Dorothy Sloan -- Books

Ranching Catalogue Part 2(Authors D-G)

Items 1540-1564

The items in this catalogue have been sold. This catalogue was issued in print form in 2005, and is presented in full on our website as a courtesy to users and for reference purposes.


1540. DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver. New York: Bantam Books, [1951]. [12] 212 pp. 16mo, original multicolor pictorial wraps by Tom Lea. Remarkably fine, especially for a popular paperback of this vintage. This one is from Dudley R. Dobie’s library and looks so fresh that it must have been immediately stashed with his other treasures.
     First paperback edition (unabridged). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 128) McVicker A7b. Dobie for the masses, with histrionic advertising blurb on half-title: “Fabulous wealth and incredibly savagery.... The REAL Southwest. Out of the turbulent history of the Southwest comes this record of blood and treasure. Here are the arrogant Spaniards sweltering in armor and encased in fear. Here is the twang of an Apache arrow, the flat crack of a rifle, the rattle of pistol fire. And here is also silence—the shimmering, heat-cracked silence of the vast Southwest.” $25.00

1541. DOBIE, J. Frank. As the Moving Finger Writ. [Austin]: Privately printed, [1955]. 12 pp. Large 8vo, original salmon printed wrappers. Very fine.
     First separate printing, offprint from Southwest Review (Autumn 1955). McVicker D53. Mohr, The Range Country 664. Christmas greeting from the Dobies, containing an essay on the Texas Review and its successor, the Southwest Review, with references to Edward Gosse (including his barbed criticism of an article on cowboy songs), Walter Prescott Webb, John Lomax, Henry Nash Smith, William Faulkner, et al. $25.00

1542. DOBIE, J. Frank. Babícora. N.p., [1954]. 8 pp., map. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers. Very fine, signed by author.
     First separate printing, offprint from American Hereford Journal (January 1, 1954). Cook 52. Dykes, My Dobie Collection, p. 9: “Among the scarce and rare Dobie booklets” (#17 on his rarities list). McVicker D51. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 18. JFD’s account of his 1953 visit to William Randolph Hearst’s vast Babícora Ranch in Chihuahua, “where thousands of commercial Herefords were raised each year over a long period. The breaking up of this property last year marked the end of an era.” $75.00

1543. DOBIE, J. Frank. Babícora. N.p., [1954]. Another copy, not signed. Very fine. $65.00

1544. DOBIE, J. Frank. The Ben Lilly Legend. Boston: Little, Brown, 1950. [vi] [2, inserted autograph leaf] [vii-xv] [3] 237 pp., color frontispiece portrait by Tom Lea, plates (photographic and reproductions of drawings by Lilly and Dunton). 12mo, original tan pictorial cloth. Slight foxing to fore-edges, otherwise very fine in d.j. with Lea illustration. Signed by J. Frank Dobie.
     First edition, signed issue, with signed leaf bound in after title. This special signed issue was not noted by McVicker. Campbell, p. 59: “Story of that eccentric Ben Lilly, mighty hunter of bears and panthers, who spent most of his life hunting big game.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Dunton 41), (Lea 143).
     “[Dobie’s] biography of Ben Lilly...is an excellent book on a man no one but Dobie could have got to” (McMurtry, In a Narrow Grave, p. 48). Among his many muy-macho activities, Lilly was a cattle trader and trail driver (one of his clients was Zack Miller’s 101 Ranch); chief huntsman for Theodore Roosevelt (1907); bounty-hunter for stock-killers (bears, lions, wolves) on New Mexico ranches for the federal government (1914); and “surpassed all other men in horn-blowing, cow-calling, and whip-popping.” The book contains much on the GOS Ranch in New Mexico, whose owner Victor Culberson introduced Lilly to JFD.
     Our favorite story in this book is how one of Lilly’s interminable perverse pranks back-fired on Lilly himself. When leading a herd of about a hundred and fifty cattle, Lilly encountered a circus caravan and got the bright idea that it would be fun to stampede the circus animals. Lilly headed his cattle toward the caravan, but when his cattle saw the elephant, they were the ones to stampede. It took Lilly a week to regather his cattle. $400.00

1545. DOBIE, J. Frank. The Ben Lilly Legend. Boston: Little, Brown, 1950. xv [3] 237 pp., color frontispiece portrait by Tom Lea, plates (photographic and reproductions of drawings by Lilly and Dunton). 12mo, original tan pictorial cloth. Slight foxing to fore-edges, otherwise very fine in d.j. illustrated by Lea.
     First trade edition. $60.00

