot kept this javelina in his library, which always gave Pingenot's family and friends a chuckle. It is not surprising that a solid borderlander like Pingenot would enjoy having such an icon of the Brush Country prominently displayed in his library.
($500-1,000)

152. JENNINGS, N. A. A Texas Ranger. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1899. 321 pp. Small 8vo, original pictorial cloth. A very fine, bright, and crisp copy.
        First edition. Adams, Guns 1173; One-Fifty 85: "The first edition is very scarce....The book contains much material on Texas gunmen such as John Wesley Hardin and King Fisher, and the Sutton-Taylor feud and other border troubles." Basic Texas Books 107: "Written by a young reporter who served under McNelly, this is one of the most interesting accounts of the life of the Texas Rangers in the 1870’s." Campbell, p. 78. Dobie, p. 60. Fifty Texas Rarities 50. Graff 2208. Howes J100. Rader 2086. Now very scarce and rare in choice collector’s condition.
($300-500)

153. JOHNSON, Richard W. A Soldier’s Reminiscences in Peace and War. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1886. 428 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original green cloth, gilt. A fine, bright copy. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author.
        First edition. Coulter 261. Graff 2222. Nicholson, p. 427. Pingenot: Johnson describes his service in the West, principally in Texas before the Civil War, including tours at Forts Duncan, Mason, Washita, Belknap, etc., experiences during the Civil War, and life in Minnesota after the War.
($150-300)

THE OPENING OF WEST TEXAS — SUPER MAPS & PLATES

154. JOHNSTON, Joseph E., et al. Reports of the Secretary of War, with Reconnaissances of Routes from San Antonio to El Paso...Also, the Report of Capt. R. B. Marcy’s Route from Fort Smith to Santa Fe; and the Report of Lieut. J. H. Simpson of an Expedition into the Navajo Country; and the Report of Lieutenant W. H. C. Whiting’s Reconnaissances of the Western Frontier of Texas. Washington: SED64, 1850. 250 pp., 2 large folding maps: (1) Reconnoissances of Routes from San Antonio de Bexas to El Paso del Norte.... Philadelphia: P. S. Duval (62.4 x 93.2 cm; 24-5/8 x 36-3/4 inches); (2) Map of the Route Pursued in 1849 by the U.S. Troops Under the Command of Bvt. Lieut. Col. Jno. M. Washington, Governor of New Mexico, in an Expedition Against the Navajos Indians. Philadelphia: P. S. Duval (23.1 x 14.7 cm; 9 x 5-3/4 inches), 72 lithographed plates (many colored or tinted, some folding). 8vo, original black cloth with gilt title on spine. Some page darkening and occasional foxing, otherwise fine.
         First edition. Alliot (Munk), p. 119. Basic Texas Books 111: "A valuable compendium of reports of government exploration that led to the opening of West Texas to travel and settlement." Bennett, American Nineteenth Century Color Plate Books, p. 63. Bradford 2824. Field 1413: "One of the most accurate and complete of all the narratives of exploration of the country of the Zuñi and Pueblo Indians." Graff 2228. Howes J170. Rader 2924. Raines, p. 218. Schwartz and Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 279: "Among the earliest chromolithographs to appear in a government report." Plains & Rockies IV:184. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 641.
($750-1,500) Illustrated Description>>

155. KEIM, De Benneville Randolph. Sheridan’s Troopers on the Borders.... Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger, 1870. 308 pp., illustrations. 12mo, original green cloth, bevelled edges, gilt pictorial title spine. Fine.
        First edition. Field 813: "The author narrates...the incidents of a campaign against the Indians of the Plains, in which the usual military role of fighting the Indians when they were best prepared, was not adhered to. General Sheridan assailed them in the depth of winter, when the [Indian’s] resources were unavailable. A winter’s campaign...with the savage enemy, and at last a great battle with the desparing tribes...with details of some bloody massacres." Graff 2283. Howes K31.
($75-150)

TEXAN-SANTA FE EXPEDITION

156. KENDALL, George Wilkins. Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition, Comprising a Description of a Tour Through Texas, and Across the Great Southwestern Prairies, the Camanche and Caygüa Hunting-Grounds, with an Account of the Sufferings from Want of Food, Losses from Hostile Indians, and Final Capture of the Texans, and Their March, as Prisoners, to the City of Mexico.... New York: Harper and Brothers, 1844. [2] xii [13]-405 + xii [11]-406 pp., 5 engraved plates, engraved folding map: KEMBLE, W. Texas and Part of Mexico & the United States.... (40.5 x 28.8 cm; 15-7/8 x 11-1/8 inches). 2 vols., 12mo, original dark brown blind-stamped cloth, gilt-pictorial spines. Spine tips expertly reinforced with matching cloth, occasional foxing, one old repair to map at juncture of book block and map, overall very good to fine, the bindings especially clean and bright. Contemporary newspaper reviews tipped onto front pastedown of Vol. I. Preserved in a dark brown silk moiré slipcase.
        First edition, first issue (1844 at foot of spine) of the best account of the abortive 1841 Republic of Texas expedition to establish jurisdiction over Santa Fe. Basic Texas Books 116: "One of the best campaign narratives ever written." Dobie, p. 56. Graff 2304. Field 818. Fifty Texas Rarities 26. Howes K75. Library of Congress, Texas Centennial Exhibition 122. Martin & Martin 34 (citing the map): "The map, along with the narrative, stimulated renewed interest in Texas and represented another major step toward the inevitable solution to the Texas question later in the decade." Plains & Rockies IV:110:1. Raines, p. 131: "No Texas library complete without it." Rittenhouse 347. Saunders 2998. Streeter 1515. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2093: "Included...are descriptions of Comanches and their powerful hold over the Texas Panhandle." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 483.
        Pingenot: One of the great Western travel narratives. The expedition was sent from Austin in 1841 to open trade routes to Santa Fe, which was then claimed by Texas, but was governed by Mexico. The expedition ended in disaster, with the Texans being captured by the Mexicans and forced-marched to Mexico City. The survivors, including Kendall, were imprisoned in Mexico for nearly two years.
($700-1,500)

SEVENTH AND BEST EDITION

157. KENDALL, George Wilkins. Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1856. xviii [13] 452 + xiii [10]-442 pp., 5 engraved plates, folding map: Texas and Part of Mexico & the United States.... (40.5 x 28.8 cm; 15-7/8 x 11-1/8 inches). 2 vols., 8vo, original dark brown blind-stamped cloth. Endpapers with some staining, occasional mild to moderate foxing, overall a very good to fine set, with contemporary ink ownership inscription. Preserved in a brown cloth slipcase.
         The rare seventh edition, with additions (Falconer’s diary, synopsis of Marcy’s Red River discoveries, and a chapter on the Woll and Snively expeditions and the Mexican-American War). Basic Texas Books 116J. Eberstadt Texas 162:457: "The rarest and most sought of all editions." Fifty Texas Rarities 26a. Graff 2306. Plains & Rockies IV:110:10. Streeter 1515Bn: "This famous Narrative [went] through seven editions by 1856. This seventh edition...includes for the first time an account by Kendall’s companion and good friend, Thomas Falconer, of the course of the expedition from August 31st, when Kendall left the main body with the small group looking for the Mexican settlements, until its surrender early in October....The most desirable edition of the Narrative is that published by Harper & Brothers in 1856 with ‘Seventh Edition’ on the title page." WLA, A Literary History of the West, p. 499: "There are a few inspired pieces of journalism, such as George W. Kendall’s Narrative;" p. 624: "When Texas Republic president Mirabeau B. Lamar stubbornly commissioned the Texas-Santa Fe Expedition in 1841, an astute young journalist went along to report what he first believed to be a trading mission. Kendall of the New Orleans Picayune soon perceived that Lamar had grandiose plans to annex New Mexico to his republic. Kendall records with a sense of the newsworthy the hardships, the imprisoned members of the party suffered on their march to Mexico." This edition contains the same excellent map as in the first edition.
(2 vols.)
($1,200-2,400)

PRESENTATION COPY FROM THOMAS FALCONER

158. KENDALL, George Wilkins. Narrative of an Expedition Across the Great Southwestern Prairies, from Texas to Santa Fé; with an Account of the Disasters Which Befell the Expedition from Want of Food and the Attacks of Hostile Indians; the Final Capture of the Texans and their Sufferings on a March of Two Thousand Miles as Prisoners of War, and in the Prisons and Lazarettos of Mexico. London: David Bogue, 1845. xii [13]-432 + viii, 436 pp., 2 engraved frontispiece plates, folding lithographed map: Texas and Part of Mexico & the United States.... (40.5 x 28.8 cm; 15-7/8 x 11-1/8 inches, below neatline, D. Bogue and J. R. Jobbins, lith. 16mo, three quarter contemporary green morocco over marbled boards, spine with raised bands and brown gilt-lettered leather labels, marbled edges. Boards slightly rubbed; first leaf of text of vol. 1 soiled at outer blank edge; inner blank margins of vol. 2 title-page and frontispiece slightly worn and stained; one clean split to map. Minor faults all, and the set is actually quite handsome, and an altogether wonderful association copy. Signed presentation copy from Thomas Falconer, inscribed on the versos of both titles: "To Miss Nicholl/ from Thomas Falconer one/ of the Adventurers from San/ Antonio to Santa Fe. 1852." On page 217 of vol. 2 Falconer has added: "In this Mr. Kendall is altogether in error. Mr. Falconer was not on the roll of the Texas command & was released at San Cristobal." This note probably refers to Kendall’s complaints about the lack of protection given U.S. citizens by its government as compared to Britain’s apparent protection of Falconer.
         Second English edition. Basic Texas Books 116C. Plains & Rockies IV:110:3. Streeter 1515Bn. Thomas Falconer (1805-1882), jurist and British secret agent, was among the participants in the abortive Santa Fe expedition. His diary was added to the seventh edition of this book (see preceding entry). The Handbook of Texas Online (Thomas Falconer): "In 1840 [Falconer] determined to immigrate to the Republic of Texas, where, according to a letter of introduction to President Mirabeau B. Lamar, ‘his services in its infant jurisprudence will be of no small value.’ He sailed from Liverpool for Boston on the Britannia on October 20 and arrived in Austin in May 1841, just as word of the intended Texan Santa Fe expedition was on every tongue. Thinking the expedition into the wilderness a great opportunity for adventure, he sought and received Lamar’s permission to accompany Hugh McLeod’s command as ‘historiographer’ and scientific observer. In Lamar’s words, ‘immense accessions’ were to be gained by Falconer’s ‘observations and labors to our knowledge of a Country, of which we are almost entirely ignorant.’ Before departing from San Antonio Falconer established a warm friendship with George Wilkins Kendall of the New Orleans Picayune, who was also to accompany the expedition as a chronicler. Kendall described Falconer as ‘a young gentleman of high literary and scientific attainments, mild and agreeable manners, and extremely sociable and companionable from the first.’ On the trail toward New Mexico, Indians stole Falconer’s horse, and a prairie fire singed off his hair and eyebrows. Although accustomed from birth to ‘the luxuries and good things of an English fireside,’ he endured the hardships of the journey across unexplored Texas well and even appointed himself camp cook for his circle of friends. When McLeod divided his command on the Pease River on August 31, Falconer, because he was now dismounted, was detailed to remain in camp. His diary of this period, published as an appendix to the 1856 edition of Kendall’s Narrative of the Texan Santa Fe Expedition, is of special significance, since it provides the only record of attacks by the Kiowas on Falconer’s party and their near starvation before McLeod’s men returned on October 9 as prisoners of the Mexicans. The two halves of the expedition, now reunited, were marched to El Paso and then to Chihuahua, where Falconer was confined in the Salón de los Distinguidos of the Jesuit hospital at the presidio, the very room in which Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla had been held captive after the collapse of his revolt in 1811. The prisoners were removed to Zacatecas and allowed to roam at will until, because of a clerical error, Falconer was placed under close arrest on New Year’s night and remained so on the march to Mexico City. Upon arrival at the Mexican capital on February 3, 1842, however, he was immediately released at the demand of the British minister."
         Included with this set is the two-volume 1935 Steck reprint of the 1844 British edition plus the 1930 limited edition (300 copies) of Falconer’s Letters and Notes on the Texan Santa Fe Expedition 1841-1842. (New York: Dauber & Pine, 1930, very fine in original half grey cloth over boards, printed papers labels). Basic Texas Books 116n. Plains & Rockies IV:90n. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2049.
(5 vols.)
($1,000-2,000) Illustrated Description>>

159. KING, Frank M. Wranglin’ the Past.... [Los Angeles]: Privately published, 1935. 244 pp., illustrated title, frontispiece portrait (photographic), plates (mostly photographic). 8vo, original maroon cloth. Very minimal edge wear, otherwise a fine, bright copy. Bookplate of Wyoming author J. K. Rollinson. Author’s signed presentation copy to "J. K. Rollinson, Altadena, California, A Real Westerner. Frank M. King Cowboy Author." Rollinson’s blue ink stamp with illustration of buffalo head on dedication leaf. One pencil correction by Rollinson (p. 153) questioning whether cattle could be on the run for three days straight.
        First edition, limited edition (#27 of 300 autographed copies). Adams, Guns 1239: "contain[s] considerable material on gunmen such as Johnny Ringo, Billy the Kid, and the Earps"; Herd 1277: "Scarce"; One-Fifty 91: "Considerable material on gunman such as Johnny Ringo, Billy the Kid and the Earps." Dobie, pp. 109-10: "King went all the way from Texas to California, listening and looking." Dykes, Kid 219 & 365: "King invaded Lincoln County in 1884 and worked on the old Flying H ranch, south of Lincoln, for Jimmy Dolan." Howes K151.
($100-300)

160. KIP, Lawrence. Army Life on the Pacific: A Journal of the Expedition against the Northern Indians, the Tribes of the Cœur D’Alenes, Spokans, and Pelouzes, in the Summer of 1858. Redfield: [Edward O. Jenkins, Printer], 1859. 144 pp. 8vo, original brown cloth, spine with gilt letter and device. Spinal extremities lightly chipped, blank preliminary and terminal leaves moderately foxed, generally fine. Author’s presentation copy: "For W. Harris[?] From Rt. Rev. Bishop Kip of California."
        First edition. Cowan (1914), pp. 130-31. Field 837. Graff 2341. Howes K172. Jones 1413. Smith 5519. Soliday Sale II 721: "Life at Forts Dalles, Walla Walla, Taylor, and at the Coeur d’Alene, Spokan, and Pelouze Council. The author took part in the battles of Four Lakes and Spokan Plains." Tweney, Washington 89 40: "Kip was an Army officer who participated in the 1858 campaign against the northwestern tribes. This is by far the best account of that campaign." The author later became the first Episcopal Bishop of California.
($250-500)

161. [KRAUS, Sargent Major & R. P. Wainright (compilers). A History and Photographic Record of the First Cavalry. Animo et Fide. Colonel J. E. Gaujot Commanding. San Antonio: San Antonio Printing Company], 1919. [75] pp., photographic illustrations. Large 4to, original stiff grey pictorial wrppers printed in gold and black, tied with a yellow cord. Cover illustration depicts mounted cavalryman in a desert scene. Pictorial tile page also with a desert scene. A very fine copy with just a few very minor stains on wrap.
         Twenty pages present a detailed historical record of the First U.S. Cavalry from its creation in 1833 to 1919. Portraits of the current officers and men of each troop and detachment fill the latter part of the book.
($125-250)

162. LAMAR, Mirabeau Buonaparte. The Papers of...Edited from the Original Papers in the Texas State Library by Charles Adams Gulick, Jr., with...Katherine Elliott.... Austin: A. C. Baldwin & Sons [1 & 2]; Von Boeckmann-Jones [3-6], 1921-1927. viii, 596 + xi [1] 599 + [4] 600 + [4] 300; [4, blank] 241 + 515 + 543 pp., 6 vols., complete, 8vo, original printed wrappers bound in dark brown cloth. Each volume contains the bookplate of J. P. Bryan, noted Texana collector and father of the great Texana collector.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 118: "One of the most valuable collections of historical data on Texas ever published....Not even in the Writings of Houston, does one find such a wealth of primary source material." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2077: "An absolutely essential source of correspondence regarding Governor Lamar’s harsh Indian policy, various acts for increasing the size of military forces in the Republic of Texas, and controversy with Sam Houston’s milder policy of negotiation." This set is essential for anyone researching pre-Republic and Republic history in depth. Lamar came to Texas in 1835 intending to write a history of Texas, and within the year he was a hero of San Jacinto and Vice President of the Republic (1838-1841). He never wrote that history, but he has left us the invaluable remains of his indefatigable research.
($600-1,200)

POETIC PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC

163. LAMAR, Mirabeau B. Verse Memorials. New York: W. P. Fetridge & Co., 1857. 224 pp., engraved mezzotint portrait of Lamar (Engraved By J[ohn] Sartain, Phila.). Royal 8vo, original blue embossed cloth, gilt-lettered spine, bevelled edges, a.e.g. Binding lightly darkened and worn, lower inner margins of first few signatures stained. Very good—the Dorothy and Clint Josey copy, with their bookplate. Nineteenth-century ink ownership inscription of John M. McCoy, and his bookplate with quotation: "If all the crowns of Europe were placed at my disposal on condition that I should abandon my books and studies, I should spurn the crowns away and stand by the books" (Fenelon). First edition. Library of Congress, Texas Centennial Exhibition 280. Raines, p. 135: "Some sparkling gems, evincing poetic talent. Very scarce." Vandale, Texianameter 99. Webb, Texana, Statehood 10: "After leaving Texas he returned to Georgia and in 1857 was appointed U.S. Minister to Nicaragua and Costa Rica. He published Verse Memorials while he was in Nicaragua." The portrait of Lamar was done by John Sartain (1808-1897), London-born engraver and portraitist, who came to the United States in 1830, locating in Philadelphia. He is said to have created around 1,500 engravings, particularly in context with periodicals, such as Graham’s Magazine, his own Sartain’s Union Magazine, etc. See Mantle Field’s Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors & Engravers.
        Pingenot: Includes numerous poems by the ex-President of the Republic of Texas relating to Texas, the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, etc. Pp. [5]-6 contain an effusive dedication to "Mrs. William L. Cazneau—so favorably known to the public by her pen, as ‘Cora Montgomery,’ and now the wife of one of my best and long-cherished friends....Her name, like that of her husband, is identified with the history of Texas." Jane McManus Cazneau, writer, political activist, adventurer, etc. was an ardent admirer of Lamar and praised him lavishly in her book Texas and Her Presidents (New York, 1845). Lamar gave a large portion of the print run of this book to a Latin American country; consequently, the volume is now quite rare. A rare and highly desirable item of Texana.
($900-1,800)

164. LANE, Lydia Spencer. I Married a Soldier, or Old Days in the Old Army. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1893. 214 pp. 12mo, original beige cloth lettered and decorated in navy blue. Rare pastedown slightly abraded, overall fine.
        First edition. Graff 2382n: "A very interesting account of Army life at western and southwestern Army posts in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, and Arizona prior to and immediately after the Civil War." Howes L68. Myres, Following the Drum. Pingenot: Excellent narrative by an army officer’s wife, giving her experiences at Forts McIntosh, Duncan, Inge, Clark, Concho, Stockton, Davis, in Texas, and at Forts Craig, Fillmore, Stanton, Union, etc. in New Mexico both before and after the Civil War.
        With a copy of the second edition, published at Philadelphia in 1910 (12mo, original blue ribbed cloth lettered and decorated in gilt. Very fine and bright, in d.j. reinforced on verso with old tape). Author’s presentation copy, signed on front free endpaper "Lydia Spence Lane December, Nineteen Twelve." A most desirable copy in the rare d.j., and signed by author.
(2 vols.)
($150-300)

165. LANG, William W. A Paper on the Resources and Capabilities of Texas...to which is Appended a Brief Summary of the Advantages of the State as a Field for Immigration.... N.p., [South-Western Immigration Company, [1881]. [2] 61 [1] pp. (printed in double column), engraved frontispiece of view near Taylor. 8vo, original yellow printed wrappers with ornamental border and lone star. Wraps slight worn and dust soiled. Old blue ink library stamp of New York Sate Library on upper wrap, along with a fairly light, more recent deaccession stamp at top right margin of wrap. Slight wear and dust-soiling to wraps, internally very fine.
        Third and best edition, with an added essay on the "Advantages of the State as a Field for Immigration" (the first two editions, of 19 and 31 pp. respectively, were published in New York the same year). The map, which was not bound in the book, apparently was an afterthought and not included in all copies. Adams, Guns 1278: "Part of this paper deals with lawlessness in Texas"; Herd 1305: "Rare." Graff 2388. Howes L74 (noting that the map does not appear in all copies). Raines, p. 137. Lang (Handbook of Texas Online: William A. Lang), president of the South-Western Immigration Company, gives an extremely optimistic account of Texas, placing cattle and the cattle industry second only to King Cotton. Pingenot: Lang extolls the ‘magnitude of Texas’ immense capabilities, and of the glorious future that awaits the development of her limitless resources. The South-Western Immigration Company was organized by several railroad companies to promote immigration into Texas. The pamphlet has a fascinating section denouncing Texas’ reputation for lawlessness, an article on Capt. King and his ranch and much of "How to Go to Texas." This is a fine Texas promotional, and very scarce in this edition and with the wrappers.
($100-300)

166. LARSON, James. Sergeant Larson, 4th Cav. San Antonio: Southern Literary Institute, 1935. [14] 326 pp., frontispiece portrait (photographic), text illustrations after the author’s sketches. 8vo, original blue gilt-decorated cloth. Very fine. Presentation copy, inscribed and signed by Mrs. Blum, editor and Larson’s daughter. Laid in is printed leaf with a brief biography of Larson.
        First edition. Coulter 284. Dornbusch II:1618. Pingenot: Edited and with an introduction by Annie Larson Blum, Sergeant Larson’s daughter. First and only edition of this obscurely published and rare memoir of service with the 4th Cavalry. James Larson (1841-1921) was born in Wisconsin and enlisted in the U.S. Army in St. Louis where for more than a year he saw frontier service with officers like John Sedgwick and J.E.B. Stuart fighting Indians, mostly in the vicinity of Fort Riley. During the Civil War he saw much fighting in the campaigns in Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama. At the end of the war, he accompanied his unit by boat from New Orleans to Matagorda Bay and marched from there to San Antonio.
($300-600)

SADDLE BLANKET EDITION

167. LEA, Tom. The King Ranch. Kingsville: Printed for the King Ranch, 1957. [10] 467 + [9] 469-838 pp., illustrations by author (some in color), facsimiles, maps. 2 vols., square 8vo, original natural linen with the King Ranch "Running W" brand. In publisher’s original natural linen box with gilt-lettered spine label. Near mint.
        First edition, limited edition, the "Saddle Blanket Edition" produced exclusively for the King Ranch. Adams, Herd 1319. Basic Texas Books 121: "Few, if any, Texas books have had such a perfect blend of text, design, and illustration." Dykes, Lea 65; "A Range Man’s Library" in Western High Spots, pp. 79; & "The Texas Range Today" in Western High Spots, pp. 102. King, Women on the Cattle Trail, p. 17: "This ranch history includes substantial information about Henrietta King." Lowman, Printer at the Pass 99; Printing Arts in Texas, p. 54: "Lea’s history of the King Ranch is one of the most important books ever to emerge from a Texas background. Its typographical achievement is equally distinguished." Reese, Six Score 69: "Privately printed history of the largest ranch in Texas....Perhaps the most exhaustive ranch history ever written." Pingenot: Unlike the trade edition, that was published in the East by Little Brown & Company, this private edition was printed and bound entirely in Texas. The complete history of this vast Texas ranch, from its establishment in 1852 to modern times. No range collection is complete without it.
        With this lot we include a very fine copy in wrappers of Bruce, S. Cheeseman and Al Lowman's The Book of All Christendom: Tom Lea, Carl Hertzog, and the Making of the King Ranch (Kingsville: King Ranch Inc. [Designed by W. Thomas Taylor], 1972). This pamphlet gives an interesting history of the genesis of The King Ranch.
($600-1,200)

"MIGHTY RARE AND A FINE NARRATION"—DYKES

168. LEE, Nelson. Three Years Among the Camanches: The Narrative of Nelson Lee, The Texan Ranger. Albany: Baker & Taylor, 1859. xii [1] 14-224 pp., engraved frontispiece portrait. 12mo, original blind-stamped brown cloth, title gilt-lettered on upper cover. Endpapers browned and a few minor abrasions to front pastedown, otherwise exceptionally fine, about as nice a copy as a collector could hope to find. Preserved in a half dark-brown levant morocco and marbled clamshell case.
        First edition. Ayer 182. Basic Texas Books 123: "Besides drama and hair-raising excitement, this book offers the best contemporary description of the life of the early Texas Rangers, and one of the few surviving eye-witness accounts of the life and activities of the ferocious Comanche Indians....The accounts of the Texas Ranger service, Mier Expedition, and Mexican War are generally accurate, always fascinating, and add considerably to our knowledge of those events." Dobie, p. 34. Dykes, "My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West" in Western High Spots, p. 21 (#1 on his second pick of best Ten): "Mighty rare and a fine narration"; "A Range Man’s Library" in Western High Spots, p. 86: "Lee was a horse and cow trader and trail driver to Louisiana before he was captured." Field 905. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 227. Graff 2444. Howes L212. Library of Congress, Texas 219. Plains & Rockies IV:333:1: "Lee participated briefly in the Black Hawk War and was associated with Jack Hays in the early days of the Texas rebellion. He was captured by Comanches while on his way to California in 1855, and married a Comanche woman during his captivity." Rader 2215. Walter Prescott Webb in the introduction to the 1957 reprint of Lee’s account stated that "there is no better description of the life of the Texas Rangers than that of Nelson Lee." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography.
        Pingenot: One of the premier Indian captivity narratives. Lee served in the Texas Navy and under Jack Hays in the Texas Rangers. He fought at Plum Creek, served in the Mier Expedition and the Mexican War, and then became a mustanger until captured by the Comanches. Some scholars have questioned the veracity of Lee’s larger-than-life adventures. See The Handbook of Texas Online (Nelson Lee).
($2,500-5,000) Illustrated Description>>

169. LINN, John J. Reminiscences of Fifty Years in Texas. New York: D. & J. Sadlier & Co., 1883. 369 pp., engraved frontispiece portrait of author, 3 engraved plates: (1) Stephen F. Austin; (2) Alamo (printed title beneath identifies image as the Alamo, but errata leaf at back indicates it is really Goliad Mission); San Jacinto cenotaph. 8vo, original blind-stamped green cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Spinal extremities and corners lightly worn, small inkstamp removed from front pastedown, a few signatures slightly loose, overall very good, binding bright and text very clean, with the tipped-in printed errata at end. Preserved in a green cloth slipcase.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 127: "Personal recollections, written by an early Texas pioneer leader....Basic source on the revolutionary period. Written with considerably more frankness, more gusto, and less cant than other writers of his generation....[Linn] came to Texas as a merchant in 1830...was alcalde and mayor of Victoria, served in the Consultation, was a member of the General Council, and as a member of the Convention of 1836 would have signed the Declaration of Independence but for the rapid advance of the Mexican Army." Clark, Old South III:63: "Reprints the journal of Dr. J. H. Barnard, a physician in Fannin’s command at Goliad (pp. 148-892)." Dobie, p. 57. Graff 2503. Howes L363. Raines, p. 139. Pingenot: Linn, a native of Ireland, came to Texas in 1830 where he opened a general store in Victoria and later founded the town of Linnville. He was an active participant in the Revolution, a Congressman during the Republic, and a leading businessman for more than a half century.
($300-600)

170. LOWE, Percival G. Five Years a Dragoon (’49 to ’54) and Other Adventures on the Great Plains. Kansas City: Franklin Hudson Publishing Company, 1906. 418 pp., frontispiece portrait (photographic), text illustrations (mostly photographic—military personnel, Native Americans, etc.). Very light shelf wear and small spot to fore-edges, generally fine. 8vo, original maize and orange pictorial cloth.
        First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains & Rockies 299. Graff 2550. Howes L526. Rader 2255. Rittenhouse 375. Pingenot: One of the best personal accounts of cavalry service and wagon freighting on the plains, from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Laramie, Salt Lake City, Denver, and Santa Fe. After his army service, Lowe continued to travel the Santa Fe Trail as a freight contractor until 1870.
($100-250)

A QUAKER ABOLITIONIST IN TEXAS IN THE 1830S

171. [LUNDY, Benjamin]. The Life, Travels and Opinions of Benjamin Lundy, Including his Journeys to Texas and Mexico; with a Sketch of Cotemporary [sic] events, and a Notice of the Revolution in Hayti. Compiled under the Direction and on Behalf of His Children [compiled by T. Earle]. Philadelphia: William D. Parrish, 1847. [4, blank] [5]-316 pp., lithographed frontispiece portrait of Lundy, folding lithographed map with original full color: California, Texas, Mexico, and Part of the United States Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities (21.8 x 26 cm; 8-1/2 x 10-1/8 inches). 12mo, original dark brown blind-stamped cloth. Some outer wear and spotting to binding, intermittent foxing and browning to interior. Contemporary ownership stencil of Jonah H. Lupton on preface leaf.
        First edition. Clark, Old South III:66: "Contains Lundy’s journals kept on his journeys to Texas, 1833-34 and 1834-35, in search of suitable places for the colonization of freed slaves." Eberstadt, Texas 162:505: "Diary of his journey through Texas in 1833-35 touching at Brazoria, Austin, and San Antonio. Contains much on the country and its products, local manners, etc." Graff 1195. Howes E10. Matthews, pp. 255-6: "The most traveled of the abolitionists was Lundy, who said he had walked 5,000 miles and had rode another 20,000. He went to nineteen states, Haiti, Canada, Texas, and Mexico." Plains & Rockies Iv:108n. Streeter 1169n: "A most interesting Texas book because of Lundy’s three journeys to Texas....Lundy was a keen observer and in his journeys refers to many of the prominent Texans." The colorful map (which is not listed by Wheat) shows the Nueces Strip and the Panhandle uncolored, because those areas were still in dispute. This book is one of our few contemporary sources on pioneer Texas printer Samuel Bangs.
($600-1,200) Illustrated Description>>

IN THE ORIGINAL PRINTED WRAPPERS

172. [LUNDY, BENJAMIN]. The War in Texas; A Review of Facts and Circumstances, Showing that This Contest Is the Result of a Long Premeditated Crusade Against Mexico, Set on Foot and Supported by Slaveholders, Land-Speculators, &c. with the View of Re-establishing, Extending, and Perpetuating the System of Slavery and the Slave Trade in the Republic of Mexico. By a Citizen of the United States. Philadelphia: Printed for the Author, Merrihew and Gunn, 1836. 56 [1] pp., printed in double column. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers. Light waterstain affecting upper right front wrapper and title, occasional inconsequential foxing, overall a fine copy in the rare wraps (this is the only copy with original wrappers that we find offered in the market, back to 1975). The upper wrap bears the contemporary ink ownership inscription of the "Plymouth A[nti]-S[lavery] Library, No. 1" and ink notation below "2 cts. per week" (repeated at foot of title). Provenance: This copy belonged to Thomas W. Streeter, the premier bibliographer of Texana; the cream of his Texas collection now resides at Yale. On the title are Streeter’s distinctive diminutive pencil notes on title-page pointing out list of empresarios, Galveston & Texas Land Company, John Quincy Adams’ famous speech on Texas and its publication in Mexico, etc. Preserved in an archival half brown mottled tan calf and beige cloth folding case.
        First edition of one of the most influential anti-slavery treatises on Texas. Eberstadt, Texas 162:503: "Copies with wrappers are the exception....While entirely innocent of the slightest impartiality, Lundy’s dialectics are fortified with careful personal observations gleaned from three trips to Texas in 1832, 1833, and 1834." Howes L569. Library of Congress. Texas Centennial Exhibition.88. Rader 2266. Raines, p. 141: "Anything but favorable to Texas." Streeter 1217. "Believing that the slavery problem could be solved by settling free blacks in thinly populated regions, [Lundy] visited Haiti and Canada and between the years 1830 and 1835 paid three visits to Texas in hopes of obtaining land for such a colony. While in Texas he talked to free blacks, planters, and Mexican officials and visited Nacogdoches, San Antonio, and the Brazos and Rio Grande areas. He concluded that Texas was an ideal place for his colonization experiment; the Mexican government was friendly to his proposal. The Texas Revolution intervened before Lundy could carry out his plans, however, and the Republic of Texas legalized slavery. Lundy charged that the revolution was a slaveholders’ plot to take Texas from Mexico and to add slave territory to the United States. He began publishing the National Enquirer and Constitutional Advocate of Universal Liberty in Philadelphia in August 1836 to set forth his thesis. In the same year he published The War in Texas, a pamphlet arguing against the annexation of Texas to the United States. Lundy won many influential adherents, among them John Quincy Adams, who represented his views in the United States Congress. Adams, Lundy, and their followers were instrumental in delaying the annexation of Texas for nine years."—The Handbook of Texas Online: Benjamin Lundy).
($600-1,200) Illustrated Description>>

173. MacARTHUR, Douglas. Duty... Honor... Country. N.p., n.d. Folio broadside, illustrated with an American eagle at the top and a portrait of MacArthur as a faint background. Very fine. Framed in a black wooden frame.
        The address by General MacArthur here presented was delivered to the Corps of West Point when MacArthur received the Sylvannus Service Award for Sewrvice to his country. This broadside was one of Ben Pingenot’s favorite pieces and hung on the shelf at the end of his desk.
($50-100)

174. McCONNELL, H. H. Five Years a Cavalryman; or, Sketches of Regular Army Life on the Texas Frontier Twenty Odd Years Ago. Jacksboro: J. N. Rogers & Co., Printers, 1889. 319 pp., printed on pink paper. 12mo, original terracotta pebbled cloth stamped in gilt and blind. Minor abrasions and shelf-wear to binding, overall very good. Author’s signed presentation copy, inscribed: "Dr. J. C. McCoy/Fort Worth, Texas/with complements of the Author/ H. H. McConnell, Jacksboro, Texas/October 5, 1894."
        First edition. Adams, Herd 1380: "The appendix concerns cowboys and cattle thieves"; Guns 1393: "Scarce. Has some information on the Texas Rangers and thieves. The author says that Joe Horner (who later left Texas and assumed the name Frank Canton) and ‘his followers were the typical bad men,’ the ‘shooters from shootersville’ of that day." Basic Texas Books 131: "The most lively and authentic account of cavalry life in Texas after the Civil War....McConnell was a private in the 6th U. S. Cavalry who arrived in Galveston with the Reconstruction occupiers in November, 1866. He served at Fort Belknap and Fort Richardson on the Texas frontier until 1871, then settled at Jacksboro....Also gives an excellent description of Texas cowboys on a spree in Kansas after a cattle drive." Campbell, p. 66. Dobie, p. 52: "Bully." Graff 2579. Howes M59. Raines, p. 142. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2809: "A valuable primary account...during some of the most important confrontations between Comanches and Kiowas of the late 1860s and early 1870s." The appendix includes "Cattle Thieving in Texas" and Lt. R. G. Carter’s "The Cowboy’s Verdict." This book pleases us with its manly content printed on pale pink paper.
($300-750)

EAGLE PASS CIRCUS POSTER WITH TIM McCOY AS THE MAIN ATTRACTION

175. [McCOY, TIM]. CARSON & BARNES CIRCUS. [Poster advertising Carson & Barnes appearance in Eagle Pass, Texas on April 18, 1955, with Col. Tim McCoy as the main attraction]. Ureka Spgs., Ark.: Neal Walters Poster Corp., n.d. Double folio poster (71 x 53.5 cm; 28 x 21 inches) printed in red and blue on bright yellow paper. Minor wrinkling to left edge, tape on reverse where removed from window display, creased where formerly folded. Overall very fine and bright.
        Tim McCoy (1891-1978) was among the early cowboy film stars, known as "The Last Plainsman," appearing in almost one hundred films over a forty-year period. McCoy spent six years with Carson & Barnes Circus from the mid-1950s. Text reads: "Carson & Barnes 3 Ring Circus with Col. Tim McCoy in Person. Ft. Duncan Park Eagle Pass. Afternoon & Night Mon. Apr. 18." This piece has to be rare, and the Fort Duncan-Eagle Pass connection is wonderful. we suspect that Ben saved this poster after attending the circus. He gathered a small reading collection on McCoy and western film, which we offer in lot 372.
($100-300)

176. MACKENZIE, Ranald S. Ranald S. Mackenzie’s Official Correspondence Relating to Texas, 1871-1873... [With]: Ranald S. Mackenzie’s Official Correspondence Relating to Texas, 1871-1873. Lubbock: West Texas Museum Association, 1967-1968. xvi, 202 + xvi, 241 pp. 2 vols., 8vo, original navy blue (Vol. 1) and light grey (Vol. 2) cloth. Very fine in very fine dust wrappers.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 25n: "Excellent." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 3210: "Included in this wide selection of reports and military correspondence taken from the National Archive are the relevant materials on the Red River War." One of the most sought-after set of books on the Indian Wars of West Texas, skillfully edited by Ernest Wallace. Included with this set are Wallace’s Ranald S. Mackenzie on the Texas Frontier (Lubbock, 1964, maps, photos, very fine in lightly worn d.j.); Richard A. Thompson’s Crossing the Border with the 4th Cavalry: Mackenzie’s Raid into Mexico - 1873 (Waco: Texian Press, 1986, maps, photos, new in d.j.; and Charles M. Robinson’s A Biography of General Ranald S. Mackenzie (Austin: State House Press, 1993, maps, photos, very fine in d.j., author’s presentation copy to Pingenot).
5 vols.
($250-500)

A NAVY SURGEON IN THE MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR

177. McSHERRY, Richard. El Puchero: Or, A Mixed Dish from Mexico, Embracing General Scott’s Campaign, With Sketches of Military Life in Field and Camp, of Character of the Country, Manners and Ways of the People, Etc.... Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1850. [4] 247 [1] 24 (ads) pp., 10 engraved plates, folding engraved map (Battles of Mexico, Survey of the Line of Operations of the U.S. Army under the Command of Major General Winfield Scott...Made by Major Turnbull, Captain McClellan and Lieut. Hardcastle.... (23.2 x 16.0 cm; 9-1/8 x 6-3/8 inches). 8vo, original blind-stamped plum cloth, gilt decorated spine. A few light stains and nicks to binding, plates and a few ad leaves browned. Contemporary presentation inscription in pencil to "Eds. Sun, with compliments of John Murphy & Co." Rare.
        First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 162. Haferkorn, p. 48: "Dr. McSherry served as a surgeon with the regiment of marines that formed part of Gen. Scott’s force from Vera Cruz to Mexico." Moran, p. 66: "A Naval surgeon’s account of the March of Watson’s Marine Battalion from Vera Cruz to Mexico City." Tutorow 3658: "A series of letters to David Holmes Conrad written while the author was serving as a surgeon with the U.S. Marine Corps. Many descriptions and observations of McSherry’s experiences...[with] accounts of the siege of Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo....The book contains a list of officers...who were engaged in the battles in the valley of Mexico."
($250-500)

178. MAHAN, D[ennis] H[art]. A Complete Treatise on Field Fortification, with the General Outlines of the Principles Regulating the Arrangement, the Attack, and the Defence of Permanent Works. New York: Wiley & Long, 1836. xviii, 268 pp., 12 engraved foldout plates. 16mo, original blind-stamped brown cloth, gilt-lettering and decoration on spine. Binding worn and with some staining and spotting, occasional mild foxing.
        First edition of author’s first book. American Imprints Inventory 38690. Sabin (43862-3) lists editions of this work that are Confederate imprints (New Orleans, 1861, & Richmond, 1863; an edition came out at Richmond in 1862, also). "The standard work on this subject carried into the field by United States officers in both the Mexican-American and Civil Wars....[Mahan (1802-1871)] was one of the fifty original incorporators of the National Academy of Sciences."—DAB. Mahan was a professor of Military and Civil Engineering at West Point.
($150-350)

WITH A RARE BRITISH MAP OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS

179. MAILLARD, N. Doran. The History of the Republic of Texas, from the Discovery of the Country to the Present, and the Cause of Her Separation from Mexico. London: Smith, Elder, and Co., 1842. xxiv, 512 [1, ad for Emigration Gazette] [24, ads] pp., folding lithographic map of Texas with original outline coloring to boundaries and lone star at lower left: A New Map of Texas, 1841. Day & Haghe Lithrs to the Queen (42.0 x 39.0 cm; 16-7/16 x 15-1/4 inches). 8vo, original blind-stamped black cloth, gilt-lettered title on spine. One clean split to map (easy to repair), otherwise a superb copy—the best we’ve handled—preserved in a black cloth slipcase. Very rare.
        First edition. Basic Texas Books 134: "The most vitriolic denunciation of the Republic of Texas [comprising] a compendium of everything bad that could be claimed about Texas and Texans of those times." Graff 2663: "Texas cut down to size—a difficult feat even in 1842." Howes M225. Raines, p. 144. Streeter 1422: "Though this account of Texas has little value as a history because of Maillard’s extreme bias, it should be included in Texas collections as an example of what can be said about Texas by one who hates it....What wounded Maillard’s ego during the six months in 1839 he spent in Texas is not known, but it has caused him to characterize Texas (p. 206) as ‘a country filled with habitual liars, drunkards, blasphemers, and slanderers, sanguinary gamesters and cold-blooded assassins’ and more to the same effect. Stephen F. Austin is referred to, at page 30, as ‘the prince of hypocrites,’ and James Bowie, at page 104, as ‘monster’....Incidentally, at page vi, Maillard speaks of himself as ‘an impartial historian.’" Vandale, Texianameter 113. Webb, Texana IV: Texas as a Republic 10. Pingenot: First and only edition; never reprinted. Maillard practiced law in Texas in 1840 and edited a newspaper there while writing this bitter denunciation of the new republic. The first third of the book is devoted to the Texas Revolution, using original material gathered from participants and presenting the anti-Texan viewpoint. See The Handbook of Texas Online (Nicholas Doran Maillard).
        If you hate Texas, then this is definitely the book for you. But let us proceed in a positive fashion, and that would be the rare and excellent map of the Republic of Texas, which Streeter describes thus: "The map is the best feature of the book, for among its classifications shown in colored lines are the political boundaries of Texas under Spain and the territory now ‘absolutely in the possession of the Texians.’" The map was created by the excellent British firm of William Day & Louis Haghe, Lithographers to the Queen (see Tooley, 1999 edition, p. 343. The Day firm, which permutated though several incarnations, produced some of the superior lithographs and engravings found in Plains & Rockies titles, and the firm made early use of the chromolithographic process to produce printed block color. This book is one of those strange anomalies in today’s Texana market, in that the map is probably worth more than the book. Should some misguided soul acquire this book and map and then remove the map, may the map transform into a serpent in his hand and rend him lifeless.
($3,000-6,000)

180. [MAP]. EATON, J. H. 3 maps of Mexican-American War operations on Texas soil, lithographed on one large folding sheet measuring 30.2 x 75 cm (11-7/8 x 29-1/2 inches): (1) Sketch of the Battle Ground at Palo Alto Texas. May 8th. 1846...16 x 23 cm; (2) Sketch of the Battle Ground at Resaca de la Palma Texas May 9th. 1846... (3) Sketch of the Main Road from Fort Brown to Point Isabel, showing the Battle Ground of the 8th and 9th May 1846.... Washington, 1846. Fine.
        This map sheet is found in the following government document: Reports from General Taylor. Message from the President...Transmitting Official Reports.... Washington: HRR209, 1846 (37 pp. 8vo, disbound). Within the text is a fourth engraved map of the engagement near Matamoros. The report contains detailed battle reports of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma and the bombardment of the fort opposite Matamoros. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, pp. 416-17. Tutorow 1674. The four maps are highly detailed and very important. The two battles depicted on these maps were the first engagements of the war that eventually added New Mexico, Arizona, California, and portions of other Western states to U.S. territory.
($150-350)

181. [MAP]. HART, Juan S. Official Map of El Paso, Texas. St. Louis: A. Gast, [1881]. Lithographed map with ornate border. 68.2 x 95.5 cm (26-5/8 x 37-5/8 inches). Scale 1 inch = 400 feet. Mounted on linen. Map with splits along folds and several voids, especially at folds and along edges. Inkstamped signature of H. E. Lindberg. Pencil annotations
        This is a rare and historic map of El Paso. Juan Siqueiros Hart (1856-1918) was born at Hart’s Mill at the falls of the Rio Grande. He served as City Engineer of El Paso in 1881 and also played first and second base on the city’s first baseball team. He was partner and editor of the El Paso Link and subsequently the El Paso Times (The Handbook of Texas Online: Juan Siqueiros Hart). The map shows El Paso from Fort Bliss and Hart’s Mill on the west to the eastern city limit (boundary of Cumming’s Tract). Among the details are locations of city lots by numbers (a few have been hand colored), major streets, Magoffin and other additions, Texas & Pacific R.R. Reserve, A.T.& S.F.R.R. Reserve, Acequia Madre, Old Fort Bliss and Magoffin Acequia, etc.
($1,000-2,000)

182. [MAP]. JOHNSON, A. L. Johnson’s Texas. New York, 1866. Engraved map with original bright color. 43 x 58.5 cm (17 x 23 inches). Ornamental strapwork border. Insets of Galveston and the Panhandle. Creased where folded into atlas with split at fold.
        Standard popular nineteenth-century map of Texas. A good map for a beginning collector of Texas maps to consider.
($100-300)

183. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S. Augustus. County Map of the State of Texas Showing also the Adjoining States and Territories. Philadelphia, 1881. Engraved map with original full and outline coloring. 35.5 x 54 cm (14 x 21-1/4 inches). Scale: 1 inch = approximately 55 miles. Inset: Plan of Galveston and Vicinity. Creased where formerly folded into atlas. Fine.
        Standard Texas map of the late nineteenth century, showing all of New Mexico, too.
($100-200)

184. [MAP]. MITCHELL, S. Augustus. Map of Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies. Constructed & Engraved by W. Williams. [Philadelphia]: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1867. Engraved map with original full and outline coloring. 33.5 x 53.7 cm (13-1/4 x 21-1/8 inches). Insets: Map of the Island of Cuba, Map of the Island of Jamaica, Map of the Bermuda Islands, Map of the Panama Railroad. Creased where folded, stub for binding into atlas present, some unobtrusive water stains.
         See Phillips, Atlases 850.
($50-100)

185. [MAP]. SAYER, Robert. A New Map of North America, with the British, French, Spanish, Dutch, & Danish Dominions on that Great Continent; and the West India Islands, Done from the Latest Geographers, with Great Improvements from the Sieurs D’Anville and Robert. London: Robert Sayer, 1760. Engraved map. 57.3 x 95.3 cm (22-1/2 x 37-1/2 inches). Title within large cartouche at upper left. Inset, lower left (ten plans showing the harbors of St. Johns, Boston, New ). A few short tears affecting blank lower margin, otherwise fine.
        See Lowry, Maps of the Spanish Possessions 657. Tooley, The Mapping of America (p. 51) describes a 1772 Sayer map which incorporates the changes reflected by the Paris Treaty of February 10, 1763. Wagner, Northwest Coast 693 (1783 issue). Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 164 (citing a 1775 Sayer map) and 196 (the 1783 issue). Pingenot: A very rare map of North America, in splendid condition, issued only sixteen years before the American colonists declared their independence.
($1,500-3,000)

186. [MAP]. SCHENK, Pieter. America Septentrionalis Novissima...[and] Meridionallis Accuratissima. Amsterdam, (ca. 1695). Very fine. Copper-engraved map of the Western Hemisphere with contemporary coloring 48 x 56.5 cm (18-7/8 x 22-1/4 inches). Fine.
         Beautifully hand colored with an elaborate pictorial cartouche for both Americas, showing explorers, Native Americans, flora and fauna, etc. California is shown as an island on the second Sanson model. On the North American continent, New York is identified as Hollandia; Florida occupies the entire southeastern portion of what is now the U.S. from the Carolinas to the Rio Grande (identified as Rio de las Palmas); numerous Native American tribes are identified throughout the Spanish Southwest, along with the villages of Taos and Santa Fe. Koemann III, p. 119(11). Leighly, California as an Island, 102. McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island, 120. Tooley, The Mapping of America, p. 125. Tooley, California as an Island 56: "A slightly unusual feature of this map is the double title...each within a decorative cartouche." Leighly, California as an Island 102.
($500-1,000)

187. [MAP]. SMITH, G[ustavus] W[oodson]. Sketch of Line of March of Gen. Patterson’s Division from Matamoras to Victoria and of Route from Victoria to Tampico. Based upon Data from Genl. Arista’s Map & Observations Made on Line of March. Washington, 1850. Lithographed folding map 37.5 x 28.0 cm (14-5/8 x 11 inches). Uniform mild browning.
        With this map is the following government document: General Patterson’s Route of March. Letter from the Secretary of War, a Report on the Route of General Patterson’s Division from Matamoras to Victoria. (Washington: HRED13, 1850). 7 pp. Garrett, The Mexican American War, p. 291.
($60-120)

188. [MAP]. SMITH, M. L. & E. L. F. Hardcastle. Map of the Valley of Mexico with a Plan of the Defenses of the Capital and the Line of Operations of the United States Army under Major General Scott in August and September 1847.... New York: J. & D. Major’s Lith., [1850]. Lithographed map with U.S. Army routes in red. 65.9 x 50.0 cm (26 x 19-5/8 inches). A few short tears and light uniform browning.
         With this large-scale map is the following government document: Report of the Secretary of War, Communicating...a Map of the Valley of Mexico, from Surveys.... Washington: SED11, 1849. 8vo, disbound. Garrett, The Mexican-American War 430-31. Haferkorn, p. 31. Tutorow 1632. In the accompanying document, cartographer M. L. Smith (Lieutenant of the Topographical Engineers) writes to J. J. Abert (Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers) paying homage to the accuracy of Baron Humboldt’s map of the Valley of Mexico and stating that it was the only one in which they placed confidence for moving troops in to capture the city. He remarks, however, that he believes that the present map is the first survey of the valley ever made by triangulation. His colleague, E. L. F. Hardcastle, supplements the report with memoirs of the march made in his journal as events occurred. This sparse but pithy report has excellent details on military engineering, and the map is a great one for collectors of both the Mexican-American War and the cartography of Mexico.
($150-300)

189. [MAP]. TALLIS, J. & F. Mexico, California and Texas. London, Edinburgh & Dublin: Tallis, [1850]. Engraved map with original coloring and tinted vignettes, 25.5 x 32.8 cm (10 x 13 inches). Very fine.
        The preferred state, with the vignette of California gold washers that did not appear on the early incarnations. The two other vignettes are Ruins at Uxmal, Yucatan and Mexican Peasantry. Day, p. 48. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 737; Maps of the California Gold Region 200. Pingenot: A fine map showing the southwestern United States and all of Mexico. Texas is shown in its early statehood form with its western border the Rio Grande to its source in Colorado. The Old Spanish Trail, indicated as the "Great Caravan Route," extends from Santa Fe (in Texas) to "Pueblo de Los Angelos." The Gulf Coast is shown eastward to Tallahassee, and the West includes lower California named in the still unsettled western region.
($200-400)

190. [MAP]. TEXAS. GENERAL LAND OFFICE. Map of Eastland Co. Corrected and Drawn by F. G. Blau. Houston: [Rand, Avery & Co. of Boston for] Robt. M. Elgin, 1877. Heliotype process map. 56 x 54.2 cm (22 x 21-3/8 inches). Rough along right edge and a few other short tears on blank margins, otherwise very good.
        Scarce county map put out by the General Land Office, drawn by Blau, one of the top GLO mapmapers. The process used to create this map was one not in use for a lengthy period. Heliotype images were obtained by printing from a film of gelatin which had been sensitized with bichromate of potash and exposed to light under a negative.
($300-600)

191. [MAP]. TEXAS & NEW ORLEANS RAIL ROAD CO. T.& N.O.R.R.Cos. Lands in the Counties of Runnels and Tom Green. Resurveyed by M. W. Neyland April 1887. Drawn by J. McBean Jany 1888. N.p., 1888. Lithographed map. 58.3 x 41.6 cm (23 x 16-3/8 inches). Scale 1 inch = approximately 2,000 varas. Browned, mounted on cartogrphic linen. Small chip at top blank edge and rubber stamp "Land Department" in lower margin.
        This is an example of the fine Texas General Land Office maps being subsequently adapted for commerical use.
($200-400)

192. [MAP]. TEXAS & PACIFIC RAILWAY CO. Borden County Texas. Marshall: Lithographed by August Gast and Cos. New Process, 187_. Lithographed map. 40 x 39.5 cm (16 x 15-3/4 inches). Scale: 1 inch = 4,000 varas. Creased where formerly folded and split at center horizontal crease.
        The General Land Office map here has been adopted for use by the Texas & Pacific Railway Company.
($200-400)

193. [MAP]. THOMAS, COWPERTHWAIT & CO. Mexico & Guatemala. Philadelphia, 1850. Engraved map with original full color. 30.8 x 38.5 cm (12-1/8 x 15-1/8 inches). Scale: 1 inch = aspproxomately 180 miles. Four inset maps: The Isthmus of Tehuantepec Showing the Proposed Route from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean; The Isthmus of Nicuragua Showing the Proposed Routes from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean; Guatemala or Central America; Valley of Mexico. Minor browning at edges, very fine.
        Fascinating for transportation history. Most of Texas is shown. Very decorative.
($60-125)

SIXTEEN MAPS OF CALIFORNIA, NEW MEXICO & MEXICO

194. [MAP]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Executive Documents Printed by Order of the Senate of the United States, During the First Session of the Thirtieth Congress.... Washington: GPO [SED1], 1847. [2] 30 [2, blank] 1369 [1, blank] + 249 pp., 5 tables, 17 lithographed folding maps, including California and New Mexico battles: (1) Sketch of the Actions Fought at San Pascal in Upper California between the Americans and Mexicans; (2) Sketch of the Battle of Los Angeles Upper California Fought between the Americans and the Mexicans; (3) Sketch of the Passage of the Rio San Gabriel, Upper California, by the Americans, Discomfiting the Opposing Mex. Forces; (4) Untitled map of the California coast from slightly north of Sutter’s Fort to Cabo San Lucas; (5) Sketch Accompanying Col. Price’s Despatch of 18 April 1847 [Santa Fe to Cañada]; (6) Sketch Accompanying Col. Price’s Despatch of 15th. April 1847 [Joya to Embudo]; (7) Sketch Accompanying Col. Price Despatch [Taos and environs]. Thick 8vo, later brown buckram. Intermittment foxing (affecting a few of the maps).
        First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 321. Haferkorn, pp. 22-23. Plains & Rockies IV:133. Graff 1344. Rittenhouse 207. Tutorow 1684. Pingenot: A massive storehouse of information covering almost every aspect of the War and is especially valuable for its fine maps of battles in Mexico, California, and New Mexico. The folding maps are superb.
($400-800)

195. [MAP]. WALZ, W. G. Map of Mexico. Compliments of W. G. Walz Company...El Paso, Texas. Chicago: Rand McNally, [1916]. Pocket map: Machine-printed map in full color. 35.5 x 53.5 cm (14 x 21 inches), folded into original 16mo stiff grey printed wrappers. Very fine.
        On the pocket map folder, the Walz emporium touts its goods to enhance borderland outings—Eastman Kodaks, film, rifles, revolvers, ammunition, flash lights, sun glasses, Spalding athletic goods, safety razors, playing cards, poker chips, Ingersoll watches, fishing tackle, Victor victrolas, etc. Pingenot: An interesting map issued in the wake of Gen. Pershing’s Punitive Expedition into Mexico. Overprinted in red with sites of U.S. forts on the border from New Mexico through Texas, including Huachuca, Bayard, Bliss, Clark, Duncan, McIntosh, Ringgold and Brown. Also highlighted are the "Principal Garrisons of Mexican-Constitutionalist Troops in the North," as well as "Routes Taken by U.S. Soldiers" in pursuit of Pancho Villa, indicated by two large arrows southward from Columbus, NM.
($150-300)

196. [MAPS & PRINTS]. Lot of approximately 30 items, including:

BOOK CLUB OF TEXAS. Cowboys. Austin: Wind River Press, 1988. Folio broadside. Quotation from Larry McMurtry, with illustration by Barbara Holman. Typeset by William Holman and printed by David Holman. Commemorative broadside for the first annual meeting of the Book Club of Texas.

CISNEROS, José. [Buffalo Soldiers]. 2 signed, limited edition prints (each #170 of 300). 1971. Folio. The first print shows two mounted soldiers; the second, soldiers in hand-to-hand combat with Indian warriors. Both very fine.

CISNEROS, José. Four Original Prints [to accompany the limited edition of Flanagan’s Trailing the Longhorns]. Austin: Madrona Press, [1974]. 4 double folio prints in a tan portfolio. Very fine.

[MAP]. BRADSHAW, J. R. Bradshaw’s Map Maverick County, Texas. Scale: 1 inch = 4,000 varas. Blueprint plat map locating oil and gas wells and dry wells.

[MAPS]. Contours of Discovery. Printed Maps Delineating the Texas and Southwestern Chapters in the Cartographic History of North America 1513-1930. Austin: Texas State Historical Association in Cooperation with the Center for Studies in Texas History, University of Texas, 1981. Wrapped in original shipping carton.
         Portfolio of facsimile maps.

[MAPS] HOTCHKISS, David. Spanish Missions of Texas From 1776 Including the Battle of the Alamo—1835. [Corpus Christi: Hotchkiss, 1966]. 14 maps and plans, including wrappers. Oblong large folio

[MAP]. MID-WEST MAP CO. Highway Map of the United States Showing Inter-State Highways. Aurora, 1920.

[MAP]. NOURSE, B. E. Map of Maverick County Texas. Eagle Pass, 1909. Scale 1 inch = 2,000 varas.

[MAP] SOUTH TEXAS MAPPING SERVICE. Ownership Map of Maverick County Texas. Corpus Christi & San Antonio, n.d. [after 1964]. Scale: 1 inch = 4,000 feet. Large Scale map showing oil and gas wells and leases.

Mitchell’s School Atlas. Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait, & Company, 1846. Not paginated. Color maps. Worn.

(approximately 40 items)
($200-400)

FIRST ACCURATE MAPS OF THE RED RIVER COUNTRY

197. MARCY, Randolph B. Exploration of the Red River of Louisiana in the Year 1852.... Washington: Beverley Tucker, SED, 1854. [16] 310 pp., 65 lithographed plates (a few with tinted grounds, geological folding plate). 8vo, original blind-stamped brown cloth. With the separately issued map folder (8vo, original brown blind-stamped cloth), containing 2 lithographed maps: (1) Map of the Country Between the Frontiers of Arkansas and New Mexico.... (69.2 x 149.3 cm; 27-3/8 x 59 inches), and (2) Map of the Country upon Upper Red-River Explored in 1852.... (41.2 x 86 cm; 16-3/8 x 33-7/8 inches). A fine, bright set (maps with some splits, but no losses and mild browning and staining).
         Second edition, second issue (first printing was the Senate issue, SED54, in 1853, followed by this unnumbered Senate issue). Basic Texas Books 135A: "Written by one of the greatest nineteenth-century explorers, this is one of the most interesting accounts of an original exploration of unknown parts of Texas." Clark, Old South III:354. Field 1066. Howes M276. Meisel III, p. 144. Pilling 2471n. Plains & Rockies IV:226:2. Rader 2346n. Raines, p. 146. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 791-92 & pp. 15-16: "Marcy’s map is...one of the best of the period....No southern emigrant could afford to be without (it)." Holman and Tyler, in their forthcoming book on nineteenth-century lithographs of Texas, state that Marcy’s report provides "the first lithographic documentation of the Palo Duro Canyon." About 30 of the lithographs are of Texas subjects.
         Pingenot: One of the best nineteenth-century accounts of exploration of Texas, containing Marcy’s official report of his expedition to the headwaters of the Red and Canadian Rivers in Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Marcy’s report gives the first accurate description of the region, and is important for its observations of the Indian tribes he encountered.
(2 vols.)
($400-800)

"A VADE MECUM FOR THE STILL BUSY PLAINS"—WHEAT

198. MARCY, Randolph B. The Prairie Traveler: A Hand-Book for Overland Expeditions. With Maps, Illustrations, and Itineraries of the Principal Routes between the Mississippi and the Pacific.... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1859. 340 pp., engraved frontispiece of Fort Smith, Arkansas, text illustrations, folding engraved map: Sketch of the Different Roads Embraced in the Itineraries (23.4 x 28.0 cm; 9-1/4 x 11 inches); text map Sketch of the Country in the Vicinity of the Gold Region near Pike’s Peak and Cherry Creek (11.3 x 7.3 cm; 4-1/2 x 3 inches). 12mo, original green blind-stamped cloth. Minor edge wear, upper hinged cracked (but strong), front flyleaves browned, occasional mild foxing. A very good copy, the maps very fine.
         First edition. Cowan, p. 414. Graff 2676. Howes M279. Plains & Rockies IV:335:1: "After half a lifetime spent on the western plains and in the Rocky Mountains, Captain Marcy was well qualified to advise the prospective emigrant, and he ably summarized his experiences in this book." Rittenhouse 399: "A how-to-do-it book widely used by emigrants over all Western trails. It describes equipment to carry, methods of organizing a wagon train, techniques of avoiding dangers and attacks." Smith 6509. Wheat, Transmississippi West 984: "This map [of the West] covers the entire trans-Mississippi West, with the main emigrant routes and Capt. Marcy’s various trails and routes....It affords an excellent general view of the routes of travel just prior to the railroad building era, most of the routes shown by Marcy closely approximating the later railroad routes to the Pacific Coast"; 985 & pp. 145-46 & 174-75: "[Marcy’s map of the Colorado Gold region] is one of the best that appeared that year." Wynar 3415.
($300-600)

199. MARCY, Randolph B. The Prairie Traveller....Edited (with Notes) by Richard F. Burton. London: Trübner and Co., 1863. xvi, 251 [1] [24, ads] pp., engraved frontispiece of Fort Smith, Arkansas, text illustrations, folding engraved map: Itineraries described in Capt. Marcy’s Prairie Traveller...Drawn by E. J. Ravenstein. 14.4 x 20.0 cm (5-7/16 x 7-3/4 inches). 12mo, original dark brown moiré cloth. Cloth at upper joint split and spine almost detached, shelf worn at upper extremities and edges, internally fine.
         Fourth and best edition, edited and with additional notes and revised map by Sir Richard F. Burton (first edition, New York, 1859). Graff 2677. Mintz, The Trail 326: "Marcy’s book well illustrates how the massive Western movement had created a demand for alternate and/or more direct routes. He lists here twenty-eight routes of travel, a far cry from the two or three advisable roads of the 1840s." Plains & Rockies IV:335:4: "The book was...brought up to date in 1863 with a new edition...edited by Richard Burton, who had just returned from a visit to Salt Lake." The map in Burton’s edition has been reworked, and instead of the Pike’s Peak map being a separate map, it appears at the lower left in an inset.
($200-400)

200. MARCY, Randolph B. Thirty Years of Army Life on the Border.... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1866. xvi [17]-442 pp., engraved frontispiece, plates, text illustrations. 8vo, original gilt-decorated green cloth, bevelled edges. Light wear, but generally fine. Ink presentation inscription: "F. A. Russell with the affection of her brother, R. B. Marcy."
         First edition. Dobie, p. 155. Eberstadt, Modern Overlands 322. Field 1007. Graff 2679. Howes M280. Rader 2348. Raines, p. 146. Smith 6511. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2169: "An excellent source of descriptive information on the Comanches, based upon Marcy’s several reconnaissances through their country during the late 1840s and 1850s....Also deals with Marcy’s role in establishing the two reservations in northwestern Texas during the 1850s." The lively illustrations include at least three by Alfred Waud (see Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators 1966). Pingenot: This work contains Marcy’s experiences in Texas, descriptions of the nomadic Plains tribes, explorations of new territory, a trip across the Rocky Mountains in the winter, incidents in the lives of frontiersmen, etc. With this are included two other works by Marcy, the 1872 edition of his Border Reminiscences in original cloth (Graff 2674: "Mostly humor-military, western humor") and W. Eugene Hollon’s 1955 edited edition of Beyond the Cross Timbers: The Travels of Randolph B. Marcy (fine in d.j.)
($300-600)

201. [MATTHEWS, SALLIE REYNOLDS and WATT R. MATTHEWS]. Lot of 4 titles:

MATTHEWS, Sallie Reynolds. Interwoven: A Pioneer Chronicle...Drawings by E. E. Schiwetz. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1982] [With]: HOLDEN, Frances Mayhugh. Lambshead before Interwoven: A Texas Range Chronicle, 1848–1878...Drawings by John Guerin. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1982]. xiv [4] 226 [1] + xv [5] 230 [1] pp., portraits, illustrations. 2 vols., 8vo, original terracotta cloth over patterned beige cloth with gilt brands and gilt printed label. Very fine, in publisher’s slipcase, with supplemental pamphlet Chronology of the Matthews and Reynolds Families inserted.
         Fourth edition of Interwoven and first edition of Lambshead Before Interwoven. Limited edition (#289 of 350 specially bound and slipcased sets), signed by Hertzog, Holden, Guerin, and Schiwetz. Basic Texas Books 139H. Lambsgead Before Interwoven discusses events in the area prior to or not discussed in Interwoven.

MATTHEWS, Watt R. Lambshead Legacy: The Ranch Diary of Watt R. Matthews. Edited by Janet M. Neugebauer.... College Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1997]. xx, 277 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic illustrations, endpaper maps. 8vo, brown cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition.

WILSON, Laura. Watt Matthews of Lambshead. Photographs and Text by Laura Wilson. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1989]. 139 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic illustrations. Very fine in d.j. Signed by Matthews and Wilson.
         First edition.

(4 vols.)
($250-500)

202. MAYER, Brantz. Mexico; Aztec, Spanish and Republican: A Historical Sketch of the Late War; and Notices of New Mexico and California. Hartford: S. Drake and Company, 1851. [4] 433; 398 pp., numerous engraved plates and text illustrations (after Nebel, Waldeck, Weber-Frémont, Catherwood, et al.). Thick 8vo, 2 vols. in one, full original extra gilt-pictorial red morocco, a.e.g. Binding with a bit of minor shelf wear. Turn-of-the-century lending library label on upper pastedown, library slip at back. Despite being an ex-library copy, this is still a near fine copy, with no external markings to mar the elaborate nineteenth-century binding.
         First printing of the greatly enlarged edition of the author’s Mexico as It Was and as It Is (New York, 1844, 390 pp.). Pingenot: This is the true first edition of a book that is bibliographically confusing because the date on the title-pages is MDCCCLI (1851), whereas 1850 is the date shown on the verso of the t.p., suggesting an 1850 printing. The author (1809-1879), a Baltimore lawyer and founder of the Maryland Historical Society (1844), was the author of other volumes on Mexican and Maryland history.
         Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 366: "Mayer reiterates...that Paredes’ belligerent posture really brought on the war, although it was the annexation of Texas that underlay it." Cowan, p. 421. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 923. Hill, p. 494: "The first printing of this work with its enlarged title was issued in 1851"; p. 195: "Mayer tried to present Mexico in a light apart from the misconceptions and prejudices that arose out of the Texas Revolution. He wrote of antiquities, agriculture, manufactures, commerce, coinage, natural resources, religion, and government. In his official government capacity, he met General Santa Ana." Palau 158998. Raines, p. 148: "Historical sketch of Mexico. The viceroys’ rule in chronological order, with notice of the Texan struggle and the war with the United States." Tutorow 3103.
($250-500)

203. [MERCER COLONY]. Original ornate lithographed stock certificate within ornamental border and illustration of the Lone Star and a Native American spearing a buffalo: Grant 1844 Texas Association No. ___ Republic of Texas [lone star] 8,000 Square miles on the Trinity River. This certifies that _______ is entitled to One Share of the Stock in "The Texas Association" established for colonizing certain land in TEXAS under the authority of the Republic....In Witness whereof is affixed the Signatures of the President & Secretary 18__ at Louisville, Ky..... [vignette] [Louisville, Kentucky, ca. 1844]. At lower center: Hart, Mapother & Co. Lithogrs. Louisville, Ky. Very fine, unused.
         Unrecorded by Streeter, who lists other Mercer Colony/Texas Association material. The Mercer Colony was formed by Charles F. Mercer (former agent for the Peters Colony), who received the grant from Sam Houston in 1844. This lithograph is recorded in Tyler & Holman’s preliminary research on nineteenth-century lithographs of Texas. Peters, America on Stone (p. 206) locates the lithographic firm of Hart and Mapother in Louisville in 1861.
($400-800)


Selections relating to the Mexican-American War

TWO LETTERS FROM A WAR HERO—WRITTEN FROM THE FRONT

204. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. DUNCAN, James. Two autograph letters, written from Matamoros (July 23, 1846) and Mexico City (December 8, 1847), to his Uncle, Isaac Faurot, Esq. at West Point, New York. 3 pp., 4to, integral address (with ink postal marking "Pt. Isabel July 26 jf" + 2 pp., 4to, integral address (ink stamp postal marking). Creased where formerly folded, else fine.
         Fort Duncan, Texas, was named in honor of Duncan (1831-1849), a hero of the Mexican War, who served as Brevet Colonel, 2nd Artillery Regiment, and Chief of Artillery, 1st Regiment. He was awarded honors for gallantry at the Texas battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de Palma, as well as the Battle of Monterrey. Duncan’s brilliant management of the artillery battery played a significant part in defeating numerically far superior forces at the battles of Palo Alto and Buena Vista, and was instrumental in the U.S. victory at Churubusco. See John S. D. Eisenhower, So Far From God: The U.S. War with Mexico, 1846-1848 (New York: Random House, 1989, pp. 354-55) and Smith & Judah, Chronicles of the Gringos (pp. 437-40) for an account of the conflict between Generals Worth and Scott that prompted Old Fuss & Feathers to arrest Duncan for writing letters subsequently printed in the New Orleans Delta, which Scott felt undermined his heroshipness. Several of the maps found in Item 211 below (SED1) refer to Duncan.
         Extract from Duncan’s letter of July 23, 1846, written at Matadors: When you write to me please to direct your letter Head Quarters of the army of Occupation Mexico as I cannot say where it will overtake me. I leave this place tomorrow, or rather day after tomorrow for Camargo situated about 120 miles by land up the Rio Grande from Matadors, the distance by water is about 300 so crooked is the river. There are steamboats navigating the river but my command has to march on account of the difficulty of transporting my guns and wares on boats. Camargo is to be a large depot of supplies, whence the army, when ready for a forward movement, will move upon Monter[r]ey, which is situated nearly south from Camargo, at the mouth of the principal pass through the Sierra Madre mountains. I do not anticipate any interruption by the enemy, of my march, from here to Camargo, though, from the bad state of the roads, and the hot sun, the march will doubtless be unpleasant.
        
