Dorothy Sloan -- Books

Ranching Catalogue Part 1 (Authors A-C)

Items 1302-1340

The items in this catalogue have been sold. This catalogue was issued in print form in 2002, and is presented in full on our website as a courtesy to users and for reference purposes.


1302. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). Raton Chronicle. [Denver: World Press, 1948]. [12] 146 pp., illustrations. 8vo, original grey pictorial wrappers. Soiled and shaken, pencilings on lower cover. Signed presentation copy from author to Mr. and Mrs. Boyle.
First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Guns 2117: “Has some material on early-day lawlessness in Raton, New Mexico, and some information on Bob Ford’s stay in Raton.” Howes C893. Rittenhouse 534. Includes material on ranching operations in the area. $250.00

1303. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). Raton Chronicle. [Denver: World Press, 1948]. Another copy. Very fine. $250.00

1304. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Red River, New Mexico Story. Pantex, Texas, 1962. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Mentions grazing in the area. $35.00

1305. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). Rodeo Town: Canadian, Texas. [Denver: World Press, 1953]. [12] 418 pp., text illustrations. 8vo, original blue cloth. Very fine in slightly worn d.j. Signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (#99 of 500 copies). CBC 2395. Herd 2150. History of Hemphill County in the Texas Panhandle, with brief biographies and anecdotes, some involving ranch women. $165.00

1306. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Rogers, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1967. 23 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). A familiar story was once again played out here when cattlemen and nesters skirmished. The townsite was once part of the vast DZ ranch. $35.00

1307. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The San Marcial, New Mexico Story. [White Deer, Texas, 1960]. 18 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition. Guns 2118: “Has some material on Dave Rudabaugh.” Rudabaugh joined forces with Billy the Kid, and their gang was suspected of most of the stock thefts in the Territory. This was the first of Father Stanley’s “story” series of booklets on New Mexico places. $35.00

1308. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Sapello, New Mexico Story. Nazareth, Texas, 1970. 23 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Mentions various sheepraising and ranching activities in the area. $35.00

1309. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Seven Rivers, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1963. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Guns 2119: “Has some information on the Beckwiths, Billy the Kid, Bob Olinger, Tom Pickett, Billy Wilson, Dave Rudabaugh, and others.” Sheepraising; Lincoln County War; early visit to the area by Charles Goodnight and Oliver Loving; Clay Allison; various episodes of rustling. $35.00

1310. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Shakespeare, New Mexico Story. Pantex, Texas, 1961. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition. Guns 2120. Includes information on William Tattenbaum (also known as Russian Bill), the wealthy, multilingual young lieutenant of Czar Alexander II’s Imperial White Hussars. Russian Bill deserted the Hussars in 1880, landing in Tombstone outfitted in the finest of western-style raiment and arms. Russian Bill supposedly took up with the then-powerful Clanton gang, whose main business was cattle rustling. When making a solo trip into New Mexico on an allegedly stolen mount, Russian Bill was promptly thrown in jail at Shakespeare and within forty-eight hours was swinging from a beam in the banquet hall of the Grant House. $35.00

1311. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). Socorro, the Oasis. [Denver: World Press, 1950]. [16] 221 pp., photographic illustrations. 8vo, original yellow cloth. Very fine in worn and soiled d.j. Bookplate.
First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Guns 2121: “Has some history of early-day Socorro, with a chapter on Joel Fowler and his lynching, as well as information on the vigilantes and on Elfego Baca.” Howes C894. The emphasis is on crime and lawlessness, but it occurs in the context of ranching and cowboys. Vigilantes lynched Fowler at Socorro because he knifed a man to death while on a drunken spree celebrating the sale of his ranch at White Oak for $53,500. Baca, considered the best peace officer Socorro ever had, won his fame in a lop-sided gun-battle siege unique in Western history. Over eighty cowboys, most of whom were Texans in the employ of John B. Slaughter, persistently attacked Baca in a tiny shack for over 36 hours. Baca escaped unscathed to stand trial for killing one cowboy; he was acquitted. $225.00

1312. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Sofia, New Mexico Story. Nazareth, Texas, 1970. 24 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Mentions the ranching operations that proliferated in the area before the large spreads were broken up to encourage homesteaders. $35.00