 

“First item to bear the Encino Press device” (Whaley)

1546. DOBIE, J. Frank. Bob More: Man and Bird Man. Dallas: Encino Press, 1965. vii [1] 27 [2] pp., title and text illustrations by William Wittliff. Square 8vo, original tan cloth, printed paper label on upper cover. Superb condition, in publisher’s brown slipcase with printed paper spine label. Inscribed and signed by publisher-printer William Wittliff: “Con mucho gusto.” Laid in is an Encino Press invoice for $7.65, with Wittliff’s ink note to purchaser: “This includes a dinner with us some evening soon.”
     First edition, limited edition (#453 of 550 copies), originally printed in Southwest Review 27:1 (Autumn 1941), with added introduction containing Wittliff’s touching tribute to JFD and a terrific description of Bill’s first visit with “The Man of Texas Letters.” Cook 70. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 34: “A month before his death, Dobie granted Wittliff permission to reprint his Bob More essay. This reprint was the first book published by Encino Press.... Scarce.” Whaley, Wittliff 8.
     An excellent essay on Robert Lee More (1873-1941), ornithologist and ranch manager-partner with William T. Waggoner on the vast Three D Ranch, where More often carried out his ornithological research. Bob More considered the Waggoner Ranch along Beaver Creek and the Wichita River to be the greatest bird preserve in Texas. He assembled, organized, and scientifically marked a collection of some 12,000 to 15,000 bird eggs from 750 species (including the rare California condor). More’s collection is “considered the finest west of the Mississippi River and the outstanding private collection of the world” (Handbook of Texas Online: Robert Lee More).
     Bob More, a pioneer conservationist both in his ornithological and ranching activities, insisted on light stocking and extra tanks to bring native grasses back to the pristine lushness that would benefit land, cattle, birds, and man. JFD tells us that Bob More’s standing order to the Three D Ranch harvesters was to leave a patch of grain around every wild turkey nest discovered in the field.
     According to JFD, Bob More often said: “Birds are man’s best friends. If they were suddenly destroyed, insects would within a short time destroy the vegetation on which the human race is dependent.” JFD interviewed Bob More three times and wrote this essay to document his contributions to ranching and zoology. Amidst the field of JFD’s cornerstone works, little gems like this one make us realize the great legacy JFD left us by taking the time to interview people and preserve fugitive history that might otherwise have been lost. The Wittliff-Encino connection only adds to the appeal of this excellent book. $150.00

1547. DOBIE, J. Frank. “Bovine Sense of Smell: J. Frank Dobie in American Cattle Producer Says Old Time Longhorns Could Smell Water Miles Away,” in The Purebred 1:2 (February 1941). Pp. 7, 44-45, illustration from The Longhorns. 8vo, original dark blue printed wrappers with photographic illustration. Edges a bit worn, moderately foxed, overall very good.
     McVicker C181b. $15.00

1548. DOBIE, J. Frank. “The Brush Country of Texas,” in Lincoln-Mercury Times 2:6 (November-December, 1950). Pp. 1-4, color illustrations by H. O. Kelly. 4to, original multi-color pictorial wrappers with color illustration by H. O. Kelly. Fine.
     McVicker C296. The illustrations of ranch life in the brush country are by H. O. Kelly (1884-1955), retired cowpuncher living at Blanket, Texas, who worked in thirty states as a cowboy, sheepherder, cowhand, logger, bullwhacker, sharecropper, and occasionally, rodeo rider. Kelly came to public notice through a one-man exhibit arranged by Jerry Bywaters in 1950. “According to Francis Henry Taylor, once director of the Metropolitan Museum of New York, Kelly was ‘one of the few genuine primitive painters we have had in our country’” (Handbook of Texas Online: Harold Osman Kelly). JFD’s accompanying article on the brush country of Southwest Texas, where he was raised on a ranch in Live Oak County, is elegiac. $25.00

1549. DOBIE, J. Frank. Charm in Mexican Folktales. N.p., [1951]. 8 pp. 8vo, original light green printed wrappers. Very fine.
     First separate printing, offprint from Texas Folklore Society Publication 24 (The Healer of Los Olmos and Other Mexican Lore). McVicker D43. In this Christmas keepsake, JFD recounts gathering folklore for his book The Longhorns. Among the yarns he spins is that of José Beltrán, an old spent vaquero on the Tom O’Connor Ranch near Refugio, whose job consisted of trapping wild cattle. One moonlit night while waiting patiently at the waterhole for his quarry, Beltrán encountered a maverick bull (puro negro) that actually turned out to be el diablo. $50.00

