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13. [MAP]. KIEPERT,

H[einrich].

Mexico, Texas und Californien

. Below neat line

[left]:

Bearbeitet und gezeichnet von

H.

Kiepert

; [center]:

Weimar,

Verlag des

Geographiscen Institus, 1847

; [right]:

Situation und Schrift gestochen von K.

Mädel, Terrain

von C. Jungmann

. Inset at lower left:

Plateau von Mexico im doppelten Maasstab der

Hauptkarte.

Inset at upper right:

Die Republiken von Central-America im Maasstab der

Hauptkarte.

Pro

W

le at lower

margin:

Durchschnitt des

Hochlandes von

Anahuac...

.

Engraved map with original outline coloring. 55.5 x 63 cm (21

x 24

inches). Some

marginal creasing, nicks, and reinforcements, overall

W

ne.

The 1847 edition of Kiepert’s rare map of

Mexico, Central America, the American

West, and Texas.

Wheat notes that Kiepert based his map of the Western regions on

Frémont and cites the 1851 edition of the present map (

Mapping the Transmississippi

West

#723n;

Maps of the California Gold Region

#199n). Kiepert’s rendering of Texas and

its then-disputed boundary walks a line of circumspect neutrality. Kiepert shows two

blue outlined boundaries, one in the Emory conformation with the overextended,

ambitious Panhandle, an another possibility, the truncated version of Texas without

Panhandle and with southern boundary at the Nueces River. The outlining of Texas’s

boundary with Mexico is thin and tentative, but the other boundaries are quite bold-

ly colored. The German Colony in Texas is shaded pale green and labeled

Deutsche

Colonie des

Mainzer Verein

(the largest in

X

ux of Germans to Texas occurred between

1844 and 1847 through the e

V

orts of the Adelsverein, the

Verein zum Schutze

Deutscher Einwanderer in Texas, or the German Emigration Company).

Detail is

good in California, though it is too early for the Gold Regions to be located.

Noted

German geographer Heinrich Kiepert (1818-1899) made a life-long career in cartogra-

phy, and his maps are noted for their density and incredible detail. Kiepert’s most

important set of maps was the

Formae Orbis Antiqui,

the ful

W

llment of his desire for a

de

W

nitive classical atlas (still considered an authority in the

W

eld). Kiepert’s maps are

rare, especially the few he devoted to Texas, California, the West, and Mexico. In 1999

we o

V

ered the 1849 edition of this map at our Auction 8 with an estimate of $1,500-

$3,00 and were surprised when it fetched $9,500.

($4,000-$10,000)

14. [MAP]. KIEPERT,

H[einrich].

Mexico, Texas und Californien

. Below neat line

[left]:

Bearbeitet und gezeichnet von

H.

Kiepert

; [center]:

Weimar,

Verlag des

Geographiscen Institus, 1849

; [right]:

Situation und Schrift gestochen von K.

Mädel, Terrain

von C. Jungmann

. Inset at lower left:

Plateau von Mexico im doppelten Maasstab der

Hauptkarte.

Inset at upper right:

Die Republiken von Central-America im Maasstab der

Hauptkarte.

Pro

W

le at lower

margin:

Durchschnitt des

Hochlandes von

Anahuac...

.

Engraved map with original outline coloring. 55.5 x 63 cm (21

x 24

inches).

Other

than slight wear and a few neat reinforcements, a

W

ne copy.

The 1849 edition of Kiepert’s map (see preceding entry).

Wheat lists only the 1851 edi-

tion (see

Mapping the Transmississippi

West

#723n;

Maps of the California Gold Region

#199n). In this version of his map Kiepert renders Texas with much more assurance.

Texas boldly stands out in its Emory conformation, strongy outlined in blue. The

German colony in Texas retains its engraved designation, but in this version, it is not

shaded. Additional place names have been added, especially in California, where the

designation

Gold Region

has been added, along with additional place names.