1313. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Springer, New Mexico Story. Pantex, Texas, 1962. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition. Guns 2122: “Has some mention of Black Jack Ketchum and his gang.” Information on various ranching enterprises of the region. $35.00

1314. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Sugarite, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1964. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Mentions Al Coe and his ranch; also some material on Clay Allison. $35.00

1315. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Texas Panhandle: From Cattlemen to Feed Lots. [Borger, Texas: Jim Hess Printers, 1971]. [10] xx [2] 656 pp. Thick 8vo, original blue cloth. Light browning to front pastedown, otherwise very fine in slightly worn d.j. Signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (500 copies). “This book is an over-all picture of the breaking up of large ranches like the XIT, Shoe Nail, Shoe Bar, Anchor T, and many others into smaller ranches, farms, cities and villages” (d.j. blurb). $275.00

1316. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Tolar, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1967. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Mentions that this region comprises some of the best grazing land in the state. $35.00

1317. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Tome, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1966. 22 p. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Includes information on colonial sheepraising. $35.00

1318. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Van Houten, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1964. 22 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Fine. Author’s signed presentation copy “For Mrs. O. Jordan, F. Stanley,” with her Western-theme bookplate.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). As was often the case with New Mexican mining towns, the area had various ranching enterprises before mining came to the fore. $40.00

1319. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Van Houten, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1964. Another copy. Very fine, signed by author. $35.00

1320. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Wagon Mound, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1968. 24 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Peripheral mention is made of various ranching activities, noting the lush grazing grounds of the area. $35.00

1321. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Watrous, New Mexico Story. Pantex, Texas, 1962. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (500 copies). Mentions various local sheep and cattle outfits. $35.00

1322. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The White Oaks, New Mexico Story. N.p., n.d. (ca. 1961). 23 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition. Guns 2123: “Has some information about Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett, Dave Rudabaugh, Joel Fowler, and others.” $35.00

1323. [CROCCHIOLA, Stanley Francis Louis] (F. Stanley, pseud.). The Yeso, New Mexico Story. Pep, Texas, 1969. 20 pp. 12mo, original yellow wrappers, stapled. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition, limited edition (400 copies). Mentions sheep and cattle enterprises. $30.00

1324. CROFFORD, Lena H. Pioneers on the Nueces. San Antonio: Naylor, [1963]. xiii [1] 185 pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original tan pictorial cloth. Fine in fine d.j.
First edition. CBC 3541, 3978. About half of the book is devoted to a history of Danish pioneer rancher John Edward Henrichson (1807-77) and his family, who settled at San Margarita on the coastal bend of South Texas in the early 1830s. The end of this section traces the ranching activities of the Henrichson sons at Cotulla, Valley Wells, Artesia Wells, Encinal, Medina River Valley, Asherton, and Dilley. The remainder of the book covers other ranching families of the region, along with local history and lore. $55.00

1325. CROSBY, Thelma & Eve Ball. Bob Crosby, World Champion Cowboy. Clarendon, Texas: Clarendon Press, 1966. xii, 244 [4] pp., frontispiece portrait of Crosby by Peter Hurd, text illustrations (photographic plus illustrations by Olive Vandruff Bugbee). 4to, original blue denim cloth with printed leather label on upper cover (denim and leather supplied by Levi Strauss & Company), decorated endpapers. Very fine.
Limited edition, “The Trophy Edition” (#104 of 175 copies, signed by authors). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Hurd 65). Crosby’s wife Thelma writes of her life with Wild Horse Bob, “King of Cowboys” and National Rodeo All-Around Cowboy in the 1940s and 1950s. Thelma’s candid, loving memoir provides an unusual, seldom-heard voice from the world of rodeo—the distaff side. “The first time I ever saw Bob Crosby he almost drowned me, and I am sure there were times he wished he had. On many occasions I was almost angry enough to have killed him, but they never lasted long. In spite of these things, we had a very happy marriage” (p. 3 in the chapter “Roped and Tied”). “Six days a week I rode and worked cattle [on their New Mexico ranch]. And how I loved it! I loved that wild, free life.... I regret that the era of the big ranch is almost a thing of the past” (p. 25). After Bob’s first big wins in the rodeo world, “I attempted to analyze the situation and its effect upon our future. There were things I knew I must accept: Roberta [their daughter] and I were no longer the first consideration in Bob’s life. That was hard. Having admitted to myself that these things were true, I must adjust to them. They meant that we were not to have a permanent home but become nomads” (p. 5). $220.00