Extract from Duncan’s letter of December 8, 1847: Before this reaches you, you will have seen all the details of our struggle in this Valley of Mexico that put us in possession of the Capital of the nation. Peace has not come of it, nor can the wisest man tell when it will come. I passed through the different battles without a hurt - and enjoy excellent health. After we got in the city I applied for a leave of absence to come home, but the Gen. refused it to me. I do not know what the official reports say of me, but trust that my friends will be satisfied that the part assigned to me was reasonably well performed. You see from the papers that I am in arrest - but I hope to come well out of my trouble - one thing is certain I ought to come out of it well - and that is not only a consolation to me but to my friends.
($
500-1,000)

205. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. KENDALL, George Wilkins & Carl Nebel. The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated...With a New Introduction by Ron Tyler. Austin: [Designed by W. Thomas Taylor, Bradley Hutchinson, and Neil Furqueron & printed by David Holman at Wind River Press for]: Texas State Historical Association, 1994. xviii [4] 52 [11] pp., map, 12 colored plates after the original lithographs of battles scenes. Large folio, original terracotta cloth over goldenrod boards. Very fine
         Scholarly facsimile reprint of the rare original edition, which in today’s market would like fetch upwards of $10,000. Bennett, American Nineteenth Century Color Plate Books, p. 65n: "The very best American battle scenes in existence." Garrett, Mexican-American War, p. 31n. Holman & Tyler (preliminary research notes on Texas Lithographs of the Nineteenth Century: "An extraordinary portfolio...Palo Alto being the only Texas scene.... Probably the finest lithographic view of Texas produced in the nineteenth century." Howes K76n. Tyler, The Mexican War, a Lithographic Record, p. 11n: "Magnificently produced portfolio by...the first modern war correspondent"; p. 18: "Of all the Mexican War lithographs, perhaps the dozen by Kendall and Nebel are the most popular, as well as the most accurate."
($150-300)

206. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. PEÑA Y PEÑA, Manifiesto del Exmo. Sr. Presidente Provisional...á la República Mexicana publicado á su entrada en la capital del estado soberano de Querétaro el dia 13 de octubre de 1847. Querétaro: I. de F. Frias, October 13, 1847. 8 pp. 8vo, original beige printed wrappers, title within typographical border, sewn. Very fine, in blue cloth folding case.
         First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 88. Palau 217560. Not in Haferkorn or Tutorow. See Bancroft V, p. 527. After being driven from the capital city by U.S. Army of Occupation, Mexican Congress took refuge in the city of Querétaro until the Guadalupe Hidalgo Congress opened. This publication is the address of the provisional president of Mexico upon his entry into Querétaro. Pingenot: Peña y Peña, president of the Supreme Court, assumed the office of provisional president of the republic on September 26, 1847, after the fall of Mexico City to American forces. This rare pamphlet, published less than three weeks after he assumed the presidency, was issued on the occasion of the government’s relocation to the state and city of Queretaro. In his Manifiesto, Peña y Peña says that the war with the United States (then still in progress) has caused [the nation] untold disasters... [including] the blood of our compatriots that has run in torrents. (pp. 5-6).
($100-300)

BROADSHEET URGING THE MEXICANS TO SURRENDER

207. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. SCOTT, Winfield. El General en Gefe de los Egércitos de los Estados-Unidos de America, á la Nación Megicana! Megicanos: Los últimos sucesos de la guerra y las providencias que en consecuencia ha dictado vuestro gobierno, me ponen en el deber de dirigirme á vosotros para demostraros verdades que ignorais, porque os las ocultan maliciosamente.... Jalapa: Cuartel general de Egército, May 11, 1847. 2 pp., 4to, broadsheet printed on recto and verso in double columns on pale blue paper, ornamental device between title and text. Very fine in modern plain white protective wraps. Rare and interesting Mexican-American War ephemeron.
         First printing. Eberstadt, Mexican-American War (with pencil note indicating that Yale holds a copy): "‘The bloody happenings at Cerro Gordo should have shown the Mexican nation what it can reasonably hope for if it continues to ignore the true situation in which it has been involved by some of the its generals.’ An extremely fine broadside issued by General Scott to bring the Mexicans to terms, and curiously enough stating that though the war may have been unjust on the part of the United States to begin with, now the Mexicans should make peace to avert further misery." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 501. This imprint was probably created on a portable army press. Although the pencil markings have been erased from the back of the protective wrappers, we can see this copy has an interesting provenance, being marked "KHZ" indicating that it was jointly purchased by Kenneth Nebenzahl, Warren Howell, and Jake Zeitlin. The group of materials came from the long-time dealer-scout-dentist of Mexico City, Roberto Valles.
($300-600)

MUSIC TO CELEBRATE TAYLOR’S VICTORIES IN TEXAS

208. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. [SHEET MUSIC]. VANDERBEEK, W[illia]m. General Taylor’s Encampment Quick Step, as Performed by the Bands of the United States Army in Texas. New York: Vanderbeek, 1846. 5 pp., folio, stitched. Lithographed sheet music with ornate typography. Minor wear and soiling, generally very good to fine.
         As word spread across the country of the victories at the Texas battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de Palma, General Taylor’s fame grew, with a groundswell of popular support for Taylor as president. There ensued a flood of prints, pamphlets, and sheet music paying honor to Taylor, and the present imprint is part of that movement. This attractively lithographed sheet music makes a nice addition to a Texas collection, since it specifically mentions Texas.
($150-300)

209. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. TAYLOR, Zachary. Correspondence with General Taylor. Message from the President of the United States Transmitting the Correspondence with General Taylor since the Commencement of the Hostilities with Mexico, not Already Published. Washington: HRED119, 1847. 454 pp. 8vo, new tan cloth, dark brown leather spine label. Occasional foxing and browning.
         First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 327. Haferkorn, p. 26: "Covers the period from May 13, 1846, to February 18, 1847." Howes T79. The early part of the work contains official dispatches on the Texas operations.
($50-100)

210. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Message of the President...Relative to...Recent Engagements on the Mexican Frontier. Washington: SED388, 1846. 37 pp., map in text. 8vo, disbound. Fine. Preserved in green cloth folding case.
         First printing. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 320. Tutorow 1672. Not in Haferkorn. Pingenot: Official reports of the Battle of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma in South Texas, with an account of the death of Ringgold, charts and lists of casualties, and full details on both battles. The map is of the site of Battle of Resaca de la Palma. These two battles were the first and only Mexican War battles fought on Texas soil.
($60-120)

211. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Message from the President...to the Two Houses of Congress at the Commencement of the First Session of the Thirtieth Congress. Washington: SED1, 1847. 1369 [1] + 249 pp., 5 tables, 16 lithographed folding maps, including California and New Mexico battles: (1) Sketch of the Actions Fought at San Pascal in Upper California between the Americans and Mexicans; (2) Sketch of the Battle of Los Angeles Upper California Fought between the Americans and the Mexicans [showing about 16 structures!]; (3) Sketch of the Passage of the Rio San Gabriel, Upper California, by the Americans, Discomfiting the Opposing Mex. Forces; (4) Untitled map of the California coast from slightly north of Sutter’s Fort to Cabo San Lucas; (5) Sketch Accompanying Col. Price’s Despatch of 18 April 1847 [shows road from Santa Fe to Cañada]; (6) Sketch Accompanying Col. Price’s Despatch of 15th. April 1847 [shows region between Joya and Embudo]; (7) Sketch Accompanying Col. Price Despatch [Taos and environs]. Thick 8vo, contemporary three-quarter brown calf over marbled boards. Occasional mild foxing, a few tape repairs to maps, generally a very good to very fine copy, with ownership inscription of John Hancock of Albany dated 1848.
         First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 321. Haferkorn, pp. 22-23. Plains & Rockies IV:133: "Fitzpatrick’s letter from Bent’s Fort is a valuable recounting of his experiences after leaving Fort Leavenworth for the Arkansas River...he also describes conditions on the Santa Fe Trail." Graff 1344. Rittenhouse 207. Tutorow 1684. Pingenot: A massive storehouse of information covering almost every aspect of the War and is especially valuable for its fine maps of battles in Mexico, California, and New Mexico. This work is among the most substantial and important of all U.S. Government reports on the Mexican War, comprising President Polk’s State of the Union message along with Secretary of War William L. Marcy’s compilation of officers’ reports and correspondence from the battle fields during 1847. Includes extensive primary information on Taylor’s triumph at Buena Vista, General Winfield Scott at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, San Antonio, Churusbusco, Molino del Rey, and Mexico City, Col. A. W. Doniphan and other officers’ reports on the Chihuahua Expedition; Col. Sterling Price and officers’ reports on New Mexico; and General Stephen W. Kearny’s reports on California. Also includes reports of the Ordinance, Quartermaster, and Engineer, Indian agencies, and other War Department bureaus and offices. The folding maps are superb.
($400-800)

212. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Occupation of Mexican Territory. Message from the President.... Washington: HRED19, 1846. 111 pp. 8vo, new brown cloth, brown leather label. Fine.
         First edition. Eberstadt, Mexican War: "These documents contain all the ‘orders or instructions’ to any military, naval, or other officer of the government, ‘in relation to the establishment or organization of civil government in any portion of the territory of Mexico which has or might be taken possession of by the army or navy of the United States." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 323. Tutorow 1677. This document is important for New Mexico and California, containing: official government correspondence on the conquest and occupation of these regions; the highly important Kearny code; "Proclamation to the New Mexicans" (in English and Spanish, announcing the U.S. takeover); "Organic Law of the Territory of New Mexico" (September 22, 1846); secret and confidential dispatches between June 1845 and November 1846; naval operations in the Gulf of Mexico and California; Sloat’s proclamations to Californians in July of 1846 urging their surrender; Stockton’s announcement to the Californians that the U.S. flag is now flying over the former Mexican territory (Los Angeles, August 28, 1846); etc. Pingenot: Contains letters to and from Polk, Marcy, Kearny, Taylor, and Wool, among others, and a complete index and register of letters. Not in Haferkorn or Connor & Faulk.
($100-300)

213. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Messages of the President of the United States...on the Subject of the Mexican War. [caption title on p. 4: Hostilities by Mexico]. Washington: Wendell & Van Benthuysen, HRED60, 1848. 1,277 pp. 8vo, contemporary three-quarter red morocco over marbled boards. Upper cover detached, binding worn, spine varnished, blind-embossed library stamp on title.
         First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 322-23. Haferkorn, p. 29. This compilation is one of the most significant documents relating to the commencement of the war and the commencement of hostilities. In his message of May 11, 1846, Polk declares to Congress that he is going to bring the war to a speedy conclusion. As might be expected, there is a good deal of discussion on the annexation of Texas and deteriorating relations with Mexico due to that issue. Also present is copious official correspondence relating to the Commanding army of Occupation at Corpus Christi and the Texas battles, as well as material on the conquest of California and New Mexico. These fat government reports filled with details not found elsewhere are extremely valuable for scholars and anyone wishing to learn more about the pivotal Mexican-American War.
($150-300)

214. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR: TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO]. DALLAS, [George M.]. Mr. Dallas’s Letter on the Mexican Treaty [to William White Chew of Germantown, Pennsylvania]; Re-Printed from the Public Ledger of June 15, 1849. Philadelphia: U.S. Book & Job Printing, 1849. 29 pp. 8vo, original pale blue printed wrappers, sewn. Moderate browning and staining affecting only top half of backstrip and extending very slightly onto the inner edge of the upper and lower wrapper, else very fine, crisp, and clean.
         First edition. Eberstadt, Mexican War: "It is valuable as a contemporaneous and comprehensive view of the motives and features of our Treaty with Mexico. Defends not only the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which was under fire as being disadvantageous to the United States, but defends the whole war. ‘I will here take occasion to assert that no armies ever over-ran in enemy’s country with so strict and uniform attention to the rules of civilized warfare, as did ours, in all their great campaigns under Taylor, Scott, Kearny, Wool, or Doniphan." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 69. Raines, p. 61. Not in Haferkorn or Tutorow. Dallas (1795-1864) was Vice President of the U.S. during the Mexican-American War. In this letter he discusses some of the inside negotiations that had been under veil of secrecy before. Most interesting perhaps are his comments on the border and the borderlands, pointing out the necessity of protecting Mexico from incursions by Comanche, Apache and Navajo tribes north of the Rio Grande. He also alludes to the possibility that: "Tamaulipas, New Leon, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora, [and] Lower California, may separately or together achieve independence."
($100-250)

215. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR: TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Message of the President...Relative to the Treaty of Peace Concluded at Guadalupe Hidalgo on the 2d of February, 1848. Washington: HRED50, February 8, 1849. 82 pp. (English and Spanish). 8vo, new green cloth. Fine.
         This early edition of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo is an important one, containing the first publication of documents, correspondence, and instructions to commissioners which had previously been under injunction of secrecy. Polk discusses the changes which the U.S. designated to Mexico in its protocols, including land titles in California, New Mexico, and Texas, religious and other personal freedoms, and the method by which Mexico was to pay the U.S. $12,000,000. The resounding Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the Mexican-American War and ceded to the U.S. the huge expanse of northern Mexico that included California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and parts of Wyoming, Texas, and Colorado. Mexico lost about half of her territory, and the U.S. increased its size by a third. No Western collection is complete without some version of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
         The first Mexican edition was printed at Querétaro in 1848; the first U.S. edition was printed in Washington in 1848. Cowan, p. 252. Howes M565. Libros Californianos, p. 29n: "This was the treaty that gave California to the U.S." In a joint exhibit catalogue of treasures of the Huntington Library (1986-1987) and Henry H. Clifford, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was proposed as one of five possible titles to be included in an expanded Zamorano Eighty list. Henry made this pungent comment: "[This Treaty] confirmed the annexation of Texas to the U.S.A. This embraced an area of some 525,000 square miles for California and New Mexico, as against a mere 326,000 square miles for Texas. An earlier version of this treaty could have left San Diego in the Mexican hands and permitted Mexico to repurchase Texas. How many of us are so poignantly aware that we are now permanently ‘stuck’ with Texas?"
($100-300)

UNRECORDED DECREE FOR FUNDING THE RE-INVASION OF TEXAS & QUELLING MEXICAN FEDERALISTS OF THE NORTH

216. [MEXICO (Republic). LAWS (January 27, 1838)]. NUEVO LEON. GOVERNOR (Joaquín García). [Reissue of decree of Congreso general, approved by Anastasio Bustamante January 27, 1838, authorizing in seven articles the Banco Nacional de Amortización to make a loan of six million pesos, of which three-fourths of the proceeds are to be used for the expenses of the Texan war. With heading]: Gobierno del Departamento de Nuevo Leon. Circular. [Dated and signed in type at end]: Monterrey 17 de Febrero de 1838. Joaquin Garcia. Pedro del Valle. Secretario. 1 p., folio broadside. Stained and with some short marginal tears and chipping (not affecting text). With original ink rubrics of the Governor of the Mexican state of Nuevo León, Joaquín Garcia and Secretary Pedro del Valle. Official ink manuscript notation for Linares, and other official signatures on verso.
         This is the Nuevo León issue of Streeter’s entry 939 (locating only two copies of the Mexico City issue and not even mentioning the present Monterrey, Mexico imprint). In my opinion, the Nuevo León issue of this decree (issued three weeks after the Mexico City issue) is much more desirable, with infinitely more resonance, than the Mexico City printing of the decree. The present imprint—apparently the only copy surviving—is truly a fugitive leaf from the pages of borderlands history. Following the Battle of San Jacinto and the formal establishment of the government of the Republic of Texas, peace was anything but peaceful. The central government of Mexico aspired to re-invade Texas, and the trouble for Mexico did not stop short at the border, spilling into the northern Mexican states. Mexico was very concerned about the attempts of Mexican Federalists in the north (under Antonio Canales, Juan Pablo de Anaya, and José Urrea) to set up a government independent of Mexico for the northeastern states of Mexico bordering on the Rio Grande—what would shortly become known as the Republic of the Rio Grande (see Handbook of Texas Online: Republic of Rio Grande). Not surprisingly, this cause evinced a keen interest in some Texans (most notably Colonel Reuben Ross and Samuel W. Jordan).
         This decree relates to funding a military campaign to quell both the Texans and their recalcitrant brothers in northeast Mexico. President Bustamante declares: "El Banco pondrá inmediatamente á disposicion del Gobierno los caudales que negocie en virtud de la presente authorizacion, y el Gobierno, consignará exclusivamente tres cuartas partes á lo menos de dichos caudales, á los gastos que origine la guerra de Tejas, el sostenimiento de la integridad territorial, y la defensa de las Costas y Fronteras de la República." The following year Bustamante was compelled to issue an apologia for this campaign (see Streeter 941).
($250-500)

WITH AN IMPORTANT REPUBLIC OF TEXAS MAP

217. MEXICO (Republic). LEGACIÓN (United States). Gorostiza Pamphlet. Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting a Copy and Translation of a Pamphlet, in the Spanish Language, Printed and Circulated by the Late Minister from Mexico before His Departure from the United States &c. Washington: HRED190, 1838. 120 pp., engraved map: Sketch of a Part of the Boundary between Mexico & the United States, as Far as the Red River (approximately sheet size [no neatline]): 13.1 x 11.6 cm; 5-1/4 x 8-7/8 inches. 8vo, new terracotta cloth, black gilt-lettered leather label. Very fine.
         First edition in English (the first edition, a Spanish-language edition, was printed in Philadelphia in 1836 and contained the same map as in the present edition); another edition appeared in Mexico in 1837; a French translation was published in Paris in 1837). Howes G6 (citing only the Spanish edition and French editions): "Earliest [map] of the Republic of Texas." Raines, p. 95 (also unaware of this English-language edition). Streeter 1220C. The map is a decidedly simple, sparse rendering, focusing on the eastern boundary of Texas and the Gulf of Mexico only as far west as the Neches River. This bilingual edition contains correspondence relative to General Gaines’ military occupation of northeast Texas from the Sabine to Nacogdoches for the announced purpose of checking Indian depredations. It appears, however, that Gaines acted more at the request of Stephen F. Austin than U.S. authorities as he remained at Nacogdoches while the new Texas government became organized. This affair led to the breaking of diplomatic relations by Mexico with the U.S. until 1839.
($300-600) Illustrated Description>>

REVOLUTIONARIES WILL BE PUNISHED BY EXILE TO CALIFORNIA

REVOLUTIONARIES WILL BE EXILED TO CALIFORNIA!

218. MEXICO (Republic). LAWS. [Law of the Congreso general approved by President Guadalupe Victoria on October 25, 1828, promulgated the same day by Juan de Dios Cañedo, with printed heading]: Primera Secretaria de Estado. Departamento del Interior Sección 1a. [article 2 commencing]: 2. Los ciudadanos que concurrieren á tales reuniones despues de la publicacin de esta ley, sufrirán por primera vez la pena de suspensión de sus derechos por un año; de dos por la segunda; y de confinación á una de las Californias por la tercera, por término de cuatro años. Si los confinados reincidieren, serán espulsados de la república por dos años.... Mexico, October 25, 1828. 1 p., folio broadside. Left margin slightly uneven where removed from a legajo, else very fine.
         First printing. Lathrop Harper (Catalogue 12:42) offered the Tlalpam printing of this decree ca. 1961 commenting: "Forbids all ‘clandestine’ meetings and organizations during the current political upheavals and prescribes penalties for those caught in such activities, including exile to ‘one of the Californias’." The Eberstadts (158:42) offered the present printing in 1958 for $200, describing it thus: "Decrees for regulating immigration into California, 1828," but the decree seems to be more concerned with the conduct of citizens and foreigners in Mexico and its provinces, which then included Texas and California. Mexico was a seething hotbed of political unrest at that time, both in the interior and its far-flung provinces, particularly Texas. What is most interesting about this decree is that apparently a severe form of punishment at that time was considered to be exile to Alta or Baja California.
($200-400)

EARLIEST DEPICTION OF THE BATTLE OF SAN JACINTO

219. MEYRICK, Edwin. Texian Grand March, for the Piano Forte. Respectfully Dedicated to Genl. Houston and his Brave Companions in Arms. New York: Firth & Hall, 1835 [actually 1836]. 7 pp., folio, lithographed illustration of Santa Anna surrendering his sword to the wounded Houston, signed with monogram AF. Spine neatly backed with matching archival paper. Very fine copy. Preserved in a half tan levant morocco and marbled boards folding case.
         First edition (actually published in 1836), first state with lithographer’s monogram AF. Streeter and others have transcribed the monogram as FA, but according to Ron Tyler’s preliminary research on nineteenth-century Texas lithographs, the monogram has been attributed to Anthony Fleetwood (ca. 1800-after 1859). See Peters (America on Stone, pp. 186-89) for more information on Fleetwood (whose work he describes as "scarce and excellent") and Firth (published sheet music). Eberstadt, Texas 162:542: "An historic moment—Houston Accepts Santa Anna’s sword." Library of Congress, Texas Centennial Exhibition 96. Streeter 1171 (two locations): "This has been entered under the copyright date of 1835, but obviously it must have been published sometiem after April 21, 1836, the date of the battle of San Jacinto." Webb, Texana, Revolution 13. Pingenot: One of the most famous pieces of Texas sheet music. The top half of the title page is handsome lithograph showing Santa Anna surrendering his sword to the wounded Houston. The Texan leader is sitting up in bed surrounded by two fellow officers and one armed guard. Despite the artist’s imaginative (and unrealistic) concept of the uniforms worn by the Texans, this is the earliest depiction of an aspect of the Battle of San Jacinto.
($
500-1,000) Illustrated Description>>

220. MEYRICK, Edwin. The Texian Grand March.... New York: Firth & Hall, 1 Franklin Square, 1836. 7 pp., folio, with lithographed illustration of Santa Anna surrending to Sam Houston. Some small tears at left blank margin (where removed from a sewn volume), slightly foxed. Preserved in a dark brown morocco and marbled boards folding case.
         First edition, third state of preceding, with the lithographer identified as "Swett" at the head of the title and monogram AF not present. Streeter 1171B (locating five copies). This lithograph (same as in preceding entry) will be included in Tyler & Holman’s survey of nineteenth-century Texas lithographs. Peters (America on Stone, pp. 378-79) notes that Swett was associated with George Endicott, and possibly N. Currier and comments: "His work is good and quite prolific, but mostly in various associations. He seems to have been one of the ones who wandered and realigned himself with great frequency, so it is hard to follow him. He is entitled to a place of importance." It is not difficult to imagine that this colorful sheet music was an item with strong popular culture appeal at the time of the dramatic events in the Texan Revolution; thus, it is not surprising that three different issues in close conjunction exist (see also Streeter 1171A).
($300-600) Illustrated Description>>

221. MILES, Nelson A. Personal Recollections and Observations of General Nelson A. Miles...Copiously Illustrated with Graphic Pictures by Frederic Remington and Other Eminent Artists. Chicago: Werner Co., 1896. [6] 590 pp., frontispiece portrait, numerous plates and text illustrations (engraved and photographic). 4to, original brown pictorial cloth stamped in gold, black and silver. Spinal extremities and edges lightly worn, front hinge cracked, a few signatures loose, contemporary ownership inscription. Very clean and bright, inside and out.
         First edition, first issue (title as "General" under portrait). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington) 849. Graff 2789. Harvard Guide to American History, p. 414. Howes M595. Luther, High Spots of Custer 129: "Fairly strongly pro-Custer...useful in presenting the views of a successful Indian fighter on some of the controversial points." Munk (Alliott), p. 152. Nevins, Civil War Books I, p. 130. Prucha, Indian-White Relations 4637. Saunders 3051. Smith 6791. Pingenot: Miles (1839-1925) saw action all over the West as well as during the Civil War. He was with the 9th Cavalry in Texas at Fort Clark in 1873; the Red River War against the Kiowa, Comanche, and Southern Cheyenne Indians, Nez Perce, Sioux, Geronimo Campaign, Ghost Dance, Wounded Knee, etc. Miles was vain, pompous, and dogmatic. Theodore Roosevelt called him a ‘brave peacock’ (Lamar, p. 731). He had few defeats but was self-advancing and sometimes controversial. Some of the illustrations are of scenes in Texas.
($200-400)

MILITARY EPHEMERA LOT

222. [MILITARY HISTORY: EPHEMERA (Holiday Menus)]. Lot of 5 menus and programs for holiday festivities in the Army:

U.S. ARMY. 3rd CAVALRY. TROOP "I." Roster - Menu Troop "I" 3rd U.S. Cavalry. Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Christmas 1918. 4 pp. Narrow 12mo, original stiff pictorial wrappers with the flag of the 3rd Cavalry, tied with a yellow cord. Very fine.
         Roster of officers and men, menu, and a brief history of Troop "I," 3rd Cavalry.

U.S. ARMY. 8th CAVALRY. TROOP "B." Christmas 1915. Troop "B," 8th Cavalry. Fabens, Texas [cover title]. 5 pp. 12mo, original stiff pictorial wrappers with embossed U.S. flag, tied with a yellow cord. Cover splitting at fold and with brown fingerprint smear.
         Menu, roster of officers and men, and three-page history of Troop B.

U.S. ARMY. 14th CAVALRY. TROOP "A." Thanksgiving Dinner November 30, 1916. Trrop "A" 14th Cavalry Del Rio, Texas [cover title]. 3 pp., illustrations. 16mo, original stiff pictorial wrappers with guidon of the troop, tied with a yellow cord. Very fine.
         Roster of officers and men, menu.

U.S. ARMY. QUARTERMASTER’S DETACHMENTS, CAMP DEL RIO, TEXAS. Thanksgiving Dinner on the Border. Quartermaster’s Detachments’ Mess. Camp Del Rio, Texas. 1917 [cover title]. [Del Rio: Val Verde County Herald Print], 1917. 3 pp., illustrations. 12mo, original stiff pictorial wrappers with eagle and flags on upper wrap and turkey on lower wrap, tied with yellow ribbon. Very fine.
         Roster of officers and men, menu.

U.S. ARMY. 38th INFANTRY. COMPANY "A." Thanksgiving November, 1941. Company "A", Thirty-eighth Infantry. Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 4 pp., decorated with turkey border. 12mo, original stiff pictorial wrappers with embossed turkey and flag on upper wrap, tied with blue cord. Very fine.
         Menu and roster of officers and men.
(5 vols.)
($200-400)

223. MILLS, Anson. My Story. Washington: Press of Byron S. Adams, 1918. 412 pp., frontispiece portraits of Mills and his wife, plates, maps, illustrations. 8vo, original full limp hard-grain black morocco, a.e.g. Fine copy, inscribed and signed by author to his friend and classmate Colonel "Bill" Bease.
         First edition. Dustin 202. Flake 5412. Graff 2804. Howes M623. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 64: "His account of the Battle of Slim Buttes is important." Luther, High Spots of Custer 34: "An autobiography, edited by C. H. Claudy, that helps illuminate what befell Custer’s expedition." Excellent coverage of social and family life in the army, with many documentary photographs. Pingenot: Preface by General Nelson A. Miles. Service in Texas in the 1850s, in the Civil War, in Arizona, on the 1876 Crook campaign, and in El Paso as Commissioner of the Boundary Commission between the U.S. and Mexico. His recollections of El Paso and West Texas are interesting and valuable. Mills’s western campaigns extended from 1865 through the Custer Campaign of 1876. He was a champion of Custer, and accused Terry of being unfamiliar with Indian warfare. Mills was escort to General Dodge on the expedition to Oregon in 1867 and for Lord Dunraven in 1873. He was involved in the Black Hills rush and was in the Powder River Expedition.
($
100-300)

224. MISSOURI, KANSAS & TEXAS RAILWAY COMPANY. The MK and T. Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway. Missouri, Kansas, Indian, Territory, Texas, Mexico, California. Form 1. November, 1902. St. Louis: Buxton & Skinner Print, 1902. 28 pp., numerous maps, including fold-out Map of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway and Its Connecting Lines. 38.4 x 20 cm (15 x 8 inches), numerous small maps showing regional routes, photographic illustrations (train cars and interiors), ads. Small 4to (folded to narrow 8vo), original self wrappers printed in red, white, and blue and MKT logo. Fine.
         Excellent promotional for the MK&T, documenting the line with many maps and photos. The ads are informative, too, such as an one for "Indian Territory. The last large tract of fine uncultivated land to be thrown open for settlement."
($150-300)

225. MISSOURI PACIFIC RAILROAD. Statistics and Information Concerning the State of Texas with Its Millions of Acres of Unoccupied Lands for the Farmer and Stock Raiser, Unlimited Opportunities for the Merchant and Manufacturer, Great Inducements for the Investment of Capital, Health for the Invalid.... St. Louis: [Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co.], 1893. 93 [3] pp., numerous engraved text illustrations, folding map with tan shading (Latest and Correct Map of the State of Texas, with inset Map of the Great Southwest System; 42.0 x 51.5 cm 16-1/2 x 20-1/4 inches, illustration of the Texas capitol at top). 12mo, original orange printed wrappers with illustration of the Texas state seal. Original ink stamp of Geo. K. Delahanty, New Eng. Pass. Agt. Fine. General Passenger Dept. of the Missouri Pacific R’y Co.
         "Eighth Edition" (first edition, 1884). Adams, Herd 2268 (citing the 1884 edition, which he describes as rare). The copyright was issued to H. C. Townsend. The map is not listed by Day or Taliaferro. Checking the Morrison guides, we find only one copy (fourth edition) of this work offered (same copy offered by Jenkins and Ginsberg in 1987).
($100-300)

226. MORFI, Juan A. A History of Texas, 1673-1779. Albuquerque: Quivira Society, 1935. 242 + [8] 243-496 pp., 9 plates, folding map. 2 vols., 8vo, original half white cloth over tan boards gilt. Very fine set.
         First edition, limited edition (#10 of 100 copies, signed by translator and editor Carlos E. Castañeda, and with five additional plates not included in the regular edition of 500 copies). Basic Texas Books 145: "The volumes consist of a biography of Morfi, a list of his writings and extant letters, the text of his history, bibliography, and index....Monumental history of Texas." Campbell, p. 172. Howes M792: "First complete publication in any language of this contemporary manuscript, most complete history of Spanish Texas in its early period." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 1814: "[Morfi] provides details on earlier Spanish and French rivalry in Texas, and focuses much attention on the missions. Morfi’s lengthy discussion of the various Indian tribes in Texas comprises the best report of his generation, and Castañeda’s editing further assures accuracy for the original manuscript." Pingenot: Discovered by accident 150 years after it was written, Fr. Morfi’s history is an important contribution to our knowledge of Spanish Texas.
($250-500)

227. MORRIS, Maurice O’Connor. Rambles in the Rocky Mountains, with a Visit to the Gold Fields of Colorado. London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1864. vii, 264 pp. 8vo, original dark green cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Fine and bright.
         First edition. Bradford 3694. Graff 2899. Howes M831. Phillips, Sporting Books, p. 258. Plains & Rockies IV:404: "He had intended to travel by steamer up the Missouri to Fort Benton and the Montana gold fields. The boat broke down at Saint Joseph, however, and the author changed his destination to Denver where he spent several months before returning to the Atlantic states." Wynar 2050. Pingenot: An entertaining journal in which the British author describes his trip in 1863 from St. Louis across Kansas and Nebraska to Fort Kearney, Julesburg, Denver, and Central City.
($
150-300)

RARE REGIMENTAL

228. MULLER, William G. The Twenty-Fourth Infantry Past and Present. N.p.: Privately printed by the author, 1923. [128] pp., photographic illustrations. 4to, original black embossed fabrikoid. Very fine copy. Very rare (no copies recorded by OCLC or RLIN).
         First edition. Not in Graff, Howes, Tate, etc. Pingenot: After the Civil War many regiments were consolidated and reorganized. The Twenty-fourth Infantry was formed in the so-called ‘new army’ with General Ranald S. Mackenzie its first regimental commander. The area of operations would be from Forts Davis, Stockton, Concho and McKavitt, all in Texas along the southern edge of the Great Staked Plains. Muller provides a brief history of the regiment from its beginnings to about 1922. The unit moved from Texas to Indian Territory in late 1880. The Twenty-Fourth would fight in the Spanish American War, etc. The illustrations from photographs are excellent and many documents are reproduced. The infantry regiment’s action on the Texas and Indian frontier is informative. Most of these regimental histories were issued in small editions.
($500-1,000)

229. MÚSQUIZ, Ramón. Manuscript document, signed in full and with rubric, to the alcalde of Goliad acknowledging receipt of the official report of expenditures of the militia of Goliad for 1830. Bexar, March 2, 1831. 1 p. 12mo. Light uniform browning and one minor stain.
         Ramón Músquiz (1797-?), Political Chief of Bexar, was the highest civil official in Texas during the pivotal years from 1827 until 1834. He was responsible for administration of the colonization laws relating to the early Texas empresarios, and all official business had to go through him. He became friends with Stephen F. Austin, who described him in 1832 as "one of the best friends of Texas." When the Revolution broke out, Músquiz aligned with the Mexican government and was present at the fall of the Alamo. The Handbook of Texas Online (Músquiz).
($150-300)

230. MYER, Albert J. A Manual of Signals for the Use of Signal Officers in the Field, and for Military and Naval Students, Military Schools, Etc. A New Edition, Enlarged and Illustrated.... New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1866. xiv, 398 pp., engraved frontispiece, plates, text illustrations. 12mo, original gilt pictorial red roan. Fragile binding rubbed and worn at extremities and edges. Author’s signed presentation inscription to governor M. Morrill.
         Second edition, revised and enlarged (first edition, Washington, 1864, 148 pp.). The author, born in New York, 1829, received his M.D. from Buffalo Medical College, 1851, and was commissioned an Army Surgeon. He was sent to Texas in 1854 where he served at various frontier posts [Fort Duncan, Fort Davis]. Myer was an enthusiastic experimenter in signal devices and was appointed to organize and command the U.S. Army Signal Corps, June 1861, with the rank of Colonel, Chief Signal Officer. Friction with the War Department caused his relief in November, 1863, but an act of Congress of July, 1866, reorganized the Signal Corps and restored Myer to his post and rank which he held until his death. Myer was also responsible for the establishment of the U.S. Weather Bureau under direction of the Signal Corps, February, 1870. Two months before his death in 1880, he was promoted to brigadier general. "[Myer’s signal] system, first used operationally in the Navajo expedition, 1860-61, employed a single flag for daytime and a kerosene torch for night signaling. This system is known as wigwag signaling"—The Handbook of Texas Online (Albert Myer).
($250-500)

BLACK REGIMENTAL HISTORY

231. NANKIVELL, John H. (compiler & editor) History of the Twenty-fifth Regiment United States Infantry 1869-1926. Denver: Smith Brooks Printing Co., [1927]. xx, 212, [21] pp., full-color plate of the regimental seal, numerous photographic illustrations, maps. 4to, original blue cloth lettered in gilt on upper cover. Very slight wear to head of spine and lower corners. Rubber stamp "Bisbee Daily Review/Bisbee, Arizona" on endsheets and a few inner leaves.
         First edition of a privately published regimental history, very rare in commerce (no copies at auction; none in the Morrison guides). John.M. Carroll (in the preface to the 1972 reprint): "The Twenty-fifth was very active in the Comanche Indian Wars of Texas and participated in that very crucial incident at Pine Ridge, south Dakota in 1890-91 (the last major engagement against the Indians)....The regiment saw much action in Cuba—where it was very instrumental in the capture of El Caney and Santiago—and in the Philippines....Exceptional and heroic performances of duty were known but not officially recognized....There is probably no other single incident in their long, honorable history as a fighting force which has caused more debate than the celebrated ‘Brownsville Affray’ of 13-14 August 1906." The regimental also saw service in World War II and in Hawaii, Minnesota, and Mexico.
         Pingenot certainly had the knowledge and will to ferret out modern military rarities like the present work, which preserves forgotten pages in American military history on Black soldiers. I regret that Ben was not granted the time to write a note for this wonderful book. I confess that on first glance, this book seemed quite prosaic, but closer examination revealed it to be filled with interesting material not found elsewhere, e.g., "Chapter I. The Colored Soldier in the Service of the United States prior to 1866"; "Athletics...The Regimental Baseball Teams, 1894-1914—Some Well-Known Players," superb documentation on operations against Native Americans in Oklahoma, Dakota, Montana, Minnesota, and Texas and the borderlands (excellent documentation on the Mackenzie expedition); Shafter and the Seminole Scouts; Couer d’Alene labor troubles; unusual photodocumentation (Mark Twain viewing the guard mount at Fort Missoula, Montana, in 1895; the Bicycle Corps in Montana; Native Americans in the various regions of service; the baseball teams, etc.).
($750-1,500)

232. [NATIVE AMERICANS]. UNITED STATES. CONGRESS. ACTS. Acts Passed at the First Session of the Fourteenth Congress of the United States [half title]. [Washington, 1816]. 198 pp. [2] vi, [4]-198 pp. 8vo, original drab blue wrappers, remains of early (or perhaps original?) plain white paper backstrip, sewn. Fragile wraps worn and chipped, some foxing. An unsophisticated, uncut copy.
         First edition. American Imprints 39172 (4 loc.). Pp. 167-95 contain U.S. treaties with the following tribes: Pottawatamie, Kickapoo (later to be forced to relocate as far south as Texas and Mexico), Jaway (Iowa?), Teeton, Sioux of the Lakes, Sioux of the River St. Peter, Piankeshaws, Wynadots, Yankton, Sac, Fox, Great and Little Osages, Kanzas, Mahas, and Cherokee. At pp. 196-98 is the Cherokee Nation Convention of 1816.
($250-500).

233. [NATIVE AMERICANS]. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (Zachary Taylor). Message from the President of the United States, to the Two Houses of Congress, at the Commencement of the First Session of the Thirty-First Congress...Part III [only]. Washington: HRED5, 1849. [2] 371-1,215 pp., folding maps and plans. 8vo, original three-quarter black sheep over marbled boards. Text block bound upside down. Some shelf wear and a few short tears to folding material, occasional minor staining.
         First edition. The majority of this thick volume relates to Michigan, but between pages 961-1,176 is the valuable Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs dated November 30, 1849. Pingenot: Includes the Report of U.S. Agent Robert S. Neighbors, a lengthy report on Indians in Texas, and another on Indian problems in New Mexico, the return of captives from the Comanches, Indian problems in Oregon and elsewhere. Neighbors played a key role in relations with Native Americans in Texas (see The Handbook of Texas Online: Robert S. Neighbors & Neighbors Expeditions). This is Part III of a three-volume government report, but the important content for Texas Native Americans is in the present volume.
($100-200)

NATIVE AMERICAN TREATIES

234. [NATIVE AMERICANS: TREATIES]. Collection of nine different treaties between the United States and Native American Nations. [Washington], 1837-67. Folio. Very good to fine.
         First editions. The collection contains treaties with: Consolidated Tribes of Sac & Fox Indians (Ratified December 13, 1837), Blackfeet Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866), Lower Brule Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866), Minneconjon Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866), O’Gallala Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866) [2 copies present], Onk-pah-pah Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866), Sans Arcs Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866), Two Kettles Band of Dakota or Sioux Indians (Proclaimed March 17, 1866), and Nez Percé Tribe of Indians (Proclaimed April 20, 1867). "In the field of Americana few aspects of the subject compare in interest and importance with that of the relationship between the whites and the Indians, and the treaties which were the manifestation of that relationship. These treaties, often the result of the white man’s greed for lands and gold are, in effect, the fundamental documents of our national domain.... In no more revealing way can the local history of America be preserved in historical libraries and collections than by accession of various of these original treaties by which was acquired the basic claim to this land of ours" (Edward Eberstadt & Sons, A Remarkable Collection of Indian Treaties). Michael Heaston, Catalogue 16: "The Indian tribes, bands, nations [were] treated as sovereign nations each signing numerous treaties of peace with our government. This process would continue until March 3, 1871, when Executive Agreements took their place. These separately printed folio treaties...were issued for official purposes and probably no more than fifty copies were printed for private distribution." As the white man expanded westward, the sites for negotiation and treaty also pushed toward the Pacific. In this collection, the earliest treaty with the Sac and Fox was concluded on the right bank of the Mississippi in Wisconsin Territory; the treaties with bands of the Dakota or Sioux, at Fort Sully in Dakota Territory; the treaty with the Nez Percé, at the Council Ground in the valley of the Lapwai, Washington Territory.
(10 vols.)
($1,000-2,500) Illustrated Description>>

INDIAN-GIVING THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

235. [NATIVE AMERICANS: TREATIES (Comanche)]. Treaty between the United States of America and the Camanche and Kiowa Tribes of Indians. Concluded October 18, 1865. Ratification Advised, May 22, 1866. Proclaimed May 26, 1866. [Washington], 1866. 8 pp. Folio. Very fine. Preserved in a brown folding case and a half morocco brown slipcase with gilt lettered spine label. Fine.
         First edition. This treaty was concluded at the Council Ground on the Little Arkansas River in Kansas with Kit Carson acting as one of the U.S. Commissioners. By the treaty, the Comanche and Kiowa are given possession of a vast reservation in the Texas Panhandle. Unfortunately, the land the Comanche were supposedly receiving did not belong to the United States. When Texas had entered the union twenty years earlier, it was with the provision that Texas retained ownership of its public lands. The intervening Civil War had not altered that situation, and Texas was understandably reluctant to allow the Yankees to give away its land. The impasse created by Kit Carson and the other commissioners was effectively solved a few years later when Ranald Mackenzie’s troops slaughtered most of the Comanche tribe, thereby removing the claimant.
($350-700)

KICKAPOO TREATY

236. [NATIVE AMERICANS: TREATIES (Kickapoo)]. Treaty Between the United States and the Kickapoo Indians. [Washington, 1854]. 6 pp. Folio, printed on light blue paper. Fine.
         First edition. Promulgated by Franklin Pierce, July 17, 1854. The treaty was concluded in Washington, D.C. where delegates of the Kansas branch of the Kickapoo journeyed to negotiate with the American Commissioner. By this treaty the Kickapoo convey to the United States all the land southwest of the Missouri River which was provided as their permanent home in the 1832 treaty of Castor Hill, reserving only about 235 square milesof over 1,200 square miles of land originally assigned to them. For this 1,000 square miles of land, the Kickapoo are to be paid $200,000 dollars over a 19-year period plus the interest on $100,000 to be invested for support educational purposes.
($100-250)

237. NORTH, Thomas. Five Years in Texas; or, What You Did Not Hear During the War from January 1861 to January 1866. A Narrative of His Travels, Experiences, and Observations. Cincinnati: Elm Street Printing Co., 1870. 231 pp. 12mo, original blind-embossed brown cloth, gilt lettering on spine. Light wear and some staining to endsheets, overall very good.
         First edition. Clark, New South 160: "North was anti-Texas in his attitude. His book is an extensive criticism of the way of life in the state, of the unhappy incidents of wartime, and of a threat on his life. He was forced to flee the state and go into the wilds of northern Mexico and west Texas." Coulter, p. 190 (citing the second edition). Howes N193. Nevins, Civil War Books I, p. 138: "A barbed commentary on the Lone Star state." Parrish, Civil War Texana 67: "One of the best accounts of Texas during the Civil War, with much on outlawry and crime." Raines, p. 158. Pingenot: This is the rare first edition (not the 1871 second printing) of the best memoir by a Unionist civilian in Texas during the Civil War. Despite his prejudices, North’s account is especially valuable for its commentary on lawlessness and dueling, the attitudes and statements of ousted governor Sam Houston, the precarious defense of Galveston by General John Bankhead Magruder, and the severe persecution of men like North who evaded Confederate conscription.
($250-500)

238. OBER, Frederick A. Travels in Mexico and Life Among the Mexicans...I. Yucatan. II Central and Southern Mexico. III. The Border States. San Francisco: D. Dewing and Company, 1884. 672 pp., 190 engraved plates & illustrations (after author’s sketches and photographs), folding colored map of Mexico and the borderlands. Thick 8vo, original pictorial mustard cloth stamped in gilt and blank. An exceptionally fine, bright copy. Preserved in a tan cloth slipcase.
         First edition. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters, p. 953. Larned 3973: "A popular work in which the author suggests some of the fascination which the country exercises over almost all who visit it without prejudice. Distinctly interesting." Palau 197702. The Texas illustrations include a street scene at Paso del Norte, church at Paso del Norte, international bridge at Laredo, etc. Many of the plates are of Native Americans. Pingenot: Contains extensive material on Texas and the other border states. Especially fine coverage of archaeology, railroads, mining, and cattle industry. Very attractive plates.
($200-400)

239. OLMSTED, Frederick Law. A Journey Through Texas; or, A Saddle-Trip on the Southwestern Frontier: With a Statistical Appendix. New York: Dix, Edwards & Co.; London: Sampson Low, Son & Co.; Edinburgh: Thos. Constable & Co., 1857. xxxiv, 516 pp., engraved frontispiece and folding map (Map of Part of the State of Texas. Prepared by J. H. Colton & Co. New York; 19 x 22.8 cm; 7-3/8 x 9 inches). 12mo, original brown blind-stamped cloth. Three minor spots to binding and a few signatures carelessly opened, but overall this copy is still very fine (this is a really tough book to find in collector’s condition). The little Colton map of Texas is in excellent condition.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 157: "The most civilized of all nineteenth-century books on Texas...also the most interesting and the most dependable....Olmsted offers many insights into economic and social life. He gives one of the earliest descriptions of the Texas cattle ranch.... A splendid, enlightening book." Clark, Old South III:481n. Dobie, p. 52. Graff 3097. Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 45: "Perceptive and intelligent reporting...remains good reading." Howes O79. Raines, p. 159: "No better book yet written on travels in Texas."
         Sibley, Travelers in Texas, p. 216. "Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1902), noted landscape architect [who designed Central Park in New York City] and writer of travel books...made extensive tours throughout the South from 1852 to 1857. One of the products of this travel was A Journey through Texas. On his route via Natchitoches down the Old San Antonio Road, through the German settlements, down to the coastal prairie towns, through San Antonio, Eagle Pass, Houston, and Liberty, Olmsted commented on all phases of town and country life in Texas. Olmsted was a fervent opponent of slavery, and his journeys through Texas and the other slave states confirmed his deep-seated antipathy to forced servitude and to the South in general" (The Handbook of Texas Online: Olmsted).
($250-500)

PRECURSOR TO THE TREATY OF LIMITS

240. ONÍS, Luis de. Memoir upon the Negotiations Between Spain and the United States of America, Which led to the Treaty of 1819, with a Statistical Notice of that Country...Translated from the Spanish, with Notes, by Tobias Watkins. Washington: E. De Krafft, Printer, 1821. 152 pp. 8vo, new navy blue levant morocco over dark brown cloth, spine with raised bands and gilt lettering. Last signature with light uniform browning, else very fine. Rare.
         Second edition in English, revised and enlarged. The first edition was in Spanish and appeared at Madrid in 1820 (that edition in 2 volumes is a great rarity, particularly Vol. 2). A Mexican edition, also in Spanish, came out in 1826. In 1821 an edition in English with only Part One was published, omitting all the documents in the appendix except the Treaty of Limits. The present edition includes material omitted from the Baltimore edition. Eberstadt 162:580: "Negotiations which lead to the Treaty of 1819...one of the important documents in Texas, [Louisiana and Florida] history." American Imprints Inventory 6349. Howes O98: "Official correspondence concerning the Floridas and the disputed western boundary of Louisiana." Raines, p. 160. Sabin 57356. Streeter, Texas 1079c.
         This volume contains the negotiations that led to the Treaty of Limits, which established the Sabine boundary that had been rendered invalid with the change of sovereignty when Mexico achieved its independence. By the Treaty of Limits, Spain ceded to the United States both Floridas, including its claim to Alabama and Mississippi, and the United States agreed to accept the Sabine River as the Texas boundary. The Treaty also established Texas definitely as part of Mexico and opened the way for colonizing Texas through contracts with the Mexican government. The Treaty also set the border of the Louisiana purchase to be all the way to the Pacific Ocean, which strengthened the United States position in regard to Oregon and presaged the opening of the Santa Fe Trail. These negotiations were epochal for the future of the United States, Florida, Louisiana, and Texas.
($750-1,500) Illustrated Description>>

241. OSWANDEL, J. Jacob. Notes of the Mexican War, 1846-1847-1848.... Philadelphia: Privately printed for the author, 1885. 642 pp., engraved portraits and views. 8vo, original brown cloth. Fine. Laid in is an engraved one-page invitation from The Scott Legion...Philadelphia, March 6th, 1855 to dedicate a monument in Glenwood Cemetery to the memory of deceased comrades in arms (on p. 627 the author tells of the founding of Scott’s Legion, an organization of veterans of the Mexican-American War who served on Mexican soil.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 87. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, pp. 40-41: "Although the title states ‘revised,’ this is the first actual printing." Haferkorn, pp. 48-49. Tutorow 3593: "Oswandel’s account covers the period December 11, 1846, to July 29, 1848. He served with Company C, 1st Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, in Scott’s army. It has been suggested that the memoirs are based not so much on his own experiences or records, but on a diary kept by John Kreitzer. Contains many letters, a list of the officers and men in his organization, the names of deserters, and a list of those discharged or who had died." Smith & Judah (Chronicles of the Gringos) includes excerpts from Oswandel’s account, "Sordid ‘Camp Misery’" (pp. 297-299), "Mexican and the Camps" (pp. 307-308), and "Soldier’s View of Mexico City" (pp. 396-399). This book is one of those agonies of private publishing—the author states that he saved for thirty-five years to have his account published.
($200-400)

PRAIRIEDOM—WITH THE MAP

242. [PAGE, Frederic B.]. Prairiedom: Rambles and Scrambles in Texas or New Estrémadura. By a Suthron. New York: Paine & Burgess, 1845. 166 [2, blank] [3]-18 (ads) pp., engraved folding map within ornate border: Mexico [showing Mexico, Texas, the borderlands, and the West (24.2 x 30.3 cm; 9-1/2 x 12 inches), with inset of the settled portions of Texas and the coast. 12mo, original dark brown blind-stamped cloth, spine gilt. Upper joint neatly repaired and slight shelf wear. Unobtrusive embossed library stamp at bottom of title-page; inkstamp of library number at foot of dedication. Early ownership inscription on front pastedown, bookplate removed from front pastedown, remains of library slip on back pastedown, endsheets with some wear and staining. Interior fine, map excellent.
         First edition. Clark, Old South III:221: "Although the author includes some of his experiences on the road, this work is organized as a description of Texas rather than as a traveler’s log." Graff 3159. Howes P9. Rader 2568. Raines, p. 167. Streeter 1604: "This is a pleasant account of the author’s travels in Texas, for the most part of a journey in the spring of 1839 from the Sabine by way of Nacogdoches, Houston, Bastrop to San Antonio and return to Houston by way of Goliad and Texana, now Edna. It brings back to us now in charming fashion Texas of 1839." Page was a graduate of Harvard Medical School in 1821.
($500-1,000) Illustrated Description>>

WITH YET ANOTHER VERSION OF THE BRADFORD TEXAS MAP

243. PARKER, A. A. Trip to the West and Texas: Comprising a Journey of Eight Thousand Miles...in the Autumn and Winter 1834-5...With a Brief Sketch of the Texian War. Concord: William White; Boston: Benjamin B. Mussey, 1836. 380 pp., wood-engraved frontispiece (Prairie on Fire), 2 full-page untitled wood-engraved illustrations (wild horses and hunting deer), folding engraved unattributed map with original pale yellow shading to grants: Texas (19.4 x 25.2 cm; 7-5/8 x 9-7/8 inches), scale: 1 inch = approximately 80 miles. 16mo, original blind-stamped plum cloth, gilt pictorial spine depicting Lone Star flag with the word INDEPENDENCE printed upside down (rebacked, original spine preserved). The map should be restored, as it is slightly soiled, with a few splits at folds, and a few old repairs). Binding slightly worn and faded and a few minor spots, early ink-lettered label on front pastedown, contemporary ink ownership signature on title, and contemporary pencil note on p. 333 about Albert Martin, Alamo defender and one of the "Old Eighteen" defenders at Gonzales: "These eighteen men were commanded by Albert Martin, son of Jos. S. Martin of Providence—Albert was afterwards at St. Antonio, under Col Travis, and was murdered with the rest of the Garrison by the Mexicans."
         Second and best edition of the book, with the additional text on the Texas Revolution (56 pp.) and the added frontispiece. The first edition was published at Concord in 1835, with no map and two plates (with captions Shooting Deer and Wild Horses; in this second edition, those plates are uncaptioned). Basic Texas Books 159A: "The [56-page ‘Sketch of the Texian Revolution’] was one of the earliest accounts of the war in a book." Clark, Old South III:82. Graff 3184 (with only two plates and an unattributed map of Texas that measures 19.1 x 15.5 cm; scale: 1 inch = approximately 80 miles): "The second and better edition. The map is not found in all copies." Howes P74. Jenkins Catalogue (The Texas Revolution) 188:169: "The gilt Lone star flag on [the] spine [is] the first pictorial representation of the Lone Star of Texas." Phillips, Sporting Books 286. Plains & Rockies IV::57a:2. Raines, pp. 161-62: "One of the earliest descriptions of Texas in English." Streeter 1172A (calling for a folding colored map entitled Texas by Nathl Dearborn & Son, Engraver & Printer Boston, 19.0 x 26.0 cm, scale: 1 inch = approximately 72 miles): "Because this is one of the earliest travel books written in English about Texas, it is of great value."
         The map is a rare and variant feature of this second edition. One is fortunate to find a map in this book at all (only three copies of the book have appeared at auction going back to 1975, two lacked the map, and one had only a portion of the map), possibly indicating that the addition of a map to the second addition was an afterthought. We have seen three different maps with this book: (1) the Dearborn map described in Streeter’s 1172A, (2) an 1836 issue of the important Mitchell-Young map of Texas (see Streeter 1178), and (3) the present map, which is copied very closely from the 1835 Bradford map of Texas. Comparing the Parker-[Bradford] map with a copy we have in hand of the Bradford map (labeled 64.A.) from Bradford’s 1835 atlas, we find a few differences. The paper with the Parker-[Bradford] map is thin, and in the atlas version, the paper is quite thick. The southern border of the Parker-[Bradford] map is about a half degree further north than shown in the Bradford atlas map. The Parker-[Bradford] map does not locate Camargo, El Rincon, and Laguna de Santander, which are shown on the Bradford atlas map. The captions for Tamaulipas and "Mustangs or Wild Horses" have been moved slightly north and west. On the Parker-[Bradford] map, the caption "Longitude West from London" is in the center of the lower border; the caption "Longitude West from Washington" is in the center of the upper border—whereas in the Bradford atlas map these designations are to the left. The grants on the Parker-[Bradford] map are shaded pale yellow; on the Bradford atlas map, they are outlined in various colors. If anyone ever prepares a much-needed cartobibliography of the Bradford Texas maps, the present map should be included in that analysis.
($1,500-3,000)

244. PARKER, James. The Old Army Memories 1872-1918. Philadelphia: Dorrance & Company, [1929]. 454 pp., photographic frontispiece portrait and plates. 8vo, original gilt-lettered navy blue cloth. Fine copy, inscribed on front free endpaper: "Compliments of the author James Parker."
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1686. Graff 3186: "Very interesting account of frontier Indian warfare and life at the forts in the Southwest and West during the 70s and 80s. He gives a fine account of the Geronimo Campaign, and his appreciation of General Mackenzie as an Indian fighter is excellent." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 3051. Besides the Texas content, there are chapters on buffalo hunting, the Ute Campaign, Fort Myer and San Francisco, the Spanish-American War, the Philippine insurrection, etc. Pingenot: Parker’s first assignment as a young lieutenant was at Fort Clark, Texas, near the Mexican border, where he participated in forays into Mexico and described near clashes against Mexican army units. Fine military memoirs; now scarce.
($100-300)

IMPORTANT & EARLY MAP OF THE OREGON COUNTRY

245. PARKER, Samuel. Journal of an Exploring Tour Beyond the Rocky Mountains, under the Direction of the A.B.C.F.M. Performed in the Years 1835, ’36, and ’37; Containing a Description of the Geography, Geology, Climate, and Productions; and the Number, Manners, and Customs of the Natives. With a Map of Oregon Territory. Ithaca: Published by the Author, 1838. xii, 371 pp., large folding engraved map (Map of Oregon Territory...1838; 35.6 x 62.2 cm; 14 x 24-1/2 inches). 12mo, original green blind embossed cloth, printed paper spine label (skillfully rebacked, original spine preserved and sympathetic endsheets). Slight wear to spinal extremities, generally fine and fresh, the map excellent.
         First edition. Graff 3192. Howes P89. Pilling 2904. Plains & Rockies IV:70:1. Rader 2600. Smith 7893. Washington 89 60: "Parker went out to the Rockies in 1835 on a fur trading expedition with the American Fur Company. Dr. Marcus Whitman was a member of the party for part of the journey. Parker arrived at Walla Walla in October, 1835, and returned in 1837....It has been said of Parker’s journal: ‘In all the qualities which an historian would require, it has few equals.’ The first edition of this book is quite scarce, later editions are not so hard to come by."
         Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 438 & II, pp. 165-65: "Parker’s ‘Map of Oregon Territory’ of 1838 represented a real advance, and was made from personal observation. Of it Wagner-Camp remarked that it was ‘the earliest to obtain any circulation which contains reliable information as to the interior of the Oregon Territory....Parker’s map had wide circulation, and was a notable achievement.’"
($250-500)

246. PARKER, William B. Notes Taken during the Expedition Commanded by Capt. R. B. Marcy, U.S.A., through Unexplored Texas, in the Summer and Fall of 1854. Philadelphia: Hayes & Zell, 1856. xii [9]-242 [6, ads] pp. 12mo, original brown cloth blind-stamped with publisher’s logo on covers, title in gilt on spine. Very slight spinal rubbing, otherwise a fine, crisp copy.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 135n: "A well written narrative [which] adds flavor to Marcy’s report." Bradford 4186. Field 1174: "Crowded with the most interesting details of...the Indian tribes of the southern prairies." Graff 3195: "Especially valuable for the northwest part of Texas." Howes P91. Plains & Rockies IV:279: "This expedition, led by Captain Randolph Marcy, included Dr. G. G. Shumard of Fort Smith and William B. Parker, a friend of Captain Marcy and the author of these Notes. The party left Fort Smith on June 1, 1854....They traveled by way of Fort Washita to the Little Washita River and to the headwaters of the Brazos River, where they surveyed a site on Clear Fork. They returned to Fort Smith on October 15." Raines, p. 162: "A readable and reliable description of northwestern Texas before its settlement." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2176: "A valuable report by one of the civilians who accompanied Capt. Randolph B. Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors across northwestern Texas looking for a site upon which reservations could be created for Penateka Comanches and the small, displaced tribes of Texas." Vandale, Texianameter 129.
($400-800)

247. PELZER, Louis. Marches of the Dragoons in the Mississippi Valley: An Account of Marches and Activities of the First Regiment United States Dragoons in the Mississippi Valley Between the Years 1833 and 1850. Iowa City: State Historical Society of Iowa, 1917. x, 282 pp. 8vo, original gilt-decorated burgundy buckram. Very fine and bright—uncut and unopened.
         First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, pp. 178-79. Howes P188. Rittenhouse 459: "One of the best sources on general history of the Dragoons, cited by all authoritative writers on the subject. Chapter VI describes the expedition of the Dragoons to the Rocky Mountains in 1835." Tutorow 3311: "Chapters 14-15 deal with the marches of the Army of the West and the journey to California. An appendix contains Captain Nathan Boone’s journal."
($60-120)

248. [PHOTOGRAPHY]. Small collection of early photographs:

[CORSICANA TELEPHONE COMPANY]. Photograph of the switchboard room and operators of the Corsicana Telephone Company. 5 women are seated at the switchboards; 2 men are in the background; and a boy seated on the floor is identified on the reverse as "W. H. Norwood, age 12." The Coca-Cola calendar on the wall is open to March 1902. 12.2 x 17.2 cm (4-3/4 x 6-3/4 inches).

[AVIATION]. "ENLIST—LEARN TO FLY." Collection of 36 snapshot photographs, undated, but about 1917-18. 13.7 x 8.4 cm (5-3/8 x 3-1/4 inches) and 6.7 x 4.4 cm (2-5/8 x 1-3/4 inches). The primary interest for the photographer(s) is a biplane with the words "Enlist—Learn to Fly" on the fuselage, and many people are shown standing next to the wonderful flying machine. About half a dozen photographs are aerial city views of Eagle Pass. Other subjects include three men in bathing costume, men in army uniform, etc.

[PECOS HIGH BRIDGE]. 2 original nineteenth-century albumen photographs of the Pecos High Bridge:

(1) CURTIS, C. D. (photographer). Pecos Bridge.... El Paso, ca. 1894. 16 x 21.2 cm (6-1/4 x 8-3/8 inches). A view from downstream showing the Pecos River gorge and about half the length of the bridge.

(2) CURTIS, C. D. (photographer). Pecos Bridge - Highest Bridge in the U.S. El Paso, ca. 1894. 16 x 21.2 cm (6-1/4 x 8-3/8 inches). A view from the abutment area with tourists standing and walking on the bridge.
         The Pecos High Bridge, completed in 1892, was the second and most famous of three railroad bridges across the Pecos River. The bridge "was of the metal viaduct style with cantilever center sections. It was supported by twenty-four towers and had a total length of 2,180 feet. The rails stood 321 feet above the river. The bridge was thus the highest bridge in North America and the third highest in the world. For many years it was a tradition for trains to pause near the bridge and proceed slowly so that passengers could view the canyon, the landmark bridge, and the river below" (The Handbook of Texas Online: Pecos High Bridge).
(About 39 photographs)
($100-200)

249. PICHARDO, José Antonio. Pichardo’s Treatise on the Limits of Louisiana and Texas.... Austin: University of Texas, 1931, 1934, 1941, 1946. 4 vols., complete (with maps), 8vo, original navy blue cloth. A very fine set in slightly worn dust jackets, original prospectus laid in. Difficult to find complete, as the set was issued over a fifteen-year period.
         First edition of a previously unpublished manuscript written 1808-1812, translated, edited, and annotated by Charles Wilson Hackett. Basic Texas Books 160: "Gambrell deemed it ‘easily the most important reference work on the colonial history of Texas yet published in English’....When President Jefferson persisted in claiming that the territory included in the Louisiana Purchase extended to the Rio Grande, the Spanish government ordered that historical data be gathered to prove Spain’s ownership of Texas. The result was that in 1808 Father Pichardo was named head of a historical commission to ascertain the historic boundary of Louisiana and Texas....Few works of history have had a more direct effect on international diplomacy and law or on the subsequent history of the area involved. Enormous wealth of data...literally thousands of documents relating to Texas. Many of these no longer exist....With the addition of Hackett’s superb annotations, the treatise provides us with one of the fundamental resources on the early history of Texas." Clark, Old South I:23. Rader 2664. Steck, p. 14. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 1834: "One of the most important sources on Texas Indians during the Spanish-French colonial period." Wagner, Spanish Southwest, pp. 114-15n. The Handbook of Texas Online (Pichardo).
($600-1,200)

250. PIKE, Zebulon M. The Expeditions of Zebulon Montgomery Pike, to Headwaters of the Mississippi River...by Elliott Coues. New York: Francis P. Harper, 1895. [8] cxiii [1] 356 + vi [357]-855 + [6] 857-955 pp., engraved portrait of Pike, 7 maps, facsimiles. 3 vols., 8vo, original white cloth over beige boards, printed paper spine labels. Fragile bindings moderately worn and soiled, otherwise very fine. Contemporary ink ownership inscription.
         "Best edition" (Howes); limited edition (#13 of 150 large paper copies). Basic Texas Books 163F: "Marks the beginning of serious American interest in Texas." Eberstadt, Texas 162:603n: "One of the great classics of American exploration. Pike journeyed across Texas in 1807, and his description of the country is excellent and among the earliest." Field 1217n. "First government exploration of the Southwest." Harvard Guide to American History, p. 157. Howes P373: "Best edition, with copious notes....First government exploration of the Southwest." Plains & Rockies IV:9n. Raines, p. 16n. Rittenhouse 467n: "Scholars have preferred the 1895 edition for its annotations, clarity, and appended documents." Saunders 3095. Streeter 1047n. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 299n. Pingenot: One of the cornerstone works of Southwestern exploration.
($750-1,500)

WITH ORIGINAL, SIGNED DRAWING BY CISNEROS

251. PORTER, Eugene. San Elizario. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1973. 100 pp., illustrated by José Cisneros. 4to, original half brown morocco over vellum, spine gilt-lettered and with raised bands. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#3 of 50 copies, each of which contains an original signed drawing by José Cisneros). Lowman, Printing Arts in Texas, p. 42: "San Elizario, past and present, is expertly captured...far and away the finest production issued from the Pemberton Press." Pingenot: The history of San Elizario mission and area near El Paso since the 16th century. A few remaining copies of the limited edition, saved back by the publisher, were destroyed in the disastrous fire on Christmas Eve, 1985.
($
150-300)

252. POWERS, Stephen. Afoot and Alone; A Walk from Sea to Sea by the Southern Route. Adventures and Observations in Southern California, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, etc.... Hartford: Columbian Book Company, 1872. [vii]-xvi [17]-327 [1] 1 (ad) pp. (complete), engraved frontispiece, plates, and text illustrations by True Williams. 8vo, original green gilt pictorial cloth. Slightly shelf slanted and light wear and staining to binding, a few signatures weak, internally fine.
         First edition. Clark, New South I:177. Cowan, p. 498. Edwards, p. 202. Graff 3339. Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators and Wood Engravers 1995 & I, pp. 223-24. Howell, California 50:723. Howes P537. Munk (Alliott), p. 181. Rocq 16356. Zamorano Eighty 61: "A highly interesting book by the first man, probably, who ever walked alone from one coast to the other...it became so popular and was so widely read that it is today almost impossible to find a fine copy." "[Afoot and Alone] differed significantly from other travel narratives of the day. Instead of touting the famous and novel, Powers had made a special effort to seek out the common folk along the way. In his pages he graphically pictured Southerners struggling to recover from a tragic civil war; emigrants wrestling with the rigors of wagon travel; frontiersmen battling hostile Indians; and native groups in California yielding to waves of newcomers....His book offered perceptive insights into the nature and diversity of American society during the restless age."—Harwood Hinton, from the introduction of the Book Club of Texas edition (1995).($150-300)

253. PRICE, George F. (compiler). Across the Continent with the Fifth Cavalry. New York: Van Nostrand, 1883. 705 [1] pp., engraved portraits. Royal 8vo, original gilt-pictorial cloth, bevelled edges. Hinges cracked, but strong, else a fine, bright copy preserved in a custom cloth slipcase. Contemporary engraved bookplate of Edward M. Crane.
         First edition. Graff 3361. Howes P582. Munk (Alliott), p. 81. Nicholson, p. 669. Rader 2735. Pingenot: A narrative of the regiment’s activity beginning in 1855 with a march to Texas, and continuing service in Texas until 1861. Later the regiment saw service in Nebraska, in Arizona against the Apaches, and in the Indian Wars of the Plains from the Canadian River to the Yellowstone in Montana. An important source concerning U.S. military in the American West.
($200-400)

254. [PUNITIVE EXPEDITION]. CONVERSE, John W. Report of...Punitive Expedition into Mexico under the Command of General Frederick W. Funston, March 15th to April 19th, 1916. N.p.: Privately printed, [1916]. 29 pp., 9 photographic illustrations, 1 map. 8vo, original stiff white printed wrappers bound in three-quarter yellow cloth over brown cloth. Binding lightly soiled, otherwise very fine. Author’s engraved compliments card laid in. Contemporary ownership inscription of Robert McLean.
         First edition of a modern rarity on the borderlands. Pingenot: Exceedingly rare narrative written by a member of the Punitive Expedition against Pancho Villa published in a very small edition. Unknown bibliographically. The author, a sergeant with the First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry, a National Guard unit, was granted permission by the Adjutant General of the N.G. of Pennsylvania to accompany the expedition as an observer attached to the 13th Cavalry. Written as a journal, Sgt. Converse describes events as they unfold, including the army’s use of motorized vehicles, aeroplanes [sic], extracts of orders, actions taken by troop commanders, description of the country and inhabitants, etc. Pp. 21-29 contain notes detailing clothing, cooking, arms, drill, care of horses, marching, etc.
($400-800)

PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPH OF THE PUNITIVE EXPEDITION

255. [PUNITIVE EXPEDITION]. HOLT FEATURE FILM CO. Military Camp Eagle Pass Texas 1916. Eagle Pass, 1916. 13.5 x 81 cm (5-1/2 x 31-7/8 inches). Panoramic silver print photograph. Framed in contemporary dark wood frame. On the left side, about 140 conical tents are laid out in strict military rows, and a barbed-wire fenced corral is on the right. In the distance are rows of more substantial identical houses (officers’ quarters?) and some traditional wall tents.

