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Ranching Catalogue Part 1 (Authors A-C)

Items 876-900

The items in this catalogue have been sold. This catalogue was issued in print form in 2002, and is presented in full on our website as a courtesy to users and for reference purposes.


“Out Where the West Begins”—Edition Limited to 25 Copies

876. CHAPMAN, Arthur. Out Where the West Begins and Other Small Songs of a Big Country. N.p., n.d. [title verso: Copyright 1916/by Arthur Chapman/Press of Carson-Harper/Denver, Colorado]. 15 pp. 12mo, original grey printed wrappers. Very fine; interesting association copy. Laid in is an undated one-page manuscript letter written and signed in pencil by J. Harry Carson, (managing editor of the Railroad Red Book Monthly), to George L. Beam, Passenger Department of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad sending Beam this copy of Chapman’s book and stating that the book was printed in an edition of only 25 copies (“I have a couple of copies over printed—the edition was only 25.... I really have no right to send out these books, but it is more or less a family affair”). Carson’s letter is written on the printed stationery of the Railroad Red Book Monthly.
First edition (the title poem “Out Where the West Begins” first appeared in print on December 3, 1911, in “Center Shots,” the column that Chapman wrote for the Denver Republican); limited edition (25 copies printed, according to J. Harry Carson’s letter laid in the book—see previous paragraph). Carson-Harper (the printer of Chapman’s book) published the Railroad Red Book Monthly (1884-1925), which contained timetables and other material pertinent to the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad and Western Pacific Railway. Campbell, p. 225. Fourteen poems about cowboys and the West by Arthur Chapman (1873-1935), poet-journalist, including his Western classic, “Out Where the West Begins.” Legend has it that with only ten minutes left before the deadline for submitting copy for his column, Chapman glanced at some wire news about the Western states governors bickering over where the West began—the Alleghenies, the Mississippi, or someplace else. Chapman solved his problem by dashing off “Out Where the West Begins.” He promptly forgot his jingle and was astounded at the warm national reception his little poem received. Chapman began his newspaper career on the Chicago Daily News in 1895 and joined the Denver Republican three years later. In 1913 he became managing editor of the Denver Times, and subsequently relocated to New York. Chapman was considered “a crack newspaperman,” but the magazine articles and books he wrote brought him national recognition. He returned to Colorado several times to gather information on a Colorado history he planned to write.
This slender wrapper-bound book is quite scarce. RLIN locates only a microfilm copy, without date on title (as in the present copy). OCLC gives six locations (unable to determine if the date 1916 is on the title or not). The earliest date for Chapman’s book title Out Where the West Begins is Denver, 1916. The poem was very popular. OCLC lists over a dozen printings with this poem named in the title. Other printed versions of the poem include a large illustrated postcard and a version set to music for chorus. $250.00

877. CHAPMAN, Arthur. Out Where the West Begins and Other Small Songs of a Big Country. [Denver: Carson-Harper, 1916]. Another copy. Very fine. $165.00

878. CHAPMAN, Arthur. Out Where the West Begins and Other Western Verses. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin Company & Riverside Press, 1917. ix [3] 90 [4] pp., photographic endpapers. 12mo, original half brown cloth over grey boards. Binding lightly worn and with mild marginal browning and one small spot on upper cover, internally fine, in lightly worn d.j. (price-clipped). Author’s signed presentation copy to noted writer William MacLeod Raine (to whom Chapman dedicated his book The Pony Express: “In recognition of their large share in making this book: To Will and Mrs. Raine in whose friendship the Chapmans have always rejoiced. Arthur Chapman, Denver, March, 1917.”
First edition. This work contains over fifty verses, including “Out Where the West Begins,” “The Dude Ranch,” “The Cowboys and the Tempter,” “A Cowboy’s Musings,” “The Herder’s Reverie,” “Border Riders,” “The Range Pirates,” “The Ostrich-Punching of Arroyo Al,” “Before the Gringo Came,” etc. $80.00