1550. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. New York: Literary Guild of America, 1931. xv [1] 367 pp., 6 plates (including frontispiece), maps, text illustrations, and endpaper maps by Ben Carlton Mead. 8vo, original orange pictorial cloth. Faint discoloration to binding, mild foxing to frontispiece. Very good in lightly worn and soiled d.j. with one small tape repair. Related clipping laid in. Signed by J. Frank Dobie and Ben Carlton Mead.
     Literary Guild of America edition, printed from the same plates as the first edition, second printing (also issued in the same year), with dedication to JFD’s father, a “clean” cowman (clean is added in this issue), glossary revised. Basic Texas Books 45B: “Best book ever written on hidden treasure, and one of the most fascinating books on any subject to come out of Texas.” Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. [7]. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Mead 29n). Greene, Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 9. Howes D374. McVicker A2a(2). Powell, Southwest Classics, pp. 343-55: “I have chosen Coronado’s Children...not because it is his best book—my favorite is The Mustangs, his was Tongues of the Monte—but rather because it is the one that made him the legendary figure he became, the one that first brought him national recognition. It is an enthralling book.”
     Chapter 5 is devoted to “Tales of the Cow Camp”; other references to ranching and cowboys are found in the book. The last chapter (“Shadows and Symbols”) contains the first printing of the enigmatic symbols that buriers of treasure have used since time immemorial. $50.00

Item 1550 illustration
Item 1550

1551. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children.... New York: Literary Guild of America, 1931. Another copy. Covers worn and stained, mild foxing to title, d.j. not present. Reading copy. $10.00

1552. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, [early 1940s]. xiv, 367 pp. 8vo, original tan pictorial cloth. Endsheets lightly browned, otherwise very fine in fine d.j. with text illustrations by Mead. Signed by J. Frank Dobie.
     Wartime edition, with printed statement to that effect on title page, complete and unabridged text on thinner paper and slightly reduced format, plates omitted. McVicker A2a(6). $15.00

1553. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, n.d. (ca. 1946). xiv, 367 pp. 8vo, original terracotta pictorial cloth. Endsheets lightly browned, else fine in fine d.j. with Mead illustration. Signed by J. Frank Dobie.
     McVicker A2a(7). The wartime government regulation of paper statement has been removed from the title page. Publisher’s ads on d.j. verso altered from preceding. $15.00

1554. DOBIE, J. Frank. Lost Mines of the Old West: Coronado’s Children. London: Hammond, Hammond and Company, [1960]. xv [1] 367 pp., text illustrations by Mead. 8vo, original ecru cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j. with illustration of treasure hunter looking very much like JFD.
     First British edition. Basic Texas Books 45H. McVicker A2d, “A line-by-line reprint from the Southwest Press trade edition.” Mead’s plates omitted. $35.00

1555. DOBIE, J. Frank. Lost Mines of the Old West: Coronado’s Children. London: Hammond, Hammond and Company, [1960]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original red cloth. Mild staining at lower hinge, else very fine in d.j. with same illustration as preceding. $30.00

1556. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of Los Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. Foreword by Frank H. Wardlaw. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1978]. xxii, 329 [2] pp., title and text illustrations by Charles Shaw. 8vo, original half terracotta cloth over tan mottled boards. Mint in publisher’s slipcase.
     Limited edition (#135 of 300 numbered copies), signed by Frank Wardlaw and illustrator Charles Shaw. Barker Texas History Center Series, No. 3. $75.00

1557. DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1978]. xxii, 329 pp., title and text illustrations by Charles Shaw. 8vo, original half terracotta cloth over tan boards. Very fine in very fine d.j. illustrated by Charles Shaw.
     First trade edition. Basic Texas Books 45I. $20.00

1558. DOBIE, J. Frank. Cow People. Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., [1964]. x [2] 305 pp., text illustrations (a few by Mead, but mostly photographic and full-page). 8vo, original brown cloth. Exceptionally fine, in very fine d.j. (with photos of cowmen on front and Tom Lea’s portrait of JFD on back).
     First edition. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #55. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 15; Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Crawford 24), (Lea 144), (Mead 29). Guns 601. Reese, Six Score 31: “Pure cow country, with sketches of Ike Pryor, Ab Blocker, Shanghai Pierce, and many other lesser known cattlemen.” McVicker 18a(1). Powell, Southwest Classics, p. 351. “Cow People [is] a delightful compendium of tales of eccentric southwestern ranchers and stockmen, springs from the author’s firsthand knowledge of such people as well as from extensive reading about them. Some may downgrade Dobie’s efforts and others dismiss him altogether, but his books will be read and his influence will endure as long as there are people who love the lore and legendry of Texas and the Southwest” (WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 504). $75.00