256. [PUNITIVE EXPEDITION]. STINESS, Henry R. W. (editor). Battery A on the Mexican Border 1916. Providence, R.I.: [Edward S. Jones Sons Co., 1917]. [144] pp., photographic illustrations. Folio, original padded khaki, title in red & battery emblem on cover. Considerable soiling and spotting; internally fine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Mustered into Federal service June 24, 1916 on order of President Wilson and mustered out on November 2, 1916, this work memorializes Battery A of the Rhode Island National Guard. Profusely photo-illustrated, most of the book details their activities at Fort Bliss near El Paso, Texas. Captain Everett Chaffee was battery commander. Rare.
($150-300)

THE RIO GRANDE RATTLER

257. [PUNITIVE EXPEDITION]. UNITED STATES. ARMY. NEW YORK DIVISION. The Rio Grande Rattler. Published in the Field by the New York Division. Vol. I, No. 7 (October 4, 1916). Hidalgo County, Texas, 1916. 8 pp., cartoon illustration, map of Wells Fargo route, pictorial ads. Double folio newspaper. Mild uniform browning, some light marginal tears or chipping, friable.
         An interesting, sprightly newspaper relating to U.S. military pursuit of Pancho Villa. "The Rattler is a credit to the boys who publish it ‘weekly at odd places in Texas’" declares the masthead. The motto of this ephemeral production is: "The Strength of the Wolf is the Pack, but the Strength of the Pack is the Wolf." The newspaper imparts a real flavor of military operations and life along the border for the New York soldiers sent to pursue the wily Villa. Besides official news, there are articles such as "Aviation Training Camp, Hempstead...Would be a Great Asset on Border" and "Frontier Day Pronounced Greatest Event in Texas. Soldiers and Cow Boys Join in Entertaining Thousands of Visitors—McAllen Gets Greatest Throng in History of Town. The Red Letter Day on the Southern Mexican Border." One of the editorials—"Booze and By-Products"—explains the "beneficent effects of the order prohibiting the use of liquor and frequenting places of prostitution" and comments: "The men of the New York Division do not patronize prostitutes when they are at home, and there is no reason why they should when they are in the field as soldiers." Wares offered in ads include a host of ice cream establishments (90 cents a gallon delivered), pies, hotels (the Nueces Hotel is touted as "The Naples of the Gulf", screens for tents, Stetson hats, English wrap puttees for the Valley, military garb, hardware drugs, Post Toasties, etc.
($100-$300)

WANTED AT ONCE! 75 ABLE-BODIED MEN

258. [PUNITIVE EXPEDITION]. UNITED STATES. ARMY. FOURTH INFANTRY. [Printed recruitment poster, commencing]: Wanted–At Once. 75 Able-Bodied Men between the Ages of 18 and 35. For Active Duty along the Mexican Border and Mexico. No Money Required. Everything Furnished. Apply to Co M Armory, Elks’ Auditorium, Champaign, Ill. (Signed Carl T. Prestin, Recruiting Officer 1st Lieut. Co. M, 4th Inf. N.p., n.d. 1 p., 4to broadside printed on recto. Browned.
         A very of-the-moment bold-type broadside calling for volunteers to join the military expedition against Pancho Villa in 1916.
($60-120)

259. [PUNITIVE EXPEDITION]. A small collection of 25 photographs and photographic postcards, mostly relating to the Punitive Expedition of 1914-17 and the United States military presence in South Texas. Generally approximately 8 x 12.5 cm (3 x 5 inches) and fine. Images include:

and 13 others.
($200-400)

CLASSIC YELLOWSTONE ACCOUNT—WITH MAP

260. RAYNOLDS, W. F. Report on the Exploration of the Yellowstone River. Washington: SED77, 1868. [2] 174 pp., large folding lithographed map (U.S. War Department, Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers and their Tributaries....; 68.0 x 105.5 cm; 26-3/4 x 41-1/2 inches). 8vo, original green cloth. Gilt lettering on upper cover faded, stained at lower blank corner of first 50 pages (affecting only a few words), map very fine.
         First edition of the first complete printing of General Raynold’s account of his exploration of the Yellowstone River region. The expedition was begun in 1859, but according to Howes R88: "A four-page preliminary report was issued in Senate Exec. Doc. 1, 1860; the Civil War prevented earlier publication in this completed form." Graff 3429. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 29: "Raynolds was directed to explore the region through which flow the principal tributaries of the Yellowstone River....His descriptions are good and his map is important." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 1012 & IV, p. 187: "An extremely well-drawn map, and except for the fact that it contains certain information gathered between the time of its making and that of its actual printing, which was not until 1868, it is probably the best map of its area that had been produced."
($150-300)

261. READ, Benjamin M. Illustrated History of New Mexico...Translated into English under the direction of the Author, by Eleuterio Baca, of Las Vegas, N.M. [Santa Fe: New Mexican Printing Company], 1912. 812 pp., illustrations (mostly photographic), printed errata sheet tipped onto front pastedown. Royal 8vo, original blind-stamped gilt-lettered purple cloth. Binding slightly faded and slightly worn at extremities. Preserved in a navy blue cloth slipcase. Author’s presentation copy to noted Spanish Southwest scholar Herbert E. Bolton, with inscription above author’s portrait: "For Prof. Herbert E. Bolton, Compliments of the author." Ink stamp "Bolton Collection" on errata. Laid in is a letter written in Spanish to the author from his son, Pablo, dated at Pueblo, Colorado in 1912.
         First edition in English (first published in Spanish in Santa Fe the prior year), limited edition (#194 of 500 numbered copies). Graff 3430. Howes R90. Rader 2765. Saunders 4545. Pingenot: "The best edition as it is expanded over the Spanish version that preceded it. A notable work covering the period of early exploration, the Indians and their culture, the work of missionaries, the various governments of New Mexico, etc.
($300-600)

262. REED, S. G. A History of the Texas Railroads.... Houston: St. Clair, [1941]. x, 822 pp. 8vo, original blue cloth. Other than minor shelf wear, very fine. Signed by author on printed limitation notice affixed to front pastedown.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 169: "One of the most comprehensive studies of the railroading history of any state, this is by far the best on Texas railroads."
($250-450)

MERRILL ARISTOCRAT

263. REMINGTON, Frederic. Crooked Trails. New York & London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1898. v [3] 151 pp., frontispiece and plates by Remington. 8vo, original pictorial ecru cloth with blue, green and lilac. A few minor spots on binding, some stains to pastedowns and free endpapers.
         First edition. Adams, Herd 1877: "Scarce." BAL 16491. Dobie, p. 114-15. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington) 309; Western High Spots, pp. 121-22 ("Ranger Reading"); ("Remington Rarities" #30). Graff 3455. Howes R203. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 23. One Hundred Head 88: "Remington used his published writings as vehicles for his art. In Crooked Trails he has demonstrated his skills as both illustrator and author." Wright III:4510. Pingenot: The author’s second book and with the text wholly by him, consisting of a collection of short stories and reminiscences commencing with "How the Law Got into the Chaparral" (Rip Ford and the Texas Rangers).
($200-400)

264. [REMINGTON, FREDERIC]. McCRACKEN, Harold. The Frederic Remington Book: A Pictorial History of the West. Garden City: Doubleday, 1966. 284 pp., color frontispiece, preceded by a tipped-in color illustration, text drawings, and profuse illustrations. Small folio, full brown leather with gilt stamping, a.e.g., slipcase with gilt stamped leather label. About mint.
         First edition, limited edition (#240 of 500 numbered and signed copies). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington) 805.
($200-400)

265. REVERE, Joseph W. Keel and Saddle: A Retrospect of Forty Years of Military and Naval Service. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1872. xiii [1] 360 pp. 12mo, original gilt pictorial cloth stamped in gilt and blind. Binding slightly rubbed at foot, minor wear at extremities, blind-embossed stamp of a Chicago library on a few inner text leaves, small stain on front free endpaper, modern bookplate on front pastedown. Binding very bright and tight, text fine.
         First edition. Cowan, p. 530. Graff 3473. Haferkorn, p. 73. Hill, p. 552: "This work was published when the author was sixty years old and gives a sketch of his colorful and at times controversial life. Revere had been in the American Navy since 1828, and in 1845, he was aboard the Portsmouth in California with Commodore Sloat’s squadron. It was Revere who first raised the American flag at Sonoma. After the war, he was appointed a U.S. agent in California, and he made several high profitable trading voyages down the Mexican coast, which enabled him to visit and provide a detailed description of San Diego, which he called ‘the queen of the south of California.’In 1851 Revere became a colonel in the Mexican Army and reorganized its artillery. During the Civil War he served as a Union general." Howell 50:765: "A readable narrative dealing with the author’s experiences in various parts of the world, including his reminiscences of California in 1845 with Commodore Sloat’s squadron and life in Marin County in 1859-50. Howes (1954) 8548. Tutorow 3671: "A gossipy memoir of naval and other experiences."
        
The author’s A Tour of Duty in California (New York & Boston, 1849) is entry 63 in Zamorano Eighty, where Layne comments: "Lieutenant Revere was a graduate of Annapolis and a grandson of Paul Revere. His Tour of Duty is one of the outstanding authorities on the period of the Conquest, and his descriptions of California and the gold regions are among the best....Revere became so enamored of the country that he acquired a rancho near Sonoma and returned to California to live the life of a ranchero."
($100-300)

266. RICHARDSON, Rupert Norval. The Comanche Barrier to South Plains Settlement: A Century and a Half of Savage Resistance to the Advancing White Frontier. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1933. 424 [4, ads] pp., plates, double-page maps. 8vo, original blue cloth. Contemporary ink stamp of The Pioneering Printing Co., Inc. on front free endpaper, front pastedown and free endpaper foxed, otherwise fine, mostly unopened.
         First edition, limited edition (750 copies). Basic Texas Books 171n. Clark & Brunet 207: "A classic account of the conflict on the southern Plains between white encroachment and Comanche resistance. It is recounted in a scholarly and impartial manner, and the book has long been considered a classic in frontier literature." Dobie, p. 35. Dykes, Western High Spots ("Western Movement—Its Literature"), p. 18. Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 68: "This is straightforward history, done well and done professionally by a writer I consider the equal to any historian the Southwest has produced." Harvard Guide to American History, p. 414. Saunders 3122. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2415.
($200-400)

267. RICHARDSON, Rupert Norval. The Comanche Barrier to South Plains Settlement. Edited by Kenneth R. Jacobs. With a new introduction by A. C. Greene. Abilene: Hardin-Simmons University [designed and printed by W. Thomas Taylor], 1991. xv [3] 260 [3] pp., photographic plates (William S. Soule’s photographs made between 1869 and 1874 in Indian Territory), text illustrations in terracotta by Barbara Whitehead. Royal 8vo, original beige decorated morocco over burgundy cloth, brown gilt-lettered spine label. Very fine.
         Limited edition (225 copies in the special binding by Booklab), second and enlarged edition of preceding. Pingenot: Richardson’s scholarly work is considered a classic on the subject of advancing the south plains frontier against Comanche Indian resistance. This printing contains over ten thousand words of text that the editors deleted from the original edition. Due to the small number of copies printed, its ‘press book’ format, and restored text, this edition is destined to appreciate as much as the first edition.
($
150-300)

268. RICHTHOFEN, Walter, Baron von. Cattle-Raising on the Plains. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1885. 102 [6, ads] pp. 12mo, original green cloth with red ruling and title stamped in gilt on upper cover. Light outer wear, otherwise fine.
         First edition. Adams, Herd 1892: "A scarce little book dealing with the business side of cattle raising, giving tables of profits to be made. This, with several other books of its kind, helped to create the cattle boom of the eighties." Campbell, 101 75. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 13. Graff 3499. Howes R273. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 23. Rader 2786. Reese, Six Score 90: "A rather strange little book written by a German nobleman with some ranching experience. Richthofen was enthusiastic about the range industry...[and was also] the father of the famous World War I ace."
($300-600)

269. RIPLEY, R. S. The War with Mexico. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1849. [3] xiv-xxii [3] 26-524 + [3] iv-vii [2] 10-650, 14 (ads) pp., 14 maps and plans lithographed by Sarony & Major major battles (including the Texas battles: Battle of Palo Alto. May 8th. 1846 and Battle of Resaca de la Palma. May 9th. 1846), Monterrey, siege of Veracruz, route from Veracruz to Mexico, Valley of Mexico (2 views), storming of Chapultepec. 2 vols., 8vo, original brown blind-stamped cloth. Light shelf wear, occasional mild foxing to text, endpapers discolored, Vol. 1 text waterstained. Ownership signature of John S. Jenkins, who wrote several works on the Mexican-American War. Interspersed in pencil in the text are Jenkins’ asterisks noting material of interest to him. Sprinkled in occasionally are Jenkins’ critical remarks, such as "Not true!" on the Texas Question. Interesting association copy.
         First edition.
Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 23: "The earliest major history of the war and long the only thorough one. It is surprisingly detailed and accurate considering the early date....Ripley does not attempt to affix blame or culpability on either nation....[He] was more interested in the military engagements, but...[does discuss] the effects of both U.S. and Mexican domestic politics on the course of the war." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 44. Haferkorn, p. 17. Howes R311. Raines, p. 174: "As a military history it has not yet been excelled. Scarce and highly valued." Tutorow 3232. The lithographed maps and plans are excellent, showing troop movements, regiments, and all manner of military detail. Pingenot: Contains much on strategic operations of the war, much of it gathered first-hand.
($150-$350)

RECUERDOS DE LA INVASIÓN NORTE-AMERICANA

270. ROA BÁRCENA, José María. Recuerdos de la invasión norte-americana 1846-1848 por un jóven de entónces. Mexico: Juan Buxó y Ca., 1883. [6] ii, 686 pp. 8vo, contemporary half brown morocco over brown, yellow, and orange marbled boards, spine gilt with raised bands. An exceptionally fine, crisp copy.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 25: "Bancroft praised the book saying it was the result of study of both American and Mexican documents." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 45: "This work is considered basic to the study of the Mexican-American War and it is among the best accounts by a Mexican author." Griffin 4245: "The most impartial, detailed, complete, and well-written account on the North American invasion. Roa Bárcena’s thesis is that defending Mexican forces did not give such a bad account of themselves." Haferkorn, p. 17. Harvard Guide to American History, p. 373. Howes R333. Palau 270660. Tutorow 3672: "Standard history of the Mexican War from the Mexican perspective."
($100-200)

271. ROBINSON, Sara T. L. Kansas: Its Interior and Exterior Life. Includes a Full View of Its Settlement, Political History, Social Life, Climate, Soil, Productions, Scenery, etc. Boston: Crosby, Nichols and Company; Cincinnati: George S. Blanchard; London: Sampson Low, Son & Co., 1856. ix [1] 366, 6 (ads) pp., 2 engraved plates (including frontispiece). 8vo, original blind-stamped red cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Light shelf wear and plates browned, overall very good, and a bright copy in the unusual red binding. Front free endpaper with old oval inkstamp and early bookplate of J. E. Tilton Bookseller and Circulating Library. This is a difficult book to find in first edition and in fine condition.
         First edition. Adams, Herd 1921: "Scarce." Dary, Kanzana 37. Plains & the Rockies IV:279b:1: "The state of affairs during this hectic period is...realistically depicted by Sara Robinson." Rader 2804. Sabin 72178. Written during a three-month stay in the United States Camp at Lecompton, where the author’s husband was a state prisoner, Mrs. Robinson provides a wealth of detail on the early settlement of Kansas by ranchers, the Border Wars, and the vicissitudes of pioneer women in the attendant strife. Pingenot: Robinson provides information concerning settlement of Kansas, its climate, soil and productions. Scarce in the first edition as many editions followed.
($
75-150)

ORIGINAL BOARDS, UNCUT

AUTHOR’S ALS WITH NEWS ON BOLIVAR & THE REVOLUTION

272. ROBINSON, William Davis. Memoirs of the Mexican Revolution: Including a Narrative of the Expedition of General Xavier Mina. With Some Observations on the Practicability of Opening a Commerce between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, through the Mexican Isthmus in the Province of Oaxaca, and at the Lake of Nicaragua; and on the Future Importance of Such Commerce to the Civilized World, and More Especially to the United States.... Philadelphia: Printed for the Author, Lydia R. Bailey, Printer, 1820. xxxvi, 396 pp. 8vo, beige original beige boards, original beige paper backstrip and printed pink spine label, uncut. Fragile binding with very light shelf wear, text uniformly browned. Preserved in a beige folding box with tan leather labels. An exceptional unsophisticated copy, in the original boards, uncut. Contemporary ink ownership signature of Josiah Wood. Laid in is a signed autograph letter (New York, May 3, 1815, 2 pp., folio, integral address and postal cancel on p. [4]) from author Robinson to Domingo Garcia Sena (see final paragraph below for more on the letter).
         First edition of a rare Texas and Latin American book. Howes R380: "Chief contemporary authority on the audacious filibustering expedition against Mexico under Mina, launched with a handful of men, through Texas in 1817. Notable also for its advocacy of a communication between the Atlantic and Pacific via Nicaragua." Palau 271093. Raines, p. 176: "One of the standard histories of the Mexican Revolution." Streeter 1080: "Nearly contemporary account of General Xavier Mina and of his expedition from Galveston Island." Robinson’s Memoirs is one of the few contemporary sources for the Mexican experiences of Samuel Bangs, the first Texas printer, who accompanied Mina and created the first Texas imprints during this expedition.
         Robinson’s original autographed letter to Domingo Garcia Sena describes his problems in launching his revolutionary expedition to South America due to the proclamation issued by "Marmion" against Simon Bolivar. Robinson praises Bolivar’s efforts to liberate South America from Spain. Robinson complains that "this accursed proclamation" has raised doubts in the minds of his backers, and says: "Although I believe it only a mementary burst of faction, and although I know that BOLIVAR cannot have any other motive than the welfare and Independence of New Granda Venezuella, yet I cannot persuade my friends to pursue their operations until get some new intelligence form Carthagena."
($750-1,500) Illustrated Description>>

"MUCH OF INTEREST FOR TEXAS AND THE WEST AND THE INDIAN WARS"—PINGENOT

273. RODENBOUGH, Theo[philus] F[rancis] & William L. Hasken. The Army of the United States: Historical Sketches of Staff and Line with Portraits of Generals-in-Chief. New York: Maynard, Merrill & Co., 1896. xi [2], 741 pp., 17 stipple engraved portraits (George Washington, James Wilkinson, Winfield Scott, Henry W. Halleck, Ulysses Simpson Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Henry Sheridan, Nelson Appleton Miles, et al.). Royal 8vo, original plum cloth (neatly rebacked, original spine retained). Binding slightly abraded and corners of upper cover bumped. One plate with staining at top blank margin.
         First edition. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, pp. 126-27 (citing only the 1966 reprint). This work contains much of interest for Texas and the West and the Indian Wars. Pingenot: This is a work difficult to find in collector’s condition. Much rarer than Rodenbough’s "From Everglade to Canyon." A detailed history of the artillery, 10th Cavalry and 25th Infantry to 1896, as well as the 2nd Cavalry which became the 5th Cavalry, etc. For some units, like the 8th and 9th cavalry this is the best and most detailed account extant. It is both useful and rare. Not in Howes, Graff, Rader, or any other major bibliography.
($
1,000-2,000)

274. RODENBOUGH, Theo[philus] F[rancis]. From Everglade to Cañon with the Second Dragoons (Second United States Cavalry): An Authentic Account of Service in Florida, Mexico, Virginia, and the Indian Country, Including the Personal Recollections of Prominent Officers....1836-1875. New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1875. 561 [1] [4] pp., 6 chromolithographic plates by noted Civil War artist Edwin Forbes (including frontispiece), engraved black-and-white plates and text illustrations, 2 folding maps: (1) Battle Fields Marches & Principal Stations of the Second Regiment of Dragoons (Second Cavalry) in the United States & Mexico; (2) Map of Portions of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania....1836-75. Thick royal 8vo, original gilt pictorial terracotta cloth, bevelled edges. Binding neatly mended at extremities and along spine; mild to moderate staining to binding. Contemporary ink ownership signature of Lucien Howe on front endpaper, later ink ownership stamp of Dr. Lucien Howe on title-page (Dr. Howe [1848-1928] was a noted ophthalmologist whose ancestor, Col. Maxwell S. Howe, is mentioned throughout the book). Very good copy, internally fine. Preserved in a terracotta cloth slipcase.
         First edition. Eberstadt 110: 193: "Included in this work is the day-by-day Journal of Wm. Drownn from 1852 to 1858, embracing a narrative of wild adventures in New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming." Eberstadt, Modern Overlands 412. Flake 7399. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 179-80. Graff 3544. Haferkorn, p. 50. Howes R395. Munk (Alliott), p. 191. Rader 2813. Tutorow 3312: "The war with Mexico is covered on pages 91-146. Appendices (dealing with the war include) the journey from New Orleans to Matamoros, Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, Monterrey, Agua Nueva, Buena Vista, Scott’s operations...California, Texas, New Mexico expedition, and Indian and Mormon campaigns." This work includes the Texas battles. Pingenot: A rare work that because of its size is usually found in broken and dilapidated condition. A long Appendix gives biographical sketches of leading officers and a short account of all battles and skirmishes in which they participated, from 1836 on. A cornerstone book for the history of the Second Dragoons which became the Second U.S. Cavalry.
($750-1,500)

CONSIDERED THE RAREST SAN ANTONIO BOOK

275. RODRÍGUEZ, [José María]. Rodríguez Memoirs of Early Texas. [San Antonio: Passing Show Printing Co.], 1913. 76 pp., frontispiece portrait, text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo, original suede with turquoise and yellow olive green lettering and decoration, original leather ties. Very fine, with engraved Rodríguez family presentation card laid in. Exceedingly rare.
         First edition. CBC 434. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 20 (designating a print run of 100 to 200 copies). Howes R398 (stating 100 copies printed). Rader 2814: "The principal families living in San Antonio prior to the annexation of Texas." The Handbook of Texas Online (Rodríguez). Pingenot: Rodríguez (ca. 1829-1913) was a native San Antonian, as were his father and grandfather on both his father’s and his mother’s side. As a small boy Rodríguez met W. B. Travis and was in San Antonio during the Alamo battle. Later, he served as county assessor-collector during the governorship of Sam Houston. After the Civil War he moved to Laredo where he was elected county clerk and then county judge, an office he held continuously for thirty-five years until his death. Rodríguez’ daughter, Alice, was the first wife of then Lieutenant John L. Bullis. The Rodríguez memoirs, published in a limited edition of 200 copies for the friends of the family, is considered by many to be the rarest San Antonio book. It contains much important information on San Antonio as well as Texas history. Especially valuable are the sketches of sixteen pioneer San Antonio Mexican families.
($750-1,000) Illustrated Description>>

276. RUXTON, George F[rederick Augustus] Adventures in Mexico and the Rocky Mountains. New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 1848. 312 pp. 12mo, original blind-stamped teal cloth, gilt-decorated spine with gilt lettering. Light foxing, as usual, otherwise a fine, bright copy. Modern ownership inscription on front endpaper.
         First American edition (with 1848 date on title) Plains & Rockies IV:139:2. Pingenot: The date "1849" appears on the spine because the sheets, printed late in the year, were not bound until early in 1849. In 1846 this young Englishman landed at Vera Cruz and went northward to El Paso, Santa Fe and Taos, then eastward in 1847 via Bent’s Fort on the Santa Fe Trail. Fine description of pioneer life, Indians, buffalo, etc. as the author describes his journey along the Red River and the Arkansas, then down the Missouri by steamboat and by stagecoach to Chicago. One of the great Southwestern classics.
($150-300)

QUIRT & SPUR IN DUST JACKET

277. RYE, Edgar. RYE, Edgar. The Quirt and the Spur: Vanishing Shadows of the Texas Frontier. Chicago: W. B. Conkey Company, [1909]. 363 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original beige pictorial cloth decorated in red and grey. Near mint, in slightly worn d.j. Publisher’s ad for two other works laid in. A spectacular copy. Rare thus.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1953: "Rare....Material on the early life of John Selman and John Larn"; Herd 1982: "Scarce....Wild days of the cowboy and buffalo hunter around Fort Griffin, Texas." Dobie, p. 161. Howes R559. Rader 2864. Reese, Six Score 95: "Rare because a prominent ranching family felt themselves slandered by some remarks in it and destroyed all the copies they could purchase....Much about Fort Griffin and Shackleford County in the early days, particularly the history of ranching there." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2425: "Includes a totally erroneous tale of Tonkawa defeat in Palo Duro Canyon, with other stories of Comanche depredations and combats with Texas Rangers." Some of the heroic Anglo pioneer epics of immortal combats with Native Americans tell us more about Anglo perceptions than the hard facts of history.
($300-600)

RAILROAD PROMOTIONAL BROADSIDE

278. SAINT LOUIS, IRON MOUNTAIN & SOUTHERN RAILWAY. Important to All! bound for the Happy Lands! Low Rates to Arkansas and Missouri via Saint Louis over the Popular St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern R’y.... St. Louis: Jno. McKittrick & Co., n.d. Tall, narrow broadside (53.3 x 16.5 cm; 21 x 6-1/2 inches). illustrated with a 10.8 cm; 4-1/4 inch diameter pictorial medallion. Creased where folded. Very fine.
         The striking medallion has bird’s-eye-view map of the route of the railroad, extending north from Galveston, Austin, and Dallas through Arkansas, with the motto "Bound for the Happy Lands" and a winged wheel in the sky above. The railway offers itself as "the shortest and quickest route to points in Missouri, Arkansas and Texas," and presents a schedule of sample fares (e.g., round trip from Little Rock to Chicago: $32.75).
($75-150)

279. SANDOZ, Mari. The Beaver Men, Spearheads of Empire. New York: Hastings House, 1964. [4] xv [1], 335 pp., plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original brown levant morocco over beige cloth, spine with raised bands and gilt lettered. In a separate beige cloth folder is: Area of the Richer Beaver Harvest of America...Map and Key.... New York: James F. Carr, 1964. 16 pp., large folding map. One page of map folder with a few small stains from printer’s ink, else mint, in publisher’s beige cloth slipcase.
         First edition, limited edition (#78 of 185 copies, signed, with two leaves of the original typescript with author’s signature and corrections, map folder, and in the special binding). Pingenot: A very handsome publication as well as being an important work on the beaver men in the fur trade.
($
200-400)

280. SANTLEBEN, August. A Texas Pioneer: Early Staging and Overland Freighting Days on the Frontiers of Texas and Mexico. New York & Washington: Neale Publishing Company, 1910. 321 pp. 8vo, original gilt-lettered lavender cloth. Binding slightly discolored, otherwise very fine, with bookplate and signature of noted Texas collector Albert Steves, dated at San Antonio in 1910. Author’s mimeographed promotional sheet tipped in at back. Preserved in a black cloth slipcase. The books published by Neale are notorious for being found in poor condition and nibbled by bugs. The Pingenot copy is the best copy that we have examined.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 181: "Most important account of stage coach and freight service in Texas." Campbell, p. 99: "Very rare. But there is nothing better in its field. The author freighted on the Chihuahua Trail. The book contains some items on Big Foot Wallace’s Indian Fighting." Dobie, p. 79. Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. 19. Graff 3676. Howes S104. Krick 441: "A Texas classic of considerable scarcity." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2426. Santleben came to Texas from Germany in 1845 and settled in Castro’s colony. At age fourteen he became the youngest Pony Express rider in the U.S., and in 1867 formed the first stage run between Mexico and Texas.
         Pingenot: No other writer sketches in such vivid detail an account of staging and freighting on the frontiers of Texas and northern Mexico. Santleben combines a wealth of information concerning the encounters and vicissitudes on the trail with a ready recollection of numerous individuals with whom he came in contact. One of the most fascinating books dealing with Southwest Texas and the northern Mexican frontier between the Civil War and the 1890s.
($
300-600)

281. SCOTT, Hugh Lenox. Some Memories of a Soldier. New York: Century Company, 1928. 673 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates (photographic). Thick 8vo, original dark green cloth, title stamped in blind on upper cover and gilt-lettered spine. A superb copy, signed by author on half-title. Laid in is author’s autograph letter signed dated in 1929. Bookplate.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1970; Herd 2029. Pingenot: Autobiography of Scott’s career from his early days in the West through the Spanish American War, the Mexican Revolution, and World War I. Contains information on Custer and the expedition to recover bodies at the Little Big Horn; Indian problems and various cavalry units in the West; sketches of Geronimo and Sitting Bull, etc. General Scott was the last living cavalry officer who could converse in Indian sign language. As chief of staff, in 1915, he personally met with Obregon and Pancho Villa in an attempt to stop the violence and unrest along the U.S.-Mexico border. An important military memoir, overlooked by Howes.
($60-120)

BY "ONE WHO HAS SEEN THE ELEPHANT"

282. [SCRIBNER, Benjamin F.]. Camp Life of a Volunteer: A Campaign in Mexico, or a Glimpse at Life in Camp. By "One who has seen the Elephant." Philadelphia: Grigg, Elliot, and Co.; New Albany: J. R. Nunemacher. And for Sale by All Booksellers and Country Merchants South and West, 1847. [5]-75 [1, blank], 8 ads [Popular and Cheap Books, Particularly Suitable for Family Libraries] pp., folding engraved map: Battle of Buena Vista...Drawn by H. H. Green Lt. U.S. Army Engd. by E. F. Woodward Philadelphia (24.5 x 38.5 cm; 9-5/8 x 15-1/4 inches). 8vo, three-quarter near contemporary nineteenth-century smooth black calf over marbled boards, spine gilt lettered. Front pastedown slightly abraded where bookplates(?) were removed, contemporary ink number "234" on title, occasional mild to moderate foxing. Very good copy of a book seldom offered on the market.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 92. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 249. Haferkorn, p. 51. Howes S246. Palau 304216. Tutorow 3679: "Scribner was a private in the 2nd Regiment of Indiana Volunteers. His account begins July 11, 1846, and ends on July 3, 1847. He was discharged following the battle of Buena Vista. The map of the battle, by Lieutenant Henry Hall Green of the 3rd and 15th Infantry is regarded as one of the best." This lively account includes an excellent description of camp life on the lower Rio Grande in the Texas-Mexico borderlands—Brazos de Santiago, Camp Belknap (fourteen miles below Matamoros), Point Isabel, Burrita or Burita (nine miles up the Rio Grande), etc. See excerpts in Smith & Judah’s Chronicles of the Gringos (pp. 277-82), who comment on Scribner’s account: "He gave perceptive insights into the common soldier’s psychology—his pleasures and his discomforts."
         Pingenot: A rare work on the Mexican-American War, especially its coverage of the Battle of Buena Vista in which the author was a participant. He also provides an unvarnished volunteer’s view of officers: "Those who hold commissions have the best pay, the best fare, and all the honor. The private performs the work, endures the privation, and when the toils and sufferings of the campaign are over, forgetfulness folds him aside gracefully in her capacious mantle."
($800-1,600) Illustrated Description>>

283. SHAW, Frederick B. One Hundred and Forty Years of Service in Peace and War: History of the Second Infantry, United States Army. Detroit: Strathmore Press, 1930. [4] iv [4] 446 [1] pp., photographic frontispiece of Fort Washington, foldout maps, text illustrations. 12mo, original light blue cloth, printed paper spine label. Binding slightly soiled and worn, internally very fine.
         First edition. Not in Garrett, Graff, or Howes. Tutorow 3323. Chapter IX covers the Mexican-American War, including the Texas battles and California. Other campaigns discussed relate to the American Revolution, Northwest Territory, Fort Detroit, occupation of New Orleans (1803), Battle of Tippecanoe (1811), War of 1812, Black Hawk War, Seminole War, Civil War, Indian Campaigns (1877-1879), Sioux Campaign (1890-1891), Spanish-American War, occupation of Cuba (1903), Philippine Insurrection (1899), etc.
($200-500)

284. [SHERIDAN, Philip H.]. Record of Engagements with Hostile Indians within the Military Division of the Missouri from 1868 to 1882, Lieutenant General P. H. Sheridan, Commanding. Compiled from Official Records. Chicago: Headquarters Military Division of the Missouri, 1882. 120 pp. 8vo, later terracotta buckram, maroon calf gilt-lettered spine label, marbled edges. 1940s red ink stamps on front pastedown and p. 118. A few pencil corrections. Fine and very clean.
         First edition of a bedrock military report, providing in-depth details on the Indian Wars. Dustin 247. Graff 3753. Howes S395: "Official compilation covering the bloodiest years of western warfare." Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 71. Rittenhouse 520: "Contains descriptions of about four hundred engagements, arranged by years and briefly described....Many of the incidents occurred along the Santa Fe Trail." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2428. This valuable compilation provides excellent documentation of Texas encounters, including Mackenzie (the Department of Texas was added to the Division of the Missouri in 1871). Pingenot: A basic source document on operations against hostile Indians by the frontier military, and an excellent source for information on the Indian Wars. Seventeen pages are devoted to the Little Big Horn.
($
300-600)

285. SHIPMAN, Mrs. O. L. Taming the Big Bend: A History of the Extreme Western Portion of Texas, from Fort Clark to El Paso. [N.p., 1926]. viii, 215 pp., plates (photographic portraits), large folding map: Military Map of the Rio Grande Frontier Prepared from Original Surveys, County Maps, Reports of Officers, etc. by Capt. W. R. Livermore... (37.0 x 26.3 cm; 14-1/2 x 26-1/4 inches). 8vo, original gilt-lettered purple moiré cloth. Fore-edges slightly foxed, otherwise very fine.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 2006: "In a chapter entitled ‘Law West of the Pecos’ the author deals with the Texas Rangers and lawlessness"; Herd 2063. Basic Texas Books 184: "This worthwhile account of the Big Bend region during the nineteenth century is especially valuable because one of Shipman’s major sources was her pioneer father, who...lived on the Texas frontier for seventy-five years....She also quotes extensively from other pioneers and transients in the region, such as John L. Bullis, commander of [Seminole-Negro] Indian scouts under Mackenzie; A. J. Fairmore and P. Bougad on the El Paso Salt War; Mexican outlaw Victor Ochoa; and Texas Ranger T. T. Cook. The work contains chapters on the early mail routes, the boundary commission, the camel experiment, military posts, freighting, civil affairs, Indian campaigns, Texas Rangers, ranching, outlaws, mining, and Mexican revolutionary activities." CBC 53 (+ 13 other entries). Howes S422. One of the basic books on Big Bend, including a chapter on ranching and a section of sketches of early pioneer and ranching families." Regarding women in Texas and the West, Mrs. Shipman comments: "So long as a woman remained in what the Westerner called her ‘place,’ she was the object of the greatest respect and the tenderest consideration, but let her wander from its limitations and her path was not pleasant. If she was masculine in thought or actions she was severely criticized; the Westerner wanted his womenfolk domestically inclined."
($200-400)

286. SHUMARD, George. G. A Partial Report on the Geology of Western Texas Consisting of a General Geological Report and a Journal of Geological Observations along the Routes Traveled by the Expedition between Indianola, Texas, and the Valley of the Mimbres, New Mexico, during the Years 1855 and 1856.... Austin: State Printing Office, 1886. viii, 145 pp., lithographed geological plates and profiles (some in color and/or folding, and some identified as the work of Gast of St. Louis), text illustrations. 8vo, original upper terracotta printed wrapper (chipped and mounted on new marbled paper). One profile separated at folds. Wellesley College duplicate with ink stamps and call letters. Scarce.
         First edition of a scarce modern overland. Eberstadt, Texas 162:733: "Of greater interest than the date of the publication would suggest, 69 pages being devoted to his journal of 1855-56, between Indianola and the Valley of the Mimbres, New Mexico, while with Pope’s exploring expedition." Pingenot: Scarce. A journal of geological observations along the routes traveled by Pope’s exploring expedition in Texas and New Mexico during the years 1855 and 1856, with an appendix giving a detailed report on the geology of Grayson County.
($
100-300)

SITGREAVES REPORT—WITH KERN PLATES & MAP

287. SITGREAVES, Lorenzo. Report of an Expedition Down the Zuni and Colorado Rivers. Washington: SED59, 1853. 198 pp., 78 lithographed plates of Native Americans, views, mammals, birds, reptiles, botany (one folding and several on tinted grounds), large folding lithographed map: Reconnaissance of the Zuñi, Little Colorado, and Colorado Rivers Made in 1851 (67.4 x 119.5 cm; 26-3/4 x 47-3/8 inches). 8vo, original green blind-stamped cloth. Occasional mild foxing, else fine.
         First edition. Farquhar, The Colorado River and the Grand Canyon, 16: "The plates and map by R. H. Kern are important in the development of knowledge of the region." Graff 3809. Munk (Alliott), p. 202. Plains & Rockies IV:230:1: "The expedition consisted of Sitgreaves, Lieutenant J. G. Parke, Dr. S. W. Woodhouse, R. H. Kern, with Major H. L. Kendrick in command of the escort and Antoine Leroux as guide. The group left Santo Domingo, New Mexico, on August 1, 1851, stopped at Zuni in September, and arrived at San Diego on November 30th." Farquhar 16. Field 1414. Graff 3809. Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 763 & pp. 22-23: "Wheat discusses the route of the Sitgreaves expedition and highly praises the map, calling it ‘a monumental achievement...generally correct and...exceedingly well done." " Pingenot: An important contribution to the knowledge of Arizona topography, Indian ethnology, and fauna of the desert southwest. The Kern plates are now much sought after.
($300-600) Illustrated Description>>

288. SMITH, Justin H. The War with Mexico, 1846-1848. New York: Macmillan, 1919. xxi [1] 572 + xiii [1] 620 pp., maps, plans. 2 vols., 8vo, original navy blue cloth with gilt lettering on spines. About as fine a copy as one might hope to find, in the rare printed dust wrappers.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 189n: "Remains the most comprehensive and most controversial study of the Mexican War, and contains a great deal relating to Texas." Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 27. Garrett, The Mexican-American, pp. 48-49: "Considered by many a classic on the Mexican-American War." Harvard Guide to American History, p. 372. Howes S636. Tutorow 3236: "Generally regarded as the most thoroughly researched work ever made by an American historian."
($200-400)

CHILE CON CARNE

289. SMITH, S. Compton. Chile Con Carne: or, The Camp and the Field. New York: Miller & Curtis, 1857. xvi, 404, 12 [publisher’s catalogue] [2 (ads) pp., engraved frontispiece, 6 engraved plates, engraved plan (Plan of the Battle of Buena Vista Fought February 22nd. & 23rd. 1847. 8vo, original red gilt pictorial cloth, a.e.g. The red gilt binding is the publisher’s special binding. Slight wear to extremities and edges, otherwise very fine and bright.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 534: "Smith came to Texas and joined the 1st Regiment of Texas Volunteer Rifles, received an appointment as surgeon, and accompanied his unit through the Monterey campaign." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 253. Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators and Wood Engravers 100: "[Engraver Jacob A. Dallas] was one of the early Harper’s Magazine artists. He was considerably influenced by Darley. Weitenkampf says, ‘The swing and vigor of his [Darley’s] style find a certain reflection in the drawings, somewhat exaggerated in strength, of Jacob A. Dallas.’ See also Groce and Wallace, p. 162." Sabin 83970. Tutorow 3237.
         The first chapters relate to the author’s sojourn in South Texas, before marching to Monterrey. Early in the book Smith sets the tone for the narrative: "What cared youthful blood whether the war were a righteous one or not. That was our country’s affair—not ours. And, with light hearts and bounding pulses, we left our homes to test the novelties of a first campaign, and embark in quest of wild adventures in that far-famed land" (page 3). Smith & Judah (Chronicles of the Gringos) include two excerpts from Chile con Carne. In the section on "Virtues and Defects of the Volunteers," they comment (pp. 42-43) that the author "delivered a balanced judgment on the virtues and defects of army volunteers, including the [Texas] Rangers. In the excerpt on "Gambling in the Camps" (pp. 310-22), Smith’s portrayal of the gambling dealers is described as "grim." Pingenot: Rare Mexican War narrative. Not in Decker, Eberstadt, Graff, Haferkorn, Howes, or Raines. The author gives an objective and accurate account of the campaign in northern Mexico, especially in regard to the participation of the Texas Rangers.
($
250-500)

290. SMITHWICK, Noah. The Evolution of a State, or Recollections of Old Texas Days. Austin: Gammel Book Company, [1900]. [11] 10-354 pp., 8 portraits and plates. 12mo, original blue cloth decorated and lettered in black. One leaf slightly soiled, otherwise, exceptionally fine, bright, and tight.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 189: "One of the most anecdotal of all the major and minor events of his time [with] a fascinating depiction of social life in Texas when it was a colony and a republic. Smithwick served with the Texas Rangers and lived for a time with the Comanches, learning their language and representing them in making a treaty with the Texans in 1838. He gives us anecdotes available nowhere else on men he knew, such as James Bowie, Sam Houston, Stephen F. Austin, David G. Burnet, Gail Borden...and others. He tells of smuggling, counterfeiting, gambling, drinking, and dancing with a frankness lacking in most other Texas autobiographies. Smithwick came to Texas in 1827."
         Dobie, p. 52: "Best of all books dealing with life in early Texas." Graff 3872. Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 15. Howes S726. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2112: "His valuable book incorporates much on military service and Indian fighting, including the 1840 Council House Fight and the Battle of Plum Creek. He likewise includes material on the Tonkawa scouts, Comanche customs and language, and treaty negotiations with the Comanches. Researchers have relied heavily upon materials in this highly descriptive book."
($250-500)

IN THE PRE-FIRE BINDING

291. SOWELL, A. J. Early Settlers and Indian Fighters of Southwest Texas...Facts Gathered from Survivors of Frontier Days. Austin: Ben C. Jones & Co., Printers, 1900. viii, 844 pp., 12 plates (mostly photographic), numerous text illustrations (engraved and photographic). 8vo, original red cloth decorated in gilt and black. Other than slight shelf wear, very fine and bright, preserved in a red cloth slipcase. The Pingenot copy is the best copy that we have ever examined. Most copies offered are smoke and/or water damaged and in the later solid red binding, rather than the pre-fire red and black binding.
         First edition, first issue, with copyright notice on title verso. Basic Texas Books 193: "The work contains 132 accounts of early pioneers, mostly as told by them directly to Sowell....Most of the work relates to Indian fights and Texas Rangers. This material is fresh and for the most part not repeated in Brown, Wilbarger, or other works." Dobie, pp. 58 & 60: "Meaty with the character of ready-to-fight but peace-seeking Texas pioneers, Sowell will some day be recognized as an extraordinary chronicler." Graff 3909. Howes S797: "Nearly all copies were either destroyed or damaged by fire." Rader 2957. Raines, p. 193. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2432: "Includes numerous anecdotes and first-hand information, but not always trustworthy." The Handbook of Texas Online (Sowell).
($600-1,200)

292. SOWELL, A. J. Early Settlers and Indian Fighters of Southwest Texas...Facts Gathered from Survivors of Frontier Days. Austin: Ben C. Jones & Co., Printers, 1900. viii, 844 pp., 12 plates (mostly photographic), numerous text illustrations (engraved and photographic). Large 8vo, original red cloth decorated in gilt and black. Front hinge cracked, moderate binding wear (extremities frayed), spine light and repaired. Association copy. Ownership signature, annotations, additions, and corrections by Samuel J. P. McDowell of Caldwell County, a member of the Callahan Expedition. McDowell’s notes are found on the title-page and sixteen other pages, and primarily relate to battles in which he personally participated.
         First edition, first issue. Another copy of preceding, with excellent association value.
($
500-1,000)

ROYAL REGLAMENTO GOVERNING THE FRONTIER PRESIDIOS

293. [SPANISH SOUTHWEST]. SPAIN. LAWS. 1759-1788 (Charles III). Reglamento e instrucción para los presidios que se han de formar en la linea de frontera de la Nueva España resuelto por el Rey Nuestro Señor en cédula de 10 de Setiembre de 1771. Mexico: La Oficina de la Aguila, dirigida por Jos Ximeno, 1834. 30 pp. Folio, modern Mexican tree calf over marbled boards, gilt-lettered maroon calf spine label. Two small, mild stains on title which has the slightest marginal wear at top and lower right corner. These are inconsequential flaws. Very fine.
         The first edition of this important and enduring borderlands decree was first published in Spain in 1772, followed by Mexico City editions in 1773 and 1790. Thereafter, the bibliography is a tad murky. Wagner, Spanish Southwest (159c) notes an edition of 1772 with 46 pages (one location) and comments: "This edition contains no imprint but has all the appearance of having been printed in one of the frontier provinces before 1825, very likely at Saltillo or Monterey." Wagner’s next entry (159d) is a Monterrey (Nuevo León) edition with 54 pages (one location), and he comments: "There is a notice in the catalogue of the Andrade sale of an edition in 30 pages folio, Mexico, 1834, and I have seen a notice of another edition of Madrid, 1822." Streeter (706B) notes the present edition, and locates no copies in Texas, only the Bancroft copy and his own (now at Yale). Streeter follows Wagner’s findings and adds two intriguing twists of his own: "Sabin 56262 records a Madrid, 1822, edition. In June, 1955, Dawson of Los Angeles quoted at $75 an edition published at Ures, Sonora, in 1855. Cowan, p. 526 (listing the Madrid 1772 edition and a 1773 edition without noting place of publication). Eberstadt, Texas 162:141 (the Mexico 1773 edition) & 142 (present edition). Graff 3913 (his entry 3912 is the Madrid 1772 edition.). Harper, Texas, Mexico, and the Southwest 12: "Of the most fundamental importance in the history and bibliography of Texas and the Spanish Southwest." Howes N225 (follows Wagner and adds the present edition without hesitation). Palau 254622. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography, p. 218: "Rubí conducted one of the most important tours of Spanish Texas, and he concluded that because imperial troops were spread too thin to deal with Indians and European interlopers, a total reorganization was needed. Rubí called for the abandonment of the overextended East Texas missions and a strengthening of mission-presidio complexes around San Antonio."
         Fascinating bibliographical complexities aside, this handsome imprint is of primary importance for the Spanish Southwest and the borderlands. "This Reglamento grew out of the tour of inspection of the Marqués de Rubí and contains the substance of the Instrucción which was prepared in Mexico and printed in 1771. It was in effect for a long time, as can be seen from the number of editions printed. The line of presidios marked out by Rubí formed a cordon of fifteen. It extended from Altar in Sonora to La Bahía in Texas and was maintained with a few exceptions until the Revolution, and in fact even later. The republican government in Mexico made a few changes in location, but generally speaking the system lasted until early 1850" (Wagner 159). Pingenot completes this picture by adding: The line of fifteen presidios extended from Altar in Sonora to La Bahía del Espíritu Santo in Texas and included presidios at Paso del Norte, San Vicente, Agua Verde, and Presidio del San Juan Bautista on the Rio Grande. North of this line was a presidio at San Antonio de Béjar and another at Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Reglamento goes into considerable detail as to the organization of each presidio and the policy of friendliness to the Native American tribes and the extermination of the Apache.
($750-1,500)

ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL

FORT INGE TO EL PASO IN 1850

294. SPRAGUE, Captain and Brevet Major John T[itcomb]. Original autograph manuscript, signed: Journal from Fort Inge, Leona, Txs. to El Paso del Norte, Texas, between the 1st day of July and the 16th day of September 1850, for the Use of the Wagon Master. [West Texas, 1850]. [19] pp. (plus file notes and other notations on p. [20]), written in ink (occasional pencil notations) on rectos and versos, pale blue lined paper, old yellow satin cord at top. Some marginal wear to a few pages (no losses), creased and light at some old folds, overall very good. Preserved in a terracotta morocco over marbled boards folding box. Typed transcript of complete manuscript present, along with letters of provenance from 1981, documenting history of the manuscript and transfer of ownership.
         Original valuable source material of a Western (Texas) overland exploration in the summer of 1850, giving a day-by-day account of Sprague’s command of the government wagon train that was the first to traverse the road from Fort Inge on the Leona River to El Paso (the road had been laid out the previous year by Lt. Col. Joseph E. Johnston—see Basic Texas Books 112 & Plains & Rockies IV:184). Sprague records in good detail the journey of the large wagon train (140 wagons, 4,000 animals, and 625 people) crossing some of the most challenging terrain of the West in the grueling furnace of a late Texas summer, menaced by Native tribes and prairie fires. He also discusses advantages and disadvantages of various places along the route that would be suitable for army posts.

This manuscript has not been published in full. Pingenot wrote an excellent article based on the manuscript, with some direct quotation from it. See Pingenot's article "The Great Wagon Train Expedition of 1850" in Southwestern Historical Quarterly (XCVIII:2, October, 1994, pp. 182-224). Pingenot comments on the importance of this journal: "Sprague's mission was to resupply the Third Infantry Regiment at the Pass of the North and to provide a military escort for the civilian contractors who hoped to establish a flourishing trade with outposts on the trail to California. Although other wagon trains and small parties had traversed the road since it opened the year before, this was the largest military escorted wagon train to cross southwestern Texas by the southern route and the first for which a day-to-day record of the journey remains.... Until the recent discovery of Sprague's Journal, only fragmentary information was known regarding this major expedition and the remarkable individuals that were involved in the enterprise. The Sprague document is significant in that it not only details the first major attempt to transport supplies between San Antonio and El Paso, it also removes the mystery surrounding the outcome of a significant event."

Following are a few excerpts from Sprague’s journal to give an idea of the nature of the content:

         Tuesday, July 2nd, 1850: At 11 o’clock this morning, on command of Company F’s 8th Infantry, I marched out from Fort Inge to join the main body of the supply train, twenty miles in advance. Dr. Mollowney of Austin, Acting Asst. Surgeon, Lt. Jackson, 8th Infantry, and Lt. Roy, accompanied me. We camped on the Nueces river at 4 o’clock P.M. The road passes through an open country, road heavy, as there had been rain the night before. A good camping ground is found about one mile to the left of the road, immediately by the river, on a high bluff. Distance today 12 miles....
         Saturday 6th: Coacooche or Wild Cat, came into my camp today with his band consisting of fifty Kickapoo warriors, twenty Seminoles, and many negroes. The whole band numbered about one hundred fifty souls. Gopher John was along as interpreter. He said he was on his way to Fort Duncan. The train is making preparations to move on the 10th inst. Mr. Coons is still in the rear with twenty wagons....
         Saturday July 27th: Remained
in camp. Indians all around us, seen on the hills a mile off, and heard whistling around the camp at night, signals to each other to improve opportunities to attack or steal animals. The Prairies are burning all around. Apprehension there is a concert of action, and the fires signal to distant Indians to concentrate their forces upon the train. Two mules stolen, and five oxen shot with arrows belonging to Mr. Morrell Sutler, up all night with the command listening to various sounds on the hills around, sometimes approaching within a few yards of camp, sentinels on the alert, men under arms. The animals at the picket rope show alarm by snorting and restlessness. They doubtless smell the Indians. Serious apprehension about Coons in rear lest he might be attacked. Lt. Jackson and command with him. This spring affords an abundant supply of good water. The grass cannot be depended upon. Indians live immediately at the spring, their animals and those travelling to and fro, in large numbers, with animals from Mexico, eat up the grass. The grass is burning within a few hundred yards of camp. Most of Coons train camp up today, broken down, wagons in bad condition, animals lame from the rocky road. His mule train came up in good condition. Oxen should never be put upon this road....
         Sunday, July 28th: This is what we call the Stampede Sunday. We left Howard Spring at 10 A.M. leaving Coons in camp with sixty men and forty wagons in coral, said he was strong enough to meet any number of Indians. Lt. Jackson was expected every hour with his rear guard. After we had marched about seven miles, an express overtook us from Mr. Coons of a most alarming character, expecting an attack every moment, and wished once to return with my entire force, which was twenty three miles. With me, I had his mule train, thirty wagons, six mules to each, and my own baggage train, ten wagons. To leave these was impossible, as they would be the next attacked if Mr. Coons realized he was apprehended. The attack, if one was made, was a preconceived, concentrated movement, which we had feared from the fires around us....
         Friday
[September] 6th: At San Elizario, a town of about five hundred inhabitants. The Presidio de San Elizario is a military work, forming a square of about six acres, surrounded by an adobe wall fifteen feet high. In the center of this is an adobe Catholic Church, fast falling to decay. A building which was once the residence of the Priest and Commanding officer. The whole work is in a dilapidated state, parts of it have been repaired and reused as soldiers barracks and hospital. The troops, two companies, are comfortably quartered. The officers reside in adobe houses adjacent to the work surrounded by gardens. Ditches intersect the streets furnishing water from the Rio Grande, upon which are built the residences of the citizens, low adobe houses. Every house is surrounded by gardens and fruit trees, grapes, apples, pears, peaches, and quinces grow in abundance. The population is poor and indolent. The old cracked bell in the church is constantly reminding them of their obligation to their priest and their god....


         Next is Ben Pingenot’s entire entry on Sprague from the The Handbook of Texas Online:


         John T. Sprague (1810-1878), soldier, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on July 3, 1810. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps on October 17, 1834, and in the fall of 1836 he directed the removal of a final band of Creek Indians from Tallahassee, Alabama, to the Trans­Mississippi lands allotted to them. The next year Sprague resigned his commission as a marine and became a second lieutenant in the Fifth United States Infantry, where he served from July 3, 1837, to July 7, 1838, at which time he transferred to the Eighth Infantry. He was promoted to first lieutenant on May 1, 1839, and was sent to Florida as an aide to brevet Maj. Gen. Alexander Macomb, who had been charged with bringing the interminable Second Seminole War to an end. When Col. William Jenkins Worth brought his Eighth Infantry to Florida in 1840, Sprague, as regimental adjutant not only became Worth’s aide, but eventually married his oldest daughter, Mary. Sprague was breveted captain on March 15, 1842, for meritorious conduct in the Seminole campaign and was promoted to that rank on September 21, 1846. During the Mexican War Sprague remained in Florida in charge of Indian Affairs and served as commanding officer at Fort Brook. He was breveted to the rank of major on May 30, 1848, for meritorious conduct in the Florida War. During Sprague’s long tour in Florida, he became sympathetic to the Seminoles. His book on the Second Seminole War, published in 1848, was the only full­scale history of that seven-year conflict for more than a century and is still an indispensable source.
         Sprague arrived in Texas with elements of the Eighth Infantry in January 1849, in charge of subsistence. In January 1850 he asked for field duty and was given temporary command of Fort Inge on the Leona River. There he was to assume command of a government wagon train that was to follow the road to El Paso that had been laid out by Lt. Col. Joseph E. Johnston the year before. Sprague, with E Company, Eighth Infantry, left Fort Inge on July 1, 1850, and joined the train that had already reached Las Moras Spring. Sprague took command of the train, which consisted of 340 wagons, 4,000 animals of all kinds, 450 citizens, and 175 soldiers. Because of its large size and owing to the scarcity of water and grass along the route, Sprague divided the train into two component groups, led by Nathaniel C. Lewis and Benjamin F. Coons. Although Indians were continuously sighted, the train was not attacked but did suffer from the heat and want of water before arriving at El Paso on September 16. On May 18, 1852, Sprague was detached from E Company at Fort McKavett, Texas, and was sent East on general recruiting service. In June 1855 he was sent back to the Southwest, where he served in both Texas and New Mexico Territory. In New Mexico he saw service against the Navajo, Apache, and Comanche Indians between the Rio Grande and the Sacramento Mountains. Before leaving New Mexico in August 1858 he received a "vote of thanks" from the Territorial Legislature in a joint resolution for his services and was commended to the President of the United States for promotion.
         Between 1858 and 1861 Sprague took a three­year leave of absence from the army, during which time he promoted a silver mining venture in southeastern New Mexico. In January 1861 Sprague was again ordered to Texas. He arrived in New Orleans about March 6 and was subsequently pursued to Texas for openly expressing Union sentiments and denouncing the Secession Convention then sitting in that city. Upon his arrival in San Antonio, he was prevented from rejoining his regiment at Fort Bliss and was arrested by a Committee of Public Safety. On April 23, 1861, Sprague was paroled by Confederate authorities and left Texas for New York. In June he presented a paper entitled "The Treachery in Texas" to the New York Historical Society. His monograph was the first detailed account of events leading to the federal exodus and was a scathing denunciation of the Confederate’s treatment of United States officers and soldiers serving in Texas during the takeover.
         Sprague was placed on active duty in Albany, New York, as United States mustering and disbursing officer and superintendent of the General Recruiting Service. Although he was elected by the citizens of Albany to command the 113th Regiment of New York Volunteers and appointed colonel by Governor Morgan, the appointment was disapproved by the Secretary of War. This disappointment was mitigated somewhat when incoming Governor Horacio Seymour selected Sprague to be adjutant general for the state of New York, a position he held from August 1861 to January 1865. Following the Civil War Sprague returned to Florida, the site of his glory days as a young officer. There he commanded the Seventh Infantry Regiment until April 1869. He retired on December 15, 1870, and died in New York City on September 6, 1878.

With this manuscript, we include a copy of the first edition of Sprague's, The Treachery in Texas, the Secession of Texas, and the Arrest of the U.S. Officers and Soldiers Serving in Texas... (New York, 1862, 32 pp., in slightly worn wraps). Nevins, Civil War Books II:240. Eberstadt, Texas 162:752: "An important collection of documents relating to seizure of Union forces by Confederates in Feb., 1861, by one of its victims." Raines, p. 194. Parrish, Civil War Texana 103.
(2 vols.)
($3,000-6,000)

PRISONERS OF PEROTE—A FIFTY TEXAS RARITIES

295. STAPP, William P. The Prisoners of Perote: Containing a Journal Kept by the Author, Who Was Captured by the Mexicans, at Mier, December 25, 1842, and Released from Perote, May 16, 1844. Philadelphia: G. B. Zieber and Company, 1845. 164 [4, ads] pp. 12mo, original brown blind-stamped cloth (rebacked, original spine preserved). Binding lightly worn and discolored, occasional foxing.
         First edition. Agatha, p. 32. Basic Texas Books 197: "This was the first book to appear on the Mier expedition; it is still one of the best....Descriptions of the march to the Rio Grande, the Battle of Mier, the surrender of the Texans, their imprisonment and attempts to escape, the drawing of the black beans, the removal to Mexico City, and imprisonment in Perote Prison." Dobie, p. 58. Fifty Texas Rarities 27. Graff 3949. Howes S891. Raines, p. 194. Streeter 1610 (cited by as one of the top books for a Texas collection on p. 329). Vandale, Texianameter 167.
         Pingenot: Stapp’s account of the affair differs from that written by Green...in that Green was afforded certain courtesies becoming his rank, while Stapp suffered the hardships and privations of the enlisted men until he was released. Dobie, p. 58. Fifty Texas Rarities 27. Graff 3949: "The author was a member of Colonel W. S. Fisher’s party which was defeated by the Mexicans at Mier in 1842."
($750-1,500)

A MERRILL ARISTOCRAT

296. STEEDMAN, Charles J. Bucking the Sagebrush, or the Oregon Trail in the Seventies. New York & London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1904. [x] 270 pp., tinted frontispiece by Charles Russell, 11 plates (mostly by Russell), lively text illustrations by Russell, folding map (Sketch Map Showing the Route Taken from Scott’s Bridge, Oregon to Laramie, Wyoming). 8vo, maize pictorial cloth stamped in grey, green, and brown. Slight shelf wear and lettering on spine moderately flecked, but generally a fine, tight, and clean copy of a book difficult to obtain in collector’s condition.
         First edition. Adams, Herd 2153. Dobie, p. 120. Graff 3957. Howes S916. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country. Reese, Six Score 103: "Most of this book is devoted to a narrative of a cattle drive from Oregon to Wyoming in 1878, certainly one of the earliest drives of this magnitude from Oregon east." Smith 9832. Yost & Renner I:19.
($300-600)

297. STEELE, James W. The Sons of the Border. Sketches of the Life and People of the Far Frontier. Topeka: Commonwealth Printing Co., 1873. 260 pp. 8vo, original terracotta gilt pictorial cloth. Near fine copy. Contemporary ownership inscription: "Ephraim Williams, U.S. Army, 1873" (Williams, a 1st lieutenant with the 5th Infantry, was breveted captain for "coolness, gallantry, and good conduct in action with Cheyenne Indians near Pawnee Fork, Kansas, September 23, 1867"—Heitman I, p. 1040).
         First edition. Dary, Kanzana 162. Eberstadt 115:920: "A splendid group of character sketches gleaned from personal observations on the southwestern frontier"; Modern Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 456-57. Graff 3961: "Contains six stories omitted from the second edition (Frontier Army Sketches). Steele also wrote under the pseudonym Deane Monahan." Howes S922. Kansas Imprints Inventory 1170. Sabin 91122. Wright II 2353. With a copy of the second edition, retitled Frontier Sketches (Chicago: Jansen, McClurg & Company, 1883), 12mo, original dark brown pictorial cloth decorated in gold and black (endpaper mended and hinges reinforced).
($250-300)

298. STEVENS, Isaac I. Campaigns of the Rio Grande and of Mexico. With Notices of the Recent work of Major Ripley. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851. 108 pp. 12mo, new dark brown morocco over marbled boards. Very fine.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 242. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 143. Haferkorn, p. 19. Howes S962. Tutorow 3445: "Stevens served as adjutant of engineers in the siege of Vera Cruz, the battle of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, and in the reconnaissance and battle of Churubusco. He was made brevet captain on August 20, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco. He served in the battle of Molino del Rey...and in the battle of Chapultepec. He was promoted to brevet major on September 13, 1847...and was in the assault and capture of the city of Mexico where he was wounded....Stevens’ notices on Ripley’s book amount to a defense of Taylor and Scott as competent generals whose superior judgment led to victory." Raines, p. 195: "With the [Texas] battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de Palma, and bombardment of Fort Texas, later called Fort Brown."
($300-600)

33 ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPHS OF COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, TEXAS & MEXICO—1883

299. STREET, George. Che! Wah! Wah! Or the Modern Montezumas in Mexico...Illustrated with Photographs Taken during the Trip by R. D. Cleveland, and Wood Cuts from sketches by the Author. Rochester: E. R. Andrews, 1883. 115 pp., engraved frontispiece in black and blue, 33 mounted albumen photographs (Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Mexico), 2 engraved plates, text-illustrations, vivacious pictorial initials, fold-out map (untitled map of Northern Mexico and the U.S. from Alabama to California, with upper inset Map of a Portion of the Denver & Rio Grande Railway from Salida to Marshall Pass, 13.3 x 20.2 cm; 5-1/4 x 8 inches). Royal 8vo, original gilt-pictorial dark green sheep, spine gilt lettered, bevelled edges. An unusually fine, bright copy, with only minor wear to edges. Preserved in a black cloth slipcase.
         First edition, privately printed in a small edition. Adams, Herd 2187: "Has a chapter on cowboys." Hanna & Reese, From Train to Plane 43: "This excursion tour was really a busman’s holiday; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Denver & Rio Grande, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads hosted a tour of Colorado, New Mexico, and Mexico for a group of eastern freight agents. The party derived a good deal of innocent amusement from their Che! Wah! Wah! joke." Palau 322926.
         Travelling from Chicago to Chihuahua, the party passed through or stopped at Omaha, Lincoln, Denver, Canon City, Leadville, Marshall Pass, Pueblo, Trinidad, El Paso, Raton, Las Vegas, Wagon Mound, Chihuahua, and other spots along the route. The photographs illustrate landmarks, trains, views, people, architecture (including churches, depots, Montezuma Hotel and Hot Springs in Las Vegas, Windsor Hotel in Denver). One of the most unusual and lavishly produced nineteenth-century travel books. We have long wanted to compile a bibliography of the few nineteenth-century printed books containing photographs of Texas, and this rare book would be one to include.
($1,000-2,000) Illustrated Description>>

300. [STRUBBERG, Friedrich Armand]. The Backwoodsman, or, Life on the Indian Frontier. Edited by Sir C. F. Lascelles Wraxall, Bart. [pseudonym]. London: John Maxwell and Company, 1864. iv, 428 pp., engraved frontispiece, pictorial title, 10 engraved plates (sporting scenes). 8vo, original green gilt-pictorial pebbled cloth. Hinges neatly reinforced, else very fine and bright.
         First edition in English of author’s first book (first published at Stuttgart and Augsburg in 1858 under title Amerikanische Jagd- und Reiseabenteuer; the present work is an uncredited translation). Fifty Texas Rarities 40n (citing the German edition): "Strubberg was born in Germany in 1808. He came to America [and] settled in Texas....As director of the Deutschen Fürsten Verein, he established several colonies in Texas." Graff 4016: "The scene is laid on the Leona, a tributary of the Rio Grande. The author describes in great minuteness several years of his life there. In no other work in German literature and perhaps in no other literature, has the prairie been portrayed with more skill than in this work." Howes S1086. Rader 3742. Plains & Rockies IV:311a:3: "Strubberg’s adventures took place largely in Texas but include a visit to the Rockies in 1843, where he met Sir William Drummond Stewart."
($300-600)

301. TAYLOR, Fitch W. The Broad Pennant: or, A Cruise in the United States Flag Ship of the Gulf Squadron, during the Mexican Difficulties; Together with Sketches of the Mexican War.... New York: Leavitt, Trow, & Co., 1848. 415 [1] [16, ads] pp., folding lithographed frontispiece (The United States Squadron Landing its Seamen & Marines, at the Brazos de Santiago, May 8, 1846). 12mo, original blind-stamped red cloth, gilt pictorial spine (rebacked, original spine preserved). Some staining and foxing. Rare, and seldom found with the frontispiece.
         First edition. Eberstadt, Mexican War 857: "One of the few descriptions of the naval operations of the war." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 170. Haferkorn, p. 74. Tutorow 3366. Not in Howes or Raines (the latter of whom cites Taylor’s article in Harper’s on p. 199, but does not mention the present work). An account of U.S. Navy operations in the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of Texas, with interesting material on the day-to-day life of the ordinary seaman, written by the Chaplain of the U.S. Flagship Cumberland. The lithographic frontispiece showing the congregation of U.S. Navy vessels on the Texas coast, will be listed in Holman & Tyler’s work on nineteenth-century lithographs of Texas.
($250-500)

ABORTIVE ATTEMPT TO "RECONSTRUCT" TEXAS

302. TEXAS. CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. Constitution of the State of West Texas. [Austin: ca. 1868]. 35 [1] pp. 8vo, original printed wrappers. Very fine, bright copy. Preserved in a custom half calf and cloth folding case.
         First edition. Fifty Texas Rarities 43. Graff 4108. Howes T117. Library of Congress. Texas Centennial Exhibition 176. Kuhlman, p. 77. Pingenot: The result of an attempt to divide Texas during Reconstruction, this famous constitution for the proposed state carefully defines the West Texas boundaries, with the capital set at San Antonio. It was prepared by a convention of Federal sympathizers in 1868 who felt that ex-Confederate Texans would never accept Negro rights and the rest of the Reconstruction programs. Although there is no imprint, the piece was probably printed at Austin, where the Convention was in progress.
($400-800) Illustrated Description>>

303. [TEXAS (State). CONSTITUTION]. Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting the Constitution of the State of Texas. Washington: HRED16, 1845. 28 pp. 8vo, new tan morocco over tan cloth, spine with raised bands. Very fine.
         First edition of the first constitution of Texas as a state. Eberstadt, Texas 162: "The constitution under which Texas joined the Union. Mr. Streeter calls the Austin edition of this constitution ‘one of the great Texas documents.’ Besides the constitution of 1845, this edition includes Anson Jones’s letter of transmittal, and other pertinent documents enumerated in Mr. Streeter’s note." Howes T116. Streeter 1613.
($150-300)

304. [TEXAS ANNEXATION TREATY]. UNITED STATES. CONGRESS. SENATE. Proceedings of the Senate and Documents Relative to Texas, from Which the Injunction of Secrecy Has Been Removed.... [Washington: SD341, 1844]. 119 [1]; [2]; [2] [2]; 5 pp. 5 vols., 8vo, new tan cloth, brown gilt-lettered morocco spine label. Very fine.
         First edition. Eberstadt, Texas 162:280. Streeter 1542: "This useful collection of documents and correspondence includes the full text of the annexation treaty of April 12, 1844 (p. 10-13), sent to the Senate by President Tyler on April 22, 1844 (p. 5-10); official letter of Calhoun as Secretary of State to the British Minister Pakenham, dated April 18 (p. 50-53); and Lt. Emory’s memoir to accompany his map off Texas (p. 55-63). It also includes the exchange of correspondence with Texas, leading to the execution or the treaty; correspondence with the British Government and our own representatives on the British attitude; and correspondence and documents relating to the Mexican attitude."
         Only one of the four documents after the primary entry relates to Texas, but it is a highly interesting little report of five pages: In Executive Session—Senate of the United States. [Message from the President, May 23, 1844, Transmitting Reports from the Treasury, War, and Navy Departments, in Reply to a Request from the Senate for information as to expenditures since April 12, 1844, for Stationing Troops, or Increasing the Military Force on or near the Frontiers of Texas, and for Placing a Naval Force in the Gulf of Mexico].... [Washington: SED435, 1844]. Streeter 1550: "The heads of departments report to the President that only the usual expenditures for the regular operations of the armed and naval forces had been made."
($100-200)

305. THORPE, T. B. Our Army at Monterey...Under Major General Taylor...With a Description of the Three Days’ Battle and the Storming of Monterey. Philadelphia: Carey and Hart, 1847. 204 pp., wood-engraved frontispiece (Entry into Monterey), pictorial title by F. O. C. Darley, engraved plate (City of Monterey), folding lithographed map (Monterey and Its Approaches...From a map drawn by Lieut. Benjamin, U.S.A. (17.4 x 32.0 cm; 6-7/8 x 12-5/8 inches). 12mo, later nineteenth-century brown three-quarter sheep over marbled boards, spine extra gilt, brown calf spine labels, marbled edges. Binding rubbed, upper cover almost detached, title-page stained, foxing (mainly confined to first and last signatures. Contemporary ownership of J. H. H. Woodward. Colored lithograph of U.S. seal affixed to front pastedown; two engravings on rear pastedown (Siege of Monterey and Street Fight at Monterey).
         First edition, first printing (according to Blanck’s probable sequence, gatherings mostly in sixes and with blank at end; the pictorial title is dated 1848, like all recorded copies except the LC copy). Basic Texas Books 205n: "A sequel covering that siege, and including materials on Texas troops." BAL 20306. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 245: "A contemporary history, fairly well done." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 143. Haferkorn, p. 53. Howes T235. Pingenot: Very good condition for this work. A companion volume to Thorpe’s Our Army on the Rio Grande.
($250-500) Illustrated Description>>

306. [TRESPALACIOS]. Title of Property of the Building Lot in the Block EE in the City and Port of Trespalacios, Texas.... London, 1846. Engraved stock certificate within ornate border on pale blue paper. 1 p., 4to, with small plan showing numbered lots. Very fine, unused.
         Pingenot: An unrecorded imprint granting a building lot for 50 pounds sterling to the bearer in the city of Trespalacios on Matagorda Bay, with a small plat of the city in the upper right corner. The Handbook of Texas records that the town of Trespalacios was not founded until 1903 and the name later was changed to simply "Palacios." However, Streeter 1514 enters an [1844?] "Map of the City of Trespalacios..." on the left or east bank of Trespalacios River where it flows into Trespalacios Bay. "It can hardly be the town of Palacios shown on the map in the Hunt and Randel 1839 Guide, as that town is about ten miles below the mouth of the Trespalacios River and on the east side of Trespalacios Bay" (Streeter). It is likely that, following annexation on December 29, 1845 and the inauguration of state government on February 19, 1846, this plan was discarded and the bonds left unused. To date, no known examples of this certificate have been found that have been completed in manuscript.
($
100-250)

307. TURNLEY, Parmenas Taylor. Reminiscences of...from the Cradle to Three-Score and Ten... Chicago: Donohue & Henneberry, 1892. 448 pp., frontispiece portrait, 6 plates, text illustration (coat-of-arms). 8vo, original brown blind-stamped cloth, gilt-lettered spine, a.e.g. Hinges cracked, else fine. Long presentation, signed by the author.
         First edition, the preferred issue, with the four extra plates (Howes notes only 3 extra plates in some copies). Conner & Faulk, North America Divided 96. Eberstadt, Modern Overlands 493. Flake 9057: "Trip through Salt Lake City in 1858, and an account of the rise of Mormonism." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 258. Graff 4217. Howes T429. Paullin Sale 3037: "Excessively rare." Pingenot: A rare and little-known work. In a letter written in 1893, Turnley stated that only 250 copies were printed for private distribution (see Graff 4213). After graduating from West Point, Turnley served in the Mexican War in New Orleans, Monterey, Vera Cruz, and Mexico City. After the war he spent considerable time in Texas, serving in Austin, San Antonio, Fort Inge, and along the Rio Grande with Captain Sidney Burbank in the establishment of Fort Duncan in 1849. He accompanied Harney’s Sioux expedition, went overland to Ft. Bridger, Salt Lake, and other western posts. He served with the Union during the Civil War, engaged in politics, and went on a special commission to Denver. Not in Haferkorn, Streeter Sale, or Tutorow (Tutorow lists three Mexican War items by this author, but not the present work).
($
750-1,500)

308. TWITCHELL, Ralph Emerson. The Leading Facts of New Mexican History. Cedar Rapids: Torch Press, 1911. xx [2] 506 + xxi [1] [2] 631 pp., 187 plates (portraits, photographs, facsimiles), 6 folding maps, 1 folding table. 2 vols., large 8vo, original red buckram, gilt-lettered spines, t.e.g. Hinges cracked (but strong) and very light shelf wear, otherwise fine.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 2254: "The author tells about the Lincoln County War and claims that Billy the Kid killed only nine men." Cumberland, The U.S.-Mexican Border: A Selective Guide to the Literature of the Region, p. 113: "Probably the best reference work on New Mexico is Ralph E. Twitchell, Leading Facts of New Mexican History." Howes T443. Rittenhouse 588: "With all his faults, Twitchell remains one of the great basic sources of New Mexican history.... Vol. II is especially useful for Santa Fe Trail history, with a chapter (pp. 91-146) devoted to the Trail. This volume covers the period 1822-1912 and includes material on the Texan-Santa Fe Expedition, the Mexican War, and the Civil War." Saunders 4693. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 192: "Filled with information on efforts to trade with and ultimately destroy Comanche and Kiowa power from the early 1700s to the 1870s."
($250-500)

309. TWITCHELL, Ralph Emerson. The Spanish Archives of New Mexico: Compiled and...Arranged with Historical, Genealogical, Geographical, and Other Annotations.... [Cedar Rapids]: Torch Press, 1914. xxiii [3] 525 + vi [2] 683 pp., 42 plates (maps, portraits, facsimiles, photographs). 2 vols., large 8vo, original red buckram, gilt-lettered spines, t.e.g. A very fine set, mostly unopened.
         First edition. Borderlands Sourcebook, p. 395. Howes T445. Powell, Southwestern Century 91: "Massive volumes—a mine of information." Rittenhouse 590: "These volumes are a calendar or chronological guide to thousands of New Mexico Spanish documents prior to 1821." Saunders 313. Steck, p. 88. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 138. Pingenot: This scarce work was issued in a small edition and remains one of the basic research tools on this important subject. It lists 3,097 items chronologically (1685-1821), with comments on the main content of each item and sometimes at length.