879. CHAPMAN, Arthur. Out Where the West Begins and Other Western Verses. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin Company & Riverside Press, 1917. Another copy. Author’s signed presentation copy incorporating some lines from his famous poem: “‘Where there’s more of giving and less of buying, And a man makes friends without half trying—That’s where the West begins.’ With the author’s compliments to Mr. A. J. Fynn. Arthur Chapman, Denver, Colorado, Dec. 15, 1917.” Light shelf wear, otherwise very fine in price-clipped d.j. (somewhat worn and chipped). $65.00

880. CHAPMAN, Arthur. Out Where the West Begins and Other Western Verses. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin Company & Riverside Press, 1917. Another copy, author’s signed presentation copy: “With the compliments of Arthur Chapman. Denver, March 12, 1917.” Very fine, without the d.j. $55.00

881. CHAPMAN, Arthur. The Pony Express: The Record of a Romantic Adventure in Business. New York & London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1932. 319 pp., frontispiece, plates (mostly photographic), endpaper maps. 8vo, original tan buckram. A few signatures opened carelessly, otherwise very fine in fine d.j. illustrated by Will Crawford (the d.j. is scarce).
First edition. Dobie, p. 80: “Good reading and bibliography.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Crawford 16). Guns 412: “Scarce.” Howes C291. Saunders 2809. Wynar 6714. The book contains little on ranching, but we include it here because of the excellent discussion of the ponies and horsemanship of the daring riders. Furthermore, there is a fine description and illustration (p. 86 et seq.) of the Pony Express saddle designed under the direction of W. A. Cates, Pony Express rider. Chapman discusses how the Pony Express saddle was a modified design of the regular stock saddle then in use in the West, noting that the “California tree” was lighter than the heavy model evolved from the vaquero saddle, which had been found most comfortable for man and horse in roundup work and day-to-day riding on the range. In chapter 15 (“Youth in the Saddle”), Chapman maintains that the appeal of the West in the Pony Express era, unlike the Gold Rush with its mad quest for treasure, was adventure and the attraction of vocations like ranching, freighting, and staging as an escape from the humdrum life in the East and Midwest. “These young adventurers of the trail supplied the Pony Express with some of its best riders. Among the half a dozen Overland ‘Pony’ riders whom I have chanced to know, every one, at some time in his story, has brought out the fact that he had drifted west in search of excitement. It was the same spirit that sent thousands of others to the west, later on, to seek jobs as cowboys” (pp. 224-25). $100.00

882. CHAPMAN, Arthur. The Story of Colorado: Out Where the West Begins. Chicago & New York: Rand McNally & Company, [1924]. 270 pp., color frontispiece of Spanish explorers in the Southwest by Will Crawford, numerous plates, text illustrations (2 by Crawford), maps. 8vo, original blue and green gilt-pictorial cloth. A desirable copy—fine, fresh, tight, and bright.
First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Crawford 15). Herd 447. Wilcox, p. 23: “Intended as a textbook for the schools of Colorado.” Wynar 18. Has a chapter on “Live Stock and Agricultural Industries.” The preface includes Chapman’s poem “Out Where the West Begins.” Pp. 182-84: “There is no way of estimating the number of cowboys who were in Colorado when the cattle business in this state had reached its height in the eighties, but there were many thousands...most of the available grazing lands in the state were occupied by vast herds.... The cattle business began in a small way in Colorado about the time it started in Texas, in the early sixties.... The buffalo were not yet out of the state before their range was shared by domestic cattle, running with almost as great freedom as the wild animals and looked after only twice a year, at the spring and fall round-ups.” $65.00

883. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. More Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Designed by Carl Hertzog for] Bennett Printing Company, 1961. 58 [1] pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo, original terracotta cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j. illustrated by José Cisneros.
First edition, limited edition (300 copies). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 43). Guns 414. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 131A. Tularosa is in Otero County, New Mexico, just north of El Paso. This volume includes a chapter on Three Rivers Ranch and the formation of Otero County, which had been the part of Lincoln County where the stock war occurred. Includes material on Billy the Kid and the Lincoln County War. $85.00

884. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. More Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Designed by Carl Hertzog for] Bennett Printing Company, 1961. 58 [1] pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo, original red pictorial wrappers by Cisneros. Very fine.
First edition, wrappers issue. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 44). Lowman, Printer at the Pass 131B. $40.00

885. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. More Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Designed by Carl Hertzog for] Bennett Printing Company, 1966. 58 [1] pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo, original grey pictorial wrappers by Cisneros. Mild edge wear to wraps, else fine, signed by author. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate.
Later printing. $20.00

886. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1953. [8] 69 [1] pp., illustrated title by Cisneros, text illustrations (photographic), maps by Cisneros (one double-page). 8vo, original terracotta cloth. Very fine in d.j. by Cisneros. Signed by author on front free endpaper, and author’s signed presentation note on verso: “Best wishes to Mr. & Mrs. A. E. McClymonds—friends of the Camp Charles’s. Bula Charles Alamogordo N.M. 2-27-1957.”
First edition, limited edition (100 copies bound in cloth). Guns 415 (giving incorrect publication date of 1963). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 42). Lowman, Printer at the Pass 82A: “The exceptionally fine title-page drawing (of a young Gene Rhodes on horseback) and the illustrated map (repeated on the covers) are the work of José Cisneros.” Chapters on Eugene Manlove Rhodes and the Apache Kid, noted rustler and outlaw. Edited by Francis L. Fugate. $100.00

887. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1953. Another copy. Very fine in d.j. by Cisneros. Signed by author on verso of front free endpaper. $95.00

888. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo, [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1953. Another copy. Very fine in d.j. by Cisneros, with publisher’s announcement laid in (signed by Lola Charles and Carl Hertzog). $75.00

889. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1953. [8] 69 [1] pp., illustrated title by Cisneros, text illustrations (photographic), maps by Cisneros (one double-page). 8vo, original terracotta pictorial wrappers by Cisneros. Slight edge wear to fragile wraps, but overall fine, signed by author on verso of front free endpaper.
First edition, wrappers issue. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 82B. $45.00

890. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1953. Another copy. Wrappers detaching at staples. Paper fragment on inside upper wrapper. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate and pencil note on front free endpaper: “1st ed does not have footnote on pages 7 & 49”. $40.00

891. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1954. [8] 69 pp., illustrated title by Cisneros, text illustrations (photographic), maps by Cisneros (one double-page). 8vo, original terracotta cloth, pale green King Ranch mesquite endpapers. Light staining in gutters, otherwise very fine in d.j. by Cisneros (second partial d.j. also present). Signed by artist Cisneros on title verso. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate on front pastedown and his pencil note at back: “Logging train near Cloudcroft. The narrow gauge railroad.” Printed slip regarding fourth printing laid in at rear.
Third printing, revised (footnotes added on pp. 7 and 49, colophon at end removed). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 41n). Lowman, Printer at the Pass 87A. From a personal communication with Al Lowman: “It may very well be a unique copy that Carl cobbled together from left-over scraps. It was the sort of thing he would do to bug bibliographers. If he thought it might look appealing, he wouldn't hesitate to do it. And I remember having seen that copy. Once the King Ranch book was finished, he was so intrigued with the mesquite endpapers that he used them again in the so-called Colophon Edition of Forty Years at El Paso—of which there were perhaps a hundred copies only.” $40.00

892. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1954. Another copy, variant endpapers (maize King Ranch mesquite endpapers). Light staining in gutters, otherwise very fine in d.j. by Cisneros. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate and ink note on inside flap of d.j.: “Later binding 1961.” Printed slip regarding fourth printing laid in at rear.
Third printing, revised. $40.00

893. CHARLES, Mrs. Tom [Bula]. Tales of the Tularosa. Alamogordo: [Carl Hertzog for Mrs. Tom Charles], 1954. [8] 69 pp., illustrated title by Cisneros, text illustrations (photographic), maps by Cisneros (one double-page). 8vo, original terracotta pictorial wrappers by Cisneros. Wrappers detached and moderately worn. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate.
Third printing, wrappers issue. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 87B. $20.00