1326. CROSS, Cora Melton. “Tells of Indians and Cattle Thieves” in 1973 facsimile issue of Frontier Times 3:2 (November 1925). Pp. 4-7. 8vo, original blue pictorial wrappers. A bit of mild staining to upper cover, otherwise fine.
Contains recollections of G. L. Epperson, who came overland to Llano County in 1856. At age nine when the Civil War broke out, he was the only “man” on the ranch “My main job was to herd the cattle in the woods, for Indians were thick, for safety, and it wasn’t too safe at that, for they stole my horses many a night.” Includes an account of crafty ranch wife, Mrs. John Friend, who knocked down a chief with a smoothing iron, pretended to be dead when shot with an arrow, and after the raiding party left staggered three miles to a neighbor’s ranch. $20.00

1327. CROSS, Jack L., Elizabeth H. Shaw & Kathleen Scheifele (eds.). Arizona: Its People and Resources. Tucson: University of Arizona Press,1960. [4] vi [1] 385 [1] pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic), maps. 4to, original tan cloth. Fine in near fine d.j. (slight wear and a few minor chips).
First edition. “A Seventy-fifth Anniversary Commemorative Volume.” Powell, Arizona Gathering II 58: “A compendium of information about the state. Useful and surprisingly readable.” The book has a section on the economy of Arizona, with much information on sheep and cattle. $35.00

1328. CROUCH, Carrie J. Young County: History and Biography. Dallas: Dealey and Lowe, 1937. [16] 339 [5] pp., frontispiece, photographic plates (including brands), endpaper maps. 8vo, original red textured cloth. Mild foxing to fore-edges and endpapers, otherwise fine in very good d.j. (lightly worn and foxed).
First edition. CBC 4880. Guns 518: “Scarce.” Herd 620. Howes C926. History of Young County in northern Central Texas from its organization in 1856 to the 1930s. The principal occupation of the county was stockraising, and in 1877 the Cattle Raisers Association of Texas organized in Graham. Includes a chapter on the cattle industry, an account of the blazing of the Goodnight-Loving Trail, biographies of pioneer ranchers, and details on Oliver Loving and his dreadful death. Good coverage of women and social history. $350.00

1329. CROUCH, Carrie J. Young County: History and Biography. Dallas: Dealey and Lowe, 1937. Another copy, variant endpapers (without endpaper map at back). Light foxing to fore-edges and endpapers, otherwise fine. Dust jacket not present. $250.00

1330. CROWELL, Pers. Cavalcade of American Horses. New York, London & Toronto: McGraw-Hill Book Company, [1951]. vi [2] 311 pp., text illustrations (photographs and vignettes by author). 4to, original teal cloth over pale green boards. Light shelf wear, minor stain on fore-edges, otherwise a fine copy in lightly worn d.j. with tape reinforcement at foot of spine.
First edition. The chapter on “The Western Horse” traces the introduction of horses into present-day United States by Spanish conquistadors. Also includes Native American horsemanship (“The Plains Indians were credited by American generals with being the world’s best cavalry soldiers”); horses of the California missions; Young and Hally’s cattle drive from California to the Oregon country, which broke the Hudson’s Bay Company monopoly on cattle herds and horses and introduced the cattle that would form the nucleus for a new industry in the Northwest; Spanish mustangs; rodeo; etc. $40.00

1331. CROY, Homer. Last of the Great Outlaws: The Story of Cole Younger. New York: Duell, Sloan, and Pearce, [1956]. x, 242 pp., plates. 8vo, original grey cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j. illustrated by Jim McCrea.
First edition. Guns 524. Includes material on the Cole Younger-Frank James Wild West Show, a short-lived venture. The chapter on alleged rustler and outlaw Belle Starr tells of her riding sidesaddle down the streets of Dallas dressed in an extreme style with two pistols buckled around her waist, her “big romance” with Cole, and her strange death. $70.00