310. UNITED STATES ARMY. Uniform of the Army of the United States. October 1, 1908. Compiled by the Authority of the Secretary of War Under the Supervision of Brigadier General J. B. Aleshire. Washington: Vincent Litho Co., 1908. [129] leaves, including 127 lithographed plates. Oblong 4to, three-quarter red leather portfolio with ties. Portfolio spine beginning to split, chip at top, internally very fine.
         This superb pictorial record in full color of every piece of uniform and accouterment of the U.S. Army of 1908 is an excellent research tool with great exhibit potential.
($250-500)

311. UNITED STATES. ARMY. FOURTEENTH CAVALRY. The Fourteenth Cavalry. Their Book. [Fort Des Moines, 1921]. [46] pp. (printed in double column), photographic illustrations. Oblong quarto, original ecru printed wrappers. A few minor tears and some wear. Very good.
         First edition. Full of full-page group photographs and photo montage pages of activites, "their book" presents a lively picture of cavalry life prior to World War I. Many of the pictures are identified as "on the border" in Texas. Pingenot: The 14th U.S. Cavalry was formed in 1901. The history of the regiment gives some details of its service against the Moros in the Philippines in 1903-1905, in Oregon in 1906 during open range cattle-rustling problems and considerable mention of Mexican border troubles in 1913-1918. Not in Dornbusch. Rare.
($
250-500)

312. UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (Andrew Johnson). Message of the President of the United States of January 29, 1867, Relating to the Present Condition of Mexico in Answer to a Resolution of the House of December 4, 1866. Washington: GPO, 1867. [2] 735 pp. 8vo, contemporary three-quarter dark brown morocco over marbled boards, marbled edges. The very fine Josey copy.
         First edition. Massive report on the "so-called government of Maximilian" with one of the most replete sources of documentation on the effects and actions in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands resulting from the French intervention. Includes many dispatches by Juárez written from Paso del Norte and elsewhere, protests of citizens in California, activities of Santa Anna (the U.S. apparently pondering whether the wily dictator was the lesser of two evils!), burning and occupation of Matamoros, activities in El Paso related to the establishment of Juárez’s government, French inducement of disaffected Confederates (including attempts by ex-Confederate generals to establish a colony near Cordova named Carlotta), seizure of munitions in Clarksville, Texas, and elsewhere, etc.
($100-200)

MEDICAL HISTORY—FRONTIER FORTS & FORTS

313. UNITED STATES. WAR DEPARTMENT. (Surgeon General’s Office). A Report on the Hygiene of the United States Army, with Descriptions of Military Posts. Circular No. 8. Washington: Surgeon-General’s Office, 1875. [60] 567 pp., folding map: Map of the Western Military Departments, of the United States, Showing Military Posts and Principal Routes (New York: The Graphic Co., 1874), 28.6 x 34.1 cm; 11-5/8 x 13-3/8 inches), 12 plans. 4to, original three-quarter leather over marbled boards. Worn covers reattached and original spine preserved. Internally very good to fine.
         Second edition, revised and enlarged (an edition came out in 1870, and the present edition contains revisions, adding new forts). Graff 4443. Howes B450. Pingenot: Originally published in 1870 as "A Report on Barracks and Hospitals, with a Description of Military Posts," and with the designation "Circular #4," Circular No. 8 not only has a different title, but contains most of the information in Circular 4 plus descriptions of 95 additional posts. It also contains a report on the hygiene of the U.S. Army, a subject not covered in Circular 4. Although both books are listed in Howes as B450, Circular No. 8 published in 1875 is not simply a reprint of Circular 4 from 1870. A rare work containing a vast amount of information on frontier posts.
($150-250) Illustrated Description>>

DOHENEY COPY

314. VIELÉ, [Teresa]. "Following the Drum:" A Glimpse of Frontier Life. New York: Rudd & Carleton, 1858. 256, 4 (ads) pp. 12mo, original brown diced cloth with publisher’s logo blind-stamped on covers, gilt-lettered spine with gilt drum. Cloth only slightly faded, else very fine and fresh. The Doheney copy, with gilt morocco book label on front pastedown. Very difficult to find in collector’s condition.
         First edition, first issue. Hanna, Yale Exhibit: "As a bride she went with her soldier husband to Texas, when the Mexican War was not long over and where the fierce Comanches were plentiful. Effervescence does not keep her account of life there from being a very informative one." Howes V92. Myres, Following the Drum, p. 214: "Vielé was the first woman to publish an account of army life in the trans-Mississippi West...and one of the few women who wrote about Texas." Plains & Rockies IV:312a:1: "Vielé describes her year’s stay at Ringgold Barracks in Texas, where her husband, Egbert Ludovicus Vielé, was stationed...an entertaining commentary on life on the Texas frontier in the early 1850s." Raines, p. 209. Includes descriptions of Henry Clay Davis’ ranch and the Mexican ranchos of the Rio Grande Valley.
($150-300)

FINE MAP OF MEXICO & THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI WEST

315. WARD, H. G. Mexico in 1827. London: Henry Colburn, 1828. [2] xix [1] 591 [1] + vii, 730 pp., 13 aquatint and lithographic plates of Mexican scenery, mining, etc. (7 folding or double-page, one colored), engraved text illustrations, 2 folding engraved maps: (1) Mexico. Engraved by Sidy. Hall.... (54.0 x 68.0 cm; 21-1/4 x 26-3/4 inches); (2) Map of Routes to the Principal Mining Districts in the Central States of Mexico. Engraved by Sidy. Hall.... (41.0 x 56.0 cm; 16-1/4 x 22 inches). 2 vols., contemporary three-quarter crimson morocco over marbled boards, gilt-lettered spine with raised bands, marbled edges. Other than a few mild stains to interior, a very fine, handsome copy. Nineteenth-century printed library labels (completed in ink) at upper left corner of each pastedown (Kimbolton Castle).
         First edition. Hill, p. 319: "During his appointment as British chargé d’affaires in Mexico from 1825 to 1827, Ward collected the data for this firsthand account of the political and social climate of Mexico at the time." Prideaux, p. 257. Raines, p. 215. Streeter 1104: "Classic book on Mexico [with] Wavell’s account of Texas...the rarity of accounts of Texas in the 1820s makes its inclusion.[in a Texas bibliography] worth while... [The book also includes] Simon H. G. Bourne’s account of Sonora and Cinaloa, which is referred to in the note to Bourne’s Observations [see Streeter 1099]....Ward has some interesting comments on Texas at pp. 585-90 of Vol. II. Ward first arrived at Mexico as a member of a British commission at the end of 1823."
         One overlooked feature of this beautiful and important book is the first map listed above, which is much more than the title Mexico would imply, including all of the Transmississippi West and Texas. The map is skillfully engraved and makes a good addition to any collection of maps on Texas and the West. It is somewhat similar to the great Humboldt map of New Spain. The exquisite plates were created from the original art work of the author’s wife, Lady Emily Elizabeth Swinburne Ward. "It is interesting to see the presence of aquatints and lithographs together in the book, and to notice, as Prideaux suggests, the superiority of the aquatints" (Abbey 668).
(2 vols.)
($600-1,200) Illustrated Description>>

316. WEBB, Walter Prescott. The Texas Rangers: A Century of Frontier Defense. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1935. [4] xiv [2] 583 [1] pp., frontispiece, photographs and illustrations by Lonnie Rees. 8vo, original half tan pigskin over beige buckram, gilt-lettered dark blue spine label, t.e.g. One small spot on upper cover, endpapers with mild browning, otherwise very fine in worn and split publisher’s box. Contemporary bookplate of Richard Schermerhorn Rowe (with UT Main tower as illustration). Extra inscription in ink by Webb: "This copy is the Will Rogers book. It was presented by the author to the Rogers fund and chances were sold by the book stores. The book brought $12.10. It goes to Mrs. C. E. Rowe. Dec. 19, 1935. Walter Prescott Webb." Will Rogers had been killed in a plane crash in Alaska on August 15. At the back of the book is Warren R. Howell’s penciled cost code and price of $550.
         First edition, limited edition (#8 of 250 copies, signed by author and in the special binding). Adams, Guns 2333; One-Fifty 145: "Much material on Texas outlaws." Basic Texas Books 212A: "The most important work on the Texas Rangers." Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. 27. Dobie, p. 60: "The beginning, middle and end of the subject." Dykes, Kid 210; Western High Spots, p. 119-20 ("Ranger Reading"): "If I had to limit my Texas Ranger reading to just one book, I’d take [this one]....Here is history, backed by intelligent research and by an understanding of the force (they could ride like Mexicans; trail like Indians; shoot like Tennesseans; and fight like the devil!) and the psychology of the men by actual contact with them, presented with vigor and clarity that makes it better reading than most fiction." Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 182. Howes W194. Mohr, The Range Country 790. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2449: "Best delineation of ranger-type forces throughout Texas history and...their point of view on the ‘Indian problem.’" Webb, Texana, Books in Texas 5. Tutorow 3551. WLA, A Literary History of the American West, p. 626: "A re-creation of border life as well as the story of Texas’s famous—and sometimes infamous—peace-keeping organization."
($400-800)

ILLUSTRATIONS ATTRIBUTED TO O. HENRY

317. WILBARGER, J. W. Indian Depredations in Texas. Reliable Accounts of Battles, Wars, Adventures, Foray, Murders, Massacres, etc., etc., Together with Biographical Sketches of Many of the Most Noted Indian Fighters and Frontiersmen of Texas. Austin: Hutchings Printing House, 1889. [2, portrait, printed on recto] xii [2] 672 pp., numerous wood-engraved illustrations and portraits (attributed to O. Henry). Thick 8vo, original brown pictorial cloth stamped in gilt and black. Binding with some flecking, a few minor spots to interior, much nicer condition than usually found. Blank flyleaf at front with Texas bookplate of James Duryee Stevenson of San Antonio, dated April 23, 1889.
         First edition (a second edition appeared in 1890, and this first edition is difficult to locate). Basic Texas Books 218: "This is the most thorough compilation of accounts of Indian warfare in Texas in the nineteenth century. J. Frank Dobie says it `stands unique among pioneer chronicles’....Wilbarger came to Texas from Kentucky in 1837....One remarkable feature in the book is that the 34 woodcuts in the text signed T. J. Owen were actually done by William Sydney Porter, better known as O. Henry." Howes W407: "Most complete of the early compilations." Rader 3653. Raines, p. 219. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2450: "One of the most unusual and frequently cited books in Texas history. Wilbarger was scalped by Comanches and had good reason to hold a personal grudge. The book is comprised of a series of biographical vignettes about other pioneers who fell victim to Texas Indians or who fought against them."
         Pingenot: This work was popular from the date of issue, and most copies were literally read to pieces. It is also avidly sought by O. Henry collectors because the illustrations are attributed to him. A rare book seldom offered for sale.
($
500-1,000)

318. WILLIAMS, Henry T. (editor). The Pacific Tourist. Williams’ Illustrated Trans-Continental Guide of Travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean.... New York: Henry T. Williams, 1877. [2] 278 [9, index & ads] pp., profusely illustrated with full- and partial-page engravings (some after art by Thomas Moran, Joaquin Miller, et al.). Small 4to, late nineteenth-century full dark brown calf, gilt-lettered spine with raised bands, a.e.g. Very fine. Original owner’s signed ink notation that he purchased this book on the train, June 1877.
         Early edition of a rich source of iconography of the West (first edition, 1876—oft reprinted). Cowan, p. 686 (citing the 1881 edition and noting that the guide went through many editions). Flake 9876: "The character of the Mormons, detailed information on Utah cities, and other tourist information." Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators (citing the 1879 edition), pp. 88 (William de la Montagne Cary); 188 (Thomas Moran), 216 (J. Coolidge Warren); 218 (Alfred R. Waud). Paher, Nevada 2167: "There are valuable essays on how ore is reduced, a description of an Indian village, a Paiute burial, how Paiutes fish....Interesting reading." Pingenot: Contains full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most noted scenery in the far west, also of all cities, towns, villages, U.S. forts, springs, lakes, mountains, etc. With special contributors by F. V. Hayden, Clarence King, Capt. Dutton, A. C. Peale, Joaquin Miller, J. B. Davis, and F. E. Shearer.
($
100-200)

319. WINFREY, Dorman & James M. Day. The Indian Papers of Texas and the Southwest 1825-1916. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1966. 5 vols., 8vo, original mustard cloth. Fine in publisher’s slipcase.
         Second edition and "best edition" (Basic Texas Books 219A), "with a supplemental volume of 412 pages containing 276 additional letters from the period 1846-1859. This extensive collection provides original source materials on Texas Indians....The set comprises official letters, documents, reports, and treaties....The documents are rich in first-hand reports and encounters, friendly and hostile, with the Indians, and many are rich in detail....These documents cover the declining years of the Indians in Texas and thus represent a period of social and political disorganization, rapid acculturation, and physical removal or extinction." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 2453: "This absolutely essential collection includes official correspondence from political and military figures, as well as settlers suffering from Indian raids. It is perhaps the best source of published primary materials offering the viewpoint of white people on a dangerous frontier." Long out-of-print and scarce.
($150-300)

THE FLAG OF TEXAS SHEET MUSIC

ONLY ONE OTHER COPY LOCATED—THIS ONE A VARIANT

320. WINNEMORE, A. F. The Flag of Texas: A National Song Composed in Honour of the Glorious Victory on the 21 of April 1836. and Respectfully Dedicated to General Saml. Houston...Arranged for the Piano Forte by P. M. Wolsieffer. Philadelphia: Geo. Willig., 1836. Ornately engraved sheet music. 4 pp., folio, printed on pp. 2-3. At foot of caption title at top of p. [2]: E. Gillingham. Lower right p. [3]: A.F.W. Engr. Contemporary red ink stamp at foot of p. [2]: Sold by W. A. Eichbaum Nashville. Minor foxing, else very fine. Preserved in a brown morocco and tan cloth folding case.
         Variant issue of Streeter’s entry 1262, with title, words, and music on pp. [2] and [3]; according to Streeter, the only copy known (the Library of Congress copy), has the title on p. [1] and the words and music on pp. [2-3]. Streeter comments: "The words of the song first appeared in the Baltimore Patriot, were copied in the New York Mirror of July 30, 1836, and were reproduced in Godey’s Ladys Book for September, 1836. Winnemore is listed as a music engraver in the Philadelphia Directories for 1840 and 1841." The elaborately engraved title (with no less than eight type fonts!) is followed by these lyrics:

Flow on flow thou bright young Banner
Adopted by the free
When at the cannons mouth they swore
For Death or Liberty
For Death or Liberty
Thou child of peril the stripes that date
They yet unwritten story
May gather stars and wave o’er fields
Where Freemen fight for Glory,
Where Freemen fight for Glory.
The breeze of heaven shall bear thee,
Upon its sunny wing,
Untill (sic)the triumph of thy star,
The dove of peace shall bring.
Thy birth place was the field of flood,
And wars terific (sic) thunder,
Did cradle thee till thou hast broke,
The oppressors bonds assunder.
Among the flags of nations,
There is a place for thee,
Flaunt up thou bright young banner,
Flaunt proudly o’er the free.
The stripes, and stars shall lead the[e] on,
That o’er Columbia wave,
Float on in sweet companionship,
Proud banner of the brave.
The Flag of Texas.

($400-800)

MAP OF TEXAS AND THE SANTA FE ROUTE

321. WISLIZENUS, Frederick A. Memoir of a Tour to Northern Mexico, Connected with Col. Doniphan’s Expedition, in 1846 and 1847. Washington: SMD 26, 1848. 141 pp., 3 folding lithographed profiles and maps: (1) Profile of Elevations above the Level of the Sea (38.1 x 56.3 cm; 15 x 22-1/4 inches); (2) Geological Sketch [of Texas] (30.5 x 27.4 cm; 12-1/4 x 10-3/4 inches); (3) Map of a tour from Independence to Santa Fé, Chihuahua, Monterey and Matamoros by A. Wislizenus.... (49.5 x 40.5 cm; 19.6 x 15-7/8 inches). 8vo, later black cloth over marbled boards, red morocco spine label. Occasional minor foxing, but generally fine.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 444. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 160. Graff 4723. Haferkorn, p. 37. Howes W597. Plains & Rockies IV:159:1. Rader 3715. Raines, p. 222. Rittenhouse 656. Tutorow 1761: "The original printing of an indispensable source for anyone researching the Mexican War." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, III, pp. 53-54: "The first map (the journey map) of considerable value...a number of routes to New Mexico and across Texas are shown, and Doniphan’s campaign is carefully followed from Independence, through New and Old Mexico to the camp of June 2nd, 1847...near the mouth of the Rio Grande."
         Pingenot: Wislizenus started on a privately financed trip over the Santa Fe Trail in 1846, unaware that the war with Mexico had been declared. He joined the caravan of gun-runner Albert Speyer, which was soon overtaken by Doniphan’s troops, and went to Chihuahua.
($300-600) Illustrated Description>>

322. YOAKUM, Henderson K. History of Texas from Its First Settlement to its Annexation to the United States in 1846. [New York]: Redfield, 1856. 482 [4, ads] + 576 pp., 11 engraved plates and maps: 2 folding maps (Map of Spanish Texas; and Texas Prepared for "Yoakum’s History of Texas" by J. H. Colton); 3 engraved plans (San Antonio & Its Environs...; Ground Plan of the Alamo in 1835-6; San Jacinto Battle-Ground); 4 untitled portraits with facsimile signatures (Stephen F. Austin, Peter Ellis Bean; Sam Houston; Thomas J. Rusk); folding facsimile of letter of Santa Anna; plate of Mission of San José. 2 vols., large 8vo, original blind-stamped dark brown cloth, spines gilt-lettered. Bindings clean and bright, endpapers slightly abraded and discolored (rear pastedown of Vol. 2 covered with later acid-free paper), occasional mild foxing and browning to interior, a few signatures slightly loose. Preserved in a custom brown cloth case.
         Second edition (first edition, 1855—Vandale, Texianameter 200—according to Jenkins, most copies of the first edition were destroyed by fire). Basic Texas Books 224: "Includes the very valuable `Memoir of Colonel Ellis P. Bean,’ one of the most important resources on Texas history during the early part of the nineteenth century....Yoakum had the use of materials, many no longer extant, provided to him by Sam Houston, Thomas J. Rusk...and numerous others....Contains numerous letters of Sam Houston never before published, and of the 1,266 footnotes in the main text, 739 are to original manuscripts, letters, or primary sources." Howes Y10. Raines, p. 223 (citing only the second edition). "Still indispensable to a study of the period it covers" (Eugene C. Barker). Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 202: "Numerous references to the `Indian problem’ and efforts to solve it—all reflecting the frontiersman’s viewpoint." Webb, Texana: Statehood 1.
($600-1,200)

323. ZOGBAUM, Rufus F. Horse, Foot, and Dragoons: Sketches of Army Life at Home and Abroad. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1888. 176 pp., tipped-in half-tone frontispiece on India proof paper, numerous other full-page and partial-page engraved illustrations by the author-artist. Royal 8vo, original dark blue gilt-pictorial cloth with military motifs, t.e.g. Minor shelf wear to extremities, a few inconsequential spots to binding, otherwise very fine and bright, with an extra copy of the India proof paper frontispiece laid in (this extra plate was issued with the book and is usually lacking). Pingenot described this copy as "rare in choice collector’s condition."
         First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Zogbaum) 95. Taft, Artists & Illustrators of the Old West, p. 183: "[Zogbaum] not only made many sketches on [his] trips, but he wrote frequently of his experiences so that we have a fuller record of his life in the West than we do of many of the artists and illustrators." Many of illustrations by Zogbaum will be found in Harper’s, but the present work, which reprints some of those articles and illustrations, contains some text and iconography not in Harper’s. Pingenot: Zogbaum was an illustrator who specialized in military and naval illustrations. He visited Montana, Indian Territory, and other Western locations for research purposes. Although the work includes sketches of army life in France, Great Britain, and Germany, the largest section deals with Army life in the American West. Zogbaum’s account of the hardships and excitement of being on the march with a cavalry column is second to none.
($
150-300)

SCARCE SOURCE ON THE YAQUI

324. ZÚÑIGA, Anselmo, et al. Contestación que a las especies vertidas por D. Manuel María Gándara en un empreso titulado: Esposición al Supremo Gobierno.... Mexico: Ignacio Cumplido, 1848. 118 pp. 8vo, original pale blue ornamental wrappers, sewn. Fragile wraps lightly chipped and worn and a few light stains.
         First edition of an unusual source on the Yaqui tribe and the borderlands. Bancroft, North Mexican States & Texas II:656-661. Palau 381560. Pingenot: Gandara (1801-1878), first governor of Sonora and self-proclaimed comandante of state troops, had switched from being a Federalist to a Centralist, and had initiated a counterrevolution against General Jose Urrea, the federalist military commander who supported Santa Anna. Although Sonora had suffered for years from marauding Indians, Gándara roused the Yaqui and other semibarbaric tribes to sustain his cause. Rich and influential, Gándara made a plausible defense of his policy in his Esposición. This work, penned by his opponents, deflates the governor’s arguments and exposes him in the light of truth. A rare work documenting activities of this singular figure in Sonora’s history.
($150-300)

BOOKS FOR READERS AND SCHOLARS

325. ALESSIO ROBLES, Vito. Lot of 4 titles by and about Alessio Robles, including:

ALESSIO ROBLES, Vito. Coahuila y Texas desde...la Independencia hasta el Tratado de Paz de Guadalupe Hidalgo. Mexico: 1945-1946. xv, 542 + 540 [1] pp., 8 maps (7 folding), 7 plates (1 in color). 2 vols., 4to, original white printed paper wrappers. Very fine set, showing only slight wear to the fragile glassine wraps, which are often lacking.
         First edition. xv, 542 + 540 [1] pp., 8 maps (7 folding), 7 plates (1 color). Basic Texas Books 1: "Presents the history of Texas as a Spanish province and state from the Mexican viewpoint." Griffin 2458 & 4903: "Provides a rich, solid history...a major work [that] will long be considered a standard work of reference." Howes R382. Palau 7433. Steck, Borderlands, p. 53: "A splendid, authoritative study, heavily documented, with a rich bibliography." Pingenot: In an age in which English has virtually become the world language, and Americans the most mono-lingual of cultured societies, it is difficult to understand why this fundamental work on the history of Spanish and Mexican Texas has never been translated.

ALESSIO ROBLES, Vito. Coahuila y Texas en la Epoca Colonial. Mexico: Editorial Cultura, 1938. xii, 751 [1] pp., frontispiece, illustrations, maps. Thick 8vo, original white printed wrappers bound in full sheep, red leather spine label, spine with raised bands. Author’s signed presentation copy to Ruth Lapham Butler. Some binding wear and first leaves detached.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 1: "Presents the history of Texas as a Spanish province and state from the Mexican viewpoint." Griffin 2458 & 4903: "Provides a rich, solid history...a major work [that] will long be considered a standard work of reference." Howes R382. Palau 7433.

ALESSIO ROBLES, Vito. La primera imprenta en las Provincias Internas de Oriente. Texas, Tamaulipas, Nuevo León y Coahuila. Mexico: Antigua Librería Robredo, de José Porrúa e Hijos, 1939. 79 [4] pp., plates (some folding). 8vo, original white printed wrappers. Minor shelf wear.

First edition (#13 of 550 numbered copies of which the first 50 are signed by the author). Basic Texas Books B7: "One of the first studies of early printing in Northern Mexico." Palau 6926. Pingenot: Good source on Samuel Bangs (first printer in Texas) and three Northern Mexican states. Scarce study by one of Mexico’s foremost borderlands historians on early printing and printers in Texas and the northeastern states of Mexico.

ALESSIO ROBLES, Vito. Album conmemorativo del Ing. y Gral. Vito Alessio Robles 1879-1979. Saltillo: Colegio Coahuilense de Investigaciones Históricas, 1980. Oblong 4to, original illustrated wrappers. Fine. Includes a bibliography of the published works of Alessio Robles.
(5 vols.)
($250-500)

326. [ARCHITECTURE]. Lot of 9 titles (original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BOUDREAU, Eugene H. Making the Adobe Brick. Berkeley: Fifth Street Press, 1971. Illustrations and photographs. Tall 8vo, printed wrappers. Fine.
         Fourth printing.

BUNTING, Bainbridge. Of Earth and Timbers Made: New Mexico Architecture. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1974. Photographic illustrations by Arthur Lazar. 4to, printed wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.

JUTSON, Mary Carolyn Hollers. Alfred Giles: An English Architect in Texas and Mexico. San Antonio: Trinity University Press, 1972. Photographs. 4to, cloth, gilt lettering on front and spine. Fine.
         First edition.

KELSEY, Mavis P. and Donald H. Dyal. The Courthouses of Texas. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1993. Photographs. 8vo, red cloth. Very fine in d.j. Signed by author.
         First edition.

LUMPKINS, William. Adobe Past and Present. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico, 1972. Illustrations and photographs. 4to, printed wrappers. Fine.
         Reprinted from El Palacio, Vol. 77, no. 4, a quarterly magazine of the Museum of New Mexico.

McHENRY, Paul Graham, Jr. Adobe–Build It Yourself. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1974. Illustrations and photographs. 4to, printed wrappers. Fine.
         Second printing.

ROBINSON, Willard. Texas Public Buildings of the 19th Century. Austin & London: University of Texas Press for the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, 1974. Illustrations and photographs. 4to, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

STEDMAN, Myrtle and Wilfred. Adobe Architecture. Santa Fe: Sunstone Press, 1975. Illustrations. 4to, self-wrappers. Fine.
         Second edition.

STEDMAN, Myrtle. Adobe Fireplaces. Santa Fe: Sunstone Press, 1974. Illustrations. 4to, self-wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.
(9 vols.)
($75-150)

327. [ARMY WIVES]. Lot of 17 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

ALEXANDER, Eveline M. Cavalry Wife: The Diary of Eveline M. Alexander, 1866-1867. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1977. Frontispiece, illustrations, map. Cloth. Fine.
         First edition. Edited by Sandra L. Myres. Pingenot: Being a record of Eveline Alexander’s journey from New York to Fort Smith to join her cavalry-officer husband, Andrew J. Alexander, and her experiences with him on active duty among the Indian nations and in Texas, New Mexico, and Colorado.

BALDWIN, Alice Blackwood. Memoirs of the Late Frank D. Baldwin, Major General, U.S.A. Los Angeles: Wetzel Publishing Co., 1929. Frontispiece, illustrations. Original gilt-decorated cloth, gilt title on cover and spine, autographed by the author on the front free endpaper. Very fine.
         First edition. Dustin 284. Graff 144. Howes B58: "General Baldwin campaigned against Indians all over the West and was the only officer [besides Custer’s brother] to receive twice the Medal of Honor." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 3171. Pingenot: Biography of a Civil War hero who won the Medal of Honor at the Battle of Peachtree Creek; later fought in the Indian Wars in Montana, Colorado, and Texas. In 1874 on the Staked Plains of Texas, Baldwin led a charge against renegade Dog Soldiers, rescuing two little girls whose wagon train had been attacked, and for which he received a second Medal of Honor. Includes a description of an 1876-77 trip to Yellowstone along with Alice Baldwin’s account of life as a frontier army wife. Baldwin later fought in Cuba and the Philippines.

BARBOUR, Philip Norbourne and Martha Isabella Hopkins Barbour. Journals of the Late Brevet Major Philip Norbourne Barbour, Captain in the 3rd Regiment, U.S. Infantry, and His Wife.... New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1936. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original two-color embossed cloth, paper label on spine. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#728 of 1,000 copies numbered and signed by editor). Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 149. Tutorow 3602: "Contains a vita of Barbour and recounts his death at Monterey on September 21, 1846. His journal begins on March 28, 1846. It includes a daily account of troop movements and battles and considerable commentary on his fellow soldiers. Mrs. Barbour’s journal was written in Galveston, Texas, and dates from July to October 4, 1846." Pingenot: Written during the war with Mexico, 1846, it also includes the journal of his wife, Martha Isabella Hopkins Barbour.

BOYD, Mrs. Orsemus B. Cavalry Life in Tent and Field. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1982. Frontispiece portrait. Blue cloth with gilt title on spine.
         Facsimile edition. First reprint edition with a new introduction by Darlis Miller. Pingenot: One of the best books on the frontier military as seen by an officer’s wife. The Boyds served at posts throughout the Southwest borderlands, including two tours at Fort Clark, Texas near the Mexican border. The first edition is rare and the reprint is now out-of-print.

BROWN, Marion T. Letters from Fort Sill 1886-1887. Austin: Encino Press, 1970. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Cloth and boards in publisher’s mylar d.j. Very fine.
         First edition. Edited by C. Richard King. Pingenot: The letters of Marion Taylor Brown, daughter of journalist and historian John Henry Brown, mirror the activities of a woman visiting Fort Sill in hopes that the dry climate will restore her health. The correspondence is rich in details of the social life of a frontier army post.

CHAPMAN, Helen. The News from Brownsville: Helen Chapman’s Letters from the Texas Military Frontier, 1848-1852. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1992]. 12 black and white illustrations. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A remarkable collection of letters written by a U.S. Army officer’s wife on the South Texas frontier. The author and her husband, the first quartermaster at Fort Brown, were founding citizens of Brownsville, Texas. Her letters touch on social conditions along the Rio Grande, military activities, women and minorities, and domestic life on the frontier.

DYER, Mrs. D. B. "Fort Reno" or Picturesque "Cheyenne and Arapahoe Army Life," Before the Opening of "Oklahoma." New York: G. W. Dillingham, 1896. Frontispiece, 10 photographic plates. Original embossed cloth, gilt. Minor shelf rubbing, else fine.
         First edition. Graff 1191. Howes D619. Rader 1250. Pingenot: The experiences of an Indian agent’s wife. Mrs. Dyer’s husband, Colonel Dyer, the first mayor of Oklahoma City, so resented his wife’s allusions to his conduct in her book that he divorced her and succeeded in having most of the books destroyed, thus creating a rarity. Mrs. Dyer was the daughter of Dr. N. R. Casey of Illinois.

FOUGERA, Katherine Gibson. With Custer’s Cavalry. Lincoln & London: University of Nebraska Press, 1986. Pictorial wrappers. Mint.
         Reprint.

GRIERSON, Alice Kirk. The Colonel’s Lady on the Western Frontier... Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, [1989]. Illustrations, photographs, map. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The wife of Benjamin H. Grierson, a major general who won fame in the Civil War; her letters begin in 1866, when her husband reentered the army as colonel of the "buffalo soldiers" of the Tenth Cavalry, and end with her death in 1888. These letters are extraordinary for their insight into 19th-century attitudes toward marital roles, race relations, and her life and duties as a commander’s wife on the western frontier. Contains much on life at frontier posts like Fort Riley, Gibson, Sill, Davis, Grant, and especially Fort Concho.

LAUFE, Abe (editor). An Army Doctor’s Wife on the Frontier: Letters from Alaska and the Far West. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1962. Frontispiece, portraits. 8vo, original cloth in a slightly chipped but very good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Letters of Emily FitzGerald, an assistant surgeon at the U.S. Military Academy, who was ordered to Sitka, Alaska. She was one of the first white women to live in Alaska less than a decade after its purchase by the U.S. from Russia. Later, the FitzGeralds were transferred to Fort Lapwai in present-day Idaho where they faced an Indian uprising. Her letters provide a valuable contribution giving firsthand information about methods of travel, the hardships on the northern frontier, and a woman’s viewpoint of existence in a western fort.

LAURENCE, Mary Leefe. Daughter of the Regiment. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1996. Plates. Cloth. Very fine to mint in pictorial d.j. Review copy with Pingenot’s review and a note from Smith laid in.
         First edition. Pingenot: Written in 1943-44 by the daughter of a 19th-century army officer, these memoirs remained unpublished until recently discovered in the library at the U.S.M.A. at West Point. Mary Leefe’s reminiscences cover a 20-year period in her life from age 6 in 1878 at Fort Dodge, Kansas, to age 26 in 1898 at Fort Brady, MI. Army life on the frontier, as seen by a child, include memories of Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, Forts Ringgold, Duncan, and Clark, on the Texas border, Mount Vernon Barracks, Alabama, Geronimo, etc.

LOGAN, Mrs. John A. Reminiscences of a Soldier’s Wife. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1913. Frontispiece portrait, plates. Cloth, gilt lettering on front and spine. Fine in plain d.j., chipped at edges.
         First edition. [One only: TAS 1994 $65 inscribed]

MAGOFFIN, Susan Shelby. Down the Santa Fe Trail and Into Mexico: The Diary of Susan Shelby Magoffin, 1846-1847. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1926. Frontispiece, 6 plates, folding map. Original cloth. Fine in a chipped but very good pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 436: "This is one of the most delightful of all Southwestern reminiscences." Dobie, p. 62: "She was juicy and a bride, and all life was bright to her." Graff 2656: "One of the great Santa Fe Trail diaries." Harvard Guide to American History, p. 156. Howes M211. Powell, Southwestern Century 62: "Basic source on the year of decision." Rittenhouse 392. Saunders 2870. Rader 2331. Tutorow 3592. Pingenot: Susan Magoffin accompanied her trader husband over the Santa Fe Trail during the Mexican War and was the first woman to write a major book about New Mexico.

MILES, Susan. Mrs. Buell’s Journal, 1877. Pp. 109-126 in: Fort Concho and South Plains Journal XXII, 4 (Autumn 1990). [San Angelo]: Fort Concho National Historic Landmark, 1990.

ROE, Frances M. Army Letters from an Officer’s Wife 1871-1888. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1909. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, t.e.g. Original blue cloth with gilt title on front cover and spine. A very fine bright copy.
         First edition. Flake 7400a. Graff 3546. Hanna, Yale Exhibit: "[T]his intelligent and sensible woman[‘s]...lively account of her experiences...[are well] worth reading." Howes R403. Myres, Following the Drum, p. 12: "Describes army life at various posts in Kansas, Colorado, Montana and Indian Territory." Rader 2815. An intimate and valuable narrative of army post life in the far west.

SUMMERHAYES, Martha. Vanished Arizona: Recollections of My Army Life. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1908. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original gilt pictorial cloth. Fine.
         First edition. Clark, Southwest Classics, pp. 272-284: "What she wrote was the story of an army wife on the Arizona frontier in the 1870’s, a story that is peerless in the literature of that time and place." Graff 4028: "One of the most readable books about Arizona." Howes S1132. Munk (Alliott), p. 210. Myres, Army Wives in the Trans-Mississippi West, a Preliminary Bibliography, p. 13.

VIELÉ, Teresa. "Following the Drum:" A Glimpse of Frontier Life. New York: Rudd & Carleton, 1858. 12mo, original embossed pebbled cloth, gilt spine. Somewhat shelf slanted, overall very good. Herbert T. Fletcher’s copy, with his signature stamp.
         First edition. Hanna, Yale Exhibit: "As a bride she went with her soldier husband to Texas when the Mexican War had not been long over and where the fierce Comanche were plentiful." Howes V92. Myres, Following the Drum, p. 14: "Vielé was the first woman to publish an account of army life in the trans-Mississippi West, and one of the few women who wrote about Texas." Plains & Rockies IV:312a:1: "In this lively account...Vielé describes her year’s stay at Ringgold Barracks in Texas...an entertaining commentary on life on the Texas frontier in the early 1850’s." Raines, p. 209. Winegarten, p. 118: "Mrs. Vielé was an army wife...who wrote about Brownsville, Brazos Island, Galveston, and Rio Grande City."
(17 vols.)
($750-1,100)

328. [ART]. Lot of 17 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BEELER, Joe. Cowboys and Indians: Characters in Oil and Bronze. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1967]. Illustrations (8 in color). Tall 8vo, cloth. Very fine to near mint in d.j.
         First edition. Foreword by Joe De Yong. Pingenot: Autobiographical work by this noted contemporary cowboy artist who paints in the style of Charles M. Russell. From a widely distributed collection of oils, bronzes, watercolors and many sketches, Beeler has assembled more than four score works, which together with his background accounts, are written in his easy going style.

CISNEROS, José. Four Original Prints [to accompany the limited edition of Flanagan’s Trailing the Longhorns]. Austin: Madrona Press, [1974]. 4 double folio prints in a tan portfolio. Very fine.

DeVOTO, Bernard. Across the Wide Missouri. With an Account of the Discovery of the Miller Collection by Mae Reed Porter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1947. 81 splendid plates (19 in color), map endpapers. Large 8vo, original ecru cloth. Very fine in fine pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Dobie, p. 72. Harvard Guide to American History, p. 366. Howes D296. Plains & Rockies IV:125n. Pingenot: DeVoto’s Pulitzer Prize-winning history. The fine illustrations include a 96-page section of contemporary watercolor paintings, 32 pages in full color, by Alfred Jacob Miller, Bodmer, Catlin, etc., most of them previously unpublished. Orlan Sawey, DeVoto’s biographer, described it as "more than a history; it is a work of art." It is a study of the Rocky Mountain fur trade from Astoria, through the Hudson Bay Company’s advance, to the coming of the missionaries, by which the United States won the empire of the West. Although since reprinted by others, this original Houghton Mifflin edition is by far the best because of its rich art.

EASTMAN, Seth. A Seth Eastman Sketchbook, 1848-1849. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1961. Plates. 4to, original cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: First printed appearance of the sketches made by this gifted 19th-century artist and soldier. The drawings include views of the Mississippi as Eastman traveled down the river to his new assignment in Texas. Over 150 views, mostly of scenes in Texas, make up the sketchbook. The artist’s personal journal, kept during his Texas tour, accompanies and highlights the drawings. Especially important are Eastman’s sketches of the Alamo and other missions, as well as scenes toward the border country and Fort Inge on the Leona where Eastman, then a captain, commanded Company D, First Infantry Regiment. An important work, now becoming scarce.

El Paso Museum of Art. The McKee Collection of Paintings. El Paso: El Paso Museum of Art, 1968. Illustrations. 4to, cloth with paper illustration, gilt lettering on front. Fine in glassine d.j.
         Limited edition.

GENTILZ, Theodore. Gentilz: Artist of the Old Southwest. Drawings and Paintings by Theodore Gentilz. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1974. Text drawings, 60 plates (many in color). 4to, cloth. Near fine in d.j.
         First edition. Text by Dorothy Steinbomer Kendall. Archival Research by Carmen Perry. Pingenot: Fine biography of Theodore Gentilz (1820-1906), the French artist and engineer who was employed by Henri Castro to survey and promote his colony southwest of San Antonio. Gentilz went on to record a large area of the Texas southwest and northern Mexico. His paintings of 19th-century Texas are the best that have survived.

GETLEIN, Frank. Harry Jackson, Kennedy Galleries Monograph-catalogue. New York: Kennedy Galleries, Inc., 1969. Illustrations, some folding. Oblong 4to, wrappers. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

HINE, Robert V. Edward Kern and American Expansion. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1962. 53 illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
         First edition. In Lamar and in Harvard Guide to American History. Pingenot: Kern was an artist, cartographer, and topographer with Frémont in 1845, with Simpson in 1849, and with other expeditions. He later commanded Sutter’s fort. Now out-of-print.

LEA, Tom. A Selection of Paintings and Drawings from the Nineteen-Sixties. The University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio, December 6, 1969-January 17, 1970. Illustrated. Small 4to, original wrappers with d.j. Laid in is an announcement for the special edition of the catalogue.
         Trade edition. 2 copies.

LEDBETTER, Roy C. "Frank Reaugh—Painter of Longhorn Cattle," in The Southwestern Historical Quarterly LIV, no. 1 (July 1950): 13-26.
         3 copies.

McCRACKEN, Harold. The Charles M. Russell Book: A Biography and Picture Gallery of the Famous Cowboy Artist with 35 Full Color Illustrations and More Than 150 Black and White Reproductions. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1957. Illustrations. 4to, original cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First trade edition.

McCRACKEN, Harold. Frederic Remington: Artist of the Old West. Philadelphia & New York: J. B. Lippincott Company, [1947]. Illustrations, 48 (32 color) plates. 4to, original cloth. Very good in laminated d.j.
         First edition.

SALINAS, Porfirio. Bluebonnets and Cactus: An Album of Southwestern Paintings by Porfirio Salinas. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1967. Frontispiece, color illustrations. Oblong 4to, original green leather over cloth, in publisher’s slipcase. Signed by the artist, who died in 1973.
         First edition, limited edition (250 copies). With an introduction by Joe B. Frantz, a preface by Dewey Bradford, and five short stories by O. Henry, Chas. A. Siringo, Richard Harding Davis, Emerson Hough, and Zane Grey. Contains a portfolio of 48 Salinas paintings in color. Long out-of-print and scarce with the artist’s signature.

[SCHREYVOGEL, CHARLES]. HORAN, James D. The Life and Work of Charles Schreyvogel, Painter-Historian of the Indian-Fighting Army of the American West. New York: Crown, [1969]. 62, pp., illustrated with 35 color plates, 13 pp. of platinum prints, 41 pp. of gravure prints. Oblong folio, brown leather over tan cloth. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#191 of 249 copies), signed by Horan and Schreyvogel’s daughter and with 4 added color plates. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Schreyvogel) 73.

THOMAS, W. Stephen. Fort Davis and the Texas Frontier: Paintings by Captain Arthur T. Lee, Eighth U.S. Infantry. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1976]. Portrait, 59 plates. Oblong 4to, cloth. Very good in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Arthur Tracy Lee (1814-1879) was a regular army officer who saw extensive service on the southwestern frontier prior to the Civil War. He arrived in Texas in 1849, at age 34, and spent the next twelve years building forts, guarding emigrants, chasing Indians, and, time permitting, sketching and painting his impressions of the frontier. Lee’s paintings and sketches are reproduced here for the first time, along with a biographical sketch of Lee, the man, the soldier, and the artist.

WEBER, David J. Richard H. Kern: Expeditionary Artist in the Far Southwest, 1848-1853. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1985. 151 black and white illustrations, 16 color plates. 4to, cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Latest and by far the best biography of this great Western artist, killed by Indians in Utah in 1853. Kern’s watercolors and sketches were the first published views by an American of people and places in New Mexico, southern Colorado, and Arizona. The illustrations comprise the greatest collection yet of Kern’s work. William Goetzmann calls it "an absolutely first-rate piece of work." Kern was with Frémont in 1848, with Simpson in 1849, Sitgreaves in 1851, and with Gunnison in 1853. Weber’s smooth style makes it entertaining reading.

YOST, Carl and Renner, Frederic G. A Bibliography of the Published Works of Charles M. Russell. Lincoln: University of Nebraska, 1971. Illustrations. 4to, cloth. Fine in d.j.
(20 vols.)
($400-900)

329. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 4 titles as follows:

GARD, Wayne. The Chisholm Trail. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1954. xi [1] 296 pp., illustrations by Nick Eggenhofer. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition, first printing. Adams, Guns 797; Herd 875. Basic Texas Books 70: "Entertaining and scholarly, this is the best book on the Chisholm Trail." Ross Santee described this book as "a magnificent piece of work."

HUNTER, J. Marvin (comp. & ed.). The Trail Drivers of Texas: Interesting Sketches of Early Cowboys...True Narratives.... Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1925. xvi, 1044 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Thick 8vo, original navy blue cloth, gilt title on cover and spine. Former owner’s name on front endpaper and title notation on front fly-leaf. Near fine, bright copy.
         Second edition revised and the best edition of the primary printings. Adams, Guns 1084; Herd 1103. Basic Texas Books 99C. Graff 2020. Howes H816. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country. Reese, Six Score 61: "This vast compilation of original accounts by old trail drivers is one of the best cattle books, and the largest collection of first hand narratives of the range cattle industry....[This] Nashville edition contains material not in the three original volumes...[and] is an essential foundation book for any range library."

LEA, Tom. The King Ranch. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1957. [14] 467 [3] + [15] 470-838 [6] pp., maps and illustrations by the author. 2 vols., 8vo, original two-tone cloth. Slight wear to publisher’s slip case, else a fine set.
         First edition. In this first state, the first line of page 507 begins "Alice..," whereas in the second state, it begins "For Alice...". Beautiful design and typography by Carl Hertzog. Adams, Herd 1318. Basic Texas Books 121. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 99B: "The physical dimensions of the book...all suggest the vastness of the ranch." Reese, Six Score 69: "Perhaps the most exhaustive ranch history ever written." The complete history of this vast Texas ranch, from its establishment in 1852 to modern times.

LEHMANN, V. W. Forgotten Legions: Sheep in the Rio Grande Plain of Texas. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1969. xv [3] 226 [2] pp., illustrations, maps. 8vo, pictorial buckram in d.j. Fine to mint.
         First edition. Typography and design by Carl Hertzog. Map drawn by José Cisneros. Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 110). Basic Texas Books 125: "The most thorough study of the history and development of the sheep industry in South Texas...encompassing a detailed study of the cattle and horse industry and an ecological study of the Rio Grande Plain as well." Lowman 242. Reese, Six Score 72: "An interesting and thought provoking work...." The trade edition, limited to 2,000 copies, is destined to increase in value over the years.
(5 vols.)
($150-400)

330. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

FILISOLA, Vicente. Evacuation of Texas.... Waco: Texian Press, 1965. xi-a, iv, 68 pp. 8vo, original blue cloth. Lacks d.j.
         Facsimile reprint edition. Introduction by James Day. Basic Texas Books 61e: "The best contemporary account of the Mexican retreat from Texas after the defeat of Santa Anna....Written by Santa Anna’s second in command shortly after his return to Mexico." With its scholarly introduction, index and bibliography, this is the best (and most affordable) edition of this important Texas book. Streeter 181n.

HUSON, Hobart. Captain Phillip Dimmitt’s Commandancy of Goliad, 1835-1836: An Episode of the Mexican Federalist War in Texas.... Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1974. xxix, 299 [2] pp., frontispiece, illustrations, maps. 8vo, cloth. Mint. No d.j. issued.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 102: "The most comprehensive study of the Dimmitt command during the Texas Revolution, exhaustively researched, replete with documentation and footnotes [and] an invaluable wealth of primary information...includes extensive sections on Mexican Federalist operations in Texas, Lipantitlan Expedition, the Siege of Bexar, the Goliad declaration of independence and the Johnson and Grant Expedition." A scarce, scholarly work.

NANCE, Joseph Milton. After San Jacinto: The Texas-Mexican Frontier, 1836-1841 [with] Attack and Counter-Attack: The Texas-Mexican Frontier, 1842. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963 and 1964. xiv, 642 pp. + xiv, 750 pp., plates, portraits, folding maps. 2 vols., 8vo, cloth. Mint in d.j.’s.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 149: "The most comprehensive history of the Texas-Mexican borderlands during the period." This is by far the best study of the activities between the Rio Grande and the Nueces during the Texas Revolution and Republic of Texas. "Basic for any study of Texas history"–Llerena Friend.

PEÑA, José E. de la. La Rebelión de Texas: Manuscrito Inedito de 1836, Por un Oficial de Santa Anna. Mexico: 1955. l, 321 [3] pp. 8vo, original three-quarter calf and boards. Mint.
         First edition of a previously unpublished 1836 manuscript. Edited by J. Sánchez Garza. Basic Texas Books 39: "Written by an intelligent and perceptive Mexican staff officer, this is one of the most important eye-witness records of the Texas Revolution, and especially of the Siege of the Alamo." It was de la Peña who made the claim that Crockett surrendered. The work includes 30 appendices of original documents on the Texas Revolution.

PEÑA, José E. de la. With Santa Anna in Texas: A Personal Narrative of the Revolution. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1975. Cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         First edition in English. Translated and edited by Carmen Perry. Basic Texas Books 39A: "Written by an intelligent and perceptive Mexican staff officer, this is one of the most important eye-witness records of the Texas Revolution, and especially of the siege of the Alamo." Pingenot: De la Peña was the first to claim that Davy Crockett and six others survived the battle and were subsequently executed by Santa Anna.
(6 vols.)
($150-400)

331. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 12 titles, including:

DUVAL, John C. The Adventures of Big-Foot Wallace.... Austin: Steck Company, 1935. xv [1] 309 [9 blank] pp., illustrations. 8vo, pictorial cloth. Spine slightly faded, else fine.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 50F: "A well-written account of a fascinating Texas Ranger and hero." Graff 1187. Howes D602. Raines, p. 73.

EMMETT, Chris. Shanghai Pierce: A Fair Likeness. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1953. xiii [1] 326 [4] pp., photographic illustrations with drawings by Nick Eggenhofer. 8vo, cloth. Very fine, bright copy in a fine pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 678: "An interesting book about one of Texas’ most colorful cowmen. This is some material on the Taylor-Sutton feud and on John Wesley Hardin, Jake Helm, Ben Thompson, Wild Bill Hickok and other gunmen"; Herd 764. Basic Texas Books 56: "This is one of the best biographies of a Texas cattleman....Emmett gives us Shanghai Pierce with warts and all. His volume makes both good reading and competent biography." Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Eggenhofer) 70. Reese, Six Score 38: "[T]he first cattle king of Texas. His business dealings were vast, varied, and interesting."

FORD, John Salmon. Rip Ford’s Texas. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1963]. xlviii [2] 519 pp., frontispiece portrait. Thick 8vo, cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 64: "The personal memoirs of one of the most colorful Texans of his time [and] ably edited by a fine scholar....The volume consists of a biographical essay on Ford, followed by 34 chapters divided into six chronological sections: the Republic of Texas period, the Mexican War, the Indian campaigns, the South Texas years, the Civil War, and the post-war period....Ford’s memoirs are literally full of the anecdotes that make history come alive." Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 750.

GAMBRELL, Herbert. Anson Jones: The Last President of Texas. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1948. [4] xiv, 462 [4] pp., frontispiece portrait, endpaper maps. 8vo, cloth. Very good in d.j.
         First edition.

GAMBRELL, Herbert. Anson Jones: The Last President of Texas. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1964. xiv [2] 530 [6 blank] pp., frontispiece portrait, endpaper maps. 8vo, cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         The preferred second edition because, in addition to an enlarged bibliography, it includes Gambrell’s extensive annotations, which had been omitted by the publisher in the first edition. Basic Texas Books 68: "Best edition by far...[and] the best biography of a Texan, better written than Barker’s Austin and more scholarly than James’ Raven." Campbell, p. 33. Dobie, p. 86. "the most artfully written biography that Texas has yet produced." Pingenot: Jones (1798-1858) served as president of the Republic of Texas in its last days.

GREEN, Rena Maverick. Samuel Maverick, Texan. San Antonio: Privately printed, 1952. xix, 430 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 140B. Pingenot: By far the best edition of Mary Maverick’s memoirs, incorporating the original 1921 text and adding all of Sam Maverick’s letters to his wife for a period of more than 30 years. These Mrs. Green has dovetailed chronologically with the memoirs. Also included are Samuel Maverick’s surviving journals, which include those covering the Siege of Bexar in 1835, his Perote Prison account of 1842-1843, and his log of Jack Hays’ Chihuahua Expedition of 1848.

HUNTER, Robert Hancock. Narrative of Robert Hancock Hunter 1813-1892. [Austin: Cook, 1936]. 41 pp. 8vo., printed wrappers. Very good.
         First edition.

JOHNSTON, William P. Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, Embracing His Services in the Armies of the U.S...Republic of Texas, and Confederate States. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1878. xviii, 755 [3] pp., plates, maps. Thick 8vo, original cloth with gilt title on spine. Fine copy.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 112: "An important book on early Texas as well as on Albert Sidney Johnston." Confederate General Joseph Hooker called it "The best book, by all odds, published by either side." Historian Douglas Southall Freeman said it was "Better perhaps than any other Confederate biography of so early a date [as] it retains historical authenticity." Haferkorn, p. 58. Howes J175. Nevins, Civil War Books II-68. Raines, p. 128: "The only work yet published which contains a first statement of President Lamar’s official acts." Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 1112: "Includes an account of Johnston’s command of Republic of Texas troops against Chief Bowles’ Cherokees in 1839, and his service as a U.S. army officer on the frontier of northwest Texas during the late 1850s." Tutorow 3704.

McCONNELL, H. H. Five Years a Cavalryman; or Sketches of Regular Army Life on the Texas Frontier Twenty Odd Years Ago. Jacksboro: J. N. Rogers & Company, 1889. 319 pp. 8vo, original cloth with title in gilt on front cover and spine, and in blind on back cover. A very fine, bright copy.
         First edition printed on pink paper. Adams Guns 1393; Herd 1380. Basic Texas Books 131: "This is the most lively and authentic account of cavalry life in West Texas after the Civil War....McConnell was a private in the 6th U.S. Cavalry who arrived in Galveston...in November, 1866. He served on the Texas Frontier until 1871....Throughout his service he kept a journal from which he frequently quotes verbatim....McConnell gives us the best surviving account of what it was like to be an ordinary cavalryman in occupied Texas as well as of life on the frontier outposts." Dobie, p. 52: "bully." Graff 2579. Howes M59. Raines, p. 142. Choice copies of this work are becoming very scarce.

RAYMOND, Dora N. Captain Lee Hall of Texas. Norman, 1940. xiii [1] 350 [4] pp., illustrations by Louis Lundean, photographs, text drawings. 8vo, original pictorial cloth. Signed by the author on the front free endpaper along with an original signed pen and ink sketch by the illustrator. An exceptionally fine copy in a very fine d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1827. Basic Texas Books 167: "A charming, carefully researched biography of one of the most enigmatical Texas peace officers." Howes R83. Historian Allan Nevins described it as "A remarkably full and interesting book, replete with Lee Hall’s battles against outlaws, ruffians, hostile savages, and murdering feudists...a well-rounded character study of one of the most impressive figures the Texas border ever produced." Pingenot: O. Henry lived for awhile on Hall’s ranch in La Salle County and his Heart of the West owes much to his experiences with Hall.

ROBERTS, Dan W. Rangers and Sovereignty. San Antonio: Wood Printing & Engraving, 1914. 190 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original black-lettered green cloth. Spine partially sunned, edges lightly foxed, else fine.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1870; One-Fifty 118. Basic Texas Books 178: "This account of the Frontier Battalion of Texas Rangers...gives a remarkable, concise account of the service of one of the most active of all Texas Ranger units." Dobie, p. 60. Howes R339. Pingenot: Roberts was Captain of Company D of the Texas Rangers. He was involved in the Fence Cutters’ War, the Salt War of El Paso, and saw field action until 1882.

SANTLEBEN, August. A Texas Pioneer: Early Staging and Overland Freighting on the Frontiers of Texas and Mexico. Waco: W. M. Morrison, 1967. 321 pp. 8vo, cloth with gilt title.
         The first and only facsimile reprint edition. Basic Texas Books 181. Dobie, p. 79. Graff 3676. Howes S104. Krick 441. Pingenot: One of the most fascinating books dealing with Southwest Texas and the northern Mexican frontier between the Civil War and the 1890s. The first edition is considerably scarce and high in value.

(12 vols.)
($650-1,400)

332. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 9 titles, including,

ALESSIO ROBLES, Vito. Coahuila y Texas desde...la Independencia hasta el Tratado de Paz de Guadalupe Hidalgo. Mexico, 1945-46. xv, 542 + 540 [1] pp., 8 maps (7 folding), 7 plates (1 color). 2 vols., 8vo, original printed paper wrappers. Fine. Presentation inscribed by the author to Edward Eberstadt and sons.
         First edition. Griffin 2458 and 4903: "Provides a rich, solid history...a major work [that] will long be considered a standard work of reference." Howes R382. Basic Texas Books 1: "Presents the history of Texas as a Spanish province and state from the Mexican viewpoint." Palau 7433. Steck, Borderlands, p. 53: "A splendid, authoritative study, heavily documented, with a rich bibliography."

CÉLIZ, Francisco. Diary of the Alarcón Expedition into Texas, 1718-1719. Los Angeles: Quivira Society, 1935. [14] 124 [2] pp.; [2] 52 pp. facsimiles. Plates, 2 maps. 8vo, original cloth over boards. Spine sunned, else fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#92 of 100 numbered copies signed by the editor). The 52-page facsimile of the original diary did not appear in the regular edition. Clark, Old South I-13. Howes C254. Basic Texas Books 29: "The Celiz diary records the founding of the town of San Antonio and the mission of the Alamo. It also reports on the expedition through the interior of Texas to the missions in deep eastern Texas. Lost for two centuries, it was found in 1933 by accident in the archives in Mexico City."

ESPINOSA, Isidro Felix de. Cronica de los Colegios de Propaganda Fide de la Nueva España. Washington: Academy of American Franciscan History, 1964. cii, 972 [1] pp., 29 plates and illustrations. Thick 4to, original leatherette. Very fine in fine d.j.
         This second edition contains new introduction, notes, bibliography, and index. Basic Texas Books 60B: "The most important account of the activities of the Franciscans in Texas." Clark I-79. Howes E182 (citing the 1st ed.). Library of Congress, Texas Centennial Exhibition. Raines, p. 77. Wagner, The Spanish Southwest 117n. Pingenot: This important work was preceded only by the rare 1746 original printed in Mexico. Espinosa was an important Franciscan who worked among the Indians in Guatemala, Mexico, and Texas.

HORGAN, Paul. Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History. New York: Rinehart, 1954. xv [1] 447 + vii [5] 453-1020 [4 blank] pp., maps, illustrations by the author. 2 vols., 8vo, original black cloth, gilt title on spines, in worn slipcase. Very good to fine.
         First edition. The trade edition in the publisher’s pictorial box illustrated by one of the author’s watercolor sketches. Winner of the Pulitzer prize in history for 1955. Adams, Herd 1065. Basic Texas Books 95: "Horgan devoted 14 years to the preparation of these 2 volumes and anyone who reads them will forever view the Rio Grande region with enhanced vision." Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas. Powell, Southwestern Century 48. Pingenot: A truly great book and a great read.

JACKSON, Jack (editor). Imaginary Kingdom: Texas as Seen by the Rivera and Rubí Military Expeditions, 1727 and 1767. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1995. xvii [1] 300 [6] pp., illustrations, maps. 8vo, cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The diaries of Pedro de Rivera and the Marques de Rubí, written in the 18th century during inspections of the far northern frontier of New Spain, are crucial documents for studying and understanding the Spanish presence on the frontier of what would one day be Texas. Rivera’s diary, previously unavailable in English translation, and the heretofore unknown Rubí diary are both presented here, carefully placed in historical context by Jackson and Foster. Because of Spain’s tenuous hold on the distant frontier, Rubí and Rivera saw it as an imaginary possession—the king’s domain in name only.

JOUTEL, Henri. Joutel’s Journal of La Salle’s Last Voyage: A reprint (page for page and line for line) of the first English translation, London, 1714; with the map of the original French edition Paris, 1713, in facsimile; and Notes by Melville B. Anderson. Chicago: Caxton Club, 1896. [42], 231 pp., facsimile, folding map. 8vo, original half-vellum and gray boards with gilt title on spine. Original owner’s bookplate. Customary light soiling to vellum, smudge on the half-title, else a fine, uncut copy.

First American edition, limited edition (203 copies). Printed on hand-made paper. Basic Texas Books 114G. Clark I-14. Very scarce edition. Graff 2253. Howes J266: "Most reliable eye-witness account of La Salle’s two-years wanderings in Texas. The map, based on La Salle’s Mississippi explorations, was the first accurate delineation of that river."

LAFORA, Nicolás de. The Frontiers of New Spain: Nicolás de Lafora’s Description 1766-1768. Berkeley: Quivira Society, 1958. xviii, 243 pp., 16 plates, folding map at rear. 8vo, half white cloth over brick-colored boards with gilt vignette of the Quivira Society on front cover, gilt title on backstrip. Very fine.
         First edition in English and limited edition (400 copies). Pingenot: Captain Nicolás de Lafora, Spanish Royal Engineers, accompanied the accompanied the Marqués de Rubí on his tour of inspection of the northern provinces and recommended the placement of presidios that would represent Spanish retrenchment from the ever-growing Apache menace. Lafora’s report contains a day-by-day narrative of the journey, which lasted 23 months and includes descriptions of Nueva Vizcaya, New Mexico, Sonora, Coahuila, Texas, Nueva Galicia, and Nayarit. It contains a wealth of detail on the borderlands, Indians, geographical features, frontier conditions, etc. As a result of the Rubí expedition, the Royal Reglamento of 1772 was issued which established New Spain’s northern frontier line.

MORFI, Fray Juan Agustin de. Diario y Derrotero (1777-1781). Edición de Eugenio del Hoyo y Malcolm D. McLean. Monterrey: Instituto Tecnologico, 1967. xix [1] 472 pp., 14 foldout maps. Thick 8vo, original printed wrappers. Upper wrapper detached, but overall very good.
         First edition.

WINSHIP, George Parker. The Coronado Expedition 1540-1542. Chicago: Rio Grande Press, 1964. [4] xv [1] 403 pp., illustrations, maps, facsimiles. 4to, black cloth over boards, gilt title on front.
         A reprint from the first edition of 1896.
(11 vols.)
($450-800)

333. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

BROWN, John Henry. Indian Wars and Pioneers of Texas. Austin: L. E. Daniel, [1896]. 762 pp., photographic portraits. 4to, rebound, gilt lettering on front and spine. Defective copy lacking last leaf of index. Some repairs and wear, blank right margin of title extended. Laid in is an envelope from an Eagle Pass hotel with a penciled note: "Capt. If you will express book to me 312 McKinney Ave, Houston I will have it rebound without cost to you. Yrs. L. E. Daniel."
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 23: "Brown’s most important book, and one of the best works on Texas Indian fighters and early pioneers."

BROWN, John Henry. Indian Wars and Pioneers of Texas. Austin: State House Press, 1988. [2] 812 pp., photographic portraits. 4to, blue gilt, gilt lettering. Very fine.
         Reprint of the first edition (Austin, 1896). Basic Texas Books 23: "Brown’s most important book, and one of the best works on Texas Indian fighters and early pioneers."

CARTER, Robert G. On the Border with Mackenzie or Winning West Texas from the Comanches. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961. [2] xxvi, 580 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original maroon cloth. Very fine.

Reprint of the first edition (Washington, 1935). Basic Texas Books 25: "One of the best sources on the Federal cavalry campaigns against the Indians in the 1870s."

GREENE, A. C. (editor). The Last Captive: The Lives of Herman Lehmann, Who Was Taken by the Indians as a Boy from His Texas Home & Adopted by Them.... Austin: Encino Press, 1972. xxi [1] 161 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original black morocco over boards with photograph of Lehmann pasted onto upper cover. Mint in publisher’s slipcase.
         First edition, limited edition (#113 of 250 numbered copies, in the special binding and signed by author), with the incorrect photograph of Lehmann on upper cover, "First Edition" on copyright page. Basic Texas Books 124C: "The Lehmann story...gives us a clear and virtually unique insight into the Indian warfare in Texas as it was perceived by the Indians, and into every aspect of Plains Indian culture and daily life....Greene’s version is a triumph of editing and scholarship." Pingenot: The story of Herman Lehmann, who was taken by the Indians as a boy from his Texas home and adopted by them; his career as a warrior with the Apache and Comanche tribes, and his subsequent restoration to his family. Winner of a Texas Institute of Letters Award.

LEE, Nelson. Three Years Among the Comanches: The Narrative of Nelson Lee, The Texan Ranger. Norman: University Oklahoma Press, [1957]. xvi 179 [5] pp. 8vo, paper over boards. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

RISTER, Carl Coke. Border Captives: The Traffic in Prisoners by Southern Plains Indians 1835-1875. Norman: 1940. xi [1] 220 [4] pp., folding maps, plates. 8vo, original brown gilt pictorial cloth. Fine in fine, laminated d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 174: "The best analytical account of Texas Indian captivities...it is a sociological study of the effects of this traffic on Indian life as well as on the captives themselves." Pingenot: Story of the traffic in prisoners by Southern Plains Indians 1835-1875 embracing parts of Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. Covers the five most war-like tribes: Kiowa, Comanche, Cheyenne, Apache and Arapahoe.
(6 vols.)
($300-600)

334. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

BERLANDIER, Jean Louis. Journey to Mexico During the Years 1826-1834. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1980. xxxvi [2] 287 [1] + vii [6] 290-672 [2] pp., many plates. 2 vols., large 8vo, pictorial cloth, slipcase. A very fine, mint set. Signed by four translators and editors.
         First edition, limited edition (#33 of 150 copies numbered and signed). Basic Texas Books 14D: "Best scientific study of Texas during the colonial period...[and] the most complete version published to date." Graff 278. Howes B379. Plains & Rockies 178a. Raines, p. 24. Pingenot: Based on the manuscript at the Library of Congress, with illustrations from specimens at the Gray Herbarium.

[BOLLAERT, WILLIAM]. William Bollaert’s Texas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1956. xxiii [1] 423 pp. [3], plates, map. 8vo, original cloth. Near mint copy in a very fine d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 18: "The most entertaining book on the Republic of Texas, this is also one of the most perceptive." Pingenot: Bollaert, an Englishman, visited Texas in 1842, in the closing years of the Texas Republic, and left on the eve of annexation in 1844. His notebooks and journals, heretofore unpublished, contain a rich trove of facts and Texas and fascinating reading about the people and the country.

BRACHT, Viktor. Texas in 1848. San Antonio, 1931. xxiv [2] 223 pp., 2 plates. 8vo, original decorated green cloth. A fine, bright copy.
         First edition in English and best edition, with additional material entitled "Biographical Sketches of Viktor Bracht and Dr. Felix Bracht" by the translator Charles Frank Schmidt. Basic Texas Books 21A: "One of the best Texas immigration guides, this book is also a valuable contribution to our knowledge of early Texas. Bracht is one of few early writers on Texas who based his report almost entirely on his personal observations. Few men have loved Texas more than Bracht." Sister Agatha, p. 7. Clark, Old South III:278. Dobie, p. 50. Howes B682.

HORGAN, Paul. Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History. New York: Rinehart, 1954. xv [1] 447 + vii [5] 453-1020 [4 blank] pp., maps, illustrations by the author. 2 vols., 8vo, original black cloth, gilt title on spines, slipcase. Fine set.
         First edition. The trade edition in the publisher’s pictorial slipcase illustrated by one of the author’s watercolor sketches. Winner of the Pulitzer prize in history for 1955. Adams, Herd 1065. Basic Texas Books 95: "Horgan devoted 14 years to the preparation of these 2 volumes and anyone who reads them will forever view the Rio Grande region with enhanced vision." Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas. Pingenot: A truly great book and a great read. Powell, Southwestern Century 48.

KENNEDY, William. Texas: The Rise, Progress, and Prospects of the Republic of Texas...In One Volume. Fort Worth: Molyneaux Craftsmen, 1925. xlviii, 939 pp., 2 folding maps including the large Arrowsmith Map of Texas, and 2 full-page maps. 8vo, original maroon cloth with minor external wear. Near fine.
         Facsimile reprint edition, limited edition (1,250 copies). Basic Texas Books 117F. Clark III:189. Graff 2304. Howes K92. Rader 2159. Streeter 1385: "This important work on Texas...is a most interesting book...Kennedy brings in various contemporary comments not usually found in the conventional account."

MUIR, Andrew Forest (editor). Texas in 1837: An Anonymous, Contemporary Narrative. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1958. xxi [1] 232 pp., plates, endpaper map. 8vo, cloth. Very fine copy in a near fine d.j.
         First edition. First book edition as it was first published serially in The Hesperian in the 19th century. Basic Texas Books 148: "The unknown author of this work left us the earliest written account of Texas as a republic. The Muir edition is the first in book form, and...[is] one of the best edited and best annotated of all Texas books." Graff 1872.

PARKER, William B. Notes Taken During the Expedition Commanded by Capt. R. B. Marcy, U.S.A. through Unexplored Texas, In...1854. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1984. xiv [4] 242 [4] pp., folding map in separate envelope. Small 8vo, half calf and cloth. Mint in a custom slipcase.
         Limited edition (#87 of 100 specially bound and numbered copies). Bradford 4186. Graff 3195: "Especially valuable for the northwest part of Texas." Howes P91. Raines, p. 162: "A readable and reliable description of northwestern Texas before its settlement." Plains & Rockies 279. Field 1174: "...the author has given us a volume crowded with...interesting details of...the Indian tribes of the southern prairies."
(9 vols.)
($250-700)

335. [BASIC TEXAS BOOKS]. Lot of 11 titles, including:

BARKER, Nancy (trans. and ed.). The French Legation in Texas. Austin: [Designed by Wm. Holman for] Texas State Historical Association, 1970-1973. 357 [1] + [10] 369-710 pp., illustrations. 2 vols., 8vo, cloth. Vol. 1 is in the original publisher’s mylar d.j. and Vol. 2 is in the original pictorial paper d.j. Very fine to mint.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books: "The volumes comprise one of the basic archives of contemporary reports on Texas. They sparkle with gossip and intrigue as well as with factual information." Pingenot: Extensive notes; calendar of the letters. Consists of 313 letter/reports on Texas between 1838 and 1846 covering almost every aspect of Texas affairs. These were written by the French charge d’affaires, Alphonse Dubois de Saligny, and a special agent, Viscount Jules de Crayamel. Includes a bibliography of de Saligny.

DAVIS, Nicholas A. The Campaign from Texas to Maryland. Austin: Steck Company, 1961. [16] 168 pp., illustrations. 8vo, cloth, in publisher’s slipcase. Fine.
         Facsimile reprint of the rare 1863 edition. Basic Texas Books 37(c). Pingenot: One of the best books on Hood’s Texas Brigade and also one of the best American war travel books.

HEARTSILL, W. W. Fourteen Hundred and 91 Days in the Confederate Army...of the W. P. Lane Rangers, from April 19, 1861 to May 20, 1865. Jackson: McCowar-Mercer Press, 1954. xxiv [18] 332 pp., photographs. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in lightly spotted d.j.
         Facsimile reprint of the first edition, limited edition (1,000 copies). Basic Texas Books 89A: "Best edition...historically important...one of the most vivid and intimate accounts of Civil War battle-life that has survived." Coulter 224. Howes H380. Harwell, In Tall Cotton 86. Pingenot: This McCowar-Mercer Press edition is now quite scarce; not to be confused with a crude and cheaply produced N.p.n.d. edition which is frequently offered.

HOGAN, William R. The Texas Republic: A Social and Economic History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1946]. xiii [1] 338 pp., plates. 8vo, cloth. Very fine copy in near fine d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 91: "The best social history of the Republic of Texas...a mature and penetrating analysis of the forces which blended together to give the Republic of Texas its peculiar national character." Basler 4193. Campbell, p. 172. Pingenot: Frank Wardlaw said of this book: "It remains and will, I believe, continue to remain, one of the finest books ever written about Texas."

