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twenty variations, as compared to Tanner (approximately ten variants),

White,

Gallaher &White (one edition, or two, if one falls in line with Wheat), and Rosa (two

editions). Yet, we

W

nd no copies of any edition of the Disturnell

map in the Antique

Map Price Records searched back to 1983. Searching back to 1975 in American Book

Prices Current, we

W

nd only four copies of various editions of Disturnell’s map hav-

ing sold at auction. The most recent sale of which we have knowledge is an 1850 edi-

tion sold by Swaen in the latter months of 2002 ($20,000, very good in original pocket

covers).

($20,000-$40,000)

5. [TREATY MAP]. [POCKET MAP]. TANNER,

H[enry] S[chenck].

A Map of the

United States of

Mexico, as

Organized and De

W

ned by the Several

Acts of the Congress of

That Republic, Constructed from a Great Variety of Printed and Manuscript Documents by

H. S. Tanner. Second Edition, 1846.

Below neatline at left:

Published by H. S. Tanner,

N

o.

144 Chesnut

[sic]

S

t.

Philadelphia.

Below neatline