894. CHASE, Agnes. First Book of Grasses: The Structure of Grasses Explained for Beginners. San Antonio: W. A. Silveus, 1937. xiii [3] 125 pp., text illustrations. 12mo, original light green cloth. Binding spotted and faded, text fine.
Revised edition (first published in 1922). A study of the forage that is the basis for the cattle industry. $20.00

895. CHASE, Doris. They Pushed Back the Forest. [Sacramento], 1959. 78 pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic), maps. 8vo, original stiff blue pictorial wrappers. Very fine, signed by author.
First edition. The primary industries of Del Norte County, in northern California, are lumber, tourism, and dairying. There is a description DeMartin Ranch, particularly interesting for its account of bear depredations on sheep herds. $30.00

896. CHASE, Edward L. The Big Book of Horses. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1951. [26] pp., color illustrations by author. Folio, original green pictorial boards. Head of spine torn (approximately 2.5 cm), otherwise fine.
Children’s picture book of horses with brief explanatory text on breeds and history. Double-page illustration of “Cutting Pony and the Quarter Horse” showing a herding scene. $10.00

897. CHASE, J. Smeaton. California Desert Trails. With...an Appendix of Plants. Also Hints on Desert Travelling. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, [1919]. [1, ad] xvi [2] 387 [1] pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original olive pictorial cloth. Bookplate partially removed from front pastedown, otherwise very fine.
First edition, early reprint (without date on title). Edwards, Enduring Desert, p. 48: “One of the two outstanding books descriptive of the Colorado Desert.... All phases of desert life and desert conditions are ably covered.... Indispensable to any library, large or small, whether for desert lover or desert stranger.” Flake 1259a. Rocq 16222. Description of Warner’s Ranch, driving cattle by the desert route and use of Borego Springs, challenges to livestock from desert climate and sparse, thorny forage, etc. $50.00

898. CHATELLE, Miriam. For We Love Our Valley Home. San Antonio: Naylor, [1948]. x, 114 [2, blank] [28, ads] pp., photographic plates, illustrated ads. 8vo, original green cloth. Fine in fine d.j.
First edition. Not in CBC. Regional history of the Rio Grande Valley in which Chatelle discusses early Spanish land grants. She relates that prior to the Mexican-American War, longhorn cattle of the brasada were gathered by vaqueros for hides and tallow, which were picked up by schooners belonging to Boston merchants. A section on bandits discusses dispossessed Mexican rancher Juan Nepomucena Cortinas and his raids. The nature of cattle raising was quite relaxed in the Valley—most ranchers lived on the river bank with their cattle running almost wild in the brush country along the river. Includes material on Richard King, Mifflin Kenedy, and the King Ranch. Los Fresnos, the author’s home town, receives special attention, beginning with the history of the 1791 Espíritu Santo Grant to José Salvador de la Garza and its 1846 division into long narrow strips extending to the river, which allowed each landowner unrestricted access to water for stock. The author discusses the 1918 cattle rustling and how her family was forced to abandon their home in the wake of the violence. $60.00

899. CHATTERTON, Fenimore C. Yesterday’s Wyoming: The Intimate Memoirs of Fenimore Chatterton, Territorial Citizen, Governor, Builder. [Aurora, Colorado]: Powder River Publishers & Booksellers, 1957. 133 pp., author’s portrait tipped onto preliminary leaf, plates (photographic). 8vo, original blue cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j.
First edition, limited edition (#415 of 1,000 copies). Guns 416. Herd 452: “Has some material on the Wyoming cattle industry and the Johnson County War.” $70.00

900. CHÁVEZ, Angélico. Origins of New Mexico Families in the Spanish Colonial Period.... Santa Fe: Historical Society of New Mexico, 1954. xvii [3] 339 [1] pp., facsimiles, text illustrations (some by José Cisneros). Large 4to, original stiff wrappers printed in red and black with illustration by Cisneros. Fine.
First edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Cisneros 45). A vast compendium of genealogical information on New Mexico spanning the years from 1598 to 1821. Excellent coverage of land grants, biographies of early ranchers and stockmen, occasional mention of livestock. $165.00


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