MERK, Frederick. Slavery and the Annexation of Texas. Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1972. [2] xiv, 290 x [4] pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

NIXON, Pat Ireland. The Medical Story of Early Texas, 1528-1853. Lancaster: Lancaster Press for Mollie Bennett Lupe Memorial Fund, 1946. xv [1] 507 [3] pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original cloth with printed paper labels on cover and backstrip. Near mint copy in plain paper d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 153: "The best work of Texas medical history, this is also one of the best state medical histories ever published. It is well-annotated, carefully factual, and lucidly written." Dobie, p. 70. Howes N161. Pingenot: Nixon gathered material for this classic Texas book for over forty years. Five chapters relate directly to the Texas Revolution and eight to the Republic of Texas. An appendix lists data on several hundred early Texas doctors.

OBERSTE, William H. Texas Irish Empresarios and Their Colonies. Austin: Van Boeckman-Jones, 1953. xii, 310 [14] pp., maps, facsimiles, folding maps. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j. Signed.
         First edition, limited edition (#50 of 300 signed, numbered copies). Basic Texas Books 156.

PICKRELL, Annie Doom. Pioneer Women in Texas. Austin: E. L. Steck, 1929. 474 pp. 8vo, original gilt pictorial green cloth. Owner’s name on front paste-down and tipped-in note to owner on front free endpaper. Very fine. Laid in is a clipping from the Texas Bar Journal (Feb. 1966) about author’s son.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 161: "The best book on women in early Texas, this is a useful and fascinating compilation of biographies of 77 notable Texas women, compiled from recollections and memoirs of women who came to Texas prior to statehood." Dobie, p. 62. Rader 2666. Sloan, Women in the Cattle Country 464. Winegarten, p. 115. Very scarce in the first printing.

RICHARDSON, Rupert Norval. Texas: The Lone Star State. New York: Prentice Hall, 1943. xix [3] 590 pp., color map, illustrations. 8vo, original cloth. Very good.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 171.

SMITH, Justin H. The Annexation of Texas. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1941. [2] ix [1] 496 [4] pp. 8vo, original maize cloth. Fine copy in fine d.j.
         Fourth and best edition, revised and corrected. Basic Texas Books 188C: "One of the most comprehensive studies of the movement to bring Texas into the Union." Griffin 4215: "Based on exhaustive research in American and Texas sources. Conclusion justifies annexation and fails to consider seriously the basic Mexican point of view, emphasizing, rather, the incompetence and irrationality of Mexican official action." Harvard Guide to American History, p. 235. Howes S634. Rader 2945. Trask 5721.

WEBB, Walter Prescott. (editor). The Handbook of Texas. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1952-1976. xv [3] 977 + vii [1] 953 + xiv [2] 1145 pp. 2 + supplement vol., 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.’s.
         First edition.
(14 vols.)
($300-600)

336. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE]. Lot of approximately 800 dealers’ catalogues, with an emphasis on Americana and military history, including long runs of the catalogues of Argonaut Books, J. S. Canner, Q. M. Dabney, Frontier America, Michael Heaston, Jenkins Company, William Reese, Walter Reuben, Dorothy Sloan, T. A. Swinford, Ray Walton, et al. Mostly 8vo, wrappers. Generally very fine.

(Approximately 800 vols.)
($250-500)

337. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: AMERICAN HISTORY]. Lot of 6 titles, including the following:

Harvard Guide to American History. Cambridge: Belknap, 1954. xxiv, 689 pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in very good, edge-worn d.j.
         First edition.

HOWES, Wright. U.S.iana (1650-1950): A Selective Bibliography in Which Are Described 11,620...Significant Books Relating to the...United States. New York: R. R. Bowker, 1962. 632 pp. Tall 8vo, original brown cloth, plasticized.
         Revised and enlarged edition.

JENKINS, John H. A Full Howes: A Catalogue of Books and Pamphlets Listed in Wright Howes’ U.S.iana. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1981. [311] pp. 4to, brown cloth, leather spine label, original brown wrappers bound in. Signed on colophon by Jenkins.
         Special limited edition (#21 of 50 copies).

LARNED, J. N. The Literature of American History: A Bibliographical Guide with a Supplement.... Ohio: Long’s College Book Company, 1953. ix [1], 588, [4] 37 [1 ad] pp. Small 4to, cloth. Fine.
         Reprint (original edition 1902).

PILLING, James C. Proof-sheets of a Bibliography of the Language of the North American Indians. Brooklyn: Central Book Company, 1970. xl, 1,135 pp. 8vo, original dark red cloth with gilt title on spine. Very fine.
         Glass, p. 676: "Formidable annotated bibliography, including Mexican languages." Pingenot: An important reprint of the proof-sheets that provides a useful guide to the Indian languages; a work that has not been surpassed. Contains 4,308 entries and some 3,000 supplemental entries, plus a 44-page index.

TUTOROW, Norman E. The Mexican-American War: An Annotated Bibliography. Westport: Greenwood Press, [1981]. xxix [2] 427 pp., maps, charts. 4to, original black cloth, gilt title. Some underlining, else fine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Contains 4,537 mostly annotated entries, along with appendices and maps; one of the most comprehensive bibliographies on the Mexican War.
(6 vols.)
($100-300)

338. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: ART.] Lot of 5 titles, including the following:

DYKES, Jeff. Fifty Great Western Illustrators: A Bibliographic Checklist. [Flagstaff]: Northland Press, 1975. xiv, 457 pp., illustrations. 4to, cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j. Laid in is Jeff Dykes’ Catalogue 57, Great Western Illustrators, Fall 1985 (32 pp., self-wrappers).
         First edition. Pingenot: Illustrations by the various artists/illustrators covered in the book. A classic bibliography reflecting a lifetime of research.

McCRACKEN, Harold. Frederic Remington, Artist of the Old West. Philadelphia & New York: J. B. Lippincott, [1947]. 157 [81] pp., illustrations, 48 (32 color) plates. 4to, original cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

STEINFELDT, Cecilia. Art for History’s Sake: The Texas Collection of the Witte Museum. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1993]. xxvi, [32] 356 pp., 58 color and 286 black and white illustrations. 4to, cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j. Autographed on the title-page by the author.
         First edition. Introduction by William H. Goetzmann. Pingenot: The author, recognized as the dean of Texas art historians, adds in this book a new dimension to the greater field of American art. Covering the period from 1845 to 1945, and arranged in encyclopedia format, Steinfeldt’s impressive book covers the period from 1845 to 1945. The Witte collection is rich in 19th-century Texas paintings and this book is destined to become the standard survey of historical art in Texas.

TYLER, Ron. Prints of the West: Prints from the Library of Congress. Golden: Fulcrum Publishing, 1994. viii [2] 197 pp. 50 black and white and 50 color illustrations. 4to, cloth. Mint in colorful pictorial d.j. Presentation inscribed on the half title "To Ben/ best wishes/ Ron Tyler/ March 2, 1995."
         First edition. Pingenot: Beginning with the first lithograph printed in Philadelphia in 1819, Tyler traces the fascinating history of lithography and its role in popularizing images of the West. An important work that brings together for the first time the magnificent collection of early Western prints housed by the Library of Congress.

WEATHERFORD, R. M., Inc. Catalog 70: Charles M. Russell Collection of Karl Yost. Southworth: R. M. Weatherford, [1988]. v [1] 139 pp., illustrations. 4to, pictorial wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.
(5 vols.)
($150-300)

339. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: CALIFORNIA]. Lot of 4 titles, including the following:

COWAN, Robert Ernest and Robert Granniss Cowan. A Bibliography of the History of California 1510-1930. IV Volumes in One. Los Angeles, 1964. [2] v, 926 pp. 8vo, cloth and boards with paper spine label. Near mint.
         Reprint of 1933 edition printed by John Henry Nash.

EDWARDS, E. I. Lost Oases Along the Carrizo. Los Angeles: Westernlore Press, 1961. xvi, 126 pp., endpaper maps, photographic plates. 8vo, original ecru cloth with gilt title on spine. Very fine in protected pictorial d.j.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies on Hamilton Victorian laid paper printed in special Intertype Garamond). Pingenot: The Southern Trail in the Colorado Desert region. The route includes Kearny and his army, St. George Cooke, Emory and others, including gold seekers, boundary and railroad surveys of the region. Noteworthy for its 32-page descriptive bibliography of the Colorado desert. 2 copies with sales slip laid in.

HOWELL, John, Books. Lot of Catalogues: Catalogue 50 California (Parts 1-5 [1980]); Catalogue 52 Americana [1980]; Butterfield sale catalogue Americana: The Inventory of John Howell–Books, Part I [1985].

MINTZ, Lannon W. The Trail: A Bibliography of the Travelers on the Overland Trail...During the Years 1841-1864. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987. Illustrated. Cloth. Mint in d.j. as issued.
         First edition. Pingenot: An annotated bibliography with over 500 accounts arranged alphabetically with a short comment relative to each entry, along with a coded guide to the current value of each item.

The Zamorano 80. A Selection of Distinguished California Books Made by Members of the Zamorano Club. New York: Kraus Reprint, 1969. x [2] 66 [4], frontispiece (folding facsimile), plates. 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies).
(11 vols.)
($75-150)

340. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: CONFEDERACY]. Lot of 2 titles, including the following:

COULTER, E. Merton. Travels in the Confederate States: A Bibliography. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1948. xiv 289 [1] pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         Second printing.

HARWELL, Richard Barksdale. In Tall Cotton: The 200 Most Important Confederate Books for the Reader, Researcher, and Collector. Austin: Jenkins Company, 1978. xi, 82 [2] pp., illustrations. 8vo, pictorial paper boards. Some edge wear, else fine.
         First edition.
(2 vols.)
($75-150)

341. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: DICTIONARIES & ENCYCLOPEDIAS]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

HOPKINS, Joseph G. E., et al. (editors). Concise Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1964. viii [4] 1273 pp. 4to, cloth. Fine in d.j. Signed by Hopkins.
         First edition.

THRAPP, Dan L. Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1988-1994. xvi, 524 + viii, 525-1099 [5 blank] + viii [2] 1101-1698 + xi [3] 610 pp. 4 vols., 8vo, red cloth. Very fine. Laid in is a list of revisions and corrections to second printing, compiled for the purchasers of the first printing.
         First edition, first printing.
(5 vols.)
($150-300)

342. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: DOBIE, HALEY, HERTZOG, HORGAN, LEA]. Lot of 9 titles, including the following:

DYKES, Jeff C. My Dobie Collection. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1971. [10] vii [1] 43 pp. [3], illustrated. 8vo, original cloth. Signed by Dykes.
         First edition, limited edition (#114 of 300 signed copies).

FARMER, David. The Collector’s Eye: Selections from the Sally Zaiser Collection of Paul Horgan. Dallas: Southern Methodist University, DeGolyer Library, 1991. 50 [4] pp., illustrations. 8vo, printed wrappers, program laid in. Tear to lower edge of front wrap, else fine.
         First edition.

LEA, Tom. A Selection of Paintings and Drawings from the Nineteen-Sixties. The University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio, December 6, 1969-January 17, 1970. San Antonio: University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures, [1969]. [40] pp., illustrated. Small 4to, original wrappers. Card laid in announcing special hardbound limited edition.
         Trade edition.

LOWMAN, Al. Printer at the Pass: The Work of Carl Hertzog. San Antonio: Institute of Texan Cultures, 1972. xix [1] 123 [1] pp., illustrations. 8vo, cloth, paper label on front. Very fine.
         First edition.

LUTZ, Willis J. William D. Wittliff: A Bibliography. Dallas: J & M, 1975. vii [3] 49 pp. 8vo, wrappers. Signed by Lutz.
         First edition.

McVICKER, Mary Louise. The Writings of J. Frank Dobie: A Bibliography. Lawton: Museum of the Great Plains, 1968. xv, [1] 258 [2] pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Near fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: With the assistance of Dobie himself before he died, McVicker compiled the definitive bibliography of Dobie’s many works.

ROBINSON, Chandler A. J. Evetts Haley and the Passing of the Old West: A Bibliography of His Writings, with a Collection of Essays upon His Character, Genius, Personality, Skills, and Accomplishments. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1978. 239 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, cloth. Errata slip laid in.
         First edition.

ROBINSON, Chandler M. J. Evetts Haley Cowman Historian. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1967. viii, 75 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, cloth. Fine. Signed by Haley and Hertzog.
         First edition.

SMEDLEY, Betty (bookseller). The J. Evetts Haley Roundup. Catalogue Seven. [Austin: Carl Hertzog for] Betty Smedley, [1974]. [4] 20 pp., frontispiece. 4to, cloth. Fine. Signed by Haley and Hertzog.
         First edition, limited edition (#103 of 150 copies).
(9 vols.)
($30-60)

343. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: EBERSTADT]. Lot of 5 titles, including the following:

EBERSTADT, Edward & Sons. The Annotated Eberstadt Catalogues of Americana. New York: Argosy-Antiquarian, 1965. Illustrated. 4 vols., 8vo, original maroon calf and cloth, in slipcase. Mint set. Colophon page, numbered and signed by Charles and Lindley Eberstadt, and by Archibald Hanna, who wrote the introduction.
         First edition, limited edition (#62 of 90 sets half-bound in gilt-lettered morocco, with an original leaf of the rare first edition of the first history of California, Venegas, Noticia de la California, Madrid, 1757.) Pingenot: 4 thick vols., including an index volume, complete. First edition apart from the individually issued catalogues that make up this outstanding compendium of commentary and prices for thousands of books, manuscripts, paintings, and maps issued by this distinguished firm of antiquarian booksellers.

EBERSTADT, Edward, & Sons. Catalogue 140: Americana. New York: Eberstadt, 1957. 111 pp. Folio, pictorial wrappers. Very good.
         First edition.

EBERSTADT, Edward, & Sons. Catalogue 147: The Spanish Southwest 1555-1799. New York: Eberstadt, n.d. 63 [1] pp. Folio, wrappers. Edges browned and worn, overall very good.
         First edition.

EBERSTADT, Edward, & Sons. Catalogue 162, Texas, Being a Collection of Rare & Important Books & Manuscripts Relating to the Lone Star State.... New York: Edward Eberstadt & Sons, [1963]. 220 pp., illustrations. 8vo, original printed ecru wrappers, laminated. Presentation inscribed on the title-page to bibliophile Charles Downing and signed by Archibald Hanna, author of the introduction.
         First edition. With a 5-page introduction by Archibald Hanna. Basic Texas Books B80: "Contains 950 of the rarest Texas books, pamphlets, and imprints, with detailed commentaries." Pingenot: These range from the early period of Spanish exploration through Mexican colonization, revolution, and statehood. Contains many facsimiles of title-pages, etc. Probably the finest catalog of Texas original sources ever produced, describing 950 choice items from the Spanish to the U.S. period.

JENKINS, John H. The Eberstadt Caper. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1975. 17 pp., photographic illustrations. 4to, wrappers. "Season’s Greetings from Maureen and John Jenkins and John Jenkins IV" slip laid in.
         Limited edition (375 copies).
(8 vols.)
($250-500)

344. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: LATIN AMERICA AND SPANISH SOUTHWEST]. Lot of 4 titles, including the following:

DALLAS PUBLIC LIBRARY. The Spanish Southwest: An Exhibit at the Dallas Public Library, June 15-July 2, 1971. [Austin: Encino Press, 1971]. [32] pp., illustrations. Oblong 8vo, mustard-colored wrappers with printed paper label. Near mint.
         First and only edition. Preface by Tom Lea. Lutz A57b. Whaley 79. Pingenot: An exhibit of 31 rare books and documents, in the D.P.L.’s collection, or on loan from other institutions and private collections, that highlight Spanish discovery, exploration, and settlement in what is now the southwestern United States.

GRIFFIN, Charles C. (editor). Latin America: A Guide to the Historical Literature. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1971]. xxx, 700 pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         First edition.

HAGGARD, J. Villasana. Handbook for Translators of Spanish Historical Documents. Oklahoma City: Semco Color Press [for the University of Texas], 1941. [2] vii] [1] 198 pp., illustrative examples. 8vo, blue cloth. Fine.
         First edition.

WAGNER, Henry R.. The Spanish Southwest 1542-1794. An Annotated Bibliography. Parts I and II. New York: Arno Press, 1967. 553 pp., illustrations, folding facsimiles. 2 vols., 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         Reprint. First edition published by the Quivira Society.
(5 vols.)
($75-150)

345. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: MAPPING]. Lot of 9 titles, including the following:

BRYAN, James P. and Walter K. Hanak. Texas in Maps. Austin: University of Texas, [1961]. 16, 23 [plates] [1] pp., maps, illustrations. 8vo, pictorial wrappers. Fine.
         Limited edition (2,500 copies).

DAY, James M. and Ann B. Dunlap. The Map Collection of the Texas State Archives 1527-1900. Austin: Texas State Library, 1962. [2] 156 pp. 8vo, wrappers. Fine.

DAY, James H. Maps of Texas 1527-1900: The Map Collection of the Texas State Archives. Austin: Pemberton, 1964. [6] 178 pp. 8vo, cloth with printed label pasted on front. Fine.
         First edition.

JOLLY, David C. Antique Maps, Sea Charts, City Views, Celestial Charts, & Battle Plans. Price Record & Handbook for 1985. Brookline: Jolly, 1985. 280 pp., illustrations. 8vo, green cloth.
         First edition.

REINHARTZ, Dennis and Charles C. Colley. The Mapping of the American Southwest. College Station: Texas A&M, [1987]. xv 83 [1] [8 color plates] [1] pp., maps. 8vo, simulated leather, gilt design on front and lettering on spine. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition.

RITTENHOUSE, Jack. Disturnell’s Treaty Map: The Map that was Part of the Guadalupe Hidalgo Treaty on Southwestern Boundaries, 1848. Santa Fe: Stagecoach Press, [1965]. 20 [1] pp., large folding map. 8vo, original cloth with title only on spine. Fine.
         First edition. Tutorow 4512: "[It] deals with the map that was used in establishing the international boundary between the United States and Mexico."

TALIAFERRO, Henry G., et al. Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library. College Station: Texas A&M for Rosenberg Library, 1988. xii, 234 pp., color frontispiece, 4 color plates, illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. 558 annotated entries recording works written by people living on the U.S. frontier before 1800, excluding Jesuit relations, Spanish Southwest, and Canada.

TOOLEY, R. V. The Mapping of America. [London]: Holland, [1985]. xi [1] 519 pp., illustrations, maps. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         Second impression.
(9 vols.)
($75-150)

346. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR]. Lot of 5 titles including the following:

CONNOR, Seymour V. and Odie B. Faulk. North America Divided: The Mexican War, 1846-1848. New York: 1971. viii [2] 300 pp., maps, endpaper maps. 8vo, cloth. Fine in slightly chipped d.j.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books B51. Tutorow 3205: "Attempts to get away from the traditional ‘New England’ interpretation of the Mexican War." Pingenot: The first two-thirds of the book are given to the authors’ overview and analysis of the Mexican War. Pp. 185-276 contain an analytical bibliography with more than 700 entries of works printed in English and in Spanish.

GARRETT, Jenkins. The Mexican-American War of 1846-1848: A Bibliography of the Holdings of the Libraries. College Station: [Texas A&M University Press for ] The University of Texas at Arlington, 1995. xx, 693 pp., frontispiece, illustrations. Review copy information slips laid in. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Sales Review Copy.

HAFERKORN, Henry E. The War with Mexico 1846-1848. New York: Argonaut, 1965. [6] 93 [1] xxviii pp. 8vo, cloth. Notes in margins. Fine.

TUTOROW, Norman E. The Mexican-American War: An Annotated Bibliography. Westport: Greenwood Press, [1981]. xxix, 427 pp., maps, charts. 4to, original black cloth, gilt title, gilt on spine faded. Very good.

TYLER, Ronnie C. The Mexican War: A Lithographic Record. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1973. [14] 90 pp., color frontispiece, 50 illustrations. 8vo, cloth over pictorial paper boards. Mint, as issued, in publisher’s red slipcase with companion red paper portfolio of 16 color plates not included in the trade edition, and prospectus.
         First edition, limited edition (#14 of 210 copies signed by Tyler, Ross, and William R. Holman, the designer and typographer). Tutorow 4391. Pingenot: A beautifully illustrated, scholarly treatise on the lithography of the Mexican War. This handsome book begins with Gen. Taylor and his arrival at Corpus Christi, and continues with the two opening battles in South Texas at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, as well as the invasion of Mexico. The author is a nationally known historian and critic of 19th-century art.
(5 vols.)
($150-300)

347. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE. MILITARY]. Lot of 1 title:

HEITMAN, Francis B. Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army, from its Organization, September 29, 1789, to March 2, 1903. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1965. 1,069 + [2] 626 pp. 2 vols., 8vo, cloth with gilt-lettered spines. Near mint set.
         Facsimile reprint edition. Dustin 140. Pingenot: An indispensable compilation of all officers of the U.S. and Confederate armies; their dates of entry into service, graduation from West Point, etc.; their ranks and commands until killed or retired; list of actions and engagements, forts and reservations, soldier’s homes, organization tables, etc. An absolute must for any military historian or collector. The 1965 reprint edition was reduced to 8vo size and is now out-of-print.
($40-80)

348. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: MISCELLANEOUS]. Lot of 10 titles, including the following:

BARTHOLOMEW, Ed. A Catalog of the World Famous N. H. Rose Collection of Old Time Photographs of the Frontier.... Houston: Published by the author, 1952. [64] pp. 8vo, original self wrappers. Very good.

BOWER, Donald E. Fred Rosenstock. A Legend in Books & Art. Flagstaff: Northland Press, 1976. xvii [1] 212 [2] pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original cloth. Very fine in d.j. Presentation inscribed to "my good friend and compadre, Everett Cooley," and signed by Rosenstock Nov. 5, 1976.
         First edition. Foreword by Frank Waters. Pingenot: Fine biography of one of the best-known dealers of Western Americana in the U.S. This carefully researched work captures Rosenstock’s zeal for collecting, an attribute that helped make his one of the most knowledgeable dealers in Western books and art.

DARY, David. Kanzana 1854-1900: A Selected Bibliography of Books, Pamphlets and Ephemera of Kansas. Lawrence: Allen Books; Austin: Jenkins & Reese Companies; New Haven: Frontier America Company Corporation; Bryan, 1986. [8] xii, 294 pp., illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         Limited edition (#24 of 250, signed).

HOLLAND, Vyvyan. Hand Coloured Fashion Plates 1770 to 1899. London: B. T. Batsford, 1955. 200 pp., color plates, illustrations. 4to, cloth. Fine in d.j.

HOWES, Wright. U.S.iana (1650-1950). A Selective Bibliography in which Are Described 11,620...Significant Books Relating to the...U.S. New York: R. R. Bowker, 1962. 652 pp. 8vo, original brown cloth.
         Second edition. Pingenot: For the library, collector, and bookseller. If one can have only one Americana reference work, this is the one.

JENKINS, John H. Printer in Three Republics: A Bibliography of Samuel Bangs. Austin: 1981. 190 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, original cloth. Mint in original mylar d.j.
         First edition. 573 annotated entries on Bangs, first printer in Texas, in three Mexican states, and west of the Louisiana Purchase.

JENKINS, John H. The Saga of Samuel Bangs. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1981. 10 pp. 8vo, wrappers. With card "Season’s Greetings from Maureen & John Jenkins."
         Limited edition (450 copies).

MINTZ, Lannon W. The Trail: A Bibliography of the Travelers on the Overland Trail...During the Years 1841-1864. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987. Illustrated. Cloth. Mint in d.j. as issued.
         First edition. Pingenot: An annotated bibliography with over 500 accounts arranged alphabetically with a short comment relative to each entry, along with a coded guide to the current value of each item.

RAINES, C. W. A Bibliography of Texas...Relating to Texas in Print and Manuscript since 1536.... [Houston: Frontier Press, 1955]. xvi, 268 pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in somewhat soiled publisher’s slipcase.
         Pingenot: The facsimile of the 1896 original, the pioneer work of Texas bibliography and still useful today.

TALIAFERRO, Henry G., et al. Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library. College Station: Texas A&M for Rosenberg Library, 1988. xii, 492 pp., frontispiece, 4 color plates. 8vo, cloth. Shrink-wrapped and mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Relations, Spanish Southwest, and Canada. 558 annotated entries recording works written by people living on the U.S. frontier before 1800, excluding Jesuit.

TAYLOR, W. Thomas. Texfake: An Account of the Theft and Forgery of Early Texas Printed Documents. Austin: W. Thomas Taylor, 1991. xix [1] 158 [2] pp. Plates. 8vo, cloth over pictorial boards. New. Signed.
         First edition. Pingenot: Printed by letterpress. Long awaited story of the who, how, and where the fakes of fabulous Texas documents came on the market, told by the dealer who, himself a victim, brought the truth out in the open.
(10 vols.)
($200-450)

349. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: SANTA FE TRAIL]. Lot of 3 titles, including the following:

CARROLL, H. Bailey. The Texan Santa Fe Trail. Canyon: Panhandle-Plains Historical Soc., 1951. [12] 201 pp. illustrations, maps, endpaper maps. 8vo, original heavy linen, title on spine. In publisher’s slipcase with pictorial label. Fine.
         First edition. Dobie, p. 56. Rittenhouse 103. Pingenot: Sent by the Republic of Texas to annex New Mexico, the expedition became lost on the Staked Plains, captured by the New Mexicans and marched as prisoners to Mexico City. In this work the route taken by the Texans is logged and otherwise illuminated.

RITTENHOUSE, Jack D. The Santa Fe Trail. A Historical Bibliography. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, [1971]. [6] 271 pp. 8vo, green cloth. Very fine in d.j. Signed.
         First edition.

SAUNDERS, Lyle. A Guide to Materials Bearing on Cultural Relations in New Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1944. xvi [2] 528 pp. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot note laid in: Not new but so elusive it may be new to many. Should have been named simply "A New Mexico Bibliography." It lists, usually with annotations, 5,335 books, articles, and theses. Has subject index and author index. In research on anything New Mexican before 1944, I always start my search in Saunders. Especially good on Indians, Spanish Americans, any social or ethnic aspects, and anthropology. Long out-of-print.
(3 vols.)
($40-80)

350. [BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCE: SOUTHWEST]. Lot of 12 titles, including:

ADAMS, Ramon F. The Adams One-Fifty [with] REESE, William S. Six Score: The 120. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1976. 91 + 85 pp. 2 vols., 4to, original pictorial boards. Very fine in publisher’s slipcase.
         First edition. Reese, Six Score: "The 120 are the best books on the range cattle industry. An important reference tool to any Western library." Pingenot: The Adams One-Fifty is a check-list of the 150 most important books on Western outlaws and lawmen.

ADAMS, Ramon F. Burs Under the Saddle: A Second Look at Books and Histories of the West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1964]. x [2] 610 [2] pp. 8vo, cloth. Near fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A critical evaluation of over 400 books written on the old West, ranging from early reminiscences to serious scholarly works, pointing out many legends, myths, misinformation, and outright lies.

ADAMS, Ramon F. More Burs Under the Saddle. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979. xv [1] 182 [2] pp. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in an equally fine d.j.
         First edition. Foreword by Wayne Gard. Pingenot: A critical analysis of 233 books on the West pointing out a variety of inaccuracies. An important reference work for any library of Western Americana.

ADAMS, Ramon F. The Rampaging Herd: A Bibliography of Books and Pamphlets on Men and Events in the Cattle Industry. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1959. xix [1] 463 [3] pp., illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Very fine copy. D.j. has small marginal tear, else very good.
         First edition. Reese 4. Very scarce in the first edition and much sought. Pingenot: Lists 2,651 books and pamphlets on the cattle industry, range life, etc. An essential reference for collectors.

ADAMS, Ramon F. Six-Guns and Saddle Leather: A Bibliography of Books and Pamphlets on Western Outlaws and Gunmen. [Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1969]. xxv [1] 808 [2] pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         New edition, revised and greatly enlarged.

CAMPBELL, Walter S. A Book Lover’s Southwest: A Guide to Good Reading. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1955. xii, 287 [3] pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

DOBIE, J. FRANK. Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest. viii, 222 pp. 8vo, cloth. Fine in laminated d.j.
         Fifth printing.

DYKES, Jeff C. Billy the Kid: The Bibliography of a Legend. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1952. 177 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, original gray printed wrappers. Very fine.
         First edition, first issue (40 copies in wrappers, from a total run of 500). Adams, Guns 655. Lawrence Clark Powell in Southwestern Book Trails: "A model work on a single person." Pingenot: The first attempt at a complete list of materials on the Kid—books, articles, movies, songs, etc. The annotations are excellent.

DYKES, Jeff. Collecting Range Life Literature. Bryan: Cedarshouse Press, 1982. [2] 20 [2] pp., illustrations. 8vo, pictorial wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.

KING. Evelyn. Women on the Cattle Trail and in the Roundup. N.p.: Brazos Corral of Westerners, [1983]. [2] 21 [1] pp. 8vo, pictorial wrappers. Presentation copy to Ben Pingenot, signed by King.
         First edition. Designed and printed on a hand press by Atara Clark at the Prosperity Press, Glendale, Calif., under the direction of Arthur H. Clark.

POWELL, Lawrence Clark. Southwest Classics: The Creative Literature of the Arid Lands Essays on the Books and Their Writers. Pasadena: Ward Ritchie Press, 1975. viii, 370 [6] pp., endpaper maps. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         Second printing.

WHALEY, Gould. William D. Wittliff and the Encino Press: A Bibliography. Dallas: Still Point Press, [1989]. xvi 143 [1] pp., illustrations, photographs. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in slipcase. Signed by Wittliff, Whaley, and Graves. Prospectus laid in.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Introduction by John Graves.
(12 vols.)
($300-600)

351. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: STREETER LOT 1] Lot of 1 title:

STREETER, Thomas Winthrop. Bibliography of Texas 1793-1845. Cambridge: Harvard, 1955-1960. xxiv, 283 + lxxi, 259 + [6] 263-616 +[6] 281-677 + xlii, 278 pp., plates. 5 vols., 8vo, cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.’s.
         First edition, limited edition (600 copies).
(5 vols.)
($500-1,000)

352. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: STREETER, LOT 2]. Lot of 1 title:

STREETER, Thomas Winthrop (collector). The Celebrated Collection of Americana Formed by the Late Thomas Winthrop Streeter. New York: Parke-Bernet Galleries, 1966-1969. Illustrated. 8 vols., 8vo, blue boards. Some wear. Price notations made at time of sale.
         First edition.
(8 vols.)
($300-600)

353. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: TEXAS]. Lot of 26 titles, including the following:

AGATHA, Sister Mary. Texas Prose Writing. A Reader’s Digest. Dallas: Banks, Upshaw, [1936]. xx [2] 168 pp., illustrations. 8vo, original maroon cloth. Near fine in fine d.j. Laid in is an a.l.s. dated July 11, 1964 to B.E.P.
         First edition. Pingenot: A still useful bibliographical reference on Texas books with informative, entertaining commentary on both fiction and nonfiction. There is an interesting chapter on "Cowboy Experiences and Settlers’ Reminiscences."

CASTAÑEDA, Carlos Eduardo. A Report on the Spanish Archives in San Antonio, Texas. San Antonio: Yanaguana Society, 1937. 167 pp. 8vo, original cloth. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#274 of 500 copies). Basic Texas Books 222: "An indexed listing of over two thousand Spanish records in the San Antonio county clerk’s office. Since San Antonio de Bexar acted for a century as the capital of the province of Texas many of these records relate to the whole of settled Texas."

DANIEL, Price, Jr. (bookseller). An Analysis of C. W. Raines’ Bibliography of Texas. Waco: Price Daniel Jr. Bookseller, 1962. [56] pp., illustrations. Very fine. Slipcase.
         Limited edition (#7 of 100). 211 items listed.

DAVID, C. Dorman (bookseller). Catalogue No. 6. Texas. Houston, 1964. [120] pp., facsimiles. 8vo, green cloth, gilt spine. Inscribed.
         First edition. 130 items listed.

EBERSTADT, Edward, & Sons. Catalogue 162, Texas, being a Collection of Rare & Important Books & Manuscripts Relating to the Lone Star State.... New York: Edward Eberstadt & Sons, [1963]. 220 pp., illustrations. 8vo, original ecru printed wrappers, laminated.
         First edition. With a 5-page introduction by Archibald Hanna. Basic Texas Books B80: "Contains 950 of the rarest Texas books, pamphlets, and imprints, with detailed commentaries." Pingenot: These range from the early period of Spanish exploration through Mexican colonization, revolution, and statehood. Contains many facsimiles of title-pages, etc. Probably the finest catalog of Texas original sources ever produced, describing 950 choice items from the Spanish to the U.S. period.

[EBERSTADT]. Texas: A Selective Index to Eberstadt Catalogue 162 + Newberry-Graff Sale Index. 52 pp. + [1] 12 pp. Photocopies of typescript lists in a manila folder.
         (Goes with Eberstadt Catalogue 162).

[GILLIAM, Frank]. Biblia-A-Biblia: Texana. Austin: Idolon Book Shop, n.d. 6 pp. 12mo, wrappers. Fine.
         Limited edition.

JENKINS, John H. Basic Texas Books.... Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1983. xi [3] 648 [4] pp., illustrations. Large 8vo, original cloth, leather label. Mint in publisher’s slipcase. Signed presentation copy to Ben Pingenot from John Jenkins.
         First edition, limited edition (85 copies signed by Jenkins and William R. Holman). This copy numbered "Ben Pingenot’s Copy."

JENKINS, John H. Basic Texas Books.... Revised edition. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1988]. xii [2] 648 [2] pp., illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j. Signed presentation copy to Ben Pingenot from John Jenkins.
         Revised edition.

JENKINS, John H. Cracker Barrel Chronicles: A Bibliography of Texas Towns and County Histories. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1965. [2] xv [15] 509 [3] pp. Thick 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition. Foreword by Dorman Winfrey.

JENKINS, John H. Printer in Three Republics: A Bibliography of Samuel Bangs. Austin: 1981. 190 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, original cloth. Mint in original clear plastic d.j.
         First edition. 573 annotated entries on Bangs, first printer in Texas, in three Mexican states, and west of the Louisiana Purchase.

JENKINS, John H. The Saga of Samuel Bangs. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1981. [12] pp. 8vo, wrappers. With card "Season’s Greetings from Maureen & John Jenkins."
         Limited edition (450 copies).

JENKINS, John H. Texas History: One Thousand Rare Books: With Additional Sections on Texas Maps, Photographs, and Manuscripts and a Selection on the Mexican War. Catalogue 127. Austin: Jenkins Company, 1980. [270] pp., facsimiles. 8vo, cloth with original green stiff paper wrappers bound in. Fine.
         First edition.

KIELMAN, Chester V. The University of Texas Archives. A Guide to the Historical Manuscripts Collections in the University of Texas Library. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1967. xxix [3] 594 pp. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j.

LOWMAN, Al. Printing Arts in Texas. [Austin]: Roger Beacham Publisher, 1975. [2] 107 [3] pp., profusely illustrated by Barbara Holman. Tall folio, cloth with printed paper label. A mint copy of a beautiful book. Signed by William Holman.
         Limited edition (395 copies).

McMURTRIE, Douglas C. Pioneer Printing in Texas. Austin: 1932. 28 pp., facsimiles. 8vo, original printed wrappers. Very good.
         First edition, limited edition (200 copies). Pingenot: This is one of the first scholarly studies of early printing and printers in Texas.

RAINES, C. W. A Bibliography of Texas...Relating to Texas in Print and Manuscript since 1536.... [Houston: Frontier Press, 1955]. xvi, 268 pp. 8vo, cloth. Very good in somewhat soiled publisher’s slipcase.
         Pingenot: The facsimile of the 1896 original, the pioneer work of Texas bibliography and still useful today.

REESE, William S. Six Score: The 120 Best Books on the Range Cattle Industry. New Haven: William Reese Company, 1989. [96] pp., illustrations. 4to, cloth over boards. Mint in d.j.
         Revised edition. Pingenot: Best edition with revisions, corrections, additional information, and an added essay.

SPELL, Lota M. Pioneer Printer: Samuel Bangs in Mexico and Texas. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963. xii, 230 pp., facsimiles. 8vo, cloth. Fine to mint copy. Laid in is a post card from the author, dated Sept. 29, 1964, to Ben E. Pingenot concerning a unique copy of a Bangs imprint.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books B181: "The appendices to this fine biography include a preliminary checklist of 359 Bangs imprints." Harvard Guide to American History. Pingenot: Bangs, with his press, came to Texas with the Mina Expedition in 1817. His imprints struck at Galveston Island and then at the mouth of the Rio Grande are the first examples of printing in Texas. Taken prisoner by the Mexicans at Soto la Marina, Bangs set up his press in Monterey where he issued the first imprints in northern Mexico. He returned to Texas in 1830 and at the outbreak of the Mexican War was with Taylor’s army at Corpus Christi and then Brownsville.

TALIAFERRO, Henry G., et al. Cartographic Sources in the Rosenberg Library. College Station: Texas A&M for Rosenberg Library, 1988. xii, 234 pp., color frontispiece, 4 color plates, illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. 558 annotated entries recording works written by people living on the U.S. frontier before 1800, excluding Jesuit relations, Spanish Southwest, and Canada.

TAYLOR, W. Thomas. Texfake: An Account of the Theft and Forgery of Early Texas Printed Documents. Austin: W. Thomas Taylor, 1991. xix [1] 158 [2] pp. Plates. 8vo, cloth over pictorial boards. New. Signed.
         First edition. Pingenot: Printed by letterpress. Long awaited story of the who, how, and where the fakes of fabulous Texas documents came on the market, told by the dealer who, himself a victim, brought the truth out in the open.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS. Texana at the University of Texas: An Exhibition.... [Austin: University of Texas,] 1962. 42 [2] pp., illustrations. Oblong 8vo, wrappers. Fine. Laid in is a list of "Collectors of Texana."

WALLACE, John Melton. Gaceta to Gazette: A Check List of Texas Newspapers, 1813-1846. Austin: Dept. of Journalism Development Program, The University of Texas, 1966. [4] 89 pp. 8vo, cloth. Some fading to spine, else fine in original printed boards.
         First edition. Pingenot: An annotated bibliography of Texas newspapers, with their locations, names of publishers, and list of collections. A useful work that furnishes brief histories and notes on over 100 early Texas newspapers and a checklist of newspapermen.

WEBB, Walter Prescott. Talks on Texas Books: A Collection of Book Reviews. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1970]. 94 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Compiled and edited with introduction by Llerena Friend. Pingenot: Written between 1923 and 1928 and ranging from whimsical to serious scholarly discussions about books on Texas subjects.

WINKLER, Ernest W. (editor). Check List of Texas Imprints 1846-1860. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1949. xx, 352 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

WINKLER, Ernest W. and LERENA B. Friend. Check List of Texas Imprints 1861-1876. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1963. xii, 734 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

WINKLER, Ernest W. "The Vandale Collection of Texana," in The Southwestern Historical Quarterly LIV, no. 1 (July 1950): 27-61. Fine.
(27 vols.)
($750-1,500)

354. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: TEXAS AND WESTERN AMERICANA CATALOGUE PRICES] Lot of 7 titles, including:

American Book Prices Current 1977. Volume 83.... New York: Bancroft-Parkman, 1978. [14] xxix, 1,060 pp. 8vo, red cloth, gilt lettering. Fine.

[BRININSTOOL, E. A. (collector)]. DAWSON’S BOOK SHOP. The Personal Library of E. A. Brininstool. Western Americana. Catalogue 438. Los Angeles: Dawson’s, n.d. [46] pp., illustrations. 8vo, wrappers.
         First edition.

McCARTY, Dennis. Western Americana. Clarendon Hills: [Northwest Auction Gallery], 1987. [12] 159 pp. 8vo, pictorial wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.

MORRISON, W. M. [Morrison Prices Guides]. Texana for the years: 1972; 1983, 2 copies of 1983 & supplement; vol. 4, 1985/86; vol. 6, 1988; vol. 8, 1990; vol. 11, 1993; vol. 8, 1994; vol. 12, 1994; vol. 13, 1995; vol. 14, 1996. Western: vol. 2, 1988; vol. 4, 1990; vol. 7 1993; vol. 8, 1994; vol. 10, 1996.

PARKE-BERNET GALLERIES. Americana. Duplicates from the Distinguished Collection of the Newberry Library. New York: Parke-Bernet Galleries, 1966. [8] 164 [4] pp., illustrations. 8vo, wrappers. Notes penciled on wrapper and in ink on leaves. Very good. Bid slip laid in.
         First edition.

ROBBINS, Irving Whitmore (collector). Fine Western Americana & Related Pacific Voyages. The Library of Irving Whitmore Robbins, Jr. San Francisco: Pacific Book Auction Galleries, March 21, 1996. [148] pp., plates, illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Price sheets laid in.

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON. M. D. ANDERSON LIBRARY. The William B. Bates Collection of Texana and Western Americana. [Houston: University of Houston], 1971. 28 pp., illustrations. 8vo, pictorial wrappers. Fine.
(22 vols.)
($200-400)

355. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: VOYAGES AND TRAVELS]. Lot of 5 titles, including the following:

GUNN, Dewey Wayne. Mexico in American and British Letters: A Bibliography of Fiction and Travel Books, Citing Original Editions. Metuchen: Scarecrow Press, 1974. vii [1] 150 pp. 8vo, cloth.
         First edition.

MINTZ, Lannon W. The Trail: A Bibliography of the Travelers on the Overland Trail...During the Years 1841-1864. Albuquerque, 1987. xxv [1] 292 pp., illustrated. 8vo, cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: An annotated bibliography with over 500 accounts arranged alphabetically with a short comment relative to each entry, along with a coded guide to the current value of each item. 2 copies.

[UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD]. A List of References to Literature Relating to the Union Pacific System. Newton: Crofton Publishing Corporation, 1922. vii, 299, 23 pp. 4to, blue cloth, gilt title on spine.
         Reprint.

YALE UNIVERSITY. LIBRARY. From Train to Plane: Travelers in the American West, 1866-1936. An Exhibition in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979. [64] pp. 4to, cloth, original paper wrappers bound in, leather label on spine. Fine.

YALE UNIVERSITY. LIBRARY. From Train to Plane: Travelers in the American West, 1866-1936. An Exhibition in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979. [64] pp. 4to, paper wrappers, photocopies bound with brads.
(5 vols.)
($50-100)

356. [BIBLIOGRAPHY & REFERENCE: The West]. Lot of 19 titles, including:

ANDERSON, Alex D. The Silver Country of the Great Southwest: A Review of the Mineral and Other Wealth...The Mexican Cessions...in 1848...1853. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1877. 221 pp., large folding map. 8vo, original pictorial cloth with gilt lettering. Near fine.
         First edition. Cowan, p. 14. Rader 145. Raines, p. 9: "Includes...California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Western Colorado. Texas is considered only as to resources in agriculture and stockraising." Saunders 2696. Pingenot: The work contains a lengthy Southwestern bibliography.

ATHEARN, Robert G. Westward the Briton. New York: Scribner’s, 1953. xiv, 208 pp. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j. Two cards from the Mississippi Valley Historical Review laid in regarding a review of the book for the journal by Philip D. Jordan and a copy of the review.
         First edition.

DECKER, Peter. Catalogues of Americana.... Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1979. Unpaginated, frontispiece. 3 vols. 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         First edition. Foreword by Archibald Hanna. Vol. I: Catalogues 22-35, 1944-1947. Vol. II: Catalogues 36-50, 1953-1963. Vol. III: Index.

LAMAR, Howard R. (editor). The Reader’s Encyclopedia of the American West. New York: Crowell, [1977]. x [2] 1,306 pp., illustrations, maps. Thick 8vo, cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Out of print and scarce in the first edition. Pingenot: Yale professor Lamar has produced an immensely useful work, with more than 2,400 entries, 1,306 pages, including many long articles and biographies by nearly 200 expert contributors. Judiciously cross-referenced and almost every piece is accompanied by a bibliography.

MATTES, Merrill J. Platte River Road Narratives: A Descriptive Bibliography of Travel over the Great Central Overland Route to Oregon, California, Utah, Colorado, Montana, and Other Western States and Territories, 1812-1866. Urbana & Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1988. xiv [2] 632 pp. 4to, cloth. Fine.
         First edition. Foreword by James A. Michener.

MINTZ, Lannon W. The Trail: A Bibliography of the Travelers on the Overland Trail...During the Years 1841-1864. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987. 292 pp., illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Mint in d.j. as issued.
         First edition. Pingenot: An annotated bibliography with over 500 accounts arranged alphabetically with a short comment relative to each entry, along with a coded guide to the current value of each item. 2 copies.

The Plains and the Rockies: A Bibliography of Original Narratives of Travel and Adventure 1800-1865. Columbus: Long’s College Book Company, 1953. [8] 601 [325] pp., plates. 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         Third edition. Henry H. Wagner’s bibliography, edited by Charles L. Camp.

The Plains & The Rockies: A Critical Bibliography of Exploration, Adventure and Travel in the American West 1800-1865. San Francisco: John Howell, 1982. xx, 745 [7] pp., plates. Large 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         Fourth Edition. Henry R. Wagner and Charles L. Camp’s bibliography, revised, enlarged, and edited by Robert H. Becker.

RADER, Jesse L. South of Forty, from the Mississippi to the Rio Grande: A Bibliography. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1947. xi, 336 pp. Small 4to, original cloth. Fine. Elusive d.j. chipped at spine ends and missing small piece near bottom of back side.
         First edition. Pingenot: This bibliography covers a region south of the fortieth parallel to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Mississippi to the Rio Grande. An exhaustive work of 3,793 entries. Scarce in the d.j.

STORM, Colton (compiler). A Catalogue of the Everett D. Graff Collection of Western Americana. Chicago: Newberry Library, 1968. xxv [1] 854 pp., frontispiece portrait. Thick 4to, cloth with title in gilt on spine. About mint as issued in sturdy d.j. Index to Maps in the Catalogue... laid in.
         First edition. Pingenot: With pamphlet index to maps added. Lists and describes 4,801 books in this massive collection at the Newberry Library. This is one of the finest guides to Western Americana yet published, giving extremely fine annotations and detailed collations. A must for every Western Americana collector, bookseller, and researcher. Graff was head of Ryerson Steel Company and Wright Howes, his bibliographic mentor, was his favorite bookseller.

VAIL, R. W. G. The Voice of the Old Frontier. New York: Octagon Books, 1970. [2] xii [2] 492 [4] pp. 8vo, original cloth, gilt.
         Facsimile edition. Pingenot: Although this comprises a collection of lectures delivered by the author at the University of Pennsylvania, the bulk of the text is actually an annotated bibliographical appendix (with full collations) of the works written by people on the frontier. Includes narratives of Indian captivity, promotional literature, literature of land speculators, etc.
        plus 8 others.
(21 vols.)
($300-600)

357. [BIG BEND]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

DAVIS, Evelyn and Robert Clement. Spirit of the Big Bend. San Antonio: Naylor Company, [1948]. Illustrated. 12mo, wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.

RAGSDALE, Kenneth B. Quicksilver: Terlingua and the Chisos Mining Company. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1976. Illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         First edition and a unique copy of the author’s first book. Pingenot: The front free endpaper contains a full-page essay in the author’s hand, entitled "Genesis of Quicksilver," wherein he relates the interesting circumstances that led him to write a book which might not otherwise have been written. Signed by Ragsdale and dated Feb., 1977. Any book of narrative history with details of its provenance in the author’s hand is uncommon to say the least.

SMITHERS, W. D. Chronicles of the Big Bend: A Photographic Memoir of Life on the Border. Austin: Madrona Press, 1976. Illustrated, endpaper maps. Large 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

SUL ROSS STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE.
Lot of 7 Bulletins.

TYLER, Ronnie C. The Big Bend: A History of the Last Texas Frontier. Washington: National Park Service, 1975. Maps, illustrations. 8vo, original wrappers. Fine. Autographed by the author on the half-title.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 206: "The best account of the history of the despoblado, the uninhabited land." Pingenot: An excellent and unexcelled blending of careful research, good writing, and fine illustrations, many in color. Contains material on the big ranchers, the Comanches, the Apaches, the camel experiment, the Brite Ranch raid, etc.

UNITED STATES. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE. Big Bend National Park. [Washington, 1958]. Maps, photographs. Park brochure.
(12 vols.)
($100-200)

358. [BIOGRAPHY]. Lot of 18 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BONNEY, Orrin H. and Lorraine Bonney. Battle Drums and Geysers: The Life and Journals of Lt. Gustavus Cheyney Doane, Soldier and Explorer of the Yellowstone... Chicago: Swallow Press, [1970]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Foreword by George B. Hertzog, Jr. Pingenot: Biography of Gustavus C. Doane, who, as a lieutenant of the 2nd Cavalry, kept a journal of the first official and scientific exploration of Yellowstone. He served in the Civil War and was very active on the western plains; at Fort Ellis; with Baker on the Marias; with Gibbon in 1876, the Nez Percés in 1877, Bannock in 1878, and against the Apache. Doane’s report on his exploration of the Yellowstone region helped influence Congress to establish the Yellowstone National Park in 1872. A biography of the most fascinating men on the American frontier.

[CARSON, CHRISTOPHER]. GRANT, Blanche C. (editor). Kit Carson’s Own Story of His Life as Dictated to Col. and Mrs. C. D. Peters.... Taos: [Santa Fe New Mexican Publishing Corp.], 1926. Frontispiece portrait, illustration, 12 plates. Original decorated wrappers. Fine.
         First edition. Graff 603. Howes C182. Plains & Rockies IV:306n. Rader 606. Saunders 2802. Pingenot: Dictated by Carson sometime in the mid-1850s to his friend Colonel Dewitt Peters, who wrote The Life and Adventures of Kit Carson in 1858. The manuscript passed to Peter’s son, for whom it was a family keepsake. A copy was acquired by Charles Camp of Cal Berkley, who received permission from the surviving Peters brother to publish it.

DANA, Julian. Sutter of California: A Biography. New York: Press of the Pioneers, 1934. Illustrations. Original cloth. Flaking to gilt title on cover and spine. Owner’s name in ink on title-page.
         First edition. Pingenot: An appealing figure in American history, Sutter was a Swiss emigrant who persuaded Mexican authorities that he could build a fort to "protect" the northern limits of Mexican occupation. His site on the American River at its junction with the Sacramento was where the future capital of California would rise. Frémont seized his fort during the Mexican War and gold was discovered on his place in 1848. However in the mad rush for wealth, his herds disappeared to feed hungry prospectors and by 1852 he was bankrupt.

DARROW, Clarence. The Story of My Life. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1932. Frontispiece portrait. Cloth. Fine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Autobiography of one of America’s greatest lawyers. He pulls no punches; telling it as it was, including his defense of the McNamara brothers, accused of dynamiting the Los Angeles Times building. Also, the murder of the ex-governor of Idaho. Other famous cases fully recalled include the Leob-Leopold trial, the John T. Scopes evolution case, etc. Scarce.

DeBARTHE, Joe. Life and Adventures of Frank Grouard. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1958. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Fine copy in a near fine d.j.
         Pingenot: First published in 1894, this work is one of the most intimate, accurate, and valuable books about the Sioux. Captured by the Sioux when he was nineteen, Frank Grouard spent seven years in the camps of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. He served with Crook at the Rosebud and at Red Fork, was with Lt. Sibley on his famous scout, and claimed to be the first white man to visit the Custer Battlefield after the fight. This new edition has been carefully edited and annotated by Edgar I. Stewart.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Cow People. Boston & Toronto: Little, Brown & Co., 1964. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 601. McVicker A18a. Reese, Six Score 31. Pingenot: Dobie’s last book published during his lifetime. He received the advanced copy from his publisher on the day he died. Contains biographical accounts of cowmen such as Ab Blocker, Charles Goodnight, etc.

EASTMAN, Seth. A Seth Eastman Sketchbook, 1848-1849. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1961. Plates. 4to, original cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: First printed appearance of the sketches made by this gifted 19th-century artist and soldier. The drawings include views of the Mississippi as Eastman traveled down the river to his new assignment in Texas. Over 150 views, mostly of scenes in Texas, make up the sketchbook. The artist’s personal journal, kept during his Texas tour, accompanies and highlights the drawings. Especially important are Eastman’s sketches of the Alamo and other missions, as well as scenes toward the border country and Fort Inge on the Leona where Eastman, then a captain, commanded Company D, First Infantry Regiment. An important work, now becoming scarce.

GREENE, Laurence. The Filibuster: The Career of William Walker. Indianapolis & New York: Bobbs-Merrill, [1937]. Frontispiece portrait. Original gilt-lettered cloth showing even external wear. Good.
         First edition. Rader 1676. Pingenot: Biography of the filibuster William Walker who became known in Nicaragua as "the grey-eyed man of destiny," in partial fulfillment of an old Indian legend that such a man would deliver them from the bondage of corrupt government. Contains material on the infamous Parker French.

HARRIS, Charles H. III. A Mexican Family Empire: The Latifundio of the Sanchez Navarro Family 1765-1867. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1975. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

KETCHUM, Richard M. Will Rogers, The Man and His Times. New York: American Heritage Publishing Company, 1973. Illustrations. Brown leather spine with "bandana" boards. Fine in slipcase.
         Second printing.

LEWIS, Charles Lee. David Glasgow Farragut: Admiral in the Making. Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, 1941. Frontispiece, plates. Cloth. Fine.
         First edition.

MILLER, Darlis A. Captain Jack Crawford: Buckskin Poet, Scout and Showman. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, [1993]. Illustrations. Original cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: First biography of Crawford, Indian fighter, army scout, performer with Buffalo Bill Cody, author and poet, deputy U.S. Marshall, and rancher. He was quite famous in his day, and Miller has penned a fine account of his exciting life.

MONAGHAN, Jay. Schoolboy, Cowboy, Mexican Spy. Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press, [1977]. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Very good to fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The story of a 17-year-old’s adventures in the West during the closing days of the frontier and experiences as a war correspondent and rebel army spy during the Mexican Revolution.

NOGALES, General Rafael de. Memoirs of a Soldier of Fortune. Garden City: Garden City Publishing Company, [1932]. Frontispiece portrait. Original cloth. Bookplate removed from front inside pastedown, spine sunned with small hole. Contents very good.
         First edition. Tribute by Lowell Thomas and preface by R. B. Cunninghame Graham. Pingenot: Amazing biography of Venezuelan born soldier of fortune, who fought in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, who served under Porfirio Díaz in Mexico at the onset of the Mexican Revolution, who chased after gold in Alaska and Nevada, and who rose to the rank of divisional commander in the Turkish army during World War I.

PORTER, Joseph C. Paper Medicine Man: John Gregory Bourke and His American West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1986]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps. Original boards. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: John G. Bourke was a U.S. Army officer who became an ethnologist, a military historian, and a prolific writer on the American West. He fought against the Sioux, the Northern Cheyennes, and the Apaches. He served with Crook in Arizona and his many contacts with the Indians brought about an interest in their lifeways and ceremonies. Porter gives a sensitive, richly detailed portrait of Bourke according him his rightful place in America’s military, cultural, and intellectual history.

SANBORN, Margaret. Robert E. Lee: A Portrait 1807-1861. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1966. Illustrations. Cloth. Fine copy in a good pictorial d.j. with minor chip on spine.
         First edition. Pingenot: The first volume of a two-volume biography explores the personal side of Lee, sweeping away many myths about him.

SEAGER, Robert. And Tyler Too: A Biography of John and Julia Gardiner Tyler. New York: McGraw Hill, (1963). Original cloth. Fine in a near fine pictorial d.j.
         First edition.

THOMPSON, Gerald. Edward F. Beale & the American West. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, [1983]. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Very fine in a near mint d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Drawing upon the rich resources of over 300 libraries, museums, and archives, the author has re-created the exciting life of Edward F. Beale, a major figure in the history of the West. A Mexican War hero, Beale carried East the first gold samples from California; later supervised construction of a transcontinental wagon road, and experimented with the use of camels in the Southwest.

TRACY, Milton Cook and Richard Havelock-Bailie. The Colonizer: A Saga of Stephen F. Austin. El Paso: Guyes Printing Company, 1941. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
(18 vols.)
($300-600)

359. [BIOGRAPHY: TEXAS]. Lot of 25 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

ALMARÁZ, Felix D. Tragic Cavalier: Governor Manuel Salcedo of Texas, 1808-1813. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1971]. Original cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The last major colonial administrator in Spanish Texas. An innovative and imaginative administrator whose responses to the harsh realities of frontier duty were at odds with his uncle Nemesio Salcedo’s bureaucratic tradition. He was assassinated early in 1813.

BASS, Feris A., Jr. and B. R. Brunson (editors). Fragile Empires: The Texas Correspondence of Samuel Swartwout and James Morgan 1836-1856. Austin: Shoal Creek Publishers, [1978]. Illustrations, portraits. Cloth in good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: For twenty years Swartwout, a New Yorker and investor in Texas land, and James Morgan, his agent in Texas, exchanged letters which are rich in material concerning Texas during the republic period as well as the Mexican War. Winner of the Summerfield Roberts Award from the Sons of the Republic of Texas.

CARLSON, Paul H. Empire Builder in the Texas Panhandle: William Henry Bush. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1996. Photographic plates, map. Cloth. Fine in d.j. Review copy with letter from publisher laid in.
         First edition.

CRANE, William Carey. Life and Select Literary Remains of Sam Houston, of Texas. Two Vols. in One. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Company, 1885. Frontispiece portrait, facsimile, maps. Original gilt pictorial cloth, beveled edges, gilt title on spine. Some edge wear and spotting otherwise a better than average copy of a difficult book to find in nice condition.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 126n. Raines, p. 56: "More moderate in expression [than Lester’s Life of Houston] and more just to the Texans, with the addition of new matter. The closing chapters on Houston’s domestic and religious life are quite interesting." Pingenot: Crane was a noted educator and a president of Baylor University for 22 years.

FARIAS, George. The Farias Chronicles: A History and Genealogy of a Portuguese/Spanish Family. Edinburg: New Santander Press, 1995. Maps, illustrations by Jack Jackson. Cloth with gilt-lettered titles. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies signed by author). Pingenot: A family history in two parts. The first part describes the origin of the name, and the five root branches originating in Portugal, and includes some of Portugal’s heroic defenders. It concludes with notes on other family members who have some claim to fame. In Part II the author’s branch is described dating back to 1777 when his earliest known ancestor, José Antonio Farias, appears at Presidio del Rio Grande, now Guerrero, Coahuila, Mexico. A son, José Andres Farias, came to Laredo about 1798 to command the Spanish colonial garrison. His marriage to a granddaughter of the founder of Laredo marked the beginning of the Farias family in this future border city. Winner, 1995 Documentation Award by the Webb County Heritage Foundation.

GARWOOD, Ellen Clayton. Will Clayton: A Short Biography. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1968. Photographic plates. Cloth. Fine in d.j. Inscribed. Letters and clippings laid in.
         First edition.

GAYARRE, Charles. Historical Sketch of Pierre and Jean Lafitte, the Famous Smugglers of Louisiana. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1964. Cloth. Fine.
         Limited edition (300 copies reproduced from the 1883 original).

HUNTER, J. Marvin [1880-1957]. Peregrinations of a Pioneer Printer: An Autobiography. Grand Prairie: Frontier Times, 1954. Illustrations, errata slip. Original pictorial cloth, spine sunned, some pages browned. Colophon on front pastedown: one of the first 300 numbered copies, presentation-autographed to Ben Pingenot by the author.
         First edition, limited edition (300 copies). Adams, Guns 1082. Pingenot: Hunter, the son of a newspaper publisher, was a noted country newspaper editor in West Texas, New Mexico, and briefly in Arizona. During his early years he became acquainted with many frontier characters, on both sides of the law, and developed a keen interest in preserving and recording frontier history. He eventually settled in Bandera, Texas, where he established Frontier Times magazine, a popular journal devoted to stories of the pioneers. This autobiography, published three years before his death, is rich in anecdotes, names, and human experience.

JENKINS, John H. and Kesselus, Kenneth. Edward Burleson: Texas Frontier Leader. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1990. Frontispiece, illustrations. Cloth. Mint in d.j. Signed by Kesselus.

LAMAR, Lucius M. Shards. New Orleans: Grad Printing Company, [1968]. Frontispiece portrait. 4to, original cloth with gilt title on cover and backstrip, label pasted neatly on the front pastedown with typed inscription and initialed "LML" under the author’s name.
         First edition. Pingenot: The son of a mining engineer, Lamar’s memoirs date from his early youth in the Mexican mining town of Las Esperanzas near the Texas border. Born in 1897, the author describes life in the Sabinas coal basin where he and his family lived. The Mexican Revolution brought them to the border town of Eagle Pass, where, at nearby Fort Duncan in 1911, Lamar witnessed aviation history being made as Lt. Benjamin Folouis and Phil Parmalee took off for Ft. McIntosh in a Wright Scout biplane. Much on South Texas, the Eagle Pass coal mines, San Antonio, etc. Privately printed in an edition of only 300 copies to give to friends. Very scarce.

LAY, Benett. The Lives of Ellis P. Bean. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1960. Cloth. Fine in d.j.

McDONALD, Archie P. Travis. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1976. Frontispiece portrait. Original cloth over boards. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The first complete scholarly biography of William Barrett Travis.

PHARES, Ross. Cavalier in the Wilderness: The Story of the Explorer and Trader Louis Juchereau de St. Denis. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, [1952]. Illustrations. Original cloth in slightly worn d.j. Autographed on the title-page by the author.
         First edition. Pingenot: The fascinating story of the exploits of St. Denis when he entered Mexican territory in 1714, later promoted international trade in spite of Spanish law. He was a man chosen by France to maintain peace and prosperity in Louisiana for a quarter century, and as a soldier succeeded in keeping the Spaniards at bay, mainly through his influence over the Indians of Texas. One of the few works on this remarkable man and now long out-of-print and scarce.

PHILLIPS, William G. Yarborough of Texas. Washington: Acropolis Books, 1969. Photographic illustrations. Inscribed by Yarborough. 8vo, wrappers. Fine.

PROCTER, Ben H. Not Without Honor: The Life of John H. Reagan. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1962]. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in d.j. Presentation inscribed and signed by the author.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 168n: "The best biography of Reagan." Nevins, Civil War Books II:83: "Sympathetic but scholarly study of a long career." Pingenot: An important biographical contribution and winner of the Summerfield G. Roberts Award from the Sons of the Republic of Texas. Procter’s biography covers Reagan’s career from the period of the Republic of Texas, the Cherokee Wars, Congress in the 1850’s, the Civil War during which he served in Jefferson Davis’s cabinet, Reconstruction, politics, etc.

RODRIGUEZ, José Policarpo. "The Old Guide": Surveyor, Scout, Hunter, Indian Fighter, Ranchman, Preacher. His Life in His Own Words. [San Antonio]: Bexar Graphics, n.d. Photographic illustrations, portraits. 12mo, printed white wrappers. Fine. Newspaper clipping laid in announcing death of Rodriguez’s granddaughter.
         Facsimile reprint of original publication "printed by Nashville, Tenn.; Dallas, Tex. Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Smith & Lamar, Agents," with added photographs and introduction by James S. Maverick.

ROSE, Victor M. The Life and Services of Gen. Ben McCulloch. Austin: Steck Company, 1958. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Embossed cloth. Fine in slipcase.
         Facsimile reprint of the rare 1888 original edition. See Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 520 and Tutorow 3947.

SHEARER, Ernest C. Robert Potter: Remarkable North Carolinian and Texan. Houston: University of Houston Press, 1951. Frontispiece portrait. Original cloth. Very fine. Tipped in is a t.l.s., dated May 1, 1961, from Shearer to Frontier Press in Houston concerning the publication of his manuscript entitled "Houston Before Texas."
         First edition, limited edition (1,000 copies). Basic Texas Books, 127n. See Handbook of Texas II:401, and III:749 for a biographical sketch of this colorful pioneer Texan. Pingenot: The only biography of the interesting Southerner, who prior to coming to Texas in 1835 had served in the U.S. Navy as a midshipman, and was elected to both the state and national legislatures. Potter was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. During the Texas Revolution, he held a commission in the Texas Navy, commanded the port of Galveston, and was elected ad interim Secretary of the Texas Navy. Potter was killed in 1842 during the Regulator-Moderator War. In 1876 Potter County was named for him.

SIBLEY, Marilyn McAdams. George W. Brackenridge, Maverick Philanthropist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1978. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine copy in fine d.j. Presentation inscribed by the author to book collector Charles Downing.
         First edition. Pingenot: Excellent biography of Brackenridge (1832-1920) who was a paradox to his fellow Texans; a Republican in a solidly Democratic state, a financier in a cattleman’s country, a Prohibitionist in the goodtime town of San Antonio. Brackenridge devoted his energies to making a fortune only to give it to philanthropic causes.

STILLMAN, J. D. B. Wanderings in the Southwest in 1855 by J. D. B. Stillman. Spokane: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1990. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original red cloth, gilt. Issued without d.j. Mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Seeking adventure, Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman landed on the Texas coast in May 1855. For six months he roamed the Texas countryside recording his experiences and insights and sending off letters to The Crayon, a prominent but short-lived journal of landscape art, where they were originally published. Edited and with an introduction by Ron Tyler, these 1855 letters present a remarkable picture of Texas during a crucial, complex, and little understood time in the state’s history.

STRONG, Henry W. My Frontier Days & Indian Fights on the Plains of Texas. [N.p., 1926]. Illustrations. Original photographically illustrated wrappers with cloth backstrip. Fine. Original signed photo of the author laid in.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 2159: "Has some material on the Benders and on some early-day lawlessness in Texas. The author gives quite an account of the outlaw career of one Joe Horner, who later turned up in Wyoming as Frank Canton"; Herd 2191: "Scarce." Strong served as scout and guide for Ranald S. Mackenzie and claimed to have laid out the Mackenzie Trail (Handbook of Texas II:680). Rader 2994. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 3072.

TRACY, Milton Cook and Richard Havelock-Bailie. The Colonizer: A Saga of Stephen F. Austin. El Paso: Guyes Printing Company, 1941. Pictorial cloth. Fine in chipped d.j.

WALKER, Dale L. C. L. Sonnichsen, Grassroots Historian. Southwestern Studies Monograph No. 34. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1972. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original grey and green cloth.
         First edition.

WAUGH, Julia Nott. Castro-Ville and Henry Castro, Empresario. San Antonio: Standard Printing Company, 1934. Frontispiece portrait, photographs. Original printed wrappers. Minor page tears, else very good.
         First edition. CBC 3272. Pingenot: Includes four-page list of passengers on the L’Elbro, the first ship to bring Castro colonists to Texas in 1842. The first study done on the Alsatian settlement of Castroville, southwest of San Antonio, and its founder, empresario Henry Castro. Scarce.

WILLIAMS, Alfred M. Sam Houston and the War of Independence in Texas. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1893. Frontispiece portrait, maps, one folding map at rear, t.e.g. Original gilt-decorated cloth. Spine slightly age darkened, else fine.
         First edition. Howes W446. Basic Texas Books 126n: "The first attempt at an objective biography." Rader 3666. Raines, p. 219: "Perhaps the best life of Houston....The picture presented of Austin’s colony has never been equaled by any Texan writer. Much light shed on the general history of Texas."
(25 vols.)
($300-600)

360. [BLACK HISTORY IN THE WEST]. Lot of 8 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

AMOS, Preston. Above and Beyond in the West, Black Medal of Honor Winners, 1870-1890. Falls Church: Pioneer America Society Press, 1974. Illustrations. Wrappers.

FLIPPER, Henry O. Negro Frontiersman: The Western Memoirs of Henry O. Flipper, First Negro Graduate of West Point. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1963. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original cloth. Fine in a very fine d.j. Autographed by Carl Hertzog, the typographer, on the verso of the title-page.
         First edition. Edited with an introduction by Theodore D. Harris. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 161: "Only 125 copies were bound in cloth." Pingenot: One of the few personal frontier accounts written by a Negro. Flipper was the first of his race to graduate from West Point. After serving with the Army at Forts Sill, Elliott, and Davis, he became a mining engineer in the Southwest and Mexico.

JOHNSON, Barry C. Flipper’s Dismissal: The Ruin of Lt. Henry O. Flipper, U.S.A., First Coloured Graduate of West Point. London: Privately Printed, [1980]. Original cloth. Near mint and without d.j. as issued.
         First edition, limited edition (150 numbered copies). Pingenot: The first scholarly account of the circumstances surrounding the military trial on the Texas frontier in 1881 which became, ninety years later, a minor cause celebre. The author quotes passages from the court-martial record in this thoroughly annotated work. Included too are the revisionist Congressional reviews of the mid-1970s vindicating Flipper along with the author’s conclusions. An important study and, by virtue of the small printing, destined to become rare.

KATZ, William Loren. The Black West: A Documentary and Pictorial History of the African American Role in the Westward Expansion of the United States. New York: Touchstone, 1987. Illustrations. Wrappers. Mint.

KINEVAN, Marcos. Frontier Cavalryman: Lt. John Bigelow with the Buffalo Soldiers in Texas. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1997. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Mint in d.j..
         First edition. Pingenot: Based on Bigelow’s own writings of frontier army life in a black regiment at Fort Duncan and Fort Stockton in the 1870s.

LECKIE, William H. The Buffalo Soldiers: A Narrative of the Negro Cavalry in the West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1967. Illustrations, map. Original yellow cloth. Fine in a very good d.j.
First edition.

NANKIVELL, John H. History of the Twenty-fifth Regiment United States Infantry 1869-1926. Fort Collins: Old Army Press, [1972]. Illustrations, maps. 8vo, cloth, gilt. Very fine. Signed by the editor John M. Carroll.
         Reprint. A modern military rarity in the first edition. It preserves forgotten pages in American military history on Black soldiers, including "Chapter I. The Colored Soldier in the Service of the United States prior to 1866.

SCHUBERT, Frank N. Black Valor: Buffalo Soldiers and the Medal of Honor, 1870-1898. Wilmington: Scholarly Resources, 1997. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
(8 vols.)
($200-400)

361. [BOOK CLUB OF TEXAS]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

JACKSON, Jack. Flags Along the Coast. Charting the Gulf of Mexico, 1519-1759: A Reappraisal. Austin: Book Club of Texas, [1995]. xii, 225 pp., color map frontispiece, illustrations, 65 other maps. Folio, cloth over pictorial boards, paper label on spine. Mint in d.j.
         First edition, limited edition (350 numbered copies). Pingenot: Winner of the Presidio La Bahia Award of the Sons of the Republic of Texas for outstanding research on the colonial period of Texas history. Also winner of the TSHA Kate Brock Bates Award for 1996 as the best book on Texas prior to 1900.

RATCHFORD, Fannie E. (editor). The Story of Champ D’Asile as Told by Two of the Colonists. Dallas: Book Club of Texas, [1937]. 180 [3] pp., colored frontispiece, 2 plates, endsheet maps. 8vo, green cloth. Very fine in original slipcase.
         Limited edition (300 copies). Basic Texas Books 85A: "First edition in English...This is the best contemporary account of the ill-fated colony of Napoleonic refugees in Texas..." Howes H270. Fifty Texas Rarities 6n. Streeter 1069n: "An indispensable source and by far the best." Pingenot: Printed at Santa Fe for the Book Club of Texas by Rydal Press, a fine-press edition of a novel first published in Paris in 1819 and based on the ill-fated French settlement of 150 Napoleonic exiles who in 1817 established a Utopian colony on the Trinity River. When approached by Spanish forces, the colonists fled to Galveston where they were caught in a hurricane. With the help of pirate Jean Lafitte, those who survived the storm returned to Louisiana. Sister Agatha refers to the 1819 work as the first Texas novel.