1332. CRUM, Josie Moore. Ouray County, Colorado: The Agency and the Indians; Ouray and Mining; Dallas; Ridgway; We, the Kids. [Durango: San Juan History, Inc., 1962]. [2] 132 [4] pp., text illustrations (mostly photographs), maps. Large 8vo, original tan pictorial wrappers. One small stain at upper left corner of wrappers, ownership signature, otherwise fine.
First edition. Wynar 1288. Although the focus of this local history is mining and railroads, there is some mention of ranching enterprises in the area: grueling 1875 drive of several thousand head of cattle to the Ute Los Pinos Agency on the Uncompahgre (“beef was the mainstay of the Indian diet”); pervasiveness of ranching in Ridgeway and their famous Sunday rodeos (wonderful descriptions of the disreputable cowboy heroes); etc. In her chapter “We, the Kids,” the author tells how at the beginning of the century girls began riding astride (“no girl would have dared to wear anything that looked like a pair of trousers, so the divided skirt was invented”). $35.00

1333. CRUMP, Irving. The Boys’ Book of Cowboys. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1934. xvii [1] 232 pp., frontispiece, plates (mostly photographs by W. S. Basinger of the Union Pacific Railroad and E. E. Nelson of the Northern Pacific Railroad). 12mo, original grey pictorial cloth. Binding with mild to moderate staining, fore-edges foxed, remnants of erased pencil inscription on front free endpaper.
First edition. Excellent juvenile with superb documentary photographs, covering all aspects of cowboy life, from riding the range to rodeos. The author was assisted in his research by Guy Clark, owner of the Diamond D Ranch in Montana and Ralph Johnson (“a bronc twister”), and many “range riders of the west.” $40.00

1334. CULLETON, James. Indians and Pioneers of Old Monterey: Being a Chronicle of the Religious History of Carmel Mission Considered in Connection with Monterey’s Other Local Events and California’s General History; Also a Sketch of Aboriginal Monterey. Fresno: Academy of California Church History, 1950. [14] 286 pp., frontispiece, plates (woodcuts by C. Whitman based on historical prints). 8vo, original navy blue buckram. Spine lettering faded, otherwise very fine.
First edition. Academy of California Church History, Pub. 2. Rocq 5659. Weber, The California Missions, p. 22; Catholic Footprints in California (Newhall, 1970), p. 218: “A very precisely constructed enumeration of historical fact.” Includes information on ranching and stockraising within the larger context of the mission history of Old Monterey: introduction of cattle to the Upper California missions by Portolá and Anza; Father Crespi’s supervision of stockraising at Monterey; allotment of one bull and seventeen cows to each mission; Carmel’s first cattle herd from cattle driven from San Diego in 1771 (“these animal were ancestors of the great herds that roamed mission lands in the early 1800s”); foundation herds for Missions San Francisco and Santa Clara sent by Serra from Monterey; Franciscan relinquishment of their rights to cattle that had once belonged to the Lower California missions; first private ranchos established due to 1794 viceregal regulations allowing land grants (subsequent failure of these ranches due to Native American depredations); chapter 10 “Tallow, Trade, Taxes, and Souls...1809-1819”; etc. $55.00

1335. CULLEY, John H. (Jack). Cattle, Horses, and Men of the Western Range. Los Angeles: Ward Ritchie, [1940]. xvi, 337 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, text illustrations by Katherine Field. 8vo, original brown cloth. Endpapers slightly browned from contact with d.j., otherwise very fine in good to very good pictorial d.j. (slightly chipped at extremities and edges). The d.j. is very scarce.
First edition. Adams, Burs I:101; One-Fifty 40. Campbell, p. 84. Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 26. Dobie, p. 101: “Especially good on horses.... Has the luminosity that comes from cultivated intelligence.” Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 14; Western High Spots, p. 85 (“A Range Man’s Library”). Graff 941. Guns 527: “Scarce.” Herd 623: “This excellent book was written by a well-educated Englishman [and] he devotes some space to the history of the ranch.” Howes C952. Reese, Six Score 26: “In 1893 [Culley] and his wife came to America, and he became manager of the Bell Ranch in New Mexico, which in those days comprised three quarters of a million acres.” Saunders 3995. Culley’s English ancestors were noted for their attention to improving horses, cattle, and sheep, and George Culley, Jack’s great uncle wrote a famous book, Culley on Livestock, that was the leading livestock authority for the eighteenth century. Before taking on management of the Bell Ranch, Culley and a relative, William Pinkerton, operated a sheep and cattle ranch on a large grant in New Mexico. He also worked for various horse and cattle outfits in New Mexico, including the A1 Bar, Rail 12, and others. He and his brother Chris started a small livestock business of their own before he went to the Bell Ranch. $385.00