($4,000-$10,000)

15. [MAP]. VANDERMAELEN, Ph[ilippe Marie Guillaume].

Amér. Sep. Partie de la

Vielle Californie. N

o.

53.

[Bruxelles]. Below neat line at left:

Dressée et dessinée par P

h.

Vandermaelen.

Below neat line at right:

Lith. par H.

Ode...1825.

Lithographed map with

original outline coloring and shading. 47.1 x 52.5 cm (18

x 20

æ

inches): H. Ode, Avril

[and] Juin, 1825.

No scale, but approximately 1 inch = 28 miles. Very

W

ne, on excellent

rag paper, uncut, with large margins.

One of the most beautiful and unusual carto-

graphic treatments ever created depicting the historic region at the juncture of the

Colorado and Gila Rivers at the mouth of the Gulf of California.

First printing

of the largest scale map of the region printed up to that time. The map

shows the borderland region at the pivotal juncture of southern Arizona, northern

Sonora, northern Baja, Upper California (locating San Diego,

Mission San Luis Rey de

Francia,

Mission San Juan Capistrano, etc.). The track of Vancouver’s voyage is traced,

and located are the pearl

W

shery, various tribes (Apache, Papago, Cocomaricopas, and

others), and other features. The atlas in which the map appeared was the

W

rst printed

atlas of the world on a uniform scale and the

W

rst major lithographed atlas. Koeman,

Atlantes

Neerlandici

(Vander Maelen 1) III, p. 142: “During the period when Belgium

and the Netherlands together formed the kingdom of the Netherlands, one of the most

remarkable developments of private enterprise in cartography took place in Brussels.

There lived Philippe Vandermaelen, son of the wealthy soap manufacturer,

Guillaume

Vandermaelen, who abandoned the soap trade and devoted his life to cartography.

He

did extremely well and published one of the most remarkable world atlases ever made:

a world atlas with 400 maps on a uniform scale of ca. 1:1,6 million. This work, which

appeared in 1827, was far ahead of its time, but its appearance could only be justi

W

ed by

the unparalleled zeal of its author... The completion of the huge work was realized in the

amazingly short period of three years.” Wheat,

Mapping the Transmississippi

West

#378 &

p. 94: “No mapmaker had previously attempted to use such a large scale for any west-

ern area.”

($250-500)

16. [MAP & GUIDE]. EDWARD,

David B.

History of Texas; or, The Emigrant’s,

Farmer’s, and Politician’s Guide to the Character, Climate, Soil and Productions of That

Country: Geographically Arranged from Personal

Observation and Experience.

Cincinnati:

Stereotyped and Published by J. A. James & Co., 1836. xii, [13]-336 [2, ads] pp., folding

engraved map of the Republic of Texas on onion-skin paper, grants hand-colored in out-

line:

Map of Texas Containing the Latest Grants and Discoveries by E. F. Lee

(32 x 21.6 cm;

12

x 8

inches). 12mo, original sheep, red leather label. Binding worn and abraded,

occasional foxing, interior and the excellent map

W

ne. The map, which is often lacking,

is very

W

ne and crisp, with excellent color retention.

Old ex-library, with bookplates of

Library of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio and lending library Blue

Rapids Ladies’

Library Association and 1849 ink presentation inscription by E. Easton

Esq. who has also signed his name on title and map verso (not visible on printed image

of map).

First edition. Basic Texas Books

53: “One of the best accounts of Texas on the eve of the

Revolution. The book attempts to be unprejudiced, but the author was clearly anti-

Texan at heart.” Clark,

Old South

III:35: “Like Mrs.

Holley’s Texas, this work was exten-

sively used as a basis for many other books on that state written in the 1830s and 1840s.”

Howes E48: “Conditions just prior to the Revolution described by an actual observer.”

Rader 1279. Streeter 1199: “One of the essential Texas books. It gives a good account of