TERRELL, Alexander W. From Texas to Mexico and the Court of Maximilian in 1865. Dallas: Book Club of Texas, 1933. xviii, 95 [1] pp., frontispiece, illustrations. Small 4to, original gold over brown cloth, gilt spine. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (200 copies). Gunn, Mexico in American & British Letters 1085. Pingenot: Printed by the Lakeside Press of Chicago for The Book Club of Texas. Born in Virginia in 1827, Terrell moved with his family to Missouri where he graduated from the state university. He was admitted to the bar in 1849, and three years later moved to Texas. He was elected a district judge in 1857 and served in that capacity until resigning to join the Confederate Army. He took part in battles in Missouri and Arkansas and rose to the rank of Brigadier General. On learning of Lee’s surrender, Terrell along with other Confederates traveled to Mexico where he joined the French Army of occupation. Appointed to the rank of colonel, he was frequently at the Court of Maximilian. He returned to Texas in 1866 where he became a cotton grower on the Brazos River and later a member of the state legislature. Judge Terrell was a contributor to the quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association and at the time of his death in 1912 was serving as the Association’s president. A rare work almost unknown bibliographically.
(3 vols.)
($350-700)

362. [BORDERLANDS]. Lot of 19 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

CALLAHAN, James Morton. American Foreign Policy in Mexican Relations. New York: Macmillan, 1932. Maps. Original cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Tutorow 2937: "Excellent factual reporting on the basis of documentation from State Department records." Pingenot: A general historical view of American relations with Mexico with emphasis placed on diplomacy and politics, rather than upon technical questions of international law. Particular attention is paid to the personalities who figured in the controversies between the two countries.

CLENDENEN, Clarence C. Blood on the Border: The United States Army and the Mexican Irregulars. New York: Macmillan, [1969]. 7 maps, endpaper maps. Cloth. Near mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Excellent work on Pancho Villa and Pershing’s Punitive Expedition into Mexico in 1916. It also contains earlier accounts of 19th-century border incidents including the Juan Cortina War that brought Robert E. Lee to the Rio Grande, Col. Mackenzie’s raid on the Kickapoo encampment at Remolino, the pursuit of Geronimo and the rise of Cochise and the Apaches.

LAMAR, Lucius M. Shards. New Orleans: Grad Printing Company, [1968]. Frontispiece portrait. 4to, original cloth with gilt title on cover and backstrip. Label pasted neatly on the front pastedown with typed inscription and initialed "LML" under the author’s name.
         First edition. Pingenot: The son of a mining engineer, Lamar’s memoirs date from his early youth in the Mexican mining town of Las Esperanzas near the Texas border. Born in 1897, the author describes life in the Sabinas coal basin where he and his family lived. The Mexican Revolution brought them to the border town of Eagle Pass, where, at nearby Fort Duncan in 1911, Lamar witnessed aviation history being made as Lt. Benjamin Folouis and Phil Parmalee took off for Ft. McIntosh in a Wright Scout biplane. Much on South Texas, the Eagle Pass coal mines, San Antonio, etc. Privately printed in an edition of only 300 copies to give to friends. Very scarce.

MASON, Herbert Molloy, Jr. The Great Pursuit. New York: Random House, 1970. Photographic illustrations, maps. Cloth. Near mint copy in pictorial d.j. with two small closed tears.
         First edition. Pingenot: The best and most readable account of the U.S. Army’s expedition across the Rio Grande into Mexico in 1916 to destroy the bandit Pancho Villa. The story is significant for this was the last major use of horse cavalry in the army and the first use of its fledgling aero squadron.

PEAVEY, John R. Echoes from the Rio Grande...from the Thorny Hills of Duval to the Sleepy Rio Grande.... Brownsville: Springman-King Company, [1963]. Frontispiece map, photographic illustrations. Original pictorial cloth. Fine in a very good d.j. Presentation inscribed and signed by the author.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1701. Pingenot: Memoirs of a former deputy sheriff, chief scout for U.S. Army troops along the border 1916-1920, mounted guard U.S. Immigration Service, assistant chief patrol inspector, U.S. Border Patrol, and special Texas Ranger. A fascinating book with much on the Mexican Revolution, Pancho Villa, raids into Texas, smuggling, banditry, and the early settlement of the Rio Grande Valley. Becoming scarce especially in nice collector’s condition.

PERRY, Carmen (editor). San José de Palafox: "The Impossible Dream" by the Rio Grande. San Antonio: St. Mary’s University Press, [1971]. Endpaper maps, illustrations, facsimile. Oblong 4to, original pictorial cloth. Fine. Issued without d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A documented chronicle of the establishment and annihilation of San José de Palafox located above Laredo on the Rio Grande.

PIERCE, Frank C. A Brief History of the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Menasha: George Banta Publishing Company, 1917. 2 foldout maps, portraits (including King and Kennedy), photographic illustrations. 12mo, original cloth. Very fine in cloth slipcase.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1725: "Has a chapter on the Texas Rangers and outlawry along the Mexican border." Rader 2668. Pingenot: A work scarcely known bibliographically by a man who had lived in Brownsville since 1859. Contains the text of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and a detailed order of battle for U.S. border troops. Very scarce.

RIPPY, J. Fred. The United States and Mexico. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1926. 401 pp., maps. Cloth. Near mint in d.j.
First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 378. Tutorow 2942. Pingenot: First general survey of the diplomatic relations between the United States and Mexico. Author takes the position that Texans were not conspirators against Mexico; they merely negotiated to get cheap land; and the Mexican attacks on General Taylor precipitated the war. Once begun it became a war of conquest. This work is seldom found in choice collector’s condition.

SAMPONARO, Frank N. and Paul J. Vanderwood. War Scare on the Rio Grande: Robert Runyon’s Photographs of the Border Conflict, 1913-1916. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1992. Many photographic illustrations. Oblong 4to. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Runyon’s pictures richly document the border conflict in the lower Rio Grande valley, bandit raids, U.S. Army buildup, etc.

SCHOTT, Arthur. "Las Isletas—Falls of Presidio de [sic] Rio Grande". [Washington: 1857]. 16 x 22 cm. hand-colored engraving. Small spot on margin that can be matted out. Fine.
         The Handbook of Texas Online (San Antonio Crossings). For information on the artist, see Taft, Artists and Illustrators of the Old West, p. 277. Pingenot: From Emory’s Boundary Survey and engraved by R. Metzeroth. A beautiful scene from the Mexican side of the Rio Grande looking toward Texas. Las Isletas, also known as Kingsbury Rapids, had earlier been known as Paso de Francia or the lower crossing on the Camino Real. It is located in southern Maverick County, 30 miles below Eagle Pass, and some six miles southeast of Presidio del Rio Grande, which formerly had been known as Presidio de San Juan Bautista. Throughout the 18th century, all of the Spanish entradas of conquest and colonization into Texas crossed the Rio Grande at this site.

SCOTT, Hugh Lenox. Some Memories of a Soldier. New York: Century Company, 1928. Frontispiece portrait, plates. Cloth, title stamped in black on front cover, gilt.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1970; Herd 2029. Pingenot: Autobiography of Scott’s career from his early days in the West through the Spanish American War, the Mexican Revolution, and World War I. Contains information on Custer and the expedition to recover bodies at the Little Big Horn; Indian problems and various cavalry units in the West; sketches of Geronimo and Sitting Bull, etc. General Scott was the last living cavalry officer who could converse in Indian sign language. As chief of staff, in 1915, he personally met with Obregon and Pancho Villa in an attempt to stop the violence and unrest along the U.S.-Mexico border. In Ramos, Revolution. An important military memoir, overlooked by Howes.

STEGMAIER, Mark J. Texas, New Mexico, and The Compromise of 1850: Boundary Dispute & Sectional Crisis. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, [1996]. Maps. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A definitive account and analysis of the pre-Civil War boundary dispute between Texas and New Mexico leading to the Compromise of 1850. Winner of the Coral Tullis Award by the Texas State Historical Association as the best book on Texas history for 1996.

STILLMAN, J. D. B. Wanderings in the Southwest in 1855 by J. D. B. Stillman. Spokane: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1990. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Red cloth, gilt. Issued without d.j. Mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Seeking adventure, Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman landed on the Texas coast in May 1855. For six months he roamed the Texas countryside recording his experiences and insights, and sending off letters to The Crayon, a prominent but short-lived journal of landscape art, where they were originally published. Edited and with an introduction by Ron Tyler, these 1855 letters present a remarkable picture of Texas during a crucial, complex, and little understood time in the state’s history.

SWIFT, Roy L. and Leavitt Corning, Jr. Three Roads to Chihuahua: The Great Wagon Roads that Opened the Southwest 1823-1883. Austin: 1988. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Very fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine account of the early exploration and opening of wagon roads from San Antonio and other settled areas of Texas to El Paso and regions west. Excellent coverage of overland freighting in the late 19th century to Chihuahua. Now out-of-print and scarce.

THOMPSON, Jerry. Sabers on the Rio Grande. Austin: Presidial Press, 1974. Illustrated by Bruce Marshall. Oblong 4to, original color pictorial boards with printed d.j. overlay. Fine.
         First edition. Pingenot: A fine military history on the Laredo and South Texas area from pre-historic times through the Civil War, with an emphasis on Hispanic history. Contains information on the conquistadors, Father Hidalgo, Canales, Somervell Expedition, Mier Expedition, Fort McIntosh, Santos Benavides, the Civil War, Texas Rangers, Indians and Indian raids.

THOMPSON, Jerry. A Wild and Vivid Land: An Illustrated History of the South Texas Border. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1997. Illustrations. 4to, cloth. Slipcase. Signed.
         Limited edition (#19 of 100 copies).

THOMPSON, Jerry. A Wild and Vivid Land: An Illustrated History of the South Texas Border. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1997. 4to, cloth. Mint in d.j., shrink-wrapped.
         Trade edition.

WEBER, David J. (editor). Foreigners in Their Native Land: Historical Roots of the Mexican Americans. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1973. Wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.

WILKINSON, J. B. Laredo and the Rio Grande Frontier. Austin: 1975. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Cloth. Near mint in a very fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A detailed history of this borderlands region covering a period from the 1740’s with the expedition of José de Escandon, the American Revolution, Mexican independence, and Texas independence from Mexico. The narrative also includes the Civil War and Reconstruction period ending in 1920 with the end of the Mexican Revolution.
(19 vols.)
($800-1,600)

363. [BROADSIDES, BANDOS & DECREES]. Lot of 9 items, folio and double folio, condition varies, but mostly fine:

BRANCIFORTE, Marques de, Miguel de la Grua and Talamanca y, [Viceroy of New Spain]. ...La soberana Piedad del Nuestro Señor, en Celebridad de las Matrimonios de sus...Hijas...y de la Paz Ajustada con los Franceses.... Mexico, October 18, 1796. 1 pp., double folio. Very fine.
         Pingenot: Contains ten "reglas" offering dispensation to prisoners in celebration of the marriage of the King’s daughters and the cessation of hostilities with France. This broadside marks the end of Spain’s war with France (see Bancroft, History of Mexico, III, pp. 485-490). Viceroy Branciforte was one of New Spain’s most despised viceroys because of his pompous affectations, his ruthless pursuit of self-aggrandizement, and his feigned piety. After the conclusion of peace with France, the crown ordered Branciforte to free the French prisoners. Instead, he delivered them over to the Inquisition resulting in their torture and, for many, their execution.

[MEXICO]. SANTA ANNA, Antonio López de. José Maria de Ortega...Gobernador y Comandante General del Departamento de Jalisco, á Todos Sus Habitantes.... [text begins]. Guadalajara: Palacio del gobierno, Feb. 4, 1854. 1 p. Folio.

Fine.
         A decree of two articles issued by the minister of war and marine as ordered by then Mexican president Antonio López de Santa Anna. Article 1

orders the establishment of a sub-commisary of war at the port of La Paz in Baja California. Article 2 authorizes a commissary agent at a salary of $1,200 pesos a year along with an auxillary agent at $800 pesos annually. The decree was first issued in Mexico on Jan. 9, 1845, and this subsequent state of Jalisco printing on Feb. 4, 1854. Following the Mexican War, Santa Anna had retired into exile, but in 1853 he was recalled by the conservatives. To help meet expenses he sold the Mesilla Valley to the United States as the Gadsden Purchase and was overthrown and banished by the liberals in 1855.

       Plus 7 others (dated 1769, 1789, 1791, 1816, 1820, 1829, & 1943)
(9 broadsides)
($500-1,000)

364. [CALIFORNIA]. Lot of 11 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

CARPENTER, Ford A. Los Angeles County To-Day. Los Angeles: Wayside Press for the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, 1929. Maps, many photographic illustrations. Wrappers. Very good.
         Pingenot: An interesting promotional with gobs of informational and statistical data to feed a historian’s computer but equally valuable for the fine array of vintage photographs from the twenties that highlight the city, its industries, and environs.

DERBY, George H. Phoenixiana: A Collection of the Burlesques & Sketches of John Phoenix, Alias John P. Squibob, Who Was, In Fact, Lieut. Geo. H. Derby.... San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1937. Illustrations, facsimiles. Cloth and pictorial boards, paper label on spine. Very fine.
         First edition (550 copies). One of the Fifty Books of the Year. Cowan II, p. 167. Heller & Magee, Grabhorn Press Bibliography 277. Wheat 63. Pingenot: Although best known for his humorous writings under the pseudonyms of John Phoenix and Squibob, Derby served with distinction as a topographical engineer with the U.S. Army, creating an important map of the California gold regions and performing the first reconnaissance of the Colorado River. This work, a reissue of his 1856 collection and a best-seller in its time, contains several hitherto uncollected nuggets of humor. The sequence of "hunting scenes" is here published for the first time.

DERBY, George H. The Squibob Papers. By John Phoenix [Capt. Geo. H. Derby.] Author of "Phoenixiana" with Comic Illustrations by the Author. New York: Carleton, 1865. Colored frontispiece, illustrations. Brown cloth, gilt lettered spine. Fine.

DILLON, Richard. Humbugs and Heroes: A Gallery of California Pioneers. New York, 1970. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Sixty-three interesting individuals in California history are the subjects of this group biography. While the sketches include such well-known names as Frémont, Stanford, Lummis, Sutter, and Sutro, the story of Harry Love, the man credited with the killing of Joaquin Murieta, is of special interest to Texans. Before coming to California, Love spent time in Texas as a scout, Indian fighter, El Paso express rider, and Mexican War veteran. He also led a government sponsored exploring expedition up the Rio Grande in 1850 in a keel boat named the "Major Babbitt."

HILL, Lawrence L. La Reina: Los Angeles in Three Centuries. Los Angeles: Security Trust & Savings Bank, 1929. Illustrations. Wrappers. In original mailing envelope.

IRVINE, Leigh. Santa Clara County, California. San Jose: Board of Supervisors of Santa Clara County, California [1912]. Color illustrations, map. Original wrappers. Fine.
         First edition. Rocq 13805. Contains material on vineyards.

KELSEY, Harry. Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo. San Marino: Huntington Library, 1986. Illustrations. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

PARSONS, George F. The Life and Adventures of George W. Marshall, the Discoverer of Gold in California. San Francisco: George Fields [Grabhorn Press], 1935. Frontispiece, folding illustrations.
         Limited edition, reprint (500 copies). Cowan. Howes 7768. Wheat 153.

PHILLIPS, Catherine Coffin. Cornelius Cole, California Pioneer and United States Senator.... San Francisco: John Henry Nash, 1929. Etched frontispiece, 27 plates, elaborate headpiece illustrations within text. 4to, original marbled cloth, leather label. A very fine, bright copy with publisher’s matching marbled slipcase.
         First edition, limited edition (1,000 copies). Cowan, p. 483. Howes P308. O’Day, pp. 88-89. Pingenot: Cornelius Cole (1822-1924) came to California during the Gold Rush, settled in Sacramento, and became an important figure in the political affairs of the state. He served in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and remained active in the Republican Party. Until his death at the age of 102, Cole had lived during the lifetime of every president of the United States except Washington.

REVERE, Joseph Warren. Naval Duty in California. Oakland: Biobooks, 1947. Illustrated with color plates after sketches by the author, endpaper map. 8vo, cloth. Fine.
         Limited edition (1,000 copies). A reprint of Revere’s A Tour of Duty in California, first published in 1849. Howes R222: "Description of the gold fields and authoritative particulars on the California conquest." Wheat 165. Zamorano 80, #63. "One of the most valuable works of the period" (Cowan I, p. 189 & II, p. 530).

STEWART, George R. John Phoenix, Esq., the Veritable Squibob: A Life of Captain George H. Derby, U.S.A. New York: Holt, [1937]. Frontispiece portrait, plates. Tan cloth.
(11 vols.)
($200-400)

365. [CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

DAVIS, Stephen Chapin. California Gold Rush Merchant: The Journal of Stephen Chapin Davis. San Marino: Huntington Library, 1956. Map. 8vo, cloth over boards. Printed spine label is loose, else fine in mylar d.j.

DILLON, Richard H. (editor). Texas Argonauts: Isaac H. Duval and the California Gold Rush. San Francisco: [David Holman for] The Book Club of California, 1987. xiii [1] 199 pp. [7], color illustrations by Charles Shaw, with numerous handsome full-page and double-page color plates, endpaper maps. Small folio, printed spine label. Mint in original publisher’s plain d.j. Holman’s humorous apology for delay in printing laid in.
         Limited edition (450 copies). Pingenot: A sumptuous book designed and printed by David Holman at Wind River Press, Austin, Texas. Major Duval’s reminiscences of the Gila Trail journey from Texas to the Mother Lode mines in 1849. An important account that stands as a companion volume with the Book Club’s Santa Fe Trail to California, published in 1931. Dillon’s fine introduction includes a summarization of Duval’s apprenticeship as a plainsman, as a bear hunter in the Arkansas Ozarks, and as a scout-diplomat in the Comanche country of Texas. Annotations throughout the text identify minor and obscure names and places; an appendix includes a roster of the Duval Company. This fine-press book sold out immediately upon publication and will be much-sought by Texas, Overland, and California collectors.

ECCLESTON, Robert. Overland to California on the Southwestern Trail, 1849: Diary of.... Berkeley: University of California Press, 1950. Frontispiece portrait, 2 folding maps. Small 4to, original pictorial cloth. Fine in a very good to fine d.j.
         First edition, limited edition (750 copies). Edited by George P. Hammond & Edward H. Howes. Edwards, Lost Oases, p. 68: "Eccleston was a member of the Frémont Association; and one of their leaders was the celebrated adventurer—Col. ‘Jack’ Hayes." Howes E34. Pingenot: This important diary begins April 3, 1849, when Eccleston, then 19, left New York for Galveston, Texas, and ends December 28 of the same year in the desert outside San Diego.

EVANS, George W. B. Mexican Gold Trail: The Journal of a Forty-Niner. San Marino: Ward Ritchie for Huntington, 1945. Plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, cloth. Fine in a chipped but otherwise good pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Edwards, Desert Voices, p. 55. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 714. Pingenot: The first printed appearance from Evans’s original diary still in the private hands of his descendants. Evans and his party came to Texas from Ohio in 1849 to take a "short-cut" route through northern Mexico to California. From San Antonio, these forty-niners crossed the Rio Grande at Ft. Duncan and proceeded to Muzquiz, Coahuila, where they procured a guide to lead them through the rugged mountain region south of the Texas Big Bend. After tremendous suffering and hardship the Evans party arrived in Chihuahua; continued on to Tucson, Yuma, Los Angeles, and Stockton. This is the only account of a gold rush expedition traveling via this unknown trail through northern Mexico. Long out-of-print.

FOREMAN, Grant. Marcy & the Gold Seekers: The Journal of Captain R. B. Marcy, With an Account of the Gold Rush over the Southern Route. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1939. Illustrations, folding map. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in a near fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Marcy’s journal and other diaries deal with the emigrant route to the gold fields by way of Santa Fe and the southern route.
(5 vols.)
($200-400)

366. [CIVIL WAR]. Lot of 17 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BOWDEN, J. J. The Exodus of Federal Forces from Texas 1861. Austin: Eakin Press, 1986. 22 illustrations, 1 map. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition.

CRESAP, Bernard. Appomattox Commander: The Story of General E. O. C. Ord. New York: A. S. Barnes & Company, [1981]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps. Cloth. Very fine to mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: More than just a Civil War biography, Ord had a fascinating military career spanning the 45 years from his entry into West Point in 1855 to his retirement in 1880. He served in California during the Mexican War and fought Indians in Florida, Oregon, and Washington territories. As commander in Texas in the late 1870s, Ord skillfully confronted lawlessness and Indian marauders to bring stability to the Rio Grande frontier.

DAVIS, Edwin Adams. Fallen Guidon: The Forgotten Saga of General Jo Shelby’s...Brigade that Never Surrendered, and Its Expedition to Mexico. Santa Fe: Stagecoach Press, 1962. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original cloth. Very good to near fine in d.j. with slight sun-fading to spine.
         Limited edition (1,000 copies). Pingenot: In the last days of the Civil War, this brigade, rather than surrender, rode southwest across Texas to the Mexican border at Eagle Pass. Electing to march to Mexico to enlist under Maximilian, the brigade paused to bury their battle flag, the last to fly over Confederate troops, in the Rio Grande. Long out-of-print and scarce.

EDWARDS, Jennie (editor). John N. Edwards: Biography, Memoirs, Reminiscences and Recollections...Also a Reprint of Shelby’s Expedition to Mexico. Kansas City, Mo.: [Privately published], 1889. Frontispiece portrait. Original gilt-lettered cloth. Good.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 663: "Rare."

EDWARDS, John N. Shelby’s Expedition to Mexico, An Unwritten Leaf of the War. Kansas City, Mo.: K. C. Times Job Printing, 1872. Later cloth with leather label. Preliminary leaf stained, else very good.
         First edition. Printed in double columns. Graff 1214. Howes E55. Pingenot: The rare dramatic account of a band of valiant Missouri and Texas dreamers who tried to escape defeat by running away to Mexico after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. Shelby’s command was at Marshall, Texas, when news reached them that the war had ended. Unwilling to surrender, the unit voted to keep their organization, arms, and discipline, and marched to Mexico to join another lost cause, that of Maximilian. Joined en route by Texas governor Pendleton Murrah and General E. Kirby Smith, the brigade paused at Eagle Pass to bury its battle flag in the Rio Grande. The account, written by Shelby’s adjutant, was later reprinted as an appendix to Edward’s better known Shelby and His Men. The first edition, however, is exceedingly rare.

FINCH, L. Boyd. Confederate Pathway to the Pacific: Major Sherod Hunter and Arizona Territory, C.S.A. Tucson: Arizona Historical Society, 1996. Illustrations, endpaper maps. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition.

FRAZIER, Donald S. Blood and Treasure. Confederate Empire in the Southwest. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1995. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j., shrink-wrapped.
         First edition. Pingenot: A fine award-winning book on the Confederate attempt to take Arizona and New Mexico.

HEARTSILL, W. W. Fourteen Hundred and 91 Days in the Confederate Army...of the W. P. Lane Rangers, from April 19, 1861 to May 20, 1865. Jackson: McCowar-Mercer Press, 1954. Photographs. Cloth. Very fine in slightly spotted d.j. Facsimile reprint of the first edition, limited edition (1,000 copies). Basic Texas Books 89A: "Best edition...historically important...one of the most vivid and intimate accounts of Civil War battle-life that has survived." Coulter 224. Howes H380. Harwell, In Tall Cotton 86. Pingenot: This McCowar-Mercer Press edition is now quite scarce; not to be confused with a crude and cheaply produced N.p.n.d. edition which is frequently offered.

HITCHCOCK, Ethan Allen. Fifty Years in Camp and Field: Diary of Major-General Ethan Allen Hitchcock. New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1909. Frontispiece portrait. Large 8vo, original green cloth, t.e.g.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 183. Graff 1908: "[He] was an amazing man—educated, able, honest, industrious, conscientious, and patriotic in the highest degree. His estimates of the public men of his era, most of whom he knew well, are enlightening and interesting." Howes H539. Tutorow 3587: "His diary throws some interesting light on the campaign [from Vera Cruz to Mexico], and gives some facts not found in other histories." Pingenot: Hitchcock was engaged in the Florida wars and in removing the Seminoles; he served with both Taylor and Scott in the Mexican War; and he was in the Civil War.

O’FLAHERTY, Daniel. General Jo Shelby, Undefeated Rebel. Chapel Hill: University of N. Carolina Press, 1954. Frontispiece portrait, map. Original cloth. Very good in pictorial d.j. Original owner’s name and address in ink on the front free endpaper.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1639. Pingenot: Biography of Shelby who, rather than surrender, took his brigade to Mexico to join Maximilian. He buried his battle flag in the Rio Grande at Eagle Pass while crossing into Mexico. Also contains a long chapter on the trail of Frank James.

RENEHAN, Edward J. Jr. The Secret Six: The True Tale of the Men Who Conspired with John Brown. How a Circle of Northern Aristocrats Helped Light the Fuse of the Civil War. New York: Crown, 1995. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Mint in mint d.j. Personal letter from author laid in.
         First edition.

ROLLE, Andrew F. The Lost Cause: The Confederate Exodus to Mexico. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1966. Illustrations. Cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         Second printing. Pingenot: The story of various Confederate generals and others who fled to Mexico at the conclusion of the Civil War.

SANFORD, George B. Fighting Rebels and Redskins: Experiences in Army Life of Colonel George B. Sanford, 1861-1892. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1969]. Color frontispiece, illustrations, maps. Cloth. Fine in fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The author, a professional soldier, served four years as a Union cavalry officer in the Civil War, and then for twenty-five years on the western frontier, where he became one of the famed Indian fighters of his generation. Sanford saw action in the apache Wars in Arizona, the Nez Percés War, the Bannock War, and the Sioux uprising in 1890-91.

SPRAGUE, J. T. The Treachery in Texas, the Secession of Texas, and the Arrest of the U.S. Officers and Soldiers Serving in Texas.... New York: Printed for the Society, Press of the Rebellion Record, 1862. Original printed wrappers. Fine.
         First edition. Eberstadt 162:752: "An important collection of documents relating to seizure of Union forces by Confederates in Feb., 1861, by one of its victims." Nevins, Civil War Books II:240. Parrish, Civil War Texana 103. Raines, p. 194. Pingenot: An important account including numerous documents from Sam Maverick, Ben McCulloch, and General David Twiggs, relating to the controversial Confederate takeover of Federal facilities in Texas prior to the beginning of the Civil War. Major John T. Sprague, son-in-law of the late Gen. Wm. Jenkins Worth, served in Texas in the 1850’s. His paper, read before the New York Historical Society on June 25, 1861, is a revealing source on the subject.

THOMPSON, Jerry Don. Vaqueros in Blue and Gray. Austin: Presidial Press, 1976. Illustrations, endpaper maps. Pictorial boards. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A very scarce book which thoroughly documents the contribution of Mexican-Americans to the Civil War.

TYLER, Ron C. Santiago Vidaurri and the Southern Confederacy. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1973. Cloth. Fine in d.j. Inscribed.

WILLIAMS, R. H., and John W. Sansom. The Massacre on the Nueces River: The Story of a Civil War Tragedy, as Related by...Both of Whom Participated in the Battle. Grand Prairie: Frontier Times, [1954]. Original printed wrappers. Some edge wear and creasing, else very good.
         Reprint edition, limited edition. Dornbusch III-3329. Pingenot: The first reprint edition that combines the two eyewitness accounts of the massacre on the Nueces River of German Unionists by Texas Confederate state troops under the command of the infamous Captain James Duff. Williams, whose account was taken from his With the Border Ruffians (London, 1907), was with the Confederates although he didn’t participate in the killing of the wounded German youths. Sansom, a Unionist but not German, was traveling to Mexico with the German colonist group, most of whom were defenseless against Duff’s remorseless brutality. This pamphlet is now uncommonly scarce.

(20 vols.)
($450-900)

367. [CLARK, Arthur H. (publisher)]. Lot of 17 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BANDEL, Eugene. Frontier Life in the Army, 1854-1861. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1932. Illustrations, folding map. Very fine and bright in original cloth, gilt lettering on spine.
First edition. Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 19-II. Rittenhouse 20: "Letters and journal of a soldier with the 6th Infantry at Fort Leavenworth. His regiment made trips through Nebraska, the Dakotas, and west to California. Of interest is his material on a survey of the southern Kansas border in 1857 [and] description of life at Fort Leavenworth." Pingenot: A rare and accurate picture of the pleasures and hardships of an infantryman on the frontier during a significant period in westward expansion.

[BEALE, EDWARD F.]. BRIGGS, Carl and Clyde Francis Trudell. Quarterdeck & Saddlehorn: The Story of Edward F. Beale 1822-1893. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1983. Portraits. Tall 8vo, cloth. Mint copy in original plain paper d.j.
First edition. Pingenot: Biography of a remarkable officer and frontiersman. Graduating from Annapolis in 1842, Beale served under Commodore Stockton in California but was detached at Monterey to serve with Kearney. Beale made six coast to coast journeys as dispatch bearer, including news of California gold discovery. Most thorough biography to date on this pioneer trail-blazer.

BIEBER, Ralph B. (editor). Southern Trails to California in 1849. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1937. Frontispiece, illustrations, folding map. Red cloth, gilt lettering on spine. Some wear.
First edition.

BIEBER, Ralph P. (editor). Exploring Southwestern Trails 1846-1854 by Philip St. George Cooke, William Henry Chase Whiting, Francois Xavier Aubry. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1938. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, folding map. Red cloth, gilt lettering on spine. Fine.
First edition (1,067 copies). Vol. 7 of the "Southwest Historical" Series. Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 19-VII. Rittenhouse 47. Pingenot: Cooke’s journal of the march of the Mormon Battalion (1846-47). Whiting’s 1849 journal on establishing a practicable route between San Antonio and El Paso del Norte. Aubry’s 1853-54 diaries of trips between Santa Fe and California.

BIEBER, Ralph P. (editor). Marching with the Army of the West 1846-1848 by Abraham R. Johnston, Marcellus B. Edwards, Philip G. Ferguson. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1936. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, map. Maroon cloth, gilt title on backstrip. Very fine.
First edition. Rittenhouse 49: "Journals of three soldiers who marched with the Army of the West in the Mexican War, over the SFT. All three are here published for the first time and describe incidents of the march over the Trail."

CHAPUT, Donald. Francois X. Aubrey: Trader, Trailmaker and Voyageur in the Southwest 1846-1854. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1975. Frontispiece portrait, plates, maps. Blue cloth. Mint.
         First edition.

DAVIDSON, Homer K. Black Jack Davidson, A Cavalry Commander on the Western Frontier: The Life of General John W. Davidson. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1974. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Cloth. Near mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Davidson’s military career ranged from service in Kearny’s California Column during the Mexican War through thirty-five years of frontier duty, including his organization of the 7th Cavalry, his commands of the 2nd and 10th Cavalry Regiments, his participation in Western Indian campaigns, the Camel Corp experiment in California, etc. Fine biographical contribution.

ELLINGTON, Charles G. The Trial of U.S. Grant: The Pacific Coast Years 1852-1854. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1987. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: One of America’s most revered and honored generals and a two-term president, served two troubled years on the West Coast early in his career. These were years of frustration and homesickness. In 1854 he resigned his commission to return home to his family. Based on ten years of research, this new biography reveals Grant is a new light during a phase of his life often overlooked by most biographers.

HUNT, Aurora. Major General James Henry Carleton, 1814-1873, Western Frontier Dragoon. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1958. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, 4 maps (including 1 folding). Dark blue cloth, gilt title. Very fine.
         First edition. Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 131. Clark Frontier Military Series II: "Lauded for its accuracy and detail, it has become exceedingly scarce and collectible." Dornbusch III, 3140. Paher 923. Rittenhouse 314. Pingenot: Fine biography rated best book on Carleton by Lamar. Carleton became an officer in the 1st Dragoons in 1839, served in the Mexican War (he wrote an account of the battle of Buena Vista), was involved in overland travel, the Mountain Meadow Massacre, commanded the California column to New Mexico in the Civil War, headed federal operations in New Mexico, etc.

RISTER, Carl Coke. The Southwestern Frontier 1865-1881: A History of the Coming of the Settlers, Indian Depredations and Massacres, Ranching.... Cleveland: Arthur H. Clark, 1928. 336 pp., frontispiece, double-page map of Texas, illustrations and 2 folding maps. Brown cloth with gilt title on spine, t.e.g.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1865; Herd 1909. Basic Texas Books 174n. Clark & Brunet 211: "Prepared almost entirely from unpublished documentary sources, this is a most valuable work...it represents one of the first, and perhaps the best, secondary study of this subject." Howes R318. Rader 2791. Saunders 3129. Pingenot: A classic study of the southwestern frontier covering Indian problems, the cattle industry, outlaws, railroads, etc. A scholarly work, heavily foot-noted, and with a good bibliography and index. Now difficult to locate in choice collector’s condition.

SMITH, Cornelius C. Emilio Kosterlitzky. Eagle of Sonora and the Southwest Border. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1970. Illustrations by the author. Cloth with gilt title on spine. Mint in original plain d.j.
         First edition. Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 233. Pingenot: A fine biography of this Russian Navy deserter who rose from private to commander of La Gendarmeria Fiscal, the dreaded Rurales of northern Mexico under President Porfirio Díaz. Later he became a World War I undercover agent for the U.S. Department of Justice. His Mexican Army career spanned the bloody Yaqui-Mayo wars through the tough Apache campaigns in the Sierra Madre, and the revolutionary turmoil of the early 20th century. An excellent biography and a worthwhile contribution, particularly as one views the United States frontier from the Mexican side.

STILLMAN, J. D. B. Wanderings in the Southwest in 1855 by J. D. B. Stillman. Spokane: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1990. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Red cloth, gilt. Issued without d.j. Mint.
First edition. Edited by Ron Tyler. Pingenot: Seeking adventure, Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman landed on the Texas coast in May 1855. For six months he roamed the Texas countryside recording his experiences and insights, and sending off letters to The Crayon, a prominent but short-lived journal of landscape art, where they were originally published. These 1855 letters present a remarkable picture of Texas during a crucial, complex, and little understood time in the state’s history.

TILGHMAN, Zoe A. A Marshal of the Last Frontier: Life and Services of William Matthew (Bill) Tilghman.... Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1949. 406 pp., frontispiece, illustrations, folding map. Cloth, gilt title on spine. Very fine. Affixed to the front cover pastedown is a paper inscribed and signed by the author.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 2211; Herd 2308; One-Fifty 137: "The book...tells about his experiences with the gunmen of Dodge City, the outlaws of Oklahoma and about his tragic death. [HEADLINE] The best book done on Tilghman." Pingenot: A nice association copy with the author’s presentation inscription to the late Loring Campbell, a nationally known magician and noted collector of Western Americana. A superb biography of Tilghman, including the Battle of Adobe Walls in 1874. Scarce.

UPTON, Richard (editor). Fort Custer on the Big Horn 1877-1898: Its History and Personalities as Told and Pictured by Its Contemporaries. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1973. Frontispiece, illustrations. Cloth with gilt title on spine. Near fine.
First edition.

WEBB, James Josiah. Adventures in the Santa Fe Trade 1844-1847 by James Josiah Webb, edited by Ralph P. Bieber. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1931. 301 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations, folding map at rear. Dark maroon cloth, gilt title on spine. "Property of United States Army" rubber stamp on rear pastedown. Corners bumped, else fine.
         First edition. Rittenhouse 625: "His account begins in the year that [Josiah] Gregg’s account ends and the two works cover the full span of SFT trade up to U.S. occupation of New Mexico. Rader 3592. Pingenot: The first-hand account of James Josiah Webb’s experiences as a Santa Fe trader. Although written shortly before his death in 1889, Webb paints a faithful picture of life on the old Santa Fe Trail and in Mexico during a significant period of westward expansion.

YOUNG, Otis E. The First Military Escort on the Santa Fe Trail, 1829: From the Journal and Reports of Major Bennet Riley and...St. George Cooke. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1952. Frontispiece portrait, plates, folding map. Red cloth, gilt-lettered spine, t.e.g. Very good to fine.
         First edition (1,005 copies). Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 281. Campbell, p. 194: "Major Bennet Riley, commander, led four companies of the Sixth U.S. Infantry from Leavenworth, Kansas, to the International Boundary on the Arkansas River, waited there until the caravan returned from Santa Fe and escorted them back. This historically important expedition was the creation of the U.S. Cavalry, taught the U.S. Army how to operate against hostile Indians and Mexicans, and demonstrated the superiority of oxen as draft animals on the trail. Fort Riley, the principal cavalry post on the Plains, was named for the Major." Rittenhouse 675: "The best scholarly study of the SFT in 1828-29....Young proves that all accounts of the 1829 escort march were written by Philip St. George Cooke." Pingenot: The journals of Riley and Cooke recount the governmental response to demands for protection of the Santa Fe caravans.

YOUNG, Otis E. The West of Philip St. George Cooke, 1809-1895. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1955. Frontispiece portrait, 9 plates, folding map. Original red cloth with gilt-lettered spine.
         First edition. Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 282. Rittenhouse 678. Pingenot: This is the first scholarly biography of this important army officer whose career spanned 46 years. Cooke was with Riley’s expedition on the Santa Fe Trail in 1829, with Dodge’s dragoons to the Rocky Mountains in 1835, the leading U.S. officer concerned with the Snively affair in 1843, with the Army of the West and the Mormon Battalion in the conquest of New Mexico and California during the War with Mexico, commanded troops in New Mexico in 1853-54, at Fort Riley 1855-57, etc.
(17 vols.)
($750-1,500)

368. [CUSTER, GEORGE ARMSTRONG]. Lot of 9 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BARNETT, Louise. Touched by Fire: The Life, Death, and Mythic Afterlife of George Armstrong Custer. New York: Henry Holt, 1996. Illustrations. Cloth over boards. Near mint in d.j. Review clipping laid in.
         First edition. Pingenot: A vivid account of an American legend, a remarkable marriage, and the turbulence of our nation on the verge of its Centennial. Touched by Fire is an insightful biography that is also a nuanced portrait of Custer. Author Barnett demonstrates how the conflicting views of Custer, his character, and his defeat speak more to the "contradictory needs of the national psyche than to the contradictory realities of his life."

BRILL, Charles J. Conquest of the Southern Plains. Oklahoma City: Golden Saga Publishers, 1938. Frontispiece, illustrations. Pebble cloth with gilt title on spine. Fine.
         First edition. Dustin 306. Luther 19: "A vitriolic attack on Custer and the army war policy." Pingenot: Brill was not kind to Custer or any of his followers; states in part that he killed more women and children than warriors; never took a prisoner other than old men, squaws, and papooses; he never won a battle with the Indians; he was also a Democrat! The late John Carroll frothed at the mouth at the mere mention of this slanted attack work which is mostly concerned with the Battle of the Washita.

BYRNE, P. E. Soldiers of the Plains. New York: Minton, Balch & Company, 1926. Original cloth. Library label on front free endpaper. Very good.
         First edition. Pingenot: Published on the fiftieth anniversary of the Custer disaster, this work tries to give the Indian his due by looking into the causes of the Indian wars revealing the lamentable history of our relations, a sordid tale of treaty-breaking and bad faith. Covers Crook’s battle with Crazy Horse, the Little Big Horn, Chief Joseph and the Nez Percés, etc.

DIPPIE, Brian W. and Hutton, Paul A. The Comic Book Custer: A Bibliography of Custeriana in Comic Books and Comic Strips. Publication Number 4 Brazos Corral of the Westerners, n.d. Wrappers. Signed by both authors & L. A. Maddox, Sheriff, Brazos Corral Westerners.
Limited edition (550 copies).

Entrenchment Trail. Custer Battlefield National Monument. Montana. [OSGPO, 1967]. Illustrated. Brochure.
         Guide to the national monument.

HEDREN, Paul. King on Custer: An Annotated Bibliography. Publication Number 2, Brazos Corral of the Westerners, n.d. Wrappers. Fine. Signed by author and L. A. Maddox, sheriff, Brazos Corral of the Westerners.

McCLERNAND, Edward J. On Time for Disaster: The Rescue of Custer’s Command. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1989. Photographs, illustrations, facsimiles, maps. Pictorial wrappers. Fine.
         Reprint. First Bison printing.

UTLEY, Robert M. Custer Battlefield National Monument, Montana. Washington: Office of Publications, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1969. Photographs, illustrations. Pictorial wrappers. Fine.
         First edition.

WELCH, James. Killing Custer. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1994. Frontispiece, illustrations, endpaper maps. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j. Norton news release for the book laid in.
         First edition.
(9 vols.)
($125-250)

369. [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. Lot of 18 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BODE, Winston. A Portrait of Pancho.... Austin: Pemberton, 1965. Photographic portraits and illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in laminated d.j. Signed by author.
         First edition.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver. Boston: Little, Brown, 1939. Illustrations by Tom Lea. Terracotta cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 599: "Fascinating book on lost mines..." Basic Texas Books 45n. Dykes, Lea 126. McVicker A7a(2). Pingenot: A sequel to Coronado’s People, focusing on New Mexico, Arizona, and Sonora, this fine book is lavishly illustrated in color and black and white by Tom Lea. It is the handsomest collaboration between the two men and one of Dobie’s most enjoyable books. Now scarce in fine condition such as this one.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Books and Christmas. Dallas, n.d.

Reprinted from Southwest Review, Winter 1951. Wrappers.
         Christmas keepsake from the Dobies for 1950. Very scarce.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Cow People. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1964. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 601. McVicker A18a. Reese, Six Score 31. Pingenot: Dobie’s last book published during his lifetime. He received the advanced copy from his publisher on the day he died. Contains biographical accounts of cowmen such as Ab Blocker, Charles Goodnight, etc.

[DOBIE, J. FRANK]. Dobie and Christmas. Broadside.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Hunting Cousin Sally. Dallas: Southern Methodist University Press, n.d. Reprinted from Southwest Review, Summer 1963. Cover illustration by William D. Wittliff. Wrappers.
         Christmas keepsake from the Dobies, 1963. Scarce.

DOBIE, J. Frank. J. Frank Dobie on Libraries. Austin: William R. Holman [for H.R.C.], [1970]. Small 4to. Near mint in original stiff printed wrappers.
         Limited edition (100 copies). Pingenot: Originally published in the Cotulla Record for March 3, 1950 under the heading "J. Frank Dobie plugs for LaSalle County Library," this piece was written for Mrs. Isabel Gaddis when she served as Chairman of the LaSalle County Library Board. This is the first printing in facsimile of Dobie’s 1950 letter to Mrs. Gaddis.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Man, Bird, and Beast. Austin: Texas Folklore Society, III, 1924. Original printed wrappers. Very fine copy.
         First edition. Contains an essay by Dobie, "Legends of Wichita Country" by Betty Smedley, "Ranch Remedios" by Frost Woodhull, etc. Basic Texas Books 203-8. McVicker B11.

DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mustangs. Boston: Little, Brown, 1952. Color frontispiece, illustrations. Tan and blue pictorial cloth. Very fine copy in a very good first edition d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Herd 696. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 66: "Rated by many as the best of Dobie’s books." Graff 1100. McVicker A14 a(3). Reese, Six Score 33: "Certainly the best book on range horses, with much on cattle work....Many feel this to be one of Dobie’s best books."

DOBIE, J. Frank. Out of the Old Rock: A Gallery of Uncommon Personalities Whose Lives Warmed the Heart and Furnished the Memory of One of the Best-Loved Storytellers of the Great American Southwest. Boston: Little, Brown, & Company, 1955. Paper over boards. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Puro Mexicano. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1935. Original cloth with pictorial paisano on front cover. Fine.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 203.

DOBIE, J. Frank. Puro Mexicano. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1935. 8vo, original printed wrappers. Very good.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 203.

DOBIE, J. Frank. The Voice of the Coyote. Boston: 1949. Illustrations. Cloth. Fine in chipped d.j.
         First edition. Dobie, p. 167: "Not only on the coyote but his effect on human imagination and ecological relationships...many tales from factual trappers as well as from Mexican and Indian folk. This is a strange book in some ways. If the author had quit at the end of the first chapter...he still would have said something." McVicker A12 a(1).

DOBIE, J. Frank. Wild and Free. Austin: Privately published, 1952. 3 pp. Original gray pictorial wrappers with illustration by Gutzon Borglum. Contains some pencil notations relating to the text.
         First edition. McVicker D47. Pingenot: A Christmas remembrance extracted from Dobie’s book The Mustangs. "Here’s wishing one and all good hearts and free minds at this Christmas Time! Bertha and Frank Dobie."

DOBIE, Mrs. J. Frank. The Pleasure Frank Dobie Took in Grass. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1972. Illustrations. 4to, wrappers. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Keepsake Number Two for the Friends of the Texas A&M University Library, 1972. A talk given by Mrs. J Frank Dobie on the presentation of "My Dobie Collection" by Jeff Dykes and Martha Dykes Goldsmith to the University Library, Texas A&M University. Reproduced from Mrs. Dobie’s handwritten manuscript. Introduction by Mr. Jeff Dykes. (2 copies).

DYKES, Jeff C. My Dobie Collection. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1971. Illustrations. Original stiff printed wrappers. Fine.
         First edition. Keepsake Number One, Friends of the Texas A&M University Library. Pingenot: Contains Jeff’s essay on Dobie, his selection of 50 Dobie rarities, and 249 bibliographical entries not in McVicker or Cook bibliographies since many were published after the appearance of these bibs. 2 copies.

DYKES, Jeff C. My Dobie Collection. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1971. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#203 of 300 numbered and signed copies). Keepsake Number One, Friends of the Texas A&M University Library. Pingenot: Contains Jeff’s essay on Dobie, his selection of 50 Dobie rarities, and 249 bibliographical entries not in McVicker or Cook bibliographies since many were published after the appearance of these bibs.

TINKLE, Lon. J. Frank Dobie: The Makings of an Ample Mind. Austin: Encino Press, 1968. Photographic illustrations. Original cloth and boards with printed paper label, in publisher’s slipcase. Very fine. Laid in is a "Note to the Reader" explaining the discrepancy in the identities of individuals pictured on pp. 36-37, signed by the publisher. Autographed by the author on the preliminary leaf.
         First edition, limited edition (850 numbered copies). Lutz A25. Whaley 39: "A biography of Texas’s first great literary figure by a distinguished man of letters, Lon Tinkle."
(19 vols.)
($125-300)

370. [EAGLE PASS]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

[CAZNEAU, Jane McManus]. Eagle Pass; or, Life on the Border by Cora Montgomery. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1966. Endpaper maps. 12mo. Very good to fine.
         Facsimile edition, limited edition (500 copies). Clark III, 366. Graff 2873. Howes C251. Raines, p. 172. Pingenot: Edited with an excellent historical introduction by Robert Cotner and with a useful index. Cora Montgomery was the pseudonym used by Jane McManus, wife of William L. Cazneau, an official of the Republic of Texas. Both were intimate friends of Mirabeau B. Lamar. Soon after the founding of Fort Duncan on the Rio Grande in 1849, Cazneau brought his wife to the new settlement of Eagle Pass to speculate in land and to pursue trade possibilities with Mexico. Her work provides the earliest written account of this part of the southwest Texas frontier. This Pemberton Press limited edition was largely destroyed in a warehouse fire in 1968.

DODGE, Louis. Children of the Desert. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1917. 8vo, original cloth. Full page presentation inscription signed by the author to Col. H. L. Scott, A.G. Dept. of Cuba, dated Havana, May 15, 1901.

SCARBOROUGH, Annie Cecil. The Pass of the Eagle: The Chaparral Region of Texas. Austin: San Felipe Press, 1968. Color frontispiece, black and white woodcut illustrations by the author, endpaper maps. 8vo, original pictorial cloth autographed by the author. Fine copy. Signed by author.
         First edition, limited edition. No d.j. was issued with this book. Pingenot: A survey of borderland customs, culture, folklore, and history drawn from the author’s two decades experience as an elementary school teacher in Eagle Pass prior to World War II. Long out-of-print and scarce.

SUMPTER, Jesse. Paso del Águila: A Chronicle of Frontier Days on the Texas Border as Recorded in the Memoirs. [Austin: Encino Press, 1969]. Illustrated, endpaper maps. 8vo, cloth over boards. Fine. Signed.
         First edition.

U.S. ARMY. 3rd INFANTRY REGIMENT. Program Field Meet of the 3rd Infantry RegimentMonterrey Day September 21, 1918Camp Eagle Pass, Texas. [Eagle Pass]: 3rd Infantry Regiment, 1918. 8vo, original pictorial printed self-wrappers. Small stain on front cover with slight edge wear. Very good.
         First edition. Pingenot: Program for a series of athletic events between soldiers of the 3rd Infantry stationed at Camp Eagle Pass (formerly known as Fort Duncan). Each page contains advertisements from local merchants with the schedule in between. Officials for judging were the officers of the regiment, including a Lieut. Paul Steele, who married an Eagle Pass girl, and rose to the rank of colonel commanding a tank battalion in Europe under Patton in World War II. The ceremonies preceding the contests included Sousa’s "The Rifle Regiment March" by John Phillip Sousa played by the Third Regiment Band, and "The Regiment’s Birthday" by Lieut. Colonel S. W. Anding, regimental commander. At the conclusion a "Regimental Review" was held "on the cavalry drill grounds, east of the bayonet course on Artillery Hill." Particularly valuable are the numerous ads by restaurants, merchants, banks, fruit and vegetable stands, clothing stores, etc. The name, "Monterrey Day," commemorates the 3rd Infantry’s participation in the capture of Monterrey during the Mexican War on September 21, 1846. Rare item of military and borderland ephemera.
(5 vols.)
($75-150)

371. [EL PASO]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

COLLINGWOOD, Lillian (editor). Password: Texas Sesquicentennial. El Paso: El Paso County Historical Society, Summer 1986. 55-120 [1] pp., illustrations. 8vo, original cloth. Very fine.
Vol. XXXI, no. 2. contains articles: "El Paso-Where Texas History Begins" by W. H. Timmons; "Commentary on the El Paso Valley (1807-1848) by Nancy Lee Hammons; "El Paso’s Copy of the Treaty of Velasco" by Mary A. Sarber; "Early Roads to El Paso" by Bob Miles; "Map of Texas, 1853," by Emilie Patton de Luca; and five other articles plus book reviews.

MILLS, William W. Forty Years at El Paso, 1858-1898: Recollections of War, Politics, Adventure, Events, Narratives, Sketches, Etc. El Paso, 1901. 166 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original red cloth with gilt title on front cover and backstrip. Fine.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1505: "Deals with gun battles and the bloody reign of the city marshals of El Paso." Graff 2807: "The author was a brother of General Anson Mills." Howes M633. Rader 2405. Pingenot: A scarce personal memoir of an Indiana native who moved to El Paso shortly before the Civil War, opposed secession, was arrested as a spy, eventually joined the Union Army, and became collector of U.S. Customs at El Paso. As Republican party boss he supported Reconstruction vigorously in El Paso and tangled with local troublemakers.

PORTER, Eugene. San Elizario. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1973. [12] 86 pp., illustrations by José Cisneros. 4to, half morocco and vellum with gilt title on spine. Near mint in publisher’s slipcase.
         First edition, limited edition (#4 of 50 numbered copies), each of which contains an original signed drawing by José Cisneros. Lowman, p. 42: "San Elizario, past and present, is expertly captured...far and away the finest production issued from the Pemberton Press." Pingenot: The history of San Elizario mission and area near El Paso since the 16th century. A few remaining copies of the limited edition, saved back by the publisher, were destroyed in the disastrous fire on Christmas Eve, 1985.

SONNICHSEN, C. L. Pass of the North: Four Centuries on the Rio Grande. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1968. xii [2] 467 pp., illustrations by José Cisneros. 8vo, cloth. Fine copy in d.j. autographed by the author.
         First edition. Typography by Carl Hertzog. Basic Texas Books 191: "A splendid history of the area centering around El Paso and Juarez." Lowman 229. Pingenot: Historian William C. Pool called it "a remarkable and readable history...a significant contribution to Texas and Western American history." Contains a section on the gunmen of El Paso with material on John Wesley Hardin, John Selman, George Scarborogh, Bass Outlaw, the Bosque gangs, the Texas Rangers, Jeff Milton, and others.

STRICKLAND, Rex W. El Paso in 1854...with a 30 Page Handwritten Newspaper by Frederick Augustus Percy Entitled El Sabio Sembrador.... El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1969. Illustrations, facsimiles, map. Small folio, original brick-colored linen in fine to mint condition. Signed on the half-title by Strickland and Carl Hertzog, the typographer.
         First edition, limited edition. Lowman 250. Pingenot: A beautiful work by Hertzog, it reproduces in facsimile a 30-page handwritten newsletter by F. A. Percy that was written in 1854 with news of El Paso, a map, and illustrations with watercolor effects.

TIMMONS, W. H. El Paso. A Borderlands History. El Paso: University of Texas at El Paso, 1990. 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j. Signed by Timmons and Cisneros.
(6 vols.)
($325-650)

372. [FILM HISTORY]. Lot of 8 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BROWNLOW, Kevin. The War, the West, and the Wilderness: A Celebration of the Great Silent Movie Makers Who First Ventured Out of the Studios Into Dangerous and Distant Places to Record History on Film. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1979. Illustrations. Cloth. Fine in d.j.

CAREY, Harry, Jr. Company of Heroes: My Life as an Actor in the John Ford Stock Company. Metuchen & London: Scarecrow Press, 1994. Cloth. Fine in d.j. Signed.

CARY, Diana Serra. The Hollywood Posse: The Story of a Gallant Band of Horsemen Who Made Movie History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1975. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Very good copy in a very good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Story of genuine cowboys, who, beginning in 1912, migrated to Hollywood to become stunt riders in countless Westerns. Contains information on Tom Mix, Bronco Billy Anderson, Bill Hart, C. B. DeMille, John Wayne, etc. Cary, herself, had an early screen career as child actress "Baby Peggy" making 152 silent two-reel comedies in 1920-21.

DeMARCO, Mario. Tim McCoy: The Last Plainsman. [N.p., n.d.]. 100 pp., profusely illustrated. 4to, original photographically illustrated wrappers. Very fine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Written after McCoy’s death in 1978, this work contains a biographical sketch of McCoy, a descriptive list of all of his films, illustrations of movie and circus show-bills, personal photographs, studio shots, and many, many photo-stills from his numerous films.

FENIN, George N. and William K. Everson. The Western from Silents to the Seventies. New York: Grossman Publishers, 1973. Cloth. Fine in d.j.

McCOY, Tim, with Ronald McCoy. Tim McCoy Remembers the West: An Autobiography. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1977. Photographic illustrations. 8vo, cloth. Nice copy in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A fine book on the remarkable life of a cowboy, rancher, friend of the Indians, U.S. Cavalry officer, adjutant general of Wyoming, star of his own Wild West Show and the Ringling Brothers Circus and famous star of Hollywood Westerns in the 1920 and 1930s. McCoy was still performing with Carson & Barnes Circus in the early 1960s and made a cameo appearance in the film How the West Was Won.

TUSKA, Jon. The American West in Film: Critical Approaches to the Western. Lincoln & Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 1985. Wrappers. Fine.

TUSKA, Jon. The Filming of the West: The Definitive Behind-the Scenes History of the Great Western Movies, Illustrated. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1976. Large 8vo, cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.
(8 vols.)
($75-150)

373. [FORTS: TEXAS]. Lot of 17 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

CAGLE, Eldon. Quadrangle: The History of Sam Houston. Eaken Press, 1985. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition.

CASHION, Ty. A Texas Frontier: The Clear Fork Country and Fort Griffin, 1849-1887. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1996. Cloth. Fine in d.j.

FARMER, James E. My Life with the Army in the West: The Memoirs of James E. Farmer, 1858-1898. Santa Fe: Stagecoach Press, 1967. Frontispiece portrait tipped in. 12mo, cloth. Very fine copy.
         First edition [750 copies]. Rittenhouse 200. Pingenot: The first printed appearance of Farmer’s memoirs. Farmer participated in fort building in Texas; at Ft. Duncan, Ft. Concho, Ft. Stockton; was in the Utah War; at the Battle of Glorieta Pass in New Mexico in 1862; was at Ft. Union, Ft. Dodge, Ft. Sill, etc. Met everybody and went everywhere.

HANDY, Mary Olivia. History of Fort Sam Houston. San Antonio: Naylor Company, 1951. Plates. Cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Covers the history of the post from the start of construction in 1876 through 1940. There are chapters on the military history of San Antonio covering early posts, activity prior to and after the Civil War, the Spanish-American War era, the development of the airplane, the building of Camp Travis and the second World War. Also contains some information on Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis’s camel experiment, the capture of Geronimo, Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, "Black Jack" Pershing, Eisenhower and others. One of the best books to date on San Antonio’s most notable military establishment.

MILES, Susan. Fort Concho in 1877. San Angelo: Bradley Company, 1973. Portraits, illustrations, endpaper maps. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         Second edition.

SCOBEE, Barry. Fort Davis Texas 1583-1960. El Paso: Hill Printing Company, 1963. Illustrations. Cloth. Near mint in pictorial d.j. Signed on the title-page by the author.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1964. Pingenot: A thoroughly researched account of the history of Fort Davis with memories of colorful places and persons during the settlement of far West Texas...from the Spanish explorers, Indian wars, wagon trains, coming of the telegraph and railway to its recent establishment as a National Historic site.

SCOBEE, Barry. Old Fort Davis. San Antonio: Naylor Company, 1947. Illustrations, map. 8vo, cloth. Fine copy in pictorial d.j.
         First edition.
Adams, Guns 1965; Herd 2025. Pingenot: The author’s first book on this historic West Texas frontier fort.

SIDES, Joseph C. Fort Brown Historical: History of Fort Brown, Texas, Border Post on the Rio Grande. San Antonio: Naylor Company, 1942. Endpaper maps, illustrations, maps. Cloth. Very good, in double d.j.’s with some wear and mending to one of the d.j.’s.
         First edition. Pingenot: The author was a chaplain, U.S. Army. Details the attack on Fort Brown and death of Major Jacob Brown in 1846, the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, Civil War, Cortina raids, Texas Rangers and U.S. Cavalry on the border, 20th-century border troubles, etc. Scarce.

SIMPSON, Colonel Harold B. (editor). Frontier Forts of Texas. Waco: Texian Press, 1966. Illustrations by Melvin Warren. 4to, cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Essays by Roger Conger, Joe B. Frantz, Dorman Winfrey, Kenneth Neighbours, Ben Proctor, Harold Simpson, and W. C. Nunn detail the history of eight important forts on the Texas frontier—Ft. Belknap, Ft. Bliss, Ft. Brown, Ft. Clark, Ft. Concho, Ft. Davis, Ft. Mason, and Ft. Sam Houston, including information on Indian fighting, Mackenzie, Crook, R. E. Lee, etc. The superb illustrations from original paintings by Melvin Warren make this book a collector’s item. Long out-of-print.

SMITH, Thomas Tyree. Fort Inge: Sharps, Spurs, and Sabers on the Texas Frontier 1849-1869. Austin: Eakin Press, 1993. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Now an obscure site near Uvalde, Texas, Fort Inge was one of the cordon of forts built along the border after the Mexican War.

Statement Concerning Fort Clark, Texas. [Brackettville, ca. 1938]. 8vo, original stiff printed wrappers. Near fine.
         First edition. Pingenot: During the 1930s, with the Great Depression upon the United States, a movement was made in Congress to close Fort Clark, which is located in Southwest Texas near the Mexican border. The fort was established in 1852 and had been in continuous service as a large infantry and cavalry station. This rational for not closing and abandoning the fort points out the strategic advantages of having a military outpost near the border and argues that the country would otherwise be vulnerable to Mexican bandits and revolutionists. At the time this was written, Fort Clark was headquarters for the 5th Cavalry Regiment and the First Cavalry Brigade. The beginning of World War II in Europe in 1939 saved the fort for five more years with the last troops vacating Fort Clark in the fall of 1944.

STILLMAN, J. D. B. Wanderings in the Southwest in 1855 by J. D. B. Stillman. Spokane: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1990. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Red cloth, gilt. Issued without d.j. Mint.
         First edition. Edited by Ron Tyler. Pingenot: Seeking adventure, Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman landed on the Texas coast in May 1855. For six months he roamed the Texas countryside recording his experiences and insights, and sending off letters to The Crayon, a prominent but short-lived journal of landscape art, where they were originally published. These 1855 letters present a remarkable picture of Texas during a crucial, complex, and little understood time in the state’s history.

TEXAS LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. Historic Forts and Missions in Texas-Restoration and Preservation. Austin, 1966. 110 pp. Texas Legislative Council Report No. 59-7.

THOMLINSON, M. H. The Garrison of Fort Bliss 1849-1916. El Paso: Hertzog & Resler, Printers, 1945. Frontispiece, illustrations. Original pebble boards. Very fine in fine d.j.
         First edition (1,000 copies). Lowman 33. Pingenot: Autographed by the typographer Carl Hertzog. The first history of this West Texas military outpost. This project was undertaken as a commercial job, but through care, and the enthusiasm of the author, Colonel Thomlinson, a good-looking book resulted.

WILLIAMS, Clayton W. Texas’ Last Frontier: Fort Stockton and the Trans-Pecos, 1861-1895. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1982. 457 pp. Cloth. Fine in d.j.

WOOSTER, Robert. Fort Davis: Outpost on the Texas Frontier. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1994. Portraits, maps, plates, notes. Original color pictorial wrappers. Mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Concise, scholarly history of this West Texas fort.

WOOSTER, Robert. Soldiers, Sutlers, and Settlers: Garrison Life on the Texas Frontier. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1987. Illustrations by Jack Jackson. Large 8vo, original cloth. Mint in d.j. Autographed by the author.
First edition. Pingenot: An account of life at the forts from reveille to taps, detailing the soldiers’ uniforms, weapons, and duties, along with the activities of the local civilian inhabitants.
(17 vols.)
($325-650)

374. [FORTS: WESTERN]. Lot of 16 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

AGNEW, Brad. Fort Gibson: Terminal on the Trail of Tears. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1980]. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine copy in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Established on the Grand River in 1824, Fort Gibson was the first and perhaps the most important military outpost in the Indian Territory. This is the story of the relocation of the Eastern tribes and the resulting turbulence as observed through letters, official reports, newspapers, and personal accounts of those who served at or lived near the post. Now out-of-print.

BEARSS, Edwin C. and A. M. Gibson. Fort Smith: Little Gibraltar on the Arkansas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1969]. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Owner’s name on front free endpaper. Fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The story of Fort Smith, repeatedly abandoned and reoccupied for fifty years, until it became known as the Belle Point Phoenix, the fort that "refused to die." This book relates the history of this famous old garrison from its establishment in 1817 until it became a National Historic Site in 1961.

BRISTOW, Joseph Q. Tales of Old Fort Gibson: Memories Along the Trail to Yesterday of the Oklahoma Indian Territory and the Old South. New York: Exposition Press, [1961]. Cloth. Fine in somewhat chipped and worn d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A collection of warm and vivid stories of Oklahoma and other southwestern sections of the country at the turn of the century.

BROWN, Dee. Fort Phil Kearny: An American Saga. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, [1962]. Endpaper maps, illustrations. Original two-color cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The story of Col. Henry B. Carrington’s assignment to command the Mountain District in 1866 with orders to build two forts on the Bozeman Trail and the violent reaction to the Sioux, the debacle of the Fetterman massacre, etc.

EMMETT, Chris. Fort Union and the Winning of the Southwest. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1965]. 16 pages of photographs, 7 maps. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition. Rittenhouse 187: "The best book to date on this famous SFT fort....An understanding of the role of Fort Union is essential for any appreciation of the military importance of the Trail." Pingenot: From 1851 until it closed in 1891, Fort Union was the center of all military operations in New Mexico Territory.

FRAZER, Robert W. Forts and Supplies: The Role of the Army in the Economy of the Southwest 1846-1861. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1983. Cloth. Fine in d.j.

FRAZER, Robert W. Forts of the West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1965. Cloth. Fine.
         Third edition. Pingenot: A systematic listing of all presidios and military forts west of the Mississippi from the time of the first Spanish settlements to 1898. The posts are arranged alphabetically within the boundaries of the present states. A map for each state shows the location of the forts. Information includes date of establishment, location, reason for establishing, rank and military unit of person establishing the post, origin of post name, date of abandonment, etc. A worthwhile reference.

HARPER, Frank B. Fort Union and Its Neighbors on the Upper Missouri: A Chronological Record of Events. Compliments of the Great Northern Railway, [ca. 1920]. Illustrations. 8vo, original paper wrappers. Fine.

HUNT, Elvid. History of Fort Leavenworth 1827-1927. Fort Leavenworth: General Service Schools Press, 1926. Illustrations, maps (some folding). Original dark blue cloth, gilt title on cover and spine. Some wear and spotting to front cover. Very good.
         First edition. Preface by Edward L. King. Howes H800. Tutorow 3160. Pingenot: Fine history of the fort from its founding in 1827, its role in guarding the Santa Fe Trail and fort from its founding in 1827.

HUNT, Elvid and Walter E. Lorence. History of Fort Leavenworth 1827-1927. Fort Leavenworth: Command and General Staff School Press, 1937. Illustrations, maps (some folding). Original red cloth, gilt title on cover and spine. Very fine.
         Second edition. Preface by Charles M. Bundel. Howes H800. Tutorow 3160. Pingenot: This second edition has been brought up to date by Captain Walter E. Lorence. Fine history of the fort from its founding in 1827.

NYE, W. S. Carbine & Lance. The Story of Old Fort Sill. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1969. Frontispiece, illustrations. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         Centennial edition (third edition revised).

STANLEY, F. [Crocchiola, Francis L. Stanley]. Fort Craig. Pampa, Texas: Pampa Print Shop, [1963]. Map. Cloth. Fine. Presentation inscribed.
         First edition.

STANLEY, F. [Crocchiola, Francis L. Stanley]. Fort Bascom: Comanche-Kiowa Barrier. Pampa: [Pampa Print Shop, 1961]. Cloth. Fine in d.j. Autographed by the author.
         First edition.

The Story of Old Fort Hayes by Eye Witnesses Including the Widow of Buffalo Bill, Mrs. Geo. A. Custer, Mrs. Josephine Middlekauff, C. J. Bascom...and Others. Hays: Fort Hayes Frontier Park Committee, n.d. Photographic illustrations. Wrappers. Very good.

WHARFIELD, H. B. Fort Yuma on the Colorado River. [El Cajon: Privately published, 1968]. Illustrations, maps. Original pictorial stiff printed wrappers. Short non-authorial inscription on title-page. Very fine.
         First edition.

WHARFIELD, H. B. With Scouts and Cavalry at Fort Apache. Tucson: Arizona Pioneer’s Historical Society, 1965. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Fine. 3 copies.
(18 vols.)
($200-550)

375. [FRÉMONT, John C. ]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

BIGELOW, John. Memoir of the Life and Public Services of John Charles Frémont.... New York: Derby & Jackson, 1856. Steel-engraved frontispiece portrait, 7 wood-engraved plates. Original patterned gilt pictorial cloth. A fine, bright copy.
         First edition. Cowan, pp. 52-53: "...considered to be one of the best of several campaign biographies to appear after John C. Frémont was nominated as the first Republican candidate for the Presidency." Graff 296. Not in Howes. Plains & Rockies IV:271a. Sabin 5306. Pingenot: The appendix contains a reprint of Frémont’s letter to the National Intelligencer regarding his exploring expedition of 1854-55 and his special reference to the most practicable route for a railway to the Pacific. Bigelow’s biography represents one of the earliest attempts at a national political biography, however, it did little to dispel unfavorable public opinion toward him.

EGAN, Ferol. Frémont: Explorer for a Restless Nation. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1977. Illustrations, endpaper maps, notes. Cloth. Near fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A new and full biography of John Charles Frémont, spearhead of Manifest Destiny.

FRÉMONT, John C. California Claims, in the Senate of the U.S....The Memorial....Praying an Investigation of the Claims...Against the U.S.... Washington, 1848. Quarter smooth brown calf over marbled boards. Fine.
         First edition. Cowan, p. 95. Howes F364, and by mistake it was repeated as F368. Sabin 25844. Pingenot: This is one of the prime sources for the inside story of the Bear Flag Revolt. Frémont states that the conquest of California was precipitated by Great Britain’s attempt to secure California. Contains an account of the half million dollars Frémont expended in order to secure California for the U.S., with testimony and letters of many of the men who actually took part in the conquest.

FRÉMONT, John C. Geographical Memoir upon Upper California.... Washington: Wendell & Van Benthuysen, 1848. Quarter smooth tan calf over marbled boards. Fine.
         First edition, first printing, issued with the 23-page appendix, which did not accompany the House issue. Cowan, p. 223. Graff 1429. Howes F366. Plains & Rockies IV 150. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, plate 171, p. 278: "Frémont’s epochal map of Oregon and Upper California...added many new place names to the geographical nomenclature of the West, including the Humboldt River, Lake, and Range in present-day Nevada...San Francisco’s ‘Chrysopylae or Golden Gate’...and the phrase ‘El Dorado or Gold Regions,’ one of the earliest graphic announcements of the discovery of gold in California." Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 78; Transmississippi West 559. Pingenot: Frémont’s brief but significant report on the third expedition, describing the natural characteristics of California.

FRÉMONT, John C. Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the Year 1842, and to Oregon and N. Calif. in the Years 1843-44. Washington: Blair and Rives, 1845. 583 pp., 22 lithographed plates, 4 maps (the large folding map is missing as usual). Contemporary cloth over boards, worn, upper cover detached. Contents very good.
         First edition, the House issue with the scientific data omitted. Cowan, p. 223. Field 565. Howes F370. Palau 94845. Plains & Rockies IV:115:2. Zamorano Eighty 39. Pingenot: The most spectacular reconnaissance of the American West since Lewis and Clark and the catalyst that changed the entire picture of Western geography and set a generation of pioneers and gold-seekers on the trek westward.

UPHAM, Charles Wentworth. Life, Explorations, and Public Service of John Charles Frémont. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1856. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 12mo, original embossed cloth, gilt title on spine. Some wear and repairs to title, foxing to preliminary leaves.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 463. Graff 4447. Plains & Rockies IV:282:1. Tutorow 3988. Pingenot: A campaign biography to promote Frémont’s candidacy for president with 13 unlisted illustrations.
(6 vols.)
($200-400)

376. [GENERAL]. Lot of 7 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

ALLEN, John Houghton. Southwest. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1952. Wrappers. Inscribed.

FALCONER, Thomas. On the Discovery of the Mississippi, and on the South-Western, Oregon, and North-Western Boundary of the United States. With a translation from the original ms. of memoirs, etc. relating to the discovery of the Mississippi, by Robert Cavelier De La Salle and the Chevalier Henry De Tonty. Austin: Shoal Creek, [1975]. Folding map. Decorated boards. New.