1336. CULLEY, John H. (Jack). Cattle, Horses, and Men of the Western Range. Los Angeles: Ward Ritchie, [1940]. Another copy. Light shelf wear, several embossed and ink stamps of Ed Storey, otherwise fine, without the d.j. $110.00

“Jim Cummins’ Book”—Three Binding Variants

1337. CUMMINS, [James R.] Jim. Jim Cummins’ Book...The Life Story of the Younger Gang and Their Comrades, Including the Operations of Quantrell’s [sic] Guerrillas, by One Who Rode with Them. A True but Terrible Tale of Outlawry. Denver: The Reed Publishing Company, 1903. 191 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates, portraits, facsimile. 8vo, original red pictorial cloth. Very fine.
First edition. There are two states of the binding. The present copy has the word “Illustrated” as the last line on upper cover. Adams, One-Fifty 41. Dykes, Rare Western Outlaw Books, pp. 16-19 (illustrated): “Cummins wrote his own story of his association with Quantrill, the James brothers and the Youngers, [and] it is very rare.” Graff 948. Guns 528: “An exceedingly rare book giving previously untold information about the Missouri outlaws. Cummins had been written about so exaggeratedly in wild West fiction, and in real life he was such a meek looking man, that when he tried to give himself up after the James gang was disbanded, no one would believe he was Cummins. He was never brought to trial.” Howes C951. Rader 996. “[Cummins was a] blue-eyed, sandy-haired stringbean of a man who was born around 1840. Cummins fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War.... For many years he was a hanger-on of the James gang although he never became a particularly active member” (McLoughlin, Wild & Woolly, p. 120). In chapter 29 (“Trailing Horse and Cattle Thieves”), Cummins relates chasing down some cattle and horse rustlers who were creating havoc along the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad line near Winslow and Flagstaff. At the time Cummins was working as a scout under Lieutenant Johnson at Camp Apache, and the sheriff at Flagstaff had asked for assistance in capturing the rustlers. Cummins quit after successfully completing this assignment. He was irritated at Lieutenant Johnson for not accompanying him on the raid, instead sending Cummins on his way with an “old Indian” (claimed by Lieutenant Johnson to be the best trailer) and his squaw. Cummins was incensed at making only $50 a month for such dangerous work and outraged that the squaw, who trailed right along with the party of seven men, made only $26 a month, particularly in light of the Flagstaff sheriff not sharing the considerable plunder with them. $1,045.00

1338. CUMMINS, Jim. Jim Cummins’ Book.... Denver: The Reed Publishing Company, 1903. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original green pictorial cloth. The present binding has the word “Illustrated” as the last line on upper cover. Lower corners slightly bumped, otherwise very fine. $990.00

1339. CUMMINS, Jim. Jim Cummins’ Book.... Denver: The Reed Publishing Company, 1903. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original terracotta pictorial cloth. Slight shelf wear, otherwise very fine. The present copy does not have the word “Illustrated” as the last line on upper cover. $990.00

1340. CUMMINS, Sarah J. Autobiography and Reminiscences of Sarah J. Cummins. [Walla Walla: Walla Walla Bulletin, 1914]. 61 pp., portrait. 12mo, original grey printed wrappers. Fine.
First edition, later printing, with 61 pages and imprint of Walla Walla Bulletin on back wrap. The first printing came out at La Grande, Oregon, and had 64 pages. Four printings of this excellent overland came out in 1914. Graff 949. Howell 32, Oregon 70. Howes C952. Hubach, p. 100. Mintz, The Trail 114: “This is a somewhat impetuous but enthralling account of the near-demise of Sarah when she was a teenage bride crossing the plains. She speaks of Frémont traveling with them for a short time, being saved from hostile Indians in Sioux country, and adds a bit about the Yellowstone area.” Smith 2153. Soliday I:365: “Much out-of-the-way material of the overland as seen through a woman’s eyes.” The party drove one hundred head of cattle with them on their trek from St. Joseph, Missouri, to the Oregon country in 1845. When they reached the Cascades, they divided into two parties, since it would have been impossible to take so large a herd down the river. Sarah insisted on accompanying her new husband over the Cascades with the herd rather than going in the boats with the other women. The cattle herd strayed during a blizzard near Mount Hood, and petite eighty-pound Sarah almost froze. $80.00


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