Item 1558 illustration  Item 1558 illustration
Item 1558

1559. DOBIE, J. Frank. “A Cowboy and His Polecats,” in Frontier Times 38:1 (January 1964). Pp. 13, 67. 4to, original color photographic wrappers. Back wrap slightly foxed, otherwise fine.
     First printing. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators McVicker C489. JFD, who likes skunks and does not mind their smell (“provided I am not close enough to receive its full intensity”), states that skunks have been known to stampede a herd of longhorns. This issue also includes William D. Wittliff’s “The Bandana, ‘Flag’ of the Range Country” (p. 43) and is signed by him. Charles Russell illustrations grace Mary Stuart Abbott’s article written at the age of ninety-three: “Child of the Open Range: The Daughter of Granville Stuart and Later Wife of Teddy Blue Abbott Reminisces about the Old Days in Montana.” Remington article on Babícora region, etc. $25.00

1560. DOBIE, J. Frank. Do Rattlesnakes Swallow Their Young? Austin: Texas Folklore Society, 1946. 24 pp. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers. Very fine. Inscribed and signed by J. Frank Dobie to Lester Jones: “What a beautiful medallion that Pony Express! I cherish it. Thank you so much.... June 16, 1947.”
     First separate printing, offprint from Texas Folklore Society Publication 21 (Austin, 1946). McVicker D36. JFD, who likes rattlesnakes because “they make the country more interesting and more natural,” presents firsthand accounts (mostly from cowboys and ranchers) documenting that rattlesnakes sometimes swallow their young to protect them. $75.00

1561. DOBIE, J. Frank. Do Rattlesnakes Swallow Their Young? Austin: Texas Folklore Society, 1946. Another copy. Fine. $50.00

1562. DOBIE, J. Frank. Ella Byler Dobie and Christmas. [Austin]: The American-Statesman, 1961. Folio broadside printed in three columns. Very fine.
     First separate printing of an article that appeared in the American-Statesman on December 24, 1961. McVicker D78. JFD’s tribute to his mother, with recollections of incidents at Rancho Seco in Nueces County, Texas. “When she was very young, raiders from below the Rio Grande came up into the border ranches and drove off cattle, killed them and skinned them for the hides, raided the Noakes Store in Nueces County, occasionally killed a man. The caution she grew up with never entirely left her so long as she lived on the ranch. When I was a child and Papa was gone, Mama always had the old .44 Winchester right at her head when she went to bed.” $20.00

1563. DOBIE, J. Frank. The First Cattle in Texas and the Southwest Progenitors of the Longhorns. Pp. 171-97. 8vo, original beige wrappers. Very fine.
     First separate printing, offprint from The Southwestern Historical Quarterly 42:3 (January 1939). Cook 238: “Formed Chapter One of The Longhorns.” Herd 690. McVicker C163a. In this excellent treatise JFD traces the introduction of cattle to Texas by various Catholic missions and early Spanish expeditions. The astonishing vitality and incredible proliferation of longhorn cattle in Texas influenced the lifestyle of Spanish Texas (“stock-raising [in mission-era Texas] became almost the only civilian occupation, despite governmental attempts to enforce farming”). JFD compares the physical nature and mindset of Texas longhorns with cattle in California, New Mexico, and Arizona and discusses how they impacted regions in different ways (e.g., the rise of the hide and tallow trade in California, which was practically nonexistent in Texas).
     JFD tells how longhorns were so profuse in early nineteenth-century Texas that they were generally considered more as game animals than domesticated creatures. Occasionally Native Americans hunted the longhorns, too, although, according to JFD, they preferred buffalo and horse meat to beef. He describes how Texas plantation owners often hired a professional hunter to bring in wild cattle (mentioning Captain Flack). JFD surmises the longhorns were not domesticated because they were too difficult to capture and the natural antipathy between longhorns and domesticated stock Anglo settlers imported to Texas. This treatise is filled with fascinating information on the nature of longhorns, including observations and quotations from the great longhorn painter, Frank Reaugh. $65.00

1564. DOBIE, J. Frank. The First Cattle in Texas and the Southwest Progenitors of the Longhorns. Austin, 1939. Pp. [3]-29. 8vo, original white printed wrappers. Fine.
     Reprint from The Southwestern Historical Quarterly 42:3 (January 1939). McVicker D24. $50.00


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