GRAHAM, R. B. Cunninghame. The Horses of the Conquest. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1949]. Illustrations in duo-tones by J. Craig Sheppard, with frontispiece in color. Small 4to, original maize pictorial cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First American edition. Edited and with a foreword by Robert Moorman Denhardt. Dobie, p. 132. Pingenot: This is the story of the horses that carried the Conquistadores–Cortes, the Pizarros, and De Soto–to the conquest of the Americas. These horses came from Spain–piebalds, dark chestnuts, grays, golden bays–and were the companions of brave men, soldiers and conquerors. Their achievements in battle, their vicissitudes with their masters in a world-shaking adventure, make an interesting and unusual reading experience.

LORD, Walter. The Dawn’s Early Light. New York: Norton, [1972]. Plates, maps, endpaper maps. Cloth. Very fine copy in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Author of A Time to Stand relates the climactic shaping of "the land of the free" during the War of 1812 in Washington, Baltimore, New Orleans, and London. Following an ignominious start in which the national capital was burned and the war almost lost, the infant republic managed to prevail and in the process gained some cherished and enduring symbols. Long out-of-print.

SCOTT, James Brown. Peace through Justice: Three Papers on International Justice and the Means of Attaining It. New York: Oxford University Press, 1917. Original green boards, gilt title on spine. Signed, but unreadable.

STEVENSON, Robert Louis. Plain John Wiltshire on the Situation. Midland: [W. Thomas Taylor for] the French Publishing Corporation, 1989. 35 pp., tipped in frontispiece. Printed on Fabriano, an Italian hand-made sheet. Japanese white cloth, marbled endpapers, in yellow cloth slip case. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#67 of 227 copies, numbered 1-201 for sale, and A-Z for private use of the publisher, each copy signed by the editor).

WENIGER, Del. Cacti of the Southwest: Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. Austin: University of Texas Press, n.d. Color plates. Small folio, original olive cloth. Fine in d.j.
(7 vols.)
($100-250)

377. [GOETZMANN, William H.]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

CHAMBERLAIN, Samuel. My Confession: Recollections of a Rogue. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1996]. Color illustrations, facsimiles. Large 4to, half leather over blue cloth. Very fine in slipcase. Signed.
         Limited edition (#9 of 100 copies). Edited by William H. Goetzmann. "An Unexpurgated and Annotated Edition."

GOETZMANN, William H. Army Exploration in the American West 1803-1863. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1959. Illustrations, maps (many folding). 8vo, original cloth-backed boards. Near fine copy in a fine d.j. Former owner’s name on front free endpaper.
         First edition. Pingenot: Study of the role of the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers in the opening of the American West, by the Pulitzer-prize winning author of Exploration and Empire.

GOETZMANN, William H. Exploration and Empire: The Explorer and the Scientist in the Winning of the American West. New York: Knopf, 1966. Profusely illustrated, maps. 8vo, original two-color cloth. Autographed on the half-title by the author. Fine with some wear and rubbing to pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Pulitzer-prize winning history of the exploration of the American West from 1805 to 1900 which reveals the impact of the great adventure on the whole of American culture. Out of print and scarce in the first edition.

GOETZMANN, William H. Sam Chamberlain’s Mexican War: The San Jacinto Museum of History Paintings. Austin: [David Holman at Wind River Press for] the Texas State Historical Association, 1993. 160 color illustrations, maps. 4to, half leather over blue cloth. Mint in slipcase. Autographed by the author on the title-page.
         First edition. Pingenot: Sam Chamberlain was six feet, two inches tall with golden locks and was fifteen years old when he went off to the war with Mexico, 1846-48. Based largely on the collection of 147 watercolors owned by the San Jacinto Museum, the book reproduces these for the first time in color. Maps of the battles of Monterey and Buena Vista are placed with Chamberlain’s painting of those crucial events. Goetzmann’s lively text and detailed captions enhance the visual pleasure and historical importance of Chamberlain’s views of battles, massacres, seductions, and tall tales of the Mexican War. A beautiful book designed by David Holman’s Wind River Press.

GOETZMANN, William H. When the Eagle Screamed: The Romantic Horizon in American Diplomacy, 1800-1860. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1966. Maps. 8vo, cloth. Some wear, very good in pictorial d.j. Presentation inscribed by the author to the widow of historian Edward S. Wallace to whom the book is dedicated.
         First edition. Pingenot: A history of American expansionist diplomacy from 1800 to 1860, reinterpreted in the light of global strategy, romanticism, and the myth of free security.

[GOETZMANN, WILLIAM H.]. "Texas Historian Wins Pulitzer." San Antonio Light, May 2, 1967. Newspaper clipping.

GOETZMANN, William H. and William N. Goetzmann. The West of the Imagination. New York: Norton, 1986. 8vo, cloth. Very fine in d.j. Inscribed to Pingenot by Goetzmann.
         First edition.
(7 vols.)
($100-200)

378. [GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS]. Lot of 14 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

[DE MUN, Jules]. Report: Committee on Foreign Relations....Depredations Committed Upon Persons and Property of Messrs. Chouteau and Demun (sic).... Washington: Gales & Seaton, July 2, 1836. Sen. Doc. 424. 1 pp. 8vo.
         Rittenhouse 159. Pingenot: In 1817 Messrs. Chouteau and De Mun, while trading under license upon the Arkansas, were seized and their goods amounting to $30,000 confiscated by Mexican military forces, under the authority of the governor of New Mexico. The committee’s report recommended that the U.S. demand redress from Mexico.

GRAHAM, James D. Report of the Secretary of War...Report of Lieutenant Colonel Graham on...the Boundary Line Between the U.S. and Mexico. Washington: SED 121 (Serial 627), 1852. 250 pp., 2 (of 3) folding maps. 8vo, later cloth with leather label. Fine copy.
         First edition. Folding maps: "Mexican Boundary. Sketch A." 13 x 47 cm. "Mexican Boundary. B. Extract from the Treaty Map of Disturnell of 1847." 23 x 39 cm. Plus a "Barometric Profile of the route from San Antonio...to the Copper mines of Santa Rita in New Mexico." Graff 1609. Howes G286. See Martin & Martin, pp. 142-43, Plate 40, for a comprehensive discussion of the boundary line and the map "Mexican Boundary B. Extract from the Treaty Map of Disturnell." Meisel III, p. 100. Plains & Rockies IV:212: "In addition to reporting his troubles with John R. Bartlett, Graham included information and reports on southern New Mexico and Lt. Amiel Whipple’s reports on the survey of the Gila River." Raines, p. 96: "Col. G. was principal astronomer and head of the scientific corps...in Texas and Mexico." Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West, III:227: "This Document contains Graham’s elaborate defense of his conduct while detailed to the Boundary Commission." Pingenot: The disputed territory, amounting to nearly 6,000 square miles, was acquired by the United States under the terms of the Gadsden Purchase in 1853.

NIMMO, Joseph. Report on the Internal Commerce of the United States. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1885. 2 folding maps. Cloth, worn.

[TAYLOR, Zachary]. Despatches from General Taylor. Message from the President of the United States, transmitting...May 12, 1846. 29th Congress, 1st Session. HED 197, 1846. 6 pp.

[TAYLOR, Zachary]. Message from the President of the United States. 29th Congress, 1st Session. Doc. 387. June 11, 1846. 4 pp.

[TAYLOR, Zachary]. Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress...1849-50. 31st Congress, 1st Session. Washington: S.E.D. 1, Part I, Dec. 24, 1849. 850 [1] pp., folding tables and plans. Original half morocco and marbled boards, gilt title on spine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Pp. 138-153 contains report "Operations in Texas" with correspondence from Bvt. Maj. Gen. George M. Brooke, Col. Wm. S. Harney, Capt. W. J. Hardee, etc. on military activities against Indians in Texas.

[TAYLOR, Zachary]. Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress...1849-50. 31st Congress, 1st Session. Washington: H.E.D. 5, Part II, Dec. 24, 1849. 370 pp., folding maps and plans. Original half morocco and marbled boards, gilt title on spine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Printed for the House of Representatives but the same collation as the Senate issue.

[TAYLOR, Zachary]. Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress...1849-50. 31st Congress, 1st Session. Washington: S.E.D. 1, Part III, Dec. 24, 1849. 371-1,215 pp., folding maps and plans. Original half morocco and marbled boards, gilt title on spine. Upper cover loose.
         First edition. Pingenot: Beginning on p. 961 and running to p. 1,176 are reports on Indian policy, including that of U.S. Agent Robt. S. Neighbors, a lengthy report on Indians in Texas, and another on Indian problems in New Mexico, the return of captives from the Comanches, Indian problems in Oregon and elsewhere.

[TEXAS (State). CONSTITUTION]. Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting the Constitution of the State of Texas. Washington: HRED 16, 1845. 28 pp. 8vo, new tan morocco over tan cloth, spine with raised bands. Very fine.
First edition of the first constitution of Texas as a state. Eberstadt, Texas 162: "The constitution under which Texas joined the Union. Mr. Streeter calls the Austin edition of this constitution ‘one of the great Texas documents.’ Besides the constitution of 1845, this edition includes Anson Jones’s letter of transmittal, and other pertinent documents enumerated in Mr. Streeter’s note." Howes T115, Streeter 1613.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James Monroe). Message from the President of the United States, communicating...Communications from the Agents of the U.S. with the Governments South of the U.S. which have declared Independence.... Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1822. 74 pp. Sewn, laid in a folding cloth box with leather label.
         First edition. American Imprints 11033, locating only 2 copies. Sabin 48070. Pingenot: An important document paving the way for the Monroe Doctrine, it urges recognition of the revolutionary governments of Latin America. Many interesting documents are found in this report including a translation of the first Columbian constitution, Mexico’s Plan de Iguala, Iturbide’s accession as emperor, the Peruvian Declaration of Independence, the Mina expedition, etc. Of special interest to Southwestern history is the long report on conditions in New Spain by James Smith Wilcocks, who had traveled by horseback through California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, the latter described by him as "very fertile, but almost entirely uncultivated."

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Message of the President of the United States, Relative to the Operations and Recent Engagements on the Mexican Frontier. June 12, 1846. [Washington], 1846. 37 pp.
         Not in Haferkorn. First reports giving a detailed account of the Battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de Palma. 2 copies.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James B. Buchanan). Message from the President. 32nd Congress 1st session. HOUSE Ex. Doc. No. 2. December 2, 1851. 469 pp. 8vo, embossed eagle on front and back boards, gilt title on spine with "Part 1." Spine worn.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James B. Buchanan). Message from the President. 32nd Congress 1st session. HRED2. December 2, 1851. Another copy containing pp. 105-469 only. Modern black buckram with gilt spine title: Report of the Secretary of War 1851.

UNITED STATES. WAR DEPARTMENT. SECRETARY OF WAR (William W. Belknap). Claims of the State of Texas.... Washington: HRED277, 1872. 180 pp. 8vo, tan buckram.
         First edition.
(16 vols.)
($250-500)

379. [GUNS]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

Antique Gun Trader. 4 issues: December 1979; January, February, and June 1980. Fine.

Authentic Colt Blackpowder Arms Signature Series ’96. [10] pp., color photographic illustrations. 4to, self-wrappers. Fine.
         Advertisement brochure. 2 copies.

JACKSON ARMS. Antique and Collectors’ Guns. 1965–Catalog 22. Dallas, 1965. 80 pp., photographic illustrations. 4to, wrappers. Fine.

JACKSON ARMS. Antique and Collectors’ Guns. 1966–Catalog 23. Dallas, 1965. 84 pp., photographic illustrations. 4to, wrappers. Fine.

KEILMAN, Tom. The J. W. Bates Collection. N.p.: Davis Bros. Publishing Company, 1975. [254] pp., photographic illustrations. 4to, wrappers. Fine. Prices realized laid in.
         First edition. Auction catalogue for Bates’ collection of guns, knives, spurs, chaps, saddles, and other historical items.

RYWELL, Martin. American Antique Guns and Their Current Prices. Harriman: Pioneer Press, 1959. 95 pp., photographic illustrations. 8vo, wrappers. A few stains to front wrap, else fine.

SERVEN, James E. Colt Firearms 1836-1960. Santa Ana: Serven Books, [1960]. ix [1] 394 pp., photographic illustrations. 4to, wood-grain embossed cloth. Very fine in d.j. Inscribed and signed by author.

Texas Gun Collectors Association. Lot of 15 publications: November 1965, Bulletin No. 10; Texas Gun Collector March 1960, no. 68; April 1961, no. 71; September 1961, no. 72; December 1961, no. 73; July 1968, no. 74; July 1969, no. 75; September 1973; March 1979 ; October 1979; Fall 1982; Fall 1983; Fall 1996; Fall 1997; Spring 1998.
(26 vols.)
($30-60)

380. [HALEY, J. Evetts]. Lot of 8 titles (mostly 8vo, mostly original bindings, very fine to good), including:

HALEY, J. Evetts. The Alamo Mission Bell. Midland and Austin: Encino Press for the Nita Stewart Haley Memorial Library, 1974. Frontispiece, illustrations by E. M. "Buck" Schwiwetz. 8vo, original half calf over brown cloth boards with paper label on upper cover. Very fine in brown slipcase. Signed.
         First edition, limited edition (#178 of 250 copies), specially bound, slipcased, and signed by the author.

HALEY, J. Evetts. Charles Schreiner, General Merchandise. The Story of a Country Store. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1944. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original cloth. Very fine in d.j.

HALEY, J. Evetts. Rough Times—Tough Fibre. A Fragmentary Family Chronicle. Canyon: Palo Duro Press, 1976. Illustrations. 8vo, original brown leather over pictorial linen. Very fine in publisher’s slipcase. Signed by Carl Hertzog.
         First edition. Typography by Carl Hertzog.

HALEY, J. Evetts. A Texan Looks at Lyndon. A Study in Illegitimate Power. Canyon: Palo Duro Press, [1964]. 16mo, pictorial wrappers. 5 copies.

[HALEY, J. Evetts]. "J. Evetts Haley for Governor For Segregation & States Rights." Political campaign poster with photographic portrait of Haley. Folio. Fine

CASEMENT, Dan D. The Address of Mr. Dan D. Casement at the Thirtieth Annual Meeting of the Panhandle Plains Historical Society at Canyon, Texas, May 11, 1951. [cover title]. 8 pp. 8vo, printed wrappers. Very fine.
         Limited edition.

HALEY, Evetts, Jr. J. Evetts Haley, KSJ. Cowman - Historian - Texan: The Legacy. Midland: Evetts Family Trust for the Nita Stewart Haley Memorial Museum, [1996]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 4to, original white printed wrappers. Very fine

ROBINSON, Chandler (compiler). J. Evetts Haley and the Passing of the West. Austin: Jenkins, 1978. Small 8vo, full morocco. Very fine in publishers slipcase.
         First edition, limited edition (#24 of 25 copies bound in morocco), signed by Robinson.
(12 vols.)
($125-250)

381. [HERTZOG, Carl (printer)]. Lot of 8 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

CHEESEMAN, Bruce S. and Lowman, Al. The Book of All Christendom: Tom Lea, Carl Hertzog, and the Making of the King Ranch. Kingsville: King Ranch Inc., 1972. 13 pp. Wrappers. Fine.

JAMIESON, Tulitas. Tulitas of Torreon: Reminiscences of Life in Mexico as told to Evelyn Jamieson Payne. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1969. Illustrations. Cloth. Near mint in a near mint d.j.
         First edition. Typography by Carl Hertzog. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 841. Lowman 241. Pingenot: The author’s life in Mexico and San Antonio where her civil engineer husband built bridges and dams. Covers the early days of the Mexican Revolution.

LASATER, Laurence M. The Lasater Philosophy of Cattle Raising. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1972. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition. Designed by Carl Hertzog.

LEHMANN, V. W. Forgotten Legions: Sheep in the Rio Grande Plain of Texas. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1969. Plates, portraits, facsimiles. Pictorial hopsacking with sheepskin spine, special slipcase edition. Fine. Signed by the author and typographer. Laid in is the d.j. provided on the trade edition and a holograph signed letter from Hertzog to this bookseller providing details of the special edition and the fact that it was almost sold out.
         First edition, limited edition (300 copies). Typography and design by Carl Hertzog. Basic Texas Books 125: "The most thorough study of the sheep industry in South Texas...encompassing...the cattle and horse industry...as well." Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 110. Lowman 242. Reese, Six Score 72.

NEVILLE, A. W. The Red River Valley Then and Now.... Paris, Texas: [Carl Hertzog for the North Texas Publishing Company], 1948. Illustrations and endpaper maps. Cloth. Presentation inscribed and signed by the author on the half-title. Very good copy in a near fine d.j.
         First edition, limited edition (2,000 copies). Adams, Guns 1604: "Scarce. Contains some new material on Jim Reed, Belle Star, Frank James and other outlaws." CBC 5004. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 130). Lowman 56, noting the cover was meant to match the color of Red River mud and the texture of homespun. Pingenot: Stories of early settlers, Indian fights, and border troubles in the Red River Valley during the 19th century. Published in a limited edition and now scarce.

SONNICHSEN, C. L. Pass of the North: Four Centuries on the Rio Grande. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1968. Illustrations by José Cisneros, map, plates. Cloth. Fine copy in d.j. autographed by the author.
         First edition. Typography by Carl Hertzog. Basic Texas Books 191: "A splendid history of the area centering around El Paso and Juarez." Lowman 229. Pingenot: Contains a section on the gunmen of El Paso with material on John Wesley Hardin, John Selman, George Scarborogh, Bass Outlaw, the Bosque gangs, the Texas Rangers, Jeff Milton, and others. Historian William C. Pool called it "a remarkable and readable history...a significant contribution to Texas and Western American history."

SONNICHSEN, C. L. and M. G. McKinnery. The State National Since 1881. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1971. Plates, portraits, maps. Cloth, gilt stamping, in pictorial slipcase. Mint.
         First edition, special limited edition (220 copies numbered and signed by Sonnichsen, McKinney, and Hertzog). Designed by Carl Hertzog. Just beyond the scope of Lowman.

THOMLINSON, M. H. The Garrison of Fort Bliss 1849-1916. El Paso: Hertzog & Resler, Printers, 1945. Frontispiece, 3 illustrations, endpaper maps. Original pebble boards. Very fine in fine d.j. Signed by Hertzog.
         First edition, limited edition (1,000 copies). Autographed by the typographer Carl Hertzog. Lowman 33. Pingenot: The first history of this West Texas military outpost. This project was undertaken as a commercial job, but through care, and the enthusiasm of the author, Colonel Thomlinson, a good-looking book resulted.

TIMMONS, Wilbert H. Morelos: Priest, Soldier, Statesman of Mexico. El Paso: Texas Western College Press, 1963. Portraits, illustrations, and endpaper maps by José Cisneros. Original half red cloth over green cloth, with a genuine Mexican silver peso, bearing the portrait of Morelos, inset into the front cover. Fine in d.j. Signed by author. Laid in is a 1-page typed letter dated April 8, 1963, from Hertzog to B. E. P. regarding this and other publications.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies), the "Peso Edition." Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 191). Griffin 3586: "A solid, traditional-style biography based largely on published sources." See Lowman, Printer at the Pass 170A for an interesting statement by Hertzog on the complexities of producing this handsome book. Pingenot: The first full length biography of Morelos in English. When Hertzog was asked why the insertion of a then eight cent peso coin in the front cover increased the price $3 over that of the trade edition, he quickly replied that the hole (to hold the coin) had cost him $1.95 per book to have made.
(9 vols.)
($450-850)

382.[JENKINS, John H.] Lot of 7 titles, including:

[JENKINS, John H.]. The Notting Bough, the Signal Tower, & the Fixing of Oscar. Three Southwestern Legal Documents offered at Christmas 1973. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1973. [12] pp. 8vo, blue paper wrappers. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition (300 copies).

JENKINS, John H. Thrill All the Modern Kinds: Notes from a Publisher’s Mail Bag. Austin & New York: Pemberton Press, 1972. [32] pp. 4to, green paper wrappers with title pasted on front wrapper. Fine. Season’s Greetings card from John H. Jenkins laid in.
         First edition, limited edition (300 copies)

JENKINS, John H.,(editor). The General’s Tight Pants: Edward Warren’s Texas Tour of 1836. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1976. [38] pp., facsimiles. 4to, brown paper wrappers with decorated title pasted on front wrapper. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition (450 copies).

JENKINS, John H. A Valentine in a Rough Winter: A Newly Discovered Letter from Sam Houston to His Wife, February 14, 1858. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1974. [20] pp., frontispiece portrait, photographs, facsimiles. 4to, red paper wrappers with title pasted on front wrapper. Title paper coming unglued with a small tear to lower edge, otherwise fine. Season’s Greetings card from Mr. & Mrs. John H. Jenkins laid in.
         Limited edition.

JENKINS, John H. Audubon & Texas. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1965. [8] 17 pp., color frontispiece, illustration, 18 plates. 4to, paper wrappers. Fine. "Best Wishes for the 1965 Holiday Season, Maureen & John Jenkins," card laid in. Signed by Jenkins on colophon page.
         First edition, limited edition (#120 of 400 copies).

JENKINS, John H. Patriotic Songs & Poems of Early Texas, 1836-1848. Austin: Pemberton Press, 1966. [6] 23 [1] pp., facsimile frontispiece. 4to, tan paper wrappers. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition.

REMINGTON, Frederic. How the Law Got Into the Chaparral: Conversations with Old Texas Rangers. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1987. [2] 36 [10] pp., frontispiece, illustrations. 8vo, blue paper wrappers. Fine. Seasons Greeting from Maureen & John Jenkins card laid in.
         Limited edition. Edited by John H. Jenkins.
(7 vols.)
($30-60)

383. [LOCAL HISTORY]. Lot of 17 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BLACK, READING W. The Life and Diary of Reading W. Black: A History of Early Uvalde. Uvalde: Progreso Club, 1934. Frontispiece portrait, map. Original green printed wrappers with some spotting else very good.
         First edition. Pingenot: Biography of Reading W. Black, the first settler and founder of Uvalde, Texas. Ike Moore’s introduction traces the history of the region including the upper Nueces country, and the establishment of nearby Fort Inge in 1849. Black’s diary, which Moore edited, covers the years 1854, ’55, and ’56, and sheds light on early day activities and frontier characters. Black built the first house, laid out streets, helped organize the county, etc. Reprinted in a facsimile edition twenty-five years ago which is now out-of-print and scarce, the first edition is almost unprocurable.

BLACK, READING W. The Life and Diary of Reading W. Black: A History of Early Uvalde. N.p., [ca. 1968]. Frontispiece portrait, map. Stiff blue printed wrappers. Near mint.
First edition. Pingenot: A facsimile reprint of the original 1934 edition with a 2-page addendum giving a biographical sketch of the editor. Black’s diary covers more than two years, 1854, 1855, and 1856. He recorded his experiences as he built Uvalde’s first house, laid out streets, organized the county, and participated in the interesting life of the time. As an introduction to the diary, editor Moore gives in brief narrative outline the early history of Uvalde and the Upper Nueces country. This reprint edition is now out-of-print and very scarce. The first edition is virtually unprocurable.

BELL, Peter Tomlinson. Memories of Peter Tomlinson Bell 1869-1956. St. Jo: S. J. T. Printing Company, [1980]. Illustrations. Original gilt-printed boards. Very fine to mint copy.
First edition, limited edition (750 copies). Pingenot: Mr. Bell relates many personal observations and historical facts about Carrizo Springs, Dimmit County and Atascosa County from 1862 to 1946. Contains information on ranching and prominent ranchers including Ab and John Blocker, "Big Foot" Wallace, gun smuggling during the Mexican Revolution, trips to San Antonio, etc. Edited and published by his grandson, the book is written near to his own handwritten notes.

The Coast Depot and Shipping Port of the Valley of the Rio Grande and the Provinces of Mexico Tributary Thereto with the Government Map of that Region of country, Published in 1850, Together with the Report of the Explorations of the Rio Grande. New York, 1850. Map. Stiff wrappers. Photocopy.

CROCKET, G. L. Two Centuries in East Texas: A History of San Augustine County and Surrounding Territory. From 1685 to the Present Time. Dallas: Southwest Press, [1932]. Original brown cloth. Very fine.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 514: "Contains a history of the feud between the Moderators and the Regulators and the rampant lawlessness of that time." CBC 3953. Howes C895. Rader 982. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 1719: "[Includes] East Texas missions and their relations with various Caddoan groups."

ELLIS, Olin O. Life in Uvalde, Texas 1882-1903. Baltimore: Press of Harry S. Scott, 1963. Frontispiece family photograph. 4to, original cloth with printed paper label. Mint. Signed.
         First edition. Pingenot: Autographed by the author on the title-page. The story of the Ellis and Oglesby families who migrated to Uvalde, Texas after the Civil War. Much on family life; lawlessness, and the activities of Sheriff Henry Baylor (son of George Wythe Baylor) in fighting outlaws; cattle ranching, etc. Overlooked (or ignored) by Adams. Privately published in a very small edition.

HORNBY, Harry P. Going Around. Uvalde: Hornby Press, 1945. Photographic plates. Cloth. Good, in chipped d.j.
         First edition. Overlooked by CBC. Pingenot: Autobiography of a British boy who emigrated to a ranch home in Zavala County in the 1880s. Contains his experiences as country store clerk, publisher, legislator, mayor and collector of customs, with stories of old style criminal lawyers, tragedies, and pathetic incidents that came under his observations. Scarce.

JONES, Rose Mary (Mrs. John M. Jr.) (editor). La Hacienda: An Official Bicentennial Publication. The Whitehead Memorial Museum and the Val Verde County Historical Commission. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1976. Illustrations. 4to, wrappers.
         First edition.

KELSEY, Mavis P. and Donald H. Dyal. The Courthouses of Texas. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1993. Red cloth with black label on spine, gilt title. Mint, in slipcase and shrink-wrapped.

KILGORE, D. E. Nueces County, Texas 1750-1800, A Bicentennial Memoir. Friends of the Corpus Christi Museum, Number 1, December 1975. [2] 10 pp. Two folding maps, not attached. Wrappers. Inscribed.

KILGORE, Dan. Corpus Christi: A Quarter Century of Development, 1900-1925. Reprinted from The Southwestern Historical Quarterly LXXV, no. 4 (April 1972). Inscribed.

Looking Back at La Pryor. Written by the People of La Pryor, Past and Present. N.p.: Lydra Club, 1976. 233 pp., frontispiece, map, photographic illustrations. Original stiff red printed wrappers. Mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Early history of the area with biographical sketches on numerous pioneer families.

PARKER, Richard Denny. Recollections of Robertson County Texas with Biographical and Genealogical Notes on the Pioneers and Their Families. Salado: Anson Jones Press, 1955. Illustrations, folding map. Cloth.
         Limited edition (1,000 copies).

ROBERTS, Bruce. Springs from the Parched Ground. Uvalde: Hornby Press, 1950. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Cloth. Mint copy in a mint d.j.
         First edition. Adams, Guns 1869: "This little book was written by a minister and is mostly about his experiences at different churches, but it does have a long chapter on King Fisher"; Herd 1915.

SOWELL, Andrew Jackson. History of Fort Bend County: Containing Biographical Sketches of Many Noted Characters. Waco: W. M. Morrison, 1964. Frontispiece portrait. Decorated red cloth. Fine.
         Facsimile of the exceedingly rare 1904 edition. Adams, Herd (1954) 933. Graff 3908. Howes S798. Vandale, Texianameter 164. Pingenot: Contains much on Austin’s colony, Jane Long, the Texas Revolution, Mirabeau Lamar, the Mier prisoners, etc. A great Texas rarity.

Statement Concerning Fort Clark, Texas. [Brackettville, ca. 1938]. 8vo, original stiff printed wrappers. Wrappers stained and lightly worn, overall very good.
         First edition. Pingenot: During the 1930s, with the Great Depression upon the United States, a movement was made in Congress to close Fort Clark, which is located in Southwest Texas near the Mexican border. The fort was established in 1852 and had been in continuous service as a large infantry and cavalry station. This rational for not closing and abandoning the fort points out the strategic advantages of having a military outpost near the border and argues that the country would otherwise be vulnerable to Mexican bandits and revolutionists. At the time this was written, Fort Clark was headquarters for the 5th Cavalry Regiment and the First Cavalry Brigade. The beginning of World War II in Europe in 1939 saved the fort for five more years with the last troops vacating Fort Clark in the fall of 1944.

WOOSTER, Robert. Fort Davis: Outpost on the Texas Frontier. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1994. Portraits, maps, plates, notes. Original color pictorial wrappers. Mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Concise, scholarly history of this West Texas fort.
(17 vols.)
($375-750)

384. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR: Lot 1]. Lot of 22 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good) including:

ANDERSON, Robert. An Artillery Officer in the Mexican War 1846-7...With a Prefatory Word by His Daughter, Eba Anderson Lawton. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original cloth, gilt title on spine. Original owner’s bookplate. Near fine. Signed by military historian Edward S. Wallace with date May, 1948.
         First edition. Haferkorn, p. 40. Tutorow 4019. Pingenot: Scores of letters from Anderson to his wife that shed light on his dissatisfaction with garrison duty. Anderson served with Scott’s army at Vera Cruz and Tampico. He was wounded at the battle of Molino del Rey.

[BALLENTINE, George]. Autobiography of an English Soldier in the United States Army. Comprising Observations and Adventures in the States and Mexico. New York: Stringer & Townsend, 1853. Wood-engraved frontispiece with half-title (on tinted grounds). Original embossed green cloth with gilt pictorial spine. Good, with slight rubbing to spine extremities, upper hinge loose, remains of protective paper cover on pastedowns.
         First American edition. Clark, Old South III:125: "A plainspoken account....Before being ordered to Mexico, his company was stationed in Florida-at Pensacola Bay during October, 1845, and from then until the end of the following year, at Tampa." Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 447. Haferkorn, p. 41. Howes B77. Tutorow 3692 & 3625n: "Narrative of Scott’s campaign from the standpoint of an intelligent private soldier." Pingenot: Includes an account of Walker’s Texas Rangers.

[BALLENTINE, George]. The Mexican War, by an English Soldier. Comprising Incidents and Adventures in the United States and Mexico with the American Army. New York: W. A. Townsend, 1860. [4] xii, 288 [1] 18 [3] pp. Worn boards with gilt title on spine, else very good.

BARBOUR, Philip Norbourne and Martha Isabella Hopkins Barbour. Journals of the Late Brevet Major Philip Norbourne Barbour, Captain in the 3rd Regiment, U.S. Infantry, and His Wife.... New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1936. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original two-color embossed cloth, paper label on spine. Very fine.
First edition, limited edition (#456 of 1,000 numbered and signed copies on special deckle edge paper). Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 149. Tutorow 3602: "Contains a vita of Barbour and recounts his death at Monterey on September 21, 1846. His journal begins on March 28, 1846. It includes a daily account of troop movements and battles and considerable commentary on his fellow soldiers. Mrs. Barbour’s journal was written in Galveston, Texas, and dates from July to October 4, 1846." Pingenot: Written during the war with Mexico, 1846, it also includes the journal of his wife, Martha Isabella Hopkins Barbour.

BEAUREGARD, P. G. T. With Beauregard in Mexico. The Mexican War Reminiscences of P. G. T. Beauregard. [Baton Rouge]: Louisiana State University Press, 1956. Original cloth and boards. Fine.
         First edition. Edited by T. Harry Williams.

BENTON, Thomas Hart. Thirty Years’ View; or, A History of the...American Government for Thirty Years from 1820 to 1850. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1854-1856. Frontispiece portrait. 2 vols., original embossed cloth, spines gilt decoration. Some wear, but a good set.
First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 270. Haferkorn, p. 10. Tutorow 3044. Pingenot: A power in the U.S. Senate, Benton was an advocate of Manifest Destiny and was the father-in-law of John C. Frémont.

Brother Jonathan’s Almanac, 1848. Philadelphia: C. G. Sower, [1847]. 32 pp., 8vo, integral pictorial wrappers. Well-worn, old tape repair to final page.
         First edition. Not in Garrett, Haferkorn, or Tutorow. With an article on the "Battle of Buena Vista" on pp. 30-31, and one on "Kindness of Mexican Women" on p. 32.

CHAMBERLAIN, Samuel E. My Confession: The Recollections of a Rogue. New York: Harper & Brothers, [1956]. Illustrations by the author. Original cloth, gilt, in very good d.j. Owner’s name on half-title.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 73: "It is especially valuable for soldier and camp life." Edwards, Desert Voices, p. 32. Tutorow 3634. Pingenot: This valuable work was first discovered in 1955. The author, an American hero and soldier of fortune, records in his own words and pictures his fantastic personal adventures before, during, and after the Mexican War.

CLARK, Amasa Gleason. Reminiscences of a Centenarian. As Told by Amasa Clark, Veteran of the Mexican War, to Clara Tope Clark. Bandera: Privately Printed, 1930. Photographic illustrations. Original printed wrappers. Very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 749. Tutorow 3636. Pingenot: Colonel Martin L. Crimmins’ copy with his rubber stamp imprint at the bottom of the front free endpaper. Amasa Clark was born in New York state in 1825 and in January, 1847, he enlisted in the 3rd Infantry for the duration of the war with Mexico. He and his unit went by vessel to Point Isabel in Texas and thence by transport to join Gen. Scott’s forces for the invasion of Vera Cruz. Clark participated in the battles of Contreras, Churubusco, Molina del Rey, Chapultepec, and street fighting in the city of Mexico. Clark was sent to Texas after the war and accompanied the Johnston expedition to El Paso in 1849 where he received his discharge. He settled in Bandera in 1852. He died in 1927 at the age of 101; the town’s oldest citizen.

CLARK, Francis D. (compiler). The First Regiment of New York Volunteers commanded by Col. Jonathan D. Stevenson, in the Mexican War. New York: Geo. S. Evans & Company, 1882. Two frontispiece portraits. Original gilt decorated cloth, a.e.g. Some loss to title on front cover. Very good copy of a rare book. Presentation inscribed "Compliments of/ Francis D. Clark/ N.Y. Oct of 83".
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 619. Cowan, p. 126: "The most complete history of this famous military organization." Graff 733: "The sixteen page Appendix is date August 1st, 1883." Howes C-432. Tutorow 3523 (describing the 1970 reprint): "Contains the names of the members of the regiment during its term of service in California, with a record of all known survivors as of April 15, 1882, and those known to have died, with other matters of interest pertaining to the organization and service of the regiment." Pingenot: A very scarce Mexican War book.

Complete History of the Late Mexican War. Containing an Authentic Account of All the Battles Fought in that Republic.... New York, 1850. Engraved illustrations. Original pictorial wrappers. Pages chipped and several stained.

CONNER, Philip S. P. The Home Squadron Under Commodore Conner in the War with Mexico...1846-1847. Philadelphia: [Privately published], 1896. 4to, original blue cloth, gilt. Very fine uncut copy. Presentation copy, inscribed and signed by Conner to his brother-in-law, Clifford Lewis, Esq., and dated Jan. 29, 1897.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 397. Haferkorn, p. 71. Tutorow 2250 and 3352: "Written from his father’s papers. Includes...William G. Temple’s ‘Memoir of the landing of United States troops at Vera Cruz in 1847,’ with an appendix containing all the written orders issued by General Scott and Commodore Conner."

DAVIS, George Turnbull Moore. Autobiography of the Late Col. Geo. T. M. Davis.... New York: [Press of Jenkins & McCowan], 1891. Original gilt-lettered cloth. Very fine, preserved in custom slipcase. Presentation label from representatives of Col. Davis on front endpaper. Non-authorial presentation on preliminary blank leaf.
         First edition with the initial blank leaf. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 165. Graff 1017: "Contains material about the Mormons in Illinois, the Lovejoy murder, the War Department, and the Civil War, as well as the Mexican War." Howes D113. Hubach, p. 75. Smith, War with Mexico, II, pp. 383, 412. Tutorow 3699. Pingenot: Davis was a volunteer, serving first as an aide-de-camp to General Shields; entered Mexico in 1846 with Wool’s army; later participated in the invasion of Vera Cruz and conquest of Mexico City.

ELLIOTT, Richard Smith. The Mexican War Correspondence of Richard Smith Elliott. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. D.j.
         First edition.

FRY, J. Reese and Robert T. Conrad. A Life of Gen. Zachary Taylor.... Philadelphia: Grigg, Elliot & Company, 1847. 11 engraved plates, maps. 12mo, original black embossed cloth, gilt title. Some wear and rubbing else very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 738. Haferkorn, p. 63. Tutorow 3813: "Another edition with the same imprint was printed in 1848 on cheap and very poor book paper....The book consists largely of letters from Taylor to the adjutant general."

GALLATIN, Albert. Peace with Mexico. New York: Bartlett & Welford, [1847]. Printed wrappers.

GEORGE, Isaac. Heroes and Incidents of the Mexican War. Hollywood: Sun Dance Press, 1971. Original cloth, issued without d.j.
         Reprint edition. The first edition (Greensburg, 1903) is cited by Howes G108, Graff 1539, Haferkorn, p. 12, Eberstadt, Modern Overlands 179. Pingenot: A fine work by a participant of the Mexican War in which he describes the Navajo Expedition, the battles of Sacramento, Brazito, etc., their departure to New Orleans and final discharges. Includes Captain E. M. Daggett’s "Adventures with Guerrillas."

GOETZMANN, William H. Sam Chamberlain’s Mexican War: The San Jacinto Museum of History Paintings. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1993. xii, 207 [1] pp., 160 color illustrations, maps. 4to, half leather and cloth, gilt. Mint copy in publisher’s slipcase.
         First edition, limited edition (#10 of 100 copies signed by the author). Pingenot: Sam Chamberlain was six feet, two inches tall with golden locks and was fifteen years old when he went off to the war with Mexico, 1846-48. Maps of the battles of Monterey and Buena Vista are placed with Chamberlain’s painting of those crucial events. A beautiful book designed by David Holman’s Wind River Press.

GOLDER, Frank Alfred. The March of the Mormon Battalion from Council Bluffs to California. Taken from the Journal of Henry Standage. New York: Century Company, [1928]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, endpaper maps. Original blind-stamped cloth. Very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 590. Rittenhouse 245. Tutorow 3337: "In addition to the text of Standage’s famous journal, this volume contains a great deal of correspondence on the war, a roster of the members of the Mormon Battalion, and a brief bibliography."

HITCHCOCK, Ethan Allen. Fifty Years in Camp and Field: Diary of Major-General Ethan Allen Hitchcock. New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1909. Frontispiece portrait. Large 8vo, original green cloth, t.e.g.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 183. Graff 1908: "[He] was an amazing man—educated, able, honest, industrious, conscientious, and patriotic in the highest degree. His estimates of the public men of his era, most of whom he knew well, are enlightening and interesting." Howes H539. Tutorow 3587: "His diary throws some interesting light on the campaign [from Vera Cruz to Mexico], and gives some facts not found in other histories." Pingenot: Hitchcock was engaged in the Florida wars and in removing the Seminoles; he served with both Taylor and Scott in the Mexican War; and he was in the Civil War.

JAY, William. A Review of the Causes and Consequences of the Mexican War. Boston: Benjamin B. Mussey & Company, 1849. Original blind-stamped cloth, spine title gilt. Corners lightly worn, spine ends rubbed. Internally very good. Overall a good to very good copy.
         First edition. Haferkorn, p. 14. Larned 2003: "Written from the Abolitionist point of view. Jay held that the war was merely one act in a conspiracy to secure Mexican territory." Tutorow 3218: "The major abolitionism history of the Mexican War...focuses on American atrocities committed against the Mexicans." Pingenot: An important and (then) controversial work, having gone through four printings the first year of publication (the book was published simultaneously in Philadelphia and New York). Over half the book is devoted to the Texas Revolution, Republic of Texas, Annexation of Texas, and other causes of the Mexican War.

JAY, William. A Review of the Causes and Consequences of the Mexican War. Boston: Benjamin B. Mussey & Company, 1849. Original blind-stamped cloth, spine title gilt. Corners lightly worn, spine ends rubbed and splitting along joint. Internally very good. Overall a good to very good copy.
         Second edition.
(24 vols.)
($1,000-2,000)

385. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR: Lot 2]. Lot of 26 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good) including:

KENLY, John R. Memoirs of a Maryland Volunteer: War with Mexico in the Years 1846-7-8. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1873. An exceptionally fine, bright copy in original cloth, gilt.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 514: "A rather full account of the war from a junior officer’s view." Haferkorn, p. 47. Tutorow 3652. Pingenot: Kenly was an officer of Maryland Volunteers under General Taylor, participating in the campaigns from the Texas border to Monterey; later was with Scott’s forces on the march to Mexico City. A well-written and scarce narrative especially in such nice collector’s condition. A 42-page appendix lists the officers of his regiment and includes a copy of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

LADD, Horatio O. History of the War with Mexico. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, [1883]. Double-page frontispiece. Original pebble cloth, gilt. Pages toned brown due to aging, else a fine, bright copy.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 362. Haferkorn, p. 15. Tutorow 3221: "A fair, well-balanced treatment of the war which does not focus on military movements."

LIVERMORE, Abiel Abbot. The War with Mexico Reviewed. Boston: Wm. Crosby and H. P. Nichols, 1850. xii, 298 pp. Last page misnumbered 310. Original embossed cloth, gilt title on spine. Light upper spinal rubbing, and occasional foxing. Very good to fine. Presentation inscribed "Rev. E. W. Humphreys/ with the kind regards/ of the author."
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 44: "...argues the South’s desire to acquire new slave territory." Haferkorn, p. 15: "Describes the expenditures, inhumanities, vices of camps, military executions, and all the horrors of war." Palau 139114. Tutorow 3223. Pingenot: The author was a Unitarian clergyman, an abolitionist, and a pacifist, and while his writing exhibited sound historical research, his objectivity was occasionally questioned. One of the most important anti-war accounts with much on Texas.

MANSFIELD, Edward D. Life and Services of General Winfield Scott. New York: A. S. Barnes & Company, 1852. Frontispiece, map, illustrations Original blind embossed cloth; spine gilt. Minimal wear. Fine.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 701. Tutorow 3896: "Chapters 22 and 23, pp. 359-410, deal with the Mexican War."

MANSFIELD, Edward D. The Life and Military Services of Lieut.-General Winfield Scott.... New York: N. C. Miller, 1861. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps. Original blind-stamped cloth, gilt title on spine. Some edge wear and rubbing.
         Tutorow 3895. Pingenot: This edition includes Scott’s "Brilliant achievements in the War of 1812, in the Mexican War, and the Pending War for the Union."

MANSFIELD, Edward D. The Life of General Winfield Scott. New York: A. S. Barnes & Company, 1846. Frontispiece portrait, maps, illustrations. Original blind-stamped cloth, gilt pictorial spine. Some edge wear and rubbing, else very good.
         First edition. Haferkorn, p. 61. Pingenot: First issue with the page numbered 155* and full-page illustration not numbered between pp. 155 and 156. Biography of Scott’s life and military career through the year 1845.

MANSFIELD, Edward D. The Mexican War: A History of Its Origin, and a Detailed Account of the Victories.... New York: A. S. Barnes & Co, 1849. Frontispiece, illustrations, maps. Original cloth with bright gilt pictorial spine. Although evenly worn, still a good copy.
         10th printing. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 701. Haferkorn, p. 15. Tutorow 3225: "Argues that the annexation of Texas was the cause of the Mexican War. Perhaps the most useful materials in this volume are the various tables showing the number of regulars employed in the Mexican War, the volunteers employed in Mexico, volunteers furnished by each state, total strength of the army, total losses of the army, the number of killed and wounded in each major engagement of the war, and a list of officers killed or who died of wounds."

MANSFIELD, Edward D. The Mexican War; History of its Origin.... New York: A. S. Barnes & Company, 1848. Ads, frontispiece, maps, illustrations. Contemporary calf, leather label, with some splitting and foxing.
         First edition.

McCLELLAN, George B. The Mexican War Diary of George B. McClellan. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1917. iv [1] 97 pp., frontispiece, illustrations, map. Original cloth with gilt lettering on cover and spine. Very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 516. Tutorow 3591: "As a brevet second lieutenant, McClellan served in Company A, Engineers, in Taylor’s army. This...diary covers the period from his departure from West Point in 1846 through the battle of Cerro Gordo in April, 1847. Contains many observations on the conduct and conditions of volunteer troops."

MUSICK, John R. Humbled Pride: The Age of Aggression Abroad. New York: William H. Wise & Company, 1909. Illustrations by Freeland Carter. Rebound in simulated leather, gilt title on spine. Fine.
         Wright III, 3921. Pingenot: A novel originally published in 1893 by an author who viewed the annexation of Texas and the U.S. war with Mexico as a plot to extend the slave-holding states. The story of John, a runaway slave, upon which the novel is based, was narrated to the author by a former resident of Boone County, Kentucky.

[ORDONEZ, Juan]. Refutación al Cuaderno Titulado: "Rapida Ojeada Sobre La Campaña que Hizo el Sr. General Santa Anna en el Estado de Coah...." Por J. O. [with] Segunda Parte de la Refutación a la Rapida Ojeada. Mexico: 1847. Two pamphlets, both sewn with the original printed wrappers present on the second pamphlet only. Very good.
         First editions. Alessio Robles, Coahuila y Texas...1821-1848, II, p. 369n cites this work in his discussion of "Rapida Ojeada." Not in Connor & Faulk, North America Divided, Haferkorn, Howes, or Tutorow. Palau 203639, locating only the first part but not the second. Pingenot: These two pro-Santa Anna monographs, seldom offered together, were written in response to the strong criticism leveled against Santa Anna’s conduct of field operations at the battle of Buena Vista. In the first, Ordonez completely exonerates Santa Anna from the charges presented in the famous "Rapida Ojeada" and blames his defeat on the intrigues of his political enemies in the rear. In the second work Ordonez admits that some of the criticism was justified. Very rare.

OWEN, Charles H. The Justice of the Mexican War. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1908. Original cloth, gilt lettering on spine. Very good to fine.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 370. Pingenot: A review of the causes and results of the war, with a view to distinguishing evidence from opinion and inference.

PARKER, William Harwar. Recollections of a Naval Officer, 1841-1865. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1883. Original dark blue cloth, decorated title on cover and gilt spine. Some chipping to fragile leaves, overall a good to very good copy.
         First edition. Haferkorn, p. 73. Howes P92. Tutorow 3665. Pingenot: Chapters 4-10 present a vivid picture of naval life in the Mexican War period. Parker, then a midshipman, served in the squadrons of Conner and Perry on the East Coast, and took part in all major operations. He was present at the capture of Vera Cruz. His account is interesting and accurate.

SCRIBNER, Benjamin F. Camp Life of a Volunteer. A Campaign in Mexico, or a Glimpse at Life in Camp. By "One who has seen the Elephant." Austin: Jenkins Publishing Company, 1975. Ads, folding map: Battle of Buena Vista, 24.5 x 38.5 cm. Cloth.
         Reprint edition. Haferkorn, p. 51. Howes S246. Tutorow 3679: "Scribner was a private in the 2nd Regiment of Indiana Volunteers. His account begins July 11, 1846, and ends on July 3, 1847." Pingenot: Facsimile reprint of a rare work on the Mexican War, especially its coverage of the Battle of Buena Vista in which the author was a participant.

SEMMES, Raphael. The Campaign of General Scott in the Valley of Mexico. Cincinnati: Moore & Anderson Publishers, 1852. Frontispiece folding map. Original blind stamped cloth with gilt pictorial spine. Moderate wear and staining to covers with occasional foxing to text. Overall good to very good.
         Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 232. Haferkorn, p. 74. Howes S288. Raines, p. 185: "Semmes was on Gen. Worth’s staff from Jalapa to the City of Mexico. A critical history of Scott’s campaign." Tutorow 3392. Pingenot: An abridgement of the author’s Service Afloat and Ashore..., published the preceding year. Semmes served aboard a ship in the Home Squadron during the Mexican War, but was ashore for six months on a mission to exchange prisoners, and as a member of the staffs of Generals Worth and Scott. A very scarce to rare book.

SMITH, Captain E. Kirby. To Mexico with Scott: Letters of Captain E. Kirby Smith to His Wife. Edited by his daughter Emma Jerome Blackwood. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1917. Frontispiece portrait. Original dark blue gilt-lettered cloth. Some wear. Signature of historian Edward S. Wallace and date "Sept. 1933" on front free endpaper.
         First edition. Tutorow 4049. Pingenot: Smith served with Zachary Taylor from September, 1845, until he transferred to Scott’s command where he participated in all the operations from the landing at Vera Cruz to the battle of Churubusco under the walls of Mexico. Smith’s letters are filled with cogent observations and illuminating glimpses of state policies of both Mexico and the "organized disorganization of his own country." Kirby Smith was fatally wounded on September 8, 1847 at the battle of Molina del Rey.

SUMPTER, Arthur. The Lives of Gen. Taylor and Gen. Scott: To Which Is Appended an Outline History of Mexico...and a Brief History of the Mexican War.... New York: Ensign & Thayer, 1848. Illustrations. Original decorated wrappers.
         First edition.

TAYLOR, Zachary. Letters of Zachary Taylor from the Battle-Fields of the Mexican War, Reprinted from the Originals of William K. Bixby.... Rochester: [The Genesee Press], 1908. Portraits, illustrations, facsimiles. Large 4to, cloth-backed boards with paper labels. Minor rubbing and staining to paper labels, else very good to fine copy.
         First edition, limited edition (300 signed and numbered copies for private distribution only). Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 738: "Most of the letters are addressed to Taylor’s son-in-law, Dr. R. C. Wood. In the appendix is a lengthy letter to Buchanan on the matter of his mistreatment by the War Department." Haferkorn, p. 67. Howes T78. Tutorow 4054.

[TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. A Review of the Life, Character and Political Opinions of Zachary Taylor. Boston: Eastburn’s Press, 1848. 16 pp., illustration on upper wrap. 8vo, integral wrappers. Stab holes where removed from bound volume. Fine.
         Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p. 244

[TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. A Sketch of the Life and Character of Gen. Taylor...Together with a Concise History of the Mexican War; Including the Last Battle of Buena Vista, Feb. 22...Official Return of Killed and Wounded...Remarkable Bravery and Humanity of an American Woman Connected with the Army...By the One-Legged Sergeant. Boston: John B. Hall, 1847. Woodcut illustrations. Original green printed pictorial wrappers. Fine copy.
         First edition. See Handbook of Texas III:96-7. Howes T80. Tutorow 3729. Winegarten, p. 105. Pingenot: Contains much of Texas interest including the Texas Rangers and "the Heroine of Fort Brown." The latter reference is to Sarah Borginnis, a 6’ 2" laundress, who became known as "The Great Western." This Amazon of a woman, highly esteemed by both officers and men, was noted for her outstanding feats of strength and bravery in several battles of the war. This book is one of the few contemporary sources on this remarkable woman (Sloan).

[TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. A Sketch of the Life and Character of Gen. Taylor...Together with a Concise History of the Mexican War; Including the Last. New York: S. French, 1847. Woodcut illustrations. Original cream printed pictorial wrappers. Fine.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT. (James K. Polk). Message from the President of the United States, Communicating...Negotiation Between the American and Mexican Commissioners...February 2, 1848. Washington: S.E.D. No. 20, 1848. 22 pp.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). Message of the President of the United States, Relative to the Operations and Recent Engagements on the Mexican Frontier. June 12, 1846. [Washington], 1846. 37 pp.
         Not in Haferkorn. First reports giving a detailed account of the Battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de Palma.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT. (James K. Polk). Messages of the President of the United States...on the Subject of the Mexican War. Washington: Wendell & Van Benthuysen, 1848. 1, 277 [7] pp. Original marbled boards with new leather spine. Fine.
         Haferkorn, p. 29. H.E.D. 60. Serial 520. Pingenot: This is a compilation of all correspondence relating to the Mexican War, including President Polk’s message relative to an invasion and commencement of hostilities by Mexico, letters and dispatches of the Secretary of the Navy, Commodore Sloat, Connor, Biddle, and Stockton, correspondence with General Taylor, etc.

UNITED STATES. PRESIDENT (James K. Polk). The Mexican War, and Its Expenses.—The Public Debt, and Its Payment.—The Army and Its Disbandment.—The Territory Acquired, and Its Value [caption title]. N.p.: Published Under the Authority of the Committee, n.d. 6 [2] pp. Foxed, creased where formerly folded.
         "The whig party, in its desperate efforts to elect General Taylor, does not hesitate to publish, in various forms, articles destitute of truth and responsibility. To counteract such statements, we propose to call attention to the messages of President Polk dated July 6th and 24th. They are reliable, dignified, and able State papers."

[WALLACE, LEW]. A Hoosier in the Mexican War. Prepared by the Staff of the Public Library of Fort Wayne and Allen County. 1953. Wrappers.
         Not in Tutorow.

The Whig Almanac and United States Register. 1847, 1848, & 1849. New York: Greeley & McElrath, [1846-48]. 3 vols. Wrappers.
         Includes reports on the War with Mexico.

WILCOX, Cadmus M. History of the Mexican War....Edited by his Wife Mary Rachel Wilcox. Washington: Church News Publishing Company, 1892. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps. Original gilt pictorial pebble cloth, gilt title on spine. Spine faded with very slight rubbing, top and bottom. Very good copy.
         First edition. Haferkorn, p. 30. Howes W409. Tutorow 3247. Pingenot: An intensive study of the military operations of the war, written by a 2nd lieutenant. A portion of the description is from personal observation. Appendices include the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, a roster of regular army, volunteer, and naval officers serving in Mexico, and the names of the original members of the Aztec Club.

WISE, Henry A. Los Gringos; or, an Inside View of Mexico and California, with Wanderings in Peru, Chili, and Polynesia. New York: Baker & Scribner, 1849. Original embossed cloth, title gilt, in sturdy buckram slipcase. Very fine bright copy.
         First edition. Barrett 2649. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 327. Cowan, p. 691: "vigorous and picturesque." Hill, p. 330: "A naval officer in the U.S. Navy, Wise served on board the...Independent during the Mexican War. This book narrates his experiences on an expedition sailing from Boston around Cape Horn, bound for Mexico and California....Wise recorded many details of the actual fighting....With the end of the war, the vessel returned to Boston, stopping at Hawaii, the Marquesas, Tahiti, and then Callao." Howes W593. Tutorow 3690. Pingenot: Lieutenant Wise’s ship was in Mexican and California ports during the Mexican War where he witnessed some incidents of the war and participated in the blockade of Mazatlán. The author first went to California in 1846 and stayed for some time at San Francisco, Monterey, and San Jose.

WRIGHT, Marcus J. Great Commanders: General Scott. New York: D. Appleton & Company, [1893]. Portraits, maps. Original cloth, paper label. Hinges broken, much worn and soiled.
         Limited edition, "Large Paper Edition" (#219 of 1,000 copies). Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 703. Haferkorn, p. 62. Tutorow 4016: "Most of the book is on the Mexican War." Pingenot: First published in New York in 1847, this special edition was issued as part of the Great Commanders series. The author, as a young soldier following his chief in the greatest of his military enterprises, the invasion of Mexico, was a devoted subordinate on terms of personal intimacy with Scott.

(31 vols.)
($1,000-2,000)

386. [MEXICAN AMERICAN WAR: lot 3]. Lot of 18 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BAUER, K. Jack. The Mexican War 1846-1848. New York: Macmillan, [1974]. Numerous plates, 15 maps. Cloth. Very fine in a fine d.j.
         First edition. Tutorow 3197: "The Mexican War was the most unavoidable war ever fought by the U.S. It had its inception in the lure of the frontier, the challenge of the United States to force its borders westward [but] the immediate causes were Texas annexation and its subsequent boundary dispute." Pingenot: The author focuses on the political and diplomatic aspects of the war, but much of the account deals with day-to-day fighting on the battlefield.

BAUER, K. Jack. Surfboats and Horse Marines: U.S. Naval Operations in the Mexican War, 1846-48. Annapolis: U.S. Naval Institute, 1969. Portraits, illustrations, maps. 4to, cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The history of the Navy’s role in the Mexican War, including the landing at Vera Cruz. The work discusses the campaigns in the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific separately.

BILL, Alfred Hoyt. Rehearsal for Conflict: The War with Mexico, 1846-1848. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1947. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Near mint copy in a very fine d.j. Choice collector’s copy.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 3. Tutorow 3198: "Stresses Mexican War training of future Civil War generals." Pingenot: One of the Mexican War centennial histories.

BISHOP, Farnham. Our First War in Mexico. New York: Charles Scriber’s Sons, 1916. Frontispiece, illustrations, maps. Original red cloth, gilt. Bookplate. Spine slightly sunned, else fine.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 4. Tutorow 3199: "Draws many parallels between the United States and Mexico in 1846 and 1916." Pingenot: Attempts to follow the example of George L. Rives in approaching the Mexican War with "scientific impartiality."

BRACK, Gene M. Mexico Views Manifest Destiny 1821-1846. An Essay on the Origins of the Mexican War. [Albuquerque]: University of New Mexico Press, 1975. D.j.
         First edition.

CHAMBERLAIN, Samuel E. My Confession: The Recollections of a Rogue. New York: Harper & Brothers, [1956]. 55 illustrations by the author, endpaper maps. 4to, original Arizona cowhide, gilt, in d.j. Save for a few tape mends and owner’s name in ink on the half-title, a very good to near fine copy.
         First edition, limited edition (500 copies, #32 of 50 copies bound in Arizona cowhide). Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 73: "It is especially valuable for soldier and camp life." Edwards, Desert Voices, p. 32. Tutorow 3634 (not noting this limited edition). Pingenot: Specially printed by the publisher for subscribers of Arizona Silhouettes. The author, an American soldier and adventurer, records in his own words and pictures his fantastic personal adventures before, during, and after the Mexican War.

CHAMBERLAIN, Samuel. My Confession: Recollections of a Rogue. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, [1996]. Color illustrations, facsimiles. Large 4to, blue cloth. Very fine in d.j.
First edition. Edited by William H. Goetzmann. "An Unexpurgated and Annotated Edition."

CONNELLEY, William Elsey. Doniphan’s Expedition and the Conquest of New Mexico and CaliforniaWar with Mexico, (1846-1847). Topeka: Crane & Company, 1907. xiv [2] 670 [2] pp., frontispiece, two folding maps, plates. Original cloth with illustration inlaid on front cover. Some cover wear but very good to near fine.
         First edition, first printing. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 434. Cowan, p. 139. Dobie, p. 76. Graff 851. Haferkorn, p. 36. Howes C688. Munk (Alliott), p. 54. Saunders 2829. Tutorow 3425: "Contains...official rosters of various units of the Army of the West, including that of the 1st Regiment of Missouri Mounted Volunteers, and several appendices. Valuable and well-documented source-book." Pingenot: One of the best accounts of the Doniphan Expedition, which also contains the diary of John T. Hughes, it was published sixty years after the war and was written with some perspective.

CONNOR, Seymour V. and Odie B. Faulk. North America Divided: The Mexican War, 1846-1848. New York: Oxford University Press, 1971. Endpaper maps. Cloth. Fine in slightly chipped d.j.
First edition. Basic Texas Books B51. Tutorow 3205: "Attempts to get away from the traditional ‘New England’ interpretation of the Mexican War." Pingenot: The first two-thirds of the book are given to the authors’ overview and analysis of the Mexican War. Pp. 185-276 contain an analytical bibliography with more than 700 entries of works printed in English and in Spanish.

DOWNEY, Fairfax. Texas and the War with Mexico. Illustrated with paintings, prints, drawings, maps, and photographs of the period. New York; American Heritage Publishing Company, 1961. D.j.

EISENHOWER, John S. D. So Far from God: The U.S. War with Mexico. New York: Random House, 1989. Illustrations, maps, endpaper maps. Cloth. Mint copy in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine treatment of one of the strangest, hardest fought, least known, and most important wars in American history.

FROST, J. History of the Mexican War.... New Haven: H. Mansfield, 1859. Color frontispiece, illustrations, map. Original gilt decorated red cloth.
First edition.

GANOE, William A. The History of the United States Army. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1924. Frontispiece, plates, text illustrations. Original blind-stamp cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. Edge wear and slight rubbing to lower spine, else good to very good.
         First edition.

GOETZMANN, William H. Sam Chamberlain’s Mexican War: The San Jacinto Museum of History Paintings. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1993. 160 color illustrations, maps. Folio, cloth. Mint in d.j. Autographed by the editor on the title-page.
         First edition. Pingenot: Sam Chamberlain was six feet, two inches tall with golden locks and was fifteen years old when he went off to the war with Mexico, 1846-48. Based largely on the collection of 147 watercolors owned by the San Jacinto Museum, the book reproduces these for the first time in color. Maps of the battles of Monterey and Buena Vista are placed with Chamberlain’s painting of those crucial events. Goetzmann’s lively text and detailed captions enhance the visual pleasure and historical importance of Chamberlain’s views of battles, massacres, seductions, and tall tales of the Mexican War. A beautiful book designed by David Holman’s Wind River Press.

HAECKER, Charles M. and Jeffrey G. Mauck On the Prairie of Palo Alto: Historical Archaeology of the U.S.-Mexican War Battlefield. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1997]. 58 illustrations, 11 maps. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: In this study the authors use an interdisciplinary approach, coupling the research of a historian with that of a historical archaeologist, to present an accurate version of how the battle developed and concluded.

HAFERKORN, Henry E. The War with Mexico 1846-1848. New York: Argonaut, 1965. Cloth.
         Limited edition. Reprint of 1914 edition.

HAMILTON, Holman. Zachary Taylor: Soldier in the White House. New York: Bobbs Merrill, 1951. Frontispiece portrait, plates. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The most authoritative account of this career soldier who became the twelfth president of the United States. Allan Nevins called it "a scholarly, judicious and interesting history of three critical years in the history of the nation, and a vigorous and convincing portrait of Zachary Taylor as Presidential candidate and President." Claude G. Bowers described it as "A brilliant and fascinating biography." This work completes the biography begun with Holman’s earlier volume, Zachary Taylor, Soldier of the Republic.

HAMILTON, Holman. Zachary Taylor: Soldier of the Republic. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, [1941]. Illustrations. Original cloth. Fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition, limited edition (250 numbered copies signed by the author). Tutorow 3829: "One of the best biographies of Taylor." Pingenot: Contains substantial information on Taylor’s time in Corpus Christi, his march south to the Rio Grande, the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, and Fort Brown; his thrust into Mexico and victories at Monterrey and Buena Vista. A fine work, praised by Nevins and Schesinger, covering Taylor’s life up to and through the Mexican War. This work is very scarce.
(18 vols.)
($425-1,100)

387. [MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR: Lot 4]. Lot of 18 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good) including:

BAUER, K. Jack. The Mexican War 1846-1848. New York: Macmillan, [1974]. Numerous plates, 15 maps. Cloth. Very fine in fine d.j
         First edition. Tutorow 3197: "The Mexican War was the most unavoidable war ever fought by the U.S. It had its inception in the lure of the frontier, the challenge of the United States to force its borders westward [but] the immediate causes were Texas annexation and its subsequent boundary dispute." Pingenot: The author focuses on the political and diplomatic aspects of the war, but much of the account deals with day-to-day fighting on the battlefield.

HENRY, Robert Selph. The Story of the Mexican War. New York: Bobbs-Merrill Company, [1950]. Frontispiece, illustrations, maps. Cloth with gilt title on cover and backstrip in d.j. Very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 16: "Often called the best modern work on the war....It is thoroughly researched, carefully documented, and judiciously worded." Tutorow 3215: "Other than being dated by recent research on the Mexican War, this is one of the best works available."

HUNT, Aurora. Major General James Henry Carleton, 1814-1873, Western Frontier Dragoon. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1958. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, 4 maps (including 1 folding). Original dark blue cloth, gilt title. Very fine copy.
         First edition. Clark & Brunet, The Arthur H. Clark Company 131. Clark Frontier Military Series II: "Lauded for its accuracy and detail, it has become exceedingly scarce and collectible." Dornbusch III, 3140. Paher 923. Rittenhouse 314. Pingenot: Fine biography rated best book on Carleton by Lamar. Carleton became an officer in the 1st Dragoons in 1839, served in the Mexican War (he wrote an account of the battle of Buena Vista), was involved in overland travel, the Mountain Meadow Massacre, commanded the California column to New Mexico in the Civil War, headed federal operations in New Mexico, etc.

JOHANNSEN, Robert W. To The Halls of the Montezumas: The Mexican Was in the American Imagination. New York & London: Oxford University Press, 1985. D.j.

LAIDLEY, Theodore. "Surrounded by Dangers of All Kinds": The Mexican War Letters of Lieutenant Theodore Laidley. Denton: University of North Texas Press, [1997]. Portrait, map. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Theodore Laidley, a West Point graduate, was a young army officer assigned to General Scott’s army during the Mexican War. His letters home date from August, 1845 to May, 1848, from places as far apart as New York, Brazos Santiago, Texas; Tampico, Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Jalapa, Perote, Puebla, and Mexico City. They describe details of a soldier’s life and the horrible experiences of battle, as well as descriptions of the land and people Laidley encountered in Mexico.

LAVENDER, David. Climax at Buena Vista: The American Campaigns in Northeastern Mexico 1846-47. Philadelphia & New York: J. B. Lippincott, [1966]. Maps, cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 194. Tutorow 3402: "Lavender has written a creditable history on the subject and has made judicious use of his sources."

NICHOLS, Edward J. Zach Taylor’s Little Army. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1963. Cloth. D.j.
         First edition.

OHRT, Wallace. Defiant Peacemaker: Nicholas Trist in the Mexican War. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1997. Frontispiece portrait. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Biography of a rare public figure, generally unknown today, who lived dangerously and was prepared to risk all for principle. Trist was closely acquainted with the great men of his time–Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Andrew Jackson. Sent to Mexico by President Polk, Trist later defied a presidential recall order and negotiated with Mexico the treaty that won for the U.S. the vast Southwest. Despite the treaty being accepted as a defining achievement for the United States, Trist’s career was thoroughly destroyed in the process. A fascinating and thoroughly readable biography published in a small edition.

PEÑA Y PEÑA, Manuel de la. Comunicacion Circular...Sobre La Cuestion de Paz ó Guerra.... Querétaro: Lara, 1948. Original beige printed wrappers. Fine.
         First edition. Not in Haferkorn. Howes P194. Palau 217560. Dorothy Sloan Catalogue 7:302. Tutorow 2956: "Peña y Peña was foreign minister for the Herrera government, which was accused by the radical Paredes of offering to alienate the Mexican claim to Texas. Peña y Peña recognizes in this pamphlet that refusal to see Slidell would bring on war. Mexico is justified, he says, in going to war to defend her honor, but the cost will be high and Texas is not worth it." Pingenot: An important publication antecedent to the war originally written in 1845 when the annexation of Texas was the burning question. Peña y Peña argues that it would be foolish for Mexico to wage a war against a "foreign nation, powerful, advanced in civilization, possessor of a respectable navy, and with a much larger population than we have." Highly interesting and vary scarce.

PRICE, Glenn W. Origins of the War with Mexico: The Polk-Stockton Intrigue. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1967]. Portraits, map. Cloth. Fine in d.j.
First edition. Tutorow 2958. Pingenot: An admittedly revisionist study claiming that the U.S. conflict with Mexico, leading to territorial expansion, was not unwanted. California was Polk’s prime objective from the beginning of his administration, and this Mexican province was to be acquired by conquest in a war initiated on the Texas-Mexican border. Although Polk sent several agents to Texas, the man at the center of the war intrigue was Commodore Robert F. Stockton, a man suited to the task because of his expressions of faith in American righteousness of action and in the American tradition of the divine mission.

ROBERTS, B. H. The Mormon Battalion: Its History and Achievements. Salt Lake City: Desert News, 1919. Frontispiece folding map. Original printed ecru wrappers. Minor wear. Very good copy.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 594. Tutorow 3342: "Excellent account of the call of the battalion, its march, its career in California, and the subsequent careers of its officers." Very scarce.

SANDWEISS, Martha A., Rick Stewart, and Ben W. Huseman. Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848. Fort Worth: Amon Carter Museum, 1989. Illustrations. Cloth. D.j.

SINGLETARY, Otis A. The Mexican War. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1960. Illustrations, maps. Original cloth. Fine in d.j. Signature of military historian Edward S. Wallace and date 1960 on front free endpaper.
         First edition. Edited by Daniel J. Boorstin. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 26. Tutorow 3234. Pingenot: A concise revisionist history of the Mexican War from the events leading to the conflict, through the succession of battles, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, and the nation’s new focus on the far West.

THOMSON, John Lewis. History of the War of the United States with Great Britain in 1812, and of the War with Mexico. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Company, 1873. Illustrations. Original cloth, gilt decorated spine. Spine extremities rubbed.
         Tutorow 3240 citing the 1887 printing. Pingenot: First published in 1860, this popular work went through many editions.

U.S. ARMY. 12TH INFANTRY REGIMENT. Twelfth U.S. Infantry 1798-1919: Its Story–By Its Men. New York: Knickerbocker Press, [1919]. Frontispiece portrait, photographic illustrations. Original dark blue cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. Non-authorial inscription on front free endpaper.
First edition. Controvich 3819. Pingenot: Includes a brief history of the twelfth Infantry beginning with its organization in 1798. Because World War I ended just before they were due to sail for France, this book concentrates on the training and preparations made to ready the regiment for service at the front, with numerous details of life at Camp Frémont, California. Mention is also made of the 5,000 troops from the 8th Division who served the Expeditionary Force in Siberia.

WALLACE, Edward S. Destiny and Glory. New York: Coward-McCann, [1957]. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The incredible story of a forgotten chapter in American history–the reckless men and bold adventurers who made hostile expeditions to the Caribbean, Central and South America between the Mexican and Civil Wars. Includes a chapter on Jane McManus Cazneau, a remarkable 19th-century woman whose exploits would make many 20th-century feminists blush. Long out-of-print.

WALLACE, Edward S. General William Jenkins Worth, Monterey’s Forgotten Hero. Dallas: Southern Methodist University Press, 1953. Illustrations, portraits, maps. Cloth. Fine copy in d.j. with spine slightly age darkened otherwise very good.
First edition.

WEEMS, John Edward. To Conquer a Peace: The War Between the United States and Mexico. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1974. Endpapers maps, illustrations. Cloth. Near fine copy in a very good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Bruce Catton calls this work "the best general account of the Mexican War I have yet read." By blending together the bare, unadorned thoughts of men in action with the many-sided reality of the events themselves, Weems creates a robust sense of the tragic, unpopular war that changed the destiny of two countries.
(18 vols.)
($500-1,000)

388. [MEXICO]. Lot of 48 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

ANDERSON, Alex D. The Tehuantepec Inter-Ocean Rail Road. New York: A. S. Barnes & Company, 1880. 4 folding maps. Paperback.

BAERLEIN, Henry. Mexico: The Land of Unrest. Being Chiefly an Account of What Produced the Outbreak in 1910.... Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, n.d. Frontispiece, illustrations, folding map. Original blind-stamped maroon cloth. Gilt title on spine, t.e.g.
         First edition.

BARKER, Nancy Nichols. The French Experience in Mexico, 1821-1861: A History of Constant Misunderstanding. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979. Illustrations, endpaper maps. Cloth. Very fine in d.j.
         First edition.

BEALS, Carlton. Porfirio Díaz, Dictator of Mexico. New York: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1932. 126 illustrations. D.j.
         First edition.

BRENNER, Anita. The Wind that Swept Mexico: The History of the Mexican Revolution 1910-1942. New York: Harper, [1943]. 184 historical photographs assembled by George R. Leighton. Linen cloth. Fine in lightly chipped d.j.
         First edition. Text by Anita Brenner.

BULLOCK, W. H. Across Mexico in 1864-5. London: Macmillan & Company, 1866. vi [2] 396 [4] pp., color frontispiece map of Mexico, 8 sepia-tone lithographs, including costumed groups, views, Aztec calendar stone, etc. Original embossed green cloth, gilt-decorated and -lettered spine. Slightly shelf slanted, some edge wear, upper hinge cracked, some foxing to plates.
         First edition. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 796 (noting that the author’s real name was William Henry Bullock Hall). Palau 37061. Sabin 9146. Pingenot: Traveling mostly by train, the author went from Vera Cruz via Puebla to Mexico City, which he describes in great detail. He then continued on to Morelia, Guadalajara, Tepic, and on to the Pacific Coast, returning on the same route to Mexico City and thence north to Tampico through the Huasteca. An excellent account presenting an English view of the French intervention.

BUSH, I. J. Gringo Doctor. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1939. Illustrations by James Willis. Original cloth. Fine in a near fine d.j. Rare thus.
         First edition. Dobie, p. 69. Pingenot: Dr. Bush represented frontier medicine and surgery on both sides of the Rio Grande. Living at El Paso, he was for a time with the Maderistas in the revolution against Díaz. Ranks in interest with Timothy Turner’s Bullets, Bottles, and Gardenias.

CADENHEAD, Ivie E., Jr. Jesus Gonzalez Ortega and Mexican National Politics. Fort Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1972. Original stiff pictorial wrappers. Very fine to mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: Biographical study of Ortega, who rose from obscurity in Zacatecas, joined the Liberal revolt against Santa Anna, and emerged as an important military and political figure in mid-nineteenth-century Mexico. Ortega’s prominence was meteoric, burning brilliantly and then flaming out in the midst of luminaries such as Benito Juarez and Porfirio Díaz.

CAMPBELL, Reau. Campbell’s New Revised Complete Guide and Descriptive Book of Mexico. Chicago: Published by the author, 1909. Illustrations, folding map. 12mo, cloth. Worn, overall very good.
         First edition.

CASTRO, Lorenzo. The Republic of Mexico in 1882. With Revised and Corrected Map. New York: Thompson & Moreau, 1882. iv, 271 [5] pp., ads, large folding map, 42 x 30 in., in outline color of the Republic of Mexico. Original embossed cloth-backed boards, gilt title. Fine.
         First edition. Raines, p. 225. Ramos 952. Pingenot: A thorough guide with state-by-state descriptions of towns, cities, population, brief historical sketch, products, industry, etc. Lorenzo Castro was the son of empresario Henri Castro, colonizer and founder of Castroville. During the Civil War, the Confederate government appointed Castro collector of customs at Eagle Pass. Contains detailed itineraries of the author’s travels from 1866 from San Antonio, Texas, to Mexico City and all over Mexico.

CUMBERLAND, Charles C. Mexico: The Struggle for Modernity. New York: Oxford University Press, 1968. Chart. Original cloth. Very good in good d.j.
         First edition.

CUMBERLAND, Charles. Mexican Revolution, Genesis Under Madero. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1952. Cloth. D.j.

DULLES, John W. F. Yesterday in Mexico: A Chronicle of the Revolution, 1919-1936. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1961. Illustrations. Cloth. D.j.
         First edition.

FEHRENBACH, T. R. Fire and Blood: A History of Mexico. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, [1973]. Double frontispiece map. Cloth. Fine in d.j. Autographed by the author on the front free endpaper.
         First edition.

FINERTY, John F. Reports Porfirian Mexico 1879. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1974. Frontispiece portrait. Cloth. Near mint in fine d.j.
         First edition. Edited by Wilbert H. Timmons. Pingenot: First edition of Finerty’s previously unpublished manuscript written in 1879. Finerty accompanied the American Industrial Deputation to Mexico in 1878 as a newspaper correspondent and then continued to travel the country on his own. He visited Mexican War battle sites, the hillside in Queretaro where Maximilian was executed, interviewed survivors, and penned cogent and interesting observations of Mexico, its society and customs. He was the first American newspaperman to obtain an interview with Porfirio Díaz.

FLANDRAU, Charles Macomb. Viva Mexico. Mexico: Mexico Press, 1950. Cloth. Library lettering on spine. Very good.

GARCIA NARANJO, Nemesio. Porfirio Díaz. San Antonio: Casa Editorial Lozano, 1930. Photographic plates. Small 8vo, cloth, gilt title on spine, gilt lettering on front. Very good.
         First edition.

GODOY, Jos. F. Porfirio Díaz, President of Mexico: The Master Builder of a Great Commonwealth. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1910. Frontispiece portrait, numerous photographs, diagrams, and folding map. Original maroon cloth with gilt title on front cover and spine. Previous owner’s bookplate.
         First edition. Pingenot: An effusive and adoring biography of Mexico’s last great dictator published on the eve of the Mexican Revolution that would send Díaz into exile. This work covers Díaz’s military achievements that led to his presidency as well as his efforts at developing Mexico’s mining industry, building railroads, and settlement of frontier disputes with the United States.

GOOCH, Fanny Chambers. Face to Face with the Mexicans...as Seen and Studied by an American Woman During Seven Years of Intercourse with Them.... New York: Fords, Howard, & Hulbert, 1887. 584 pp., 200 illustrations, including two brightly colored plates of Mexican flowers. 4to, original brown pictorial cloth. Minor shelf wear to lower edges, else a fine, bright copy.
         First edition. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 833: "Memoirs by a Texan, who lived chiefly in Saltillo but also in Mexico City." Larned: "Faithful account of what the author saw." Palau 106139. Raines, p. 95: "Agreeable pen picture of the domestic life of the Mexicans. The tendency of the book is to weaken, if not destroy the prejudice which exists on either bank of the Rio Grande." Pingenot: A beautifully illustrated social history, with much on the borderlands.

GREGORY, Samuel. Gregory’s History of Mexico...from the Earliest Times to the Present; Giving an Account of the...Texian Revolution.... Boston: F. Gleason, 1847. Full-page plate. Original pictorial wrappers. Some browning and edge wear to wrappers, else very good.
         First edition. Stitched as issued. Eberstadt 110:254. Pingenot: Printed at the Flag of Our Union Office, Corner of Court and Tremont Streets. Printed in the summer of 1847, during the time of General Scott’s invasion of Mexico, in order to satisfy public curiosity and demand for information about a country that seemed so far off to most Americans. The Texas material includes the Moses Austin Land Grant, colonization, the campaign of 1835, fall of the Alamo, Goliad affair and the Fannin Massacre, the battle of San Jacinto, defeat and capture of Santa Anna, the Perote prisoners, etc. Very rare.

HALE, Susan. Mexico. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1898. Color frontispiece, illustrations, maps, folding map. Small 8vo, original gilt pictorial green cloth with gilt-decorated spine. Light wear and lower spine rubbing, else very good.
         First edition.
Himno nacional mexicano 1947. Mexico: Ediciones de la Secretaria de Educación Publica, 1947. 4 pp. 12mo.

KIRKHAM, Stanton Davis. Mexican Trails: A Record of Travel in Mexico, 1904-07, and a Glimpse at the Life of the Mexican Indian. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1909. Plates. Cloth, gilt front and spine.
         First edition.

LATROBE, Charles J. The Rambler in Mexico: MDCCCXXXIV. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1836. Original patterned cloth with printed paper spine label. Spine cloth torn, otherwise very good.
         First American edition. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 871. Hill, p. 472. Palau 132953. Sabin 39221. Pingenot: Charles Latrobe (1801-1875) was born in London and came to America in 1832. After visiting the chief cities in the States, he sailed down the Mississippi to New Orleans, and, in company with Washington Irving, struck out across the prairies and then into Mexico. There Latrobe became fascinated by the lives of Indians, saints, ruins, bullfights, and the opera. Prescott remarked of this work: "Of recent tourists no one has given a more gorgeous picture of the impressions made on his senses by these sunny regions than Latrobe."

Las Líneas Nacionales de México. Mexico, 1905. Railroad timetable.

LUND, Harry (editor). Juventud, Divino Tesoro: Una Antologia de Prosa Universitaria. Mexico: Editorial Andres Noriega. 1966. Wrappers, stapled. Printed on colored stock.

MAGNER, James A. Men of Mexico. Milwaukee: Bruce Publishing Company, [1942]. 18 plates. Cloth. Fine. Owner’s name in ink on title-page and embossed on front endpaper.
         First edition. Ramos 2803. Pingenot: Biographies of Mexican leaders since Moctezuma, with chapters on Cortes, Iturbide, Santa Anna, Juarez, Díaz, Cardenas, et al.

MAYER, Brantz. Mexico as It Was and as It Is. New York: New World Press, 1844. Frontispiece, profusely illustrated, with errata leaf. Original embossed gilt pictorial cloth. Some edge wear and fading, else very good with minimal foxing to title-page and final leaves.
         First edition. Basic Texas Books 197n. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 923. Raines, p 148: "Social and political life in Mexico, sketch of Santa Anna, and incidental references to Texas." Pingenot: Mayer was secretary of the U.S. legation to Mexico in 1841 and 1842.

MEJIA, Francisco. General de brigada, Gobernador del departamento de Coahuila. 1844. 1 p. broadside.

MEXICO. SECRETARIA DE HACIENDA Y CRÉDITO PÚBLICO. Report of the Secretary of Finance of the United States of Mexico on the 15th of January, 1879: On the Actual Condition of Mexico, and the Increase of Commerce with the United States. New York: N. Ponce De Leon, 1880. Original paper wrappers.

MORRIS, Henry Hutchins. Thrilling Stories of Mexican Warfare including Intervention and Invasion by the United States. N.p.: [L. W. Walter, 1914]. Frontispiece, illustrations. Original half morocco and cloth, gilt title on spine. Very good.
         First edition. Pingenot: Including chronology. In Two Parts. Part I: Mexico Down to the Occupation of Vera Cruz by the U.S. and the Niagara Peace Conference. Part II: Recognition of Carranza, the Columbus Raid, and the Search After Villa, with its Consequences. Narratives of Mexican Conquest, Revolutions, Insurrections and Wars. Weaving a story of a country constantly swept by marauders, bandits and political aspirants, combined with a jingoistic account of U.S. demands that "insults to the flag" be apologized for and that a stable form of government be established. Reproduces contemporary U.S. political cartoons along with rare photographs.

OBER, Frederick A. Travels in Mexico and Life Among the Mexicans.... San Francisco: D. Dewing and Company, 1885. 672 pp., 190 engraved plates & illustrations (after author’s sketches and photographs), folding colored map of Mexico and the borderlands. Thick 8vo, original pictorial mustard cloth stamped in gilt and blank. Binding scuffed and worn, hinges cracked.
         Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters, p. 953. Larned 3973: "A popular work in which the author suggests some of the fascination which the country exercises over almost all who visit it without prejudice. Distinctly interesting." Palau 197702. The Texas illustrations include a street scene at Paso del Norte, church at Paso del Norte, international bridge at Laredo, etc. Many of the plates are of Native Americans. Pingenot: Contains extensive material on Texas and the other border states. Especially fine coverage of archaeology, railroads, mining, and cattle industry. Very attractive plates.

O’CONNOR, Richard. The Cactus Throne: The Tragedy of Maximilian and Carlotta. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, [1971]. Illustrations. Original cloth, gilt title, pictorial d.j. Fine.
         Pingenot: Story of the last foreign intervention on American soil which occurred during the Civil War, and of its two central figures, royal innocents hurled into a revolution they were ill-equipped to understand. An absorbing account of a gaudy and tragic episode, when royalty could still believe they were divinely appointed, and a chronicle that moves from the chancelleries of Europe to the desert and mountain battlefields of Mexico.

O’CONÓR, Hugo de. Informe de Hugo de O’Conor sobre el estado de las Provincias Internas del Norte 1771-76. Mexico: Editorial Cultura, 1952. Foldout map. Original stiff printed cream wrappers. Very fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#385 of 500 copies). Prologue by Enrique Gonzalez Flores and annotations by Francisco R. Almada. Flannery, pp. 17-20. Tate, The Indians of Texas: An Annotated Research Bibliography 1822. Tyler, Big Bend, p. 241. Pingenot: O’Conór reorganized the chaotic presidio at San Antonio and curbed attacks of local tribes, who called him "Red Chief" for his flaming red hair. In 1771 O’Conór was appointed commander of the northern frontier of New Spain, and in 1773 Commandant General of all presidios in New Spain. He opposed abandonment of East Texas presidios and missions. The Informe is his report of personal inspection of the presidios, which involved travel of more than 4,000 miles. A detailed firsthand account of the early frontier, O’Conór’s report led to transformation of the mission system throughout the Southwest.

OLIVERA, Ruth R. and Liliane Crete. Life in Mexico Under Santa Anna 1822-1855. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1991]. Illustrations, maps. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. "A definite contribution to the field of 19th-century Mexican history. It provides a highly readable and comprehensive view of society, towns, and customs of Mexicans in the age of Santa Anna. The introduction is an excellent summary of political and economic trends and developments in the period."—Oakah L. Jones, Purdue University.

PLETCHER, David M. Rails, Mines, and Progress: Seven American Promoters in Mexico, 1867-1911. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1958. Cloth. Fine copy. D.j. nicked and spine age darkened, else fine.
         First edition. Griffin 4226: "Excellent study of the activities of seven American promoters in Mexico...that serves as a possible first step toward a comprehensive history of American economic activities in Mexico. The case-study method, employing examples drawn from the two fields of promotion—railroads and mining—which represented 85 percent of American capital invested in Mexico, demonstrates the gap between aims and achievements." Pingenot: Published in a very small edition and long out-of-print.

PURCELL, William. Frontier Mexico 1875-1894: Letters of William L. Purcell. San Antonio, Texas: Naylor Company, 1963. D.j.

RICKARD, T. A. Journeys of Observation: [Part I] Across the Mines of Mexico; [Part II] Across the San Juan Mountains. San Francisco: Dewey Publishing Company, 1907. Frontispiece, numerous illustrations. Original bright pictorial cloth. Fine copy.
         First edition. Not in Griffin. Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 2001. Pingenot: Written by a mining engineer, the text covers the author’s observations and comments on the mines in Mexico and then the mines in the San Juan Mountains of western Colorado.

RUSSELL, Thomas H. Mexico in Peace and War: A Narrative of Mexican History..[with] ...an Account of the Military Operations...at Vera Cruz in 1914. Chicago: Reilly & Britton Syndicate, [1914]. 2 folding maps, many photographs. Original red gilt pictorial cloth. Very fine.
         First edition.

SAMPONARO, Frank N. and Paul J. Vanderwood. War Scare on the Rio Grande: Robert Runyon’s Photographs of the Border Conflict, 1913-1916. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1992. Photographic illustrations. Oblong 4to. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Runyon’s pictures richly document the border conflict in the lower Rio Grande valley, bandit raids, U.S. Army buildup, etc.

TOMPKINS, Frank. Chasing Villa: The Story Behind the Story of Pershing’s Expedition into Mexico. Harrisburg: Military Service Pub. Company, 1934. xx [2] 270 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps, endpaper maps. Original pebble cloth. Very fine in moderately worn and chipped pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: In 1916 Villa led a predawn raid against Columbus, N. M. Tompkins was with the U.S. troops there who counterattacked. He later accompanied Pershing’s Punitive Expedition in pursuit of Villa. Tompkins’ account is rated by far the best by a participant. Scarce especially in the d.j.

TURNER, John Kenneth. Barbarous Mexico: An Indictment of a Cruel and Corrupt System. Chicago: Charles H. Kerr & Company, 1910. 48 photographic plates. Original cloth, gilt. Minor wear and spotting. Very good.
         First edition. Palau 34287. Ramos, Revolution 1828.

TURNER, Timothy G. Bullets, Bottles, and Gardenias. Dallas: Southwest Press, 1935. Frontispiece portrait, plates. Original cloth. Fine in moderately chipped d.j.
         First edition. Dobie, p. 43: "Obscurely published but one of the best books on Mexican life." Gunn, Mexico in American and British Letters 1109. Pingenot: One of the most delightful books written on the Mexican Revolution. Turner, a newspaper man, captures the essence and spirit of a period now long since passed away.

UNITED STATES. SENATE. SELECT COMMITTEE. Report...in Relation to the Proceedings of the Board of Commissioners in the Claims Against Mexico. Rep. Com. No. 182. Washington: Beverly Tucker, 1854. Purple cloth.

WALLACE, Lew. The Fair God or, the Last of the ‘Tzins: A Tale of the Conquest of Mexico. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1889. Original gilt pictorial green cloth. Some wear and rubbing, otherwise good.
         Later printing of the 1873 edition. Wright 2614.

WALLACE, Lucy H. Real de Catorce, Mexico: The Incredible City. Mission: Amigo Enterprises, 1965. Illustrations. D.j.

WHARTON, Clarence R. El Presidente, A Sketch of the Life of General Santa Anna. Austin: Gammel’s Book Store, [1926]. Frontispiece portrait. Original cloth.
Tutorow 4003. Pingenot: Educator, attorney, and prolific writer on Texas history, Wharton is still respected for his historical contributions.

WINTON, George B. Mexico: Past and Present. Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1928. Original cloth. Wanting the frontispiece, else good. Presentation copy, inscribed on the front free endpaper and autographed by the author on the title-page.
         First edition. Pingenot: An alumnus of Vanderbilt University, the author was a widely published authority on the Mexican people and their political struggles, and during the 1920s was recognized as a leading scholar. Covers Mexico’s history from Spanish times to the Constitution of 1917 and the Calles administration.
(47 vols.)
($1,000-3,000)

389. [MIER EXPEDITION]. Lot of 4 titles (8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

BELL, Thomas W. A Narrative of the Capture and Subsequent Sufferings of the Mier Prisoners in Mexico.... Waco: Texian Press, 1964. Original cloth. Mint.
         Facsimile reprint of the rare 1845 original. Introduction and notes by James M. Day. Streeter 1563, locating only the Earl Vandale copy in the University of Texas. Vandale, Texianameter 14. Pingenot: Bell published his ordeal of almost 21 months of captivity the year following his release. No doubt the rarest published account of the Mier Expedition.

CHABOT, Frederick C. The Perote Prisoners Being the Diary of James L. Truehart Printed for the First Time Together with an Historical Introduction.... San Antonio: Naylor Company, 1934. Original cloth. Some wear and spine darkening, but very good overall. Original owner’s rubber stamp name on endpaper.
         First edition, limited edition (#108 of 400 copies, signed by Chabot). Basic Texas Books 80n. Pingenot: One of the most valuable works on the subject, Truehart’s diary is the only one to cover the entire period of imprisonment from the capture of San Antonio by General Woll in September, 1842, to the release of the prisoners from Castle Perote in March, 1844. Chabot’s 87-page introduction and copious footnotes add much to the book.

NANCE, Joseph M. Dare-Devils All: The Texan Mier Expedition, 1842-1844. Austin: Eakin Press, 1998. Original cloth, slipcase. Signed.
         First edition, limited edition (#26 of 100 copies).

WALKER, Samuel H. Samuel H. Walker’s Account of the Mier Expedition. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1978. Illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Samuel Walker led a star-crossed life. He was wounded regularly in Texas Ranger battles with the Indians, he joined the ill-fated Mier Expedition and was captured, but as luck would have it on that occasion he was not executed for drawing a black bean. During the Mexican War, he persuaded Samuel Colt to manufacture the heavy .44 caliber six-shooter which bore his name. He was killed in action just a few days after receiving a pair of them from Colt. This is the first separate publication of his journal.
(5 vols.)
($75-150)

390. [MILITARY BIOGRAPHY, Lot 1]. Lot of 18 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

ANDREWS, Avery Delano. John J. Pershing My Friend and Classmate, with Notes from My War Diary. The Military Service Publishing Company, 1939. 2 pp. Season’s Greetings card signed by Pershing. D.j.

ARNOLD, H. H. Global Mission: General of the Air Force. "Hap" Arnold, Commander-in-Chief of the Greatest Air Force the World Has Ever Seen.... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1949. D.j.
         First edition.

ATHEARN, Robert G. William Tecumseh Sherman and the Settlement of the West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1956]. Illustrations, map. Cloth. Fine copy in a good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The eighteen year career of Sherman, following the Civil War, in which he was successively in command of the Military Division of the Missouri (comprising most of the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountain areas) and General of the Army of the United States under President Grant. These were the years of savage raiding by Indians and with a handful of troops, Sherman was expected to "insure the tranquility" of the vast region under his command.

BARNETT, Louise. Touched by Fire: The Life, Death, and Mythic Afterlife of George Armstrong Custer. New York: Henry Holt, 1996. Illustrations. Near mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A vivid account of an American legend, a remarkable marriage, and the turbulence of our nation on the verge of its Centennial, Touched by Fire is an insightful biography that is also a nuanced portrait of Custer. Author Barnett demonstrates how the conflicting views of Custer, his character, and his defeat speak more to the "contradictory needs of the national psyche than to the contradictory realities of his life."

BARROWS, Edward M. The Great Commodore: The Exploits of Matthew Calbraith Perry. New York: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1935. Frontispiece portrait, plates, endpaper maps. Original blue cloth, gilt title. Minor wear and spinal fading.
         First edition. Tutorow 3740. Pingenot: Matthew Perry (1794-1858) served in the War of 1812, helped destroy pirates in the West Indies, pioneered in establishing a course of instruction at Annapolis, promoted the use of steam warships, commanded the American squadron to Africa to help suppress the slave trade, and commanded the naval forces on the east coast of Mexico, 1846-47, sharing with General Scott credit for the capitulation of Vera Cruz. His most notable accomplishment was negotiating a treaty with Japan in 1854, a country then closed to the West, which granted American trading rights at Hakodate and Shimoda.

BARTLETT, David Vandewater Golden. The Life of Gen. Frank. Pierce, of New-Hampshire, the Democratic Candidate for President of the United States. Auburn & Buffalo: Derby & Miller, 1852. 300 pp., frontispiece portrait. Original embossed cloth, gilt pictorial spine. Some wear and foxing else very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided, 657. Tutorow 3741. Pingenot: After declining an offer to serve in Polk’s cabinet, Pierce enlisted as a private, but was appointed a brigadier general and joined Scott at Puebla. Chapter 7, covering the Mexican War period, contains considerable detail on his trip to Vera Cruz and how he led his troops. Many quotes from fellow officers and newspaper editorials all designed to make Pierce a great hero.

BISBEE, William Henry. Through Four American Wars: The Impressions and Experiences of Brigadier General William Henry Bisbee.... Boston: Meador,1931. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Minor rubbing to extremities else a good copy in original cloth. Autographed on the front free endpaper: "William H. Bisbee Brig. Genl. U.S.A."
         First edition. Graff 305. Pingenot: Though showing some external wear, this is still a sound copy of the life of an American soldier who enlisted in the Civil War, fought at Shiloh, Stone River, Kenesaw Mountain, and the siege of Atlanta; after the war served at Fort Kearney and fought against the Sioux and Arapahoe; and in the Spanish American War served in Cuba and the Philippines, retiring as a brigadier general in 1902.

BISBEE, William Henry. Through Four American Wars: The Impressions and Experiences of Brigadier General William Henry Bisbee.... Boston: Meador,1931. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original cloth. Gilt on spine slightly faded, else fine.
         First edition. Graff 305.

BODE, E. A. A Dose of Frontier Soldiering: The Memoirs of Corp. E. A. Bode, Frontier Regular Infantry, 1877-1882. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1994. Cloth. Mint copy in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine military memoirs by an enlisted frontier regular, with much on Indians of the Southwest, forts, cowboys, etc.

BOOTH, Ewing E. My Observations and Experiences in the United States Army. Los Angeles: Privately printed by author, [1944]. Frontispiece portrait, portraits. Original three-quarter black calf with gilt title on cover and spine.
         First edition.

BRIMLOW, George F. Cavalryman Out of the West: Life of General William Carey Brown. Caldwell: Caxton, 1944. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Cloth. Very good to fine in chipped d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine military biography of the forty-five year army career of General Brown, including his cadet days at West Point, the Bannock Indian War of 1878, the last campaign against the Sioux, his duty in Arizona, the Spanish American War, and the Pershing Punitive Expedition against Pancho Villa.

CARLSON, Paul H. Pecos Bill. A Military Biography of William R. Shafter. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1989. D.j. Signed.

CARLSON, Paul H. William R. Shafter, Military Commander in the American West: A Dissertation in History. [Lubbock], 1973. Maroon boards, gilt title on spine. 4to typescript dissertation.

CARROLL, John M. The 7th U.S. Cavalry’s Own Colonel Tommy Tompkins: A Military Heritage and Tradition. Mattituck & Bryan: J. M. Carroll & Company, 1994. Photographic plates. Blue cloth with bronze-colored metal corners. Fine in pictorial d.j. Signed.
         First edition.

COMFORT, Will Levington. Trooper Tales: A Series of Sketches of the Real American Private Soldier. New York: Street & Smith, [1899]. Frontispiece, illustrations. Original pictorial cloth. Edges worn with some rubbing.
         First edition. Wright 1159 (listing five locations). Chapter titles include "New Recruit in the Black Cavalry," "The Silent Trooper," "Red Brennan of the Seventh," "Back to San Anton’," "The Story of a Cavalry Horse," "The Aberration of Private Brown," etc. Scarce.

CORBUSIER, William T. Verde to San Carlos: Recollections of a Famous Army Surgeon and His Observant Family on the Southwestern Frontier 1869-1886. Tucson: Dale Stuart King, [1969]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, map. Original blue suede cloth over gold boards (to simulate dress uniform of the nineteenth-century army), gilt title on spine and cover. Mint in publisher’s slipcase. Signed.
         First edition, limited edition (#2 of 250 copies). See Thrapp, Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography I:322-23. Pingenot: A fine military biography by the youngest son (1882-1973) of Col. W. H. Corbusier, a frontier army doctor. It is based on his father’s journal and it covers the period from 1869 to 1888. Corbusier served extensively in the West; was post surgeon at Camp Verde, Arizona, 1873-75, where he accompanied a reconnaissance and scout against hostile Apaches; later served at Pine Ridge Reservation, S.D., 1878-80; then to Fort Washakie, Wyoming, for work among the Shoshone and Banncock Indians. Duty in the east was followed by service at Forts Bowie and Grant, Arizona; Fort Hays, Kansas, and Fort Lewis, Colorado.

CRESAP, Bernard. Appomattox Commander: The Story of General E. O. C. Ord. New York: A. S. Barnes & Company, [1981]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, maps. Cloth. Very fine to mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: More than just a Civil War biography, Ord had a fascinating military career spanning the 45 years from his entry into West Point in 1855 to his retirement in 1880. He served in California during the Mexican War and fought Indians in Florida, Oregon, and Washington territories. As commander in Texas in the late 1870s, Ord skillfully confronted lawlessness and Indian marauders to bring stability to the Rio Grande frontier.

HAGEDORN, Hermann. Leonard Wood: A Biography. New York: Harper & Bros., 1931. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 2 vols., original cloth, gilt title. Some wear to spine ends. Internally fine. Very good overall.
         First edition.
(19 vols.)
($500-1,000)

391. [MILITARY BIOGRAPHY, Lot 2]. Lot of 19 titles, including:

EMMETT, Chris. In the Path of Events with Colonel Martin Lalor Crimmins. Waco: Jones & Morrison, 1959. Photographs. Original cloth. Near mint in pictorial d.j. Autographed by the author.
         First and only edition. Pingenot: Colonel Crimmins’s life and military career spanned the vast gulf separating the nineteenth-century frontier with 20th-century technology. He was a Rough Rider with Roosevelt, an army officer with Pershing in Mexico chasing Villa, a renown herpetologist, and an able military historian, to mention but a few of his accomplishments. Obscurely published and long out-of-print, this book is an important contribution about a colorful and noteworthy American.

FORSYTH, George A. Thrilling Days in Army Life, with illustrations by Rufus F. Zogbaum. New York: Harper, 1900. Frontispiece, plates. Small 8vo, pictorial cloth. Very good.

GLAZIER, Captain Willard. Heroes of Three Wars. Philadelphia: Hubbard Brothers, 1882. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Small 8vo, original gilt pictorial gold cloth. Extremities rubbed, else very good.
         Tutorow 3819. Pingenot: This work comprises a series of biographical sketches of distinguished soldiers of the Revolutionary War, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. Contains chapters on famous and lesser-known participants in these wars.

GOODRICH, Frederick E. Life and Public Service of Winfield Scott Hancock, Major-General, U.S.A. Philadelphia: Lee and Shepard, 1880. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original decorated cloth, gilt title. Worn, rubbed and some stains.
         First edition. Tutorow 3823. Pingenot: Pp. [329]-375 contain a "Sketch of the Life and Public Career of William H. English, of Indiana," with portrait. Hancock graduated from West Point in 1844. He served in the Seminole War, the Mexican War, and various Western posts until 1861. Commissioned a brigadier-general in 1862, he distinguished himself at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. At Gettysburg, he won fame as one of the Civil War’s great soldiers by thwarting Lee’s nearly successful attack on the Union flank. Following the war he commanded various army departments. A Democratic presidential candidate in 1880, he was defeated by James Garfield.

HAGEDORN, Hermann. Leonard Wood: A Biography. New York: Harper & Bros., 1931. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 2 vols., original cloth, gilt title. Some wear to spine ends.
         First edition.

HEIN, O. L. Memories of Long Ago.... New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1925. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original black cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. Fine.
         First edition. Luther, Custer High Spots 63: "Contains a version of the battle given to Hein by W. S. Edgerley. It is mildly critical of Reno." Pingenot: A scarce book not cited by Howes, Graff, Eberstadt, etc., with a fine account of service in the U.S. Cavalry in Nevada, California, New Mexico and Arizona. Hein served under Crook in campaigns against the Apache in 1872-73 and was a friend of Capt. John G. Bourke. Lt. Col. Hein’s reminiscences include notable incidents and prominent persons recalled both before and after the Civil War.

HIRSHSON, Stanley P. The White Tecumseh: A Biography of William T. Sherman. New York: John Wiley & Son’s, 1997. Cloth. D.j.

HITCHCOCK, Ethan Allen. Fifty Years in Camp and Field: Diary of Major-General Ethan Allen Hitchcock. New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1909. Frontispiece portrait. Original green cloth, t.e.g.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 183. Graff 1908: "[He] was an amazing man—educated, able, honest, industrious, conscientious, and patriotic in the highest degree. His estimates of the public men of his era, most of whom he knew well, are enlightening and interesting." Howes H539. Tutorow 3587: "His diary throws some interesting light on the campaign [from Vera Cruz to Mexico], and gives some facts not found in other histories." Pingenot: Hitchcock was engaged in the Florida wars and in removing the Seminoles; he served with both Taylor and Scott in the Mexican War; and he was in the Civil War.

HOWARD, Oliver Otis. General Taylor. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1892. Frontispiece portrait, maps. 12mo, original calf and marbled boards, raised bands, gilt decorated spine. Very good.
         First edition. Connor & Faulk, North America Divided 183. Haferkorn, p. 64. Tutorow 3848: "Complete biography of Taylor, with Chapters 8-22 on the Mexican War....The treatment is thorough, but noncritical." Pingenot: Maj. Gen. Howard’s biography of Taylor is one of the "Great Commander" series published by Appleton in the late nineteenth century.

HUGHES, Nathaniel Cheairs. General William J. Hardee. Old Reliable. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, [1965]. Frontispiece portrait. Cloth. Fine in a good to fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine biography of a professional army officer of the classical school who was rendered obsolete by changing mode of warfare.

JOHNSON, Barry C. Flipper’s Dismissal: The Ruin of Lt. Henry O. Flipper, U.S.A., First Coloured Graduate of West Point. London: Privately Printed, [1980]. Original cloth. Near mint and without d.j. as issued.
         First edition, limited edition (150 numbered copies). Pingenot: The first scholarly account of the circumstances surrounding the military trial on the Texas frontier in 1881 which became, ninety years later, a minor cause celebre. The author quotes passages from the court-martial record in this thoroughly annotated work. Included too are the revisionist Congressional reviews of the mid-1970s vindicating Flipper along with the author’s conclusions. An important study and, by virtue of the small printing, destined to become rare.

JOHNSON, Richard W. Memoir of Maj.-Gen. George H. Thomas. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Company, 1881. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original cloth, gilt. Spine extremities rubbed, otherwise good. Seven of the listed plates are missing.
         First edition.

JOHNSTON, Bradley T. A Memoir of the Life and Public Service of Joseph E. Johnston.... Baltimore: R. H. Woodward & Company, 1891. Frontispiece portraits. Original cloth, worn with front hinge broken. Gilt title faded. Presentation inscribed and signed by the author on the front free endpaper.
         First edition. Tutorow 3863. Pingenot: Written by one of Johnston’s subordinate officers during the Civil War, this biography focuses almost exclusively on that conflict. Only pages 1-16 cover Johnston’s pre-war military career; in Florida, the Mexican War, on the Texas frontier, and the Utah Expedition.

KING, Charles. The True Ulysses S. Grant. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, [1914]. Frontispiece portrait, 28 illustrations. Original pictorial cloth. Original owner’s bookplate on front paste-down. Minor rubbing else very good.
         First edition. Second printing. Pingenot: Stirring biography of Ulysses S. Grant from his graduation from West Point, his service in the Mexican War, his leadership in the Civil War, and as President of the United States.

KING, James T. War Eagle: A Life of General Eugene A. Carr. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1963. Illustrations, endpaper maps. Cloth. Very fine in a near fine d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine biography of a frontier cavalry commander whose life reads like an exciting novel, with its narrative of military service from the borderland frontier of Texas to explorations in the far West. Carr’s experiences included encounters with hostile Indians, dangers in the field and by flood, and brilliant Civil War action wherein he was awarded the Medal of Honor. Out of print and scarce.

LECKIE, William H. and Shirley A. Leckie. Unlikely Warriors: General Benjamin Grierson and His Family. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1984]. Illustrations. Cloth. Near mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine biography of Grierson, who had been a musician, bandleader, and unsuccessful businessman before the Civil War. During the war he converted from civilian to a brilliant cavalry officer, emerging at the end of the war a national hero. In the reorganized army of 1866, he accepted an appointment as colonel of the Tenth Cavalry, a command of white officers and black enlisted men. For the remainder of his career he served on the western frontier, commanding such Texas posts as Fort Concho and Fort Davis.

LEWIS, Charles Lee. David Glasgow Farragut: Admiral in the Making. Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, 1941. Frontispiece, plates, endpaper maps. Original blue cloth, gilt title on spine. Fine.

Life of General Scott; to Which Has Been Added Sketches of the Lives of Croghan, Johnson, Dearborn, and Carroll. New York: P. J. Cozans, 1860. 16mo, original color pictorial wrappers, some wear, spine damage.

Life of General Worth; to Which Is Added a Sketch of the Life of Brigadier-General Wool. New York: Sheldon, 1855. 16mo, original cloth, gilt lettering on spine and front. Some wear, very good.
(20 vols.)
($300-600)

392. [MILITARY BIOGRAPHY, Lot 3]. Lot of 19 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

MAURY, Dabney H. Recollections of a Virginian in the Mexican, Indian, and Civil Wars. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1894. Frontispiece portrait. Original pictorial cloth. Light wear, else fine copy of scarce book.
         First edition. Nevins, Civil War Books I:129. Coulter 320. Graff 2724. Howes M440. Rader 2369. Raines, p. 148: "A fascinating volume." Rittenhouse 406. Saunders 3041. Tutorow 3662: "[Maury] participated in the siege of Vera Cruz and was brevetted for bravery at Cerro Gordo." Pingenot: Maury served with the Mounted Rifles on the Santa Fe Trail to Fort Union, campaigned against the Navajo and Captain Jack and the Modocs, and spent time in Texas at Fort Inge near the Rio Grande. An excellent source on the Civil War in the Gulf and Trans-Mississippi theater.

MAYER, S. L. The Biography of General of the Army, Douglas MacArthur. [London]: Bison Books, [1981].

MILLS, Anson. My Story. Washington: Byron S. Adams, 1921. Portraits, plates. Original printed wrappers, black lettering. Very good.
         Second edition. Dustin 202. Graff 2804. Howes M623. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 64. Luther 39. Nichols 641. Pingenot: Service in Texas in the 1850’s, in the Civil War, in Arizona, on the 1876 Crook campaign, and in El Paso as Commissioner of the Boundary Commission between the U.S. and Mexico. His recollections of El Paso and West Texas are interesting and valuable. Mills’s western campaigns extended from 1865 through the Custer Campaign of 1876. He was a champion of Custer, and accused Terry of being unfamiliar with Indian warfare. Mills was escort to General Dodge on the expedition to Oregon in 1867 and for Lord Dunraven in 1873. He was involved in the Black Hills rush and was in the Powder River Expedition.

NORWOOD, William Howard et al. "General" John Norwood and Related Lines. Dallas: Trumpet Press, Inc., 1964. Illustrations. Cloth with leather label on spine, gilt title. Near mint.
         First edition. Pingenot: The authors trace the Norwood family from its origin in England after the Norman conquest. Jordan de Sheppey, who received bounty from William, Duke of Normandy, later changed his name to Jordan de Northwood, and still later to Norwood. In colonial times some Norwoods migrated to America and two are known to have fought in the American Revolution. The Norwood line traced by this work begins with John Norwood of Edgefield County, South Carolina, and continues through the south, the Civil War, and to Texas.

PALMER, Frederick. John J. Pershing, General of the Armies: A Biography. Harrisburg: Military Service Publishing, [1948]. Frontispiece portrait, photographic plates. Very fine bright copy in a repaired but very good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Perhaps the first biography of Pershing to appear after his death in 1948. Col. Palmer, the author, was a long-time intimate of Pershing and, save for the final chapters written after the general’s death, the manuscript had been completed before the U.S. entry into World War II.

POHANKA, Brian C. and John M. Carroll. Nelson A. Miles. A Documentary Biography of His Military Career 1861-1903. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company, 1985. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Leatherette cloth, gilt title on spine. Mint.
         First edition, limited edition (50 specially bound copies). Foreword by Robert M. Utley.

RISTER, Carl Coke. Border Command: General Phil Sheridan in the West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1944. Illustrations, map. Original cloth. Very good to fine in laminated pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A major historian’s account of Sheridan’s career 1868-1876, when, as commander in the West, he was to solve the "Indian Problem." Covers his campaigns against the Kiowa, Comanche, Apache, Cheyenne and Sioux who refused the "white man’s road" and also the treaty agreements for permanent reservations.

RISTER, Carl Coke. Robert E. Lee in Texas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1946. Illustrations, plates. Cloth. Exceptionally fine, bright copy.
         First edition, limited edition ("Texas edition," 750 specially bound copies signed by the author). Pingenot: The little-known phase of the great general’s career–his service in Texas during the four turbulent years just preceding the Civil War. Of this work, Douglas Southall Freeman said: "It is admirably done in every way." Very scarce.

ROLAND, Charles P. Albert Sidney Johnston: Soldier of Three Republics. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1964]. Illustrations, maps. Near mint in a fine d.j.
         First edition. Nevins, Civil War Books II:86: "Complete, well-rounded and scholarly, the author made excellent use of Johnston’s papers." Dornbusch IV:1457. Pingenot: Already quite scarce, this important book was selected as one of the "Civil War Times Illustrated 100 Best Books on the Civil War." Of equal importance to Texas and Confederate history, Johnston was commanding general of the Army of the Republic and later Secretary of War of the Republic. He fought the Cherokees and Comanches, was a hero at Monterrey, a Texas planter, a general of U.S. Cavalry, and a full general in the Confederate Army. He commanded the forces of the western Confederacy and was killed at Shiloh while in command against Grant. Jefferson Davis called Johnston the "great pillar of the Confederacy, her outstanding general."

SCHULTZ, Duane. Hero of Bataan: The Story of General Jonathan M. Wainwright. New York: St. Martin’s Press, [1981]. 45 photographic illustrations. Original cloth and boards in decorated d.j. Fine. Presentation inscribed to Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Waller and signed by the author.
         First edition. Pingenot: Biography of the man MacArthur left behind when he was ordered to leave the hopelessly surrounded American garrison at Corregidor. Wainwright was also the highest-ranking American captive in World War II. With dwindling supplies, little food, no air force or navy, and outmoded weapons from World War I, Wainwright fought a modern, well-equipped army to a standstill for almost five months. This is a superb history of the struggle for Bataan and Corregidor as well as documenting Wainwright’s career from his graduation from West Point in 1906 to his death in 1953.

SHERIDAN, P. H. Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan. General United States Army. New York: Charles L. Webster & Company, 1888. Illustrations, maps, including 1 folding map. 2 vols., original gilt pictorial cloth, gilt-decorated spines. Spines slightly age darkened, else a fine clean set.
         First edition.

SMYTHE, Donald. Guerrilla Warrior: The Early Life of John J. Pershing. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, [1973]. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Mint in d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Traces Pershing’s early life from farm boy to West Point cadet, his early career as a lieutenant of cavalry, an instructor at the U.S. Military Academy, the Philippine campaign, and his command of the Punitive Expedition in pursuit of Pancho Villa.

SOBIESKI, John. The Life-Story and Personal Reminiscences of Col. John Sobieski,... Shelbyville, Ill.: J. L. Douthit & Son, 1900. Frontispiece portrait, plate. Original pictorial cloth. Moderate wear and rubbing to extremities.
         First edition. Flake 8273. Pingenot: The author emigrated from Poland as a young man, took part in the Utah expedition, and then went to New Mexico until 1860. He served throughout the Civil War, then in the forces of Juarez in Mexico, where, briefly, he was Maximilian’s jailor. The rest of his life was spent in Missouri. Very scarce in the first edition.

SULLY, Langdon. No Tears for the General: The Life of Alred Sully, 1821-1979. Palo Alto: American West Publishing, [1974]. Illustrations, plates, map. Cloth. Fine in lightly worn d.j.
         First edition. Foreword by Ray Allen Billington. Pingenot: Sully’s letters and reminiscences offer a vivid word picture of California during its gold rush period, of the Minnesota frontier in the 1850s, of the peninsula campaign of the Civil War, and of the Sioux uprising of the 1860s.

WELCH, Emily Sedgwick. A Biographical Sketch: John Sedgwick, Major-General. N.p.: Privately printed at the De Vinne Press, 1899. Cloth, decorative gilt with emblem, gilt spine. Fine.
         First edition, limited edition (#250 of 500 copies).

WILSON, James Harrison. Life and Services of William Farrar Smith, Major General, United States Volunteers in the Civil War. Wilmington: John M. Rogers Press, 1904. Frontispiece portrait. Original cloth with gilt title on front cover and spine.
         First edition. Pingenot: A volume in the Heroes of the Great Conflict series. Traces the life and career of Smith from his graduation from West Point in 1845 as a Brevet Second Lieutenant of Topographical Engineers through his service on the Texas border in 1849-50 as well as his rise to Major General of Volunteers during the Civil War. Apparently bibliographically unknown.

WOODCOCK, A. W. W. Golden Days. [Salisbury: Salisbury Advertiser], 1951. Original cloth, gilt title on cover and spine. Tape marks and age darkening to spine. Rubber stamp "Property of National Press Club" on front pastedown and t. of c.
         First edition. Pingenot: The author, born in 1884, served on the Texas border in 1916 at Fort Duncan as a captain of Company "I" First Maryland Infantry. Describes life on the border during the days of the Mexican Revolution and the frontier town of Eagle Pass. Following his return home he continues with his adventures in France during World War I. Published in a small edition, this is a very uncommon military memoir.

WOODWARD, Ashbel. Life of General Nathaniel Lyon. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Company, 1862. Frontispiece, map. Modern black cloth.

WOOSTER, Robert. Nelson A. Miles and the Twilight of the Frontier Army. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1993. Photographs and illustrations. Cloth. Very fine in pictorial d.j.
         First edition.
(20 vols.)
($400-800)

393. [MILITARY HISTORY, Lot 1]. Lot of 16 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including one manual entirely in Japanese, and the following:

COFFMAN, Edward M. The Old Army: A Portrait of the American Army in Peacetime, 1784-1898. New York: Oxford University Press, 1886. Photographic illustrations. Cloth. Mint copy including d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Fine social history of the officers and men during the long periods of peace.

DUPUY, R. Ernest. The Compact History of the United States Army. New York: Hawthorn Books, 1956. Text drawings. Original cloth. Good to very good in chipped d.j.
         First edition. Tutorow 3292. Pingenot: The story of the U.S. Army itself, from the Colonials who taught the British how to fight Indians; the tattered units of the Revolution who became an Army; the soldiers, Blue and Gray, of the war that divided the nation; on the Western frontier, in Cuba and the Philippines, in Mexico, in Europe in two wars, in the Pacific islands, in Korea, etc.

ESSIN, Emmett M. Shavetails & Bell Sharps: The History of the U.S. Army Mule. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997. Illustrated. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The dramatic story of the humble army mule in a clearly written study that is essential to understanding the logistics of the U.S. Army in its wars against America’s native tribes, as well as those larger conflicts which preceded the Army’s mechanization.

GANOE, William A. The History of the United States Army. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1942. Frontispiece, plates, text illustrations. Original blind-stamp cloth with gilt title on cover and spine. Edge wear and slight rubbing to lower spine.
         Revised edition. Tutorow 3294. Pingenot: First published in 1924, the revised edition brings the reader up to the beginning of World War II. Col. Ganoe’s comprehensive history covers the army’s history from its drab beginnings in 1775-76, its discipline and success in the American Revolution, the dark years that followed through the War of 1812, its trail-blazing years, the Mexican War, its enormous expansion in the Civil War and the "Dark Ages" that immediately followed, its renaissance through the Spanish American War and finally the World Wars I and II.

HILL, Jim Dan. The Minute Man in Peace and War: A History of the National Guard. Harrisburg: Stackpole, 1964. Original pictorial cloth. Very good in price-clipped d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: The first detailed work of its kind tracing the history from the first Colonial Militia in the U.S. to the present day. It is a powerful narrative that carries the reader from Concord, 1775, to Berlin, 1961, telling the story of National Guardsmen in combat in every war the Nation has fought. Long out-of-print.

LLULL, Francisco Ferrer and Joseph Hefter. Bibliografía Iconográphica del Traje Militar de España: Pictorial Bibliography of Spanish Military Dress. Mexico: J. Hefter, 1963. Illustrations, one color. Wrappers. Scarce.

LOWE, Percival G. Five Years a Dragoon (’49 to ’54) and Other Adventures on the Great Plains. Kansas City: 1906. Illustrations. Original tan decorated cloth. Very fine.
         First edition in a variant and unrecorded binding. Graff 2550. Howes L526. Rader 2255. Rittenhouse 375. Pingenot: One of the best personal accounts of cavalry service and wagon freighting on the plains, from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Laramie, Salt Lake City, Denver, and Santa Fe. After his army service, Lowe continued to travel the Santa Fe Trail as a freight contractor until 1870.

MAHON, John K. and Romana Danysh. Infantry. Part I: Regular Army. Washington: United States Army, 1972. Illustrations including color. Tall 8vo, original gilt pictorial cloth with gilt title on spine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Army Lineage Series. Contains a brief organizational history of the regular infantry, preceding the lineages, from the American Revolution to Vietnam. Lineage, campaign credits, and unit citations for all regular Army infantry units, with color plates of insignia, descriptions of heraldic shields and mottos. The Army Lineage Series is designed to foster the esprit de corps of United State Army units.

ROOT, E. A. Root’s Military Topography and Sketching. Prepared for Use in the United States Infantry and Cavalry School. Kansas City: Hudson-Kimberly Publishing, 1901. Ads, illustrations, charts. Original cloth, gilt. Label on the front pastedown indicates this copy is from the library of Fort Douglas, Utah. Wear and rubbing, front endpaper and preliminary leaves missing with no loss of text. Fair to good.
         Fifth edition. Pingenot: Battle map of Gettysburg and 2 enclosures in rear pocket. A comprehensive text on mapping revised and enlarged by the Department of Engineering, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

STRAIT, Newton A. Alphabetical List of Battles 1754-1900: War of the Rebellion, Spanish-American War, Philippine Insurrection.... Washington, 1900. Tables. Original pictorial ecru cloth, worn and soiled. Contents very good
         First edition. Tutorow 130. Pingenot: Compiled from official records, this listing includes a summary of events of the War with Mexico, 1846-1848; War of the Rebellion, 1860-1865; the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection, 1898-1900, Troubles in China, 1900, along with other valuable information in regard to the various wars.

STUBBS, Mary Lee and Stanley R. Connor. Armor-Cavalry. Part I: Regular Army and Army Reserve; Part II: Army National Guard. Washington: United States Army, 1969-72. Illustrations including color. 2 vols., tall 8vo, original cloth, gilt title on spine.
         First edition. Pingenot: Army Lineage Series. Published by the U.S. Army’s Office of the Chief of Military History, this useful work traces the evolution of cavalry into today’s armor branch, and, in the process, presents a broad history of the growth of the entire U.S. Army. Intended for the use at all levels of command, in service schools, and in various training programs.

UPTON, Emory. The Military Policy of the United States. Washington: GPO, 1904. Folding map. Original embossed cloth, gilt title. Minor spinal rubbing.
         First edition. Tutorow 3183. Pingenot: Discusses the military policy of the U.S. from the revolutionary war, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. Other subjects covered are the militia and volunteers, military policy of the Confederate states, etc.

WEIGLEY, Russell F. History of the United States Army. New York: Macmillan Company, [1967]. Photographic plates. Cloth. Near mint throughout, including d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: A comprehensive history in which the author points out that it is actually a history of two armies: a Regular Army of professional soldiers, and a citizen army of various components, such as the militia, the National Guard, the Organized Reserves, and selectees.

WHITCOMB, Edgar D. Escape from Corregidor. Chicago: Henry Regnery Company, 1958. Original cloth. Signed.
         Third printing.

WILHELM, Thomas. Military Dictionary and Gazetteer, Comprising Ancient and Military Technical Terms...Accounts of North American Indians.... Philadelphia: L. R. Hamersly, 1881. 32 plates. Original cloth with gilt title on spine. Relatively fine copy.
         Revised edition. Pingenot: The preferred revised addition with accounts of ancient warlike tribes, notices of battles from the earliest period to 1881, with a concise explanation of terms used in heraldry and the offices thereof. Compiled from the best authorities of all nations. The work also gives valuable geographical information along with an appendix containing the articles of war.

WYLLIE, Robert E. Orders, Decorations and Insignia: Military and Civil With the History and Romance of their Origin and a Full Description of Each. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1921. Frontispiece, illustrations, color and black and white. Original cloth with light wear, gilt lettering on cover and spine very good.
         First edition.
(17 vols.)
($400-800)

394. [MILITARY HISTORY, Lot 2]. Lot of 35 titles (mostly 12mo and 16mo, original bindings, very fine to good), including the following:

Abstract of Infantry Tactics; Including Exercises and Manœuvers of Light-Infantry and Riflemen.... Boston: Hilliard, Gray and Company, 1830. Plans and illustrations. 12mo, original full calf. Worn, preliminary leaves stained and age darkened, with moderate foxing.
         Pingenot: An early manual of infantry tactics for the Militia of the United States and published by the War Department by the authority of an act of Congress of March 2, 1829. The text for the manual had been submitted on December 5, 1826, by an 8-man board of officers, including Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott and Lt. Col. Zachary Taylor. Contains all elements of infantry tactics including bugle calls. Rare.

Abstract of Infantry Tactics; Including Exercises and Manœuvers of Light-Infantry and Riflemen.... Philadelphia: Moss & Brother, 1858. Plans and illustrations. 12mo, original blind-stamped cloth, gilt title on spine. Some wear and spinal rubbing. Internally fine.
         Pingenot: Published "for the Militia of the United States." A later printing of the manual of infantry tactics that had been approved by the War Department since 1829. Contains all elements of infantry tactics including bugle calls.

ARMY AND NAVY CLUB. Articles of Association and By-Laws the Army and Navy Club. Manila, 1903. Original green boards.

ARMY AND NAVY CLUB. Certificate of Incorporation, By-Laws and House Rules, Officers, Directors, and Members. Washington, 1904. Frontispiece. 12mo, original blue cloth, gilt stamp on front.

ARMY AND NAVY CLUB. Certificate of Incorporation, By-Laws and House Rules, Officers, Directors, and Members. Washington, 1906. Frontispiece. 12mo, original blue cloth, gilt stamp on front.

BARNES, John B. Military Sketching and Map Reading. New York: D. Van Nostrand Company, 1917. Illustrations. D.j.

Basic Field Manual Infantry Drill Regulations, prepared under Direction of the Chief of Infantry. Washington: GPO, 1941. Original paper wrappers.

Cavalry Drill Regulations United States Army 1916. New York: Military Publishing Company. 12mo.

DALY, H[enry] W. Manual of Instruction in Pack Transportation by H. W. Daly, Packmaster, U.S. Army. West Point: Press of the U.S.M.A., 1901. viii [2] 10-79 pp., frontispiece, illustrations. Leather with gilt title. Full page presentation inscription signed by the author to Col. H. L. Scott, A.G. Dept. of Cuba, dated Havana, May 15, 1901. Chipped and edge worn. Good.
         First edition. See Thrapp, Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography I:372). Pingenot: Daly’s famous manual on pack transportation that went through various revisions between 1901 and 1917. The Irish-born Daly (1850-1931) came first to Canada and after 1865 roved the West for a time, claiming that he had met Kit Carson at Taos, Jim Bridger, William F. Cody, and others. By 1873 he was in Mexico reporting he had observed pack trains in operation and learning the business. By the 1880’s he was a civilian packer for the army and commanded two pack trains on Captain Emmet Crawford’s ill-fated expedition into the Sierra Madre. Daly remained with the Army, becoming the first chief packer, or packmaster, for the Quartermaster Department. He was a friend of Al Sieber, Tom Horn, Leonard Wood, as well as various Apache scouts. He packed for the Army during the Wounded Knee operation. This first manual was published when he was instructor of the art at West Point. During World War I, Daly was appointed a captain in the Quartermaster Corps., which had charge of Army pack companies. He was promoted to major the next year and was honorably discharged in September, 1920.

Drill Regulations and Service Manual for Sanitary Troops United States Army, 1914. Original binding, worn.

Field Service Regulations United States Army, 1905. Washington. Original boards and marbled edges.

Firing Regulations for Small Arms for the United States Army. Washington: GPO, 1898. Original leather, very worn, back off. Folding charts.

HAMILTON, William R. Practical Instructions for the National Guard of the United States. Part II.... New York: D Appleton, 1890. Original paper wrappers.

HUGHES, James B. Jr. Mexican Military Arms: The Cartridge Period 1866-1967. Houston: Deep River Armory, 1968. Wrappers. Printed on gloss stock.

Infantry Drill Regulations, United States Army. Washington: GPO, 1891. Original leather, worn. Gilt lettering on front.

Infantry Drill Regulations United States Army. 1904. Original blue leather bound with wrap-around closure flap. Flap very worn and taped.

Infantry Drill Regulations United States Army. Revised 1904. Washington: GPO, 1904. Original boards with gilt lettering on front.

Infantry Drill Regulations United States Army. 1911. Corrected to December 31, 1917. New York: Military Publishing Company, n.d. Original boards.

KOEHLER, H. J. Manual of Gymnastic Exercises Prepared for Use in Service Gymnasiums by First Lieutenant H. J. Koehler, U.S.A. New York: West Point, 1904. Original paper wrappers.

Light Artillery Drill Regulations, United States Army. Washington: GPO, 1891. Original (worn) red leather with metal hinged closure.

Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Cavalry of the Army of the United States, 1917. Illustrations, some photographic. Original boards.

Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry of the Army of the United States, 1917. New York: Military Publishing Company Green boards.

MASSEE, E. K. Practical Instruction in Security and Information of Non-Commissioned Officer of Infantry. Kansas City: Franklin Hudson, 1909.

McCOLLUM, L. C. History and Rhymes of the Lost Battalion: Sketches by Franklin Sly. N.p., 1925. Illustrations, folding photographic illustrations. Original paper wrappers.

REED, Hugh T. Standard Infantry Tactics. Chicago: Published by the Author, 1890. Illustrated. Original paper wrappers.
         Eighth edition.

REGAN, James. Manual of Guard Duty and Kindred Subjects for the Regular Army, Volunteers, and Militia of the United States. New York: Harper Brothers, 1883. Original leather with metal hinged closure.

Regulations for the Army of the United States 1895. Washington: GPO, 1895. Original dark blue cloth, gilt title. Some wear and mending else very good. Signature on the front free endpaper: "Capt. H. L. Ripley/ 3" NJ Cavalry."
First edition.

Services for the Use of the Grand Army of the Republic. Headquarters Grand Army of the Republic, January 1, 1893. Milwaukee: Riverside Printing Company, 1892. 12mo, original cloth.

The Soldier’s Hymn Book. Chicago: Young Men’s Christian Association. Pocket size. Original pictorial wrappers. Warped and worn.

SPURGIN, William F. Catechismal Edition Infantry Drill Regulations. Kansas City: Franklin, 1908. Original blue boards, worn and stained. Warped.
Third Edition. Revised by Captain D. K. Major, Jr.

The Super Service Data Book. War Edition. Akron: Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company [1943]. 12mo, wrappers.

U.S. ARMY. JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL. A Manual for Courts-Martial. U.S. Army. Washington: GPO, 1936. Boards.

U.S. Infantry Tactics, for the Instruction, Exercise, and Maneuvers of the United States Infantry, Including Infantry of the Line, Light Infantry, and Riflemen. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1861. Original green boards. Folding illustrative diagrams.

United States Military Reservations National Cemeteries and Military Parks. 1916. Worn boards.
         Revised edition.

UPTON, Emory. A New System of Infantry Tactics Double and Single Rank. Adapted to American Topography and Improved Fire-Arms. New York: D Appleton, 1869. Original green boards, gilt title on spine.
(35 vols.)
($800-1,600)

395. [MILITARY HISTORY: CAVALRY]. Lot of 11 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

The Army Horse in Accident and Disease: A Manual for the Use of...Farriers and Horseshoers.... Washington: GPO, 1909. Frontispiece, plates. Original ecru canvas. Fine.
         Revised edition. Pingenot: According to Major General Franklin Bell, Chief of Staff, this manual was prepared for the use of students of the training school for farriers and horseshoers, as well as for the army at large and the organized militia.

BONIFACE, Captain John J. The Cavalry Horse and His Pack: Embracing...Details of Cavalry Service. For the Use of Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers.... Kansas City: Franklin Hudson Publishing Co, 1903. Frontispiece, illustrations. Original pictorial cloth, gilt title. Binding considerably worn, internally very good. "Troop A 14 Cavalry /1912" neatly written in black on front cover.
         First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington) 414. Howes B599. Pingenot: A very scarce cavalry manual. This copy was the property of "Troop A 14th Cavalry 1912" as written on the front cover and front paste-down.

CARTER, William H. Horses, Saddles and Bridles. Leavenworth: Ketcheson & Reeves, 1895. Photographs and drawings. Original pictorial cloth, gilt title on cover and spine. Gilt spine lettering worn. Some external wear and rubbing showing solid use, yet still a good copy. Non-authorial inscription on the front free endpaper: "C. Siminger/ 2" Lt. 1" Cav./ March 20, 1902."
         First edition. Pingenot: W. H. Carter, then a captain with the 6th Cavalry, wrote widely on army life on the Western frontier. This work was written as a treatise on the care and treatment of cavalry mounts, and covers all aspects from the various items of equipment to losses of horses in various campaigns, cavalry raids, grooming, diseases, etc.

ESSIN, Emmett M. Shavetails & Bell Sharps: The History of the U.S. Army Mule. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997. Illustrated. Cloth. Mint in pictorial d.j.
First edition. Pingenot: The dramatic story of the humble army mule in a clearly written study that is essential to understanding the logistics of the U.S. Army in its wars against America’s native tribes, as well as those larger conflicts which preceded the Army’s mechanization.

HERR, John K. and Edward S. Wallace. The Story of the U.S. Cavalry. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [1953]. Small 4to, original cloth in d.j.
First edition. Foreword by General Jonathan M. Wainright.

Mechanized Cavalry. Ft. Riley: Academic Division, The Cavalry School, 1932-1933. Wrappers.

MERRILL, James M. Spurs to Glory: The Story of the United States Cavalry. New York: Rand McNally & Company, [1966]. Frontispiece, illustrations. Original pictorial cloth. Small piece missing from front upper front d.j. corner, else fine.
First edition.

MULFORD, Ami Frank. Fighting Indians in the 7th United States Cavalry.... Corning: Paul Lindsley Mulford, [1925]. Original printed wrappers with string tie. Very good.
         Second edition, revised. Howes M880. Graff 2928. Pingenot: Mulford, 22 years old, joins the 7th Cavalry at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The narrative focus is on the Indian campaign of 1877 against Chief Joseph and the Nez Percés.

PARKER, James. The Mounted Rifleman: A Method of Garrison Training and Field Instruction of Cavalry. Menasha: Collegiate Press, [1916]. Frontispiece illustrations, tables. Original printed wrappers with some soiling and chipping. Title crudely lettered on spine, some tape repairs. Internally fine. Penciled on the front cover is "Col W S Scott/ 16th Cavalry/ Aug 6th, 1916." Small typed note pasted inside front wrap reads "Compliments of Author."
         First edition. Pingenot: Topics include field instruction, combat exercises, training of recruits for war, conservation of mobility in campaign, and lessons from the "Great War," meaning World War I from 1914 to 1916. Parker maintained that British and French use of cavalry would have been more successful were it not for their "slavish adherence by many officers to the sword."

SAWICKI, James A. Cavalry Regiments of the U.S. Army. Dumfries: Wyvern Publications, [1985]. Illustrations. Small 4to, Cloth with gilt title on spine. Near fine in a very good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: This volume documents the history, heraldry, and honors of the 133 regiments of horse, mechanized, air, airmobile, and armored cavalry that have been a part of U.S. military forces since World War I.

The Story of the U.S. Cavalry. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [1953]. Illustrated. Small 4to, original cloth in d.j.
         First edition. Foreword by General Jonathan M. Wainright.

VEATCH, Byron. The Two Samurai. Chicago: F. G. Browne & Company, 1913. Color frontispiece. Very fine in original pictorial boards.
         First edition. Pingenot: Heroic tale by a former captain of Company C, Fourth Cavalry at Fort Huachuca, about two Samurai warriors. One was a first sergeant in his company and the other a Japanese civilian who wanted to become an American soldier.

WHEELER, Homer W. Buffalo Days: Forty Years in the Old West: The Personal Narrative of a Cattleman, Indian Fighter and Army Officer. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1925. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations. Original cloth. Very fine in lightly chipped d.j. Presentation copy from Jeff Dykes to Charles Downing, with Dykes note laid in: "...with the kindest personal wishes of the retiring bookseller. This is the finest copy I’ve ever seen of this book."
(13 vols.)
($300-700)

396. [MILITARY HISTORY: MEDICAL]. Lot of 9 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

ASHBURN, Percy M. A History of the Medical Department of the United States Army. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1929. Illustrations. Former owner’s bookplate. Original cloth. Fine with a fine d.j.
         First edition. Venzon 677: "Contends statutes and appropriations caused the lack of supplies and personnel within the Department. Problems caused by Quartermaster’s mishandling of medical supplies. Believes typhoid epidemic was rooted in ignorance of etiology. Covers treatment of wounded, praises Red Cross volunteers and applauds findings of Dodge Commission."

BYRNE, Bernard J. A Frontier Army Surgeon: Life in Colorado in the Eighties. New York: Exposition Press, [1962]. Illustrations with drawings. Cloth. Fine copy in a near fine d.j.
         Revised edition. Howes B-1078. Not in Graff. Pingenot: Frontier experiences of a pioneer surgeon in Colorado and New Mexico in the 1880’s as told to his wife. He performed an autopsy on "the last white man to be shot with an arrow" and sent the rib with the arrowhead embedded in it to the Army Medical Museum in Washington. Includes a brief section on General Custer. The first edition, published in an edition of only 130 copies, is virtually unprocurable.

CORBUSIER, William T. Verde to San Carlos: Recollections of a Famous Army Surgeon and His Observant Family on the Southwestern Frontier 1869-1886. Tucson: Dale Stuart King, [1969]. Frontispiece portrait, illustrations, colophon page, folding map. Original blue suede cloth over gold boards (to simulate dress uniform of the nineteenth-century army), gilt title on spine and cover. Mint in publisher’s slipcase. Author’s copy, presented by the publisher.
         First edition, limited edition (#2 of 250 numbered copies signed by the author). See Thrapp, Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography I:322-23. Pingenot: A fine military biography by the youngest son (1882-1973) of Col. W. H. Corbusier, a frontier army doctor. It is based on his father’s journal and it covers the period from 1869 to 1888. Corbusier served extensively in the West; was post surgeon at Camp Verde, Arizona, 1873-75, where he accompanied a reconnaissance and scout against hostile Apaches; later served at Pine Ridge Reservation, S.D., 1878-80; then to Fort Washakie, Wyoming, for work among the Shoshone and Banncock Indians. Duty in the east was followed by service at Forts Bowie and Grant, Arizona; Fort Hays, Kansas, and Fort Lewis, Colorado.

KOBER, George M. Reminiscences of George Martin Kober, M.D., LL.D. Washington: Georgetown University, 1930. Illustrations. Original red cloth with title in gilt on spine and front cover. Fine copy.
         First edition. Volume one was the only issue published. Howes K231: "Includes his western experiences as an army surgeon." Not in Graff, Smith, or Soliday. Pingenot: His biography contains a section on the Modoc and Bannock Indian wars and also includes the pursuit and capture of Chief Joseph and the Nez Percés. The biographical sketches of medical officers on the frontier are illuminating as are his descriptions of army posts in the West. Numerous Texas forts are described. Also included is a report of a cholera epidemic among the troops en route from New York to San Francisco. A very valuable work.

LAUFE, Abe (editor). An Army Doctor’s Wife on the Frontier: Letters from Alaska and the Far West. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1962. Frontispiece, portraits. Tall 8vo, original cloth in a slightly chipped but very good d.j.
         First edition. Pingenot: Letters of Emily FitzGerald, an assistant surgeon at the U.S. Military Academy, who was ordered to Sitka, Alaska. She was one of the first white women to live in Alaska less than a decade after its purchase by the U.S. from Russia. Later, the FitzGeralds were transferred to Fort Lapwai in present-day Idaho, where they faced an Indian uprising. Her letters provide a valuable contribution giving firsthand information about methods of travel, the hardships on the northern frontier, and a woman’s viewpoint of existence in a western fort.

McKAY, R[obert] H. Little Pills, an Army Story: Being Some Experiences of a United States Army Medical Officer on the Frontier...Half a Century Ago. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh Headlight, 1918. 3 plates. Very fine in the original khaki cloth, title in black on cover.
         First edition. Graff 2618: "Detailed pictures of life at Army posts in New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas, etc., after the Civil War." Howes M122. Rader 2305. Rittenhouse 389: "Personal memoirs of an Army doctor in Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Colorado, 1869-76. He describes a stage trip from the end of the railroad at Sheridan, Kans., 400 miles to Santa Fe....Good description of fellow officers as types." Pingenot: McKay entered service in 1869 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where General Sheridan was commanding the Department of the Missouri. His narrative covers a period of six years on the plains among soldiers, pioneers, and Indians.

PARKER, William Thornton. Annals of Old Fort Cummings, New Mexico 1867-8. Fort Davis: Frontier Book Company, 1968. Illustrations, facsimile. Cloth. Issued without d.j. Fine.
Reprint of Howes P93.

TOUSEY, Thomas G. Military History of Carlisle and Carlisle Barracks. Richmond: The Dietz Press, 1939. xvi, 447 pp., frontispiece, illustrations, charts. Tall 8vo, original maize linen cloth. Autographed by Colonel Tousey on the front free endpaper.
         First edition.

UNITED STATES. WAR DEPARTMENT. (Surgeon General’s Office). A Report on the Hygiene of the United States Army, with Descriptions of Military Posts. Circular No. 8. Washington: Surgeon-General’s Office, 1875. [60], 567 pp., folding map, 12 plans. 4to, Rebound in blue library buckram, very good.
         Graff 4443. Howes B450.
(9 vols.)
($400-700)

397. [MILITARY HISTORY: REGIMENTAL HISTORIES]. Lot of 7 titles (mostly 8vo, original bindings, very fine to good), including:

[MEWETT, Alfred]. A Brief History of Troop A, 107th Regiment of Cavalry, Ohio National Guard, The Black Horse Troop.... Cleveland: N.p., 1923. Frontispiece portrait, photographs, watermarked paper, text drawings. Slight edge wear, else fine. Original embossed fabricoid binding with deckle edge.
         First edition, limited edition (#187 of 500 copies). Pingenot: Written by Alfred Mewett, Troop Historian, and published for the active members and the veterans’ association. Drawn from minutes of Troop meetings, fifty years of newspaper files and Troop correspondence, plus memories of veterans, this work traces the history of the Black Horse Troop from its founding in 1877 to its service in Texas on the Mexican border in 1916.

EAGEN, William. The Man on the Red Horse. Portland: Metropolitan Printing Company, [1975]. Photographic illustrations, maps, large foldout photo at rear, index. Original gilt-decorated red leatherette. Fine.
         First edition. Foreword commentary by General William Hood Simpson on the 113th Cavalry Group. Pingenot: Fine regimental history of the 113th Cavalry, the "Red Horse Cavalry," which originated as an Iowa National Guard unit. Although the early history is told, the principal focus of this work is the participation of the 113th as part of the 9th Army in the E.T.O. during World War II.

HOWARD, James, L. [editor]. The Origin and Fortunes of Troop B 1788...Cavalry Connecticut National Guard 1917. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co, 1921. Frontispiece, illustrations, maps. Original gilt decorated cloth. Very fine, bright copy in pictorial d.j.
         First edition.

MULLER, William G. The Twenty Fourth Infantry Past and Present. Fort Collins: Old Army Press, [1972]. Illustrations. Cloth, gilt. Near mint.
         Pingenot: After the Civil War many regiments were consolidated and reorganized. The Twenty-fourth Infantry was formed in the so-called "new army" with General Ranald S. Mackenzie its first regimental commander. The area of operations would be from Forts Davis, Stockton, Concho, and McKavitt, all in Texas along the southern edge of the Great Staked Plains. Muller provides a brief history of the regiment from its beginnings to about 1922. The unit moved from Texas to Indian Territory in late 1880.

SMITH, Judson M. The Story of a Regiment: The Twenty-First United States Infantry. Honolulu: Advertiser Publishing Company, 1940. Illustrations, maps. 4to. Corners bumped and some edge wear, else fine.
         First edition. Dornbusch 1904. Pingenot: Covers the history of the regiment from its founding in 1861, through the Civil War, the Indian campaigns in West and Southwest, the Spanish-American War in the Philippines, to pre-Pearl Harbor duty on Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands.

Squadron A, A History of Its First Fifty Years 1889-1939. New York: Association of Ex-Members of Squadron A, 1939. Photographic plates, illustrations. Cloth. D.j.
         Mexican border service 1916 at McAllen.

U.S. ARMY. 12TH INFANTRY REGIMENT. Twelfth U.S. Infantry 1798-1919: Its Story–By its Men. New York: Knickerbocker Press, [1919]. Frontispiece portrait, photographic illustrations. Original dark blue cloth with gilt title on cover and spine.
         First edition. Controvich #3819. Pingenot: Includes a brief history of the twelfth Infantry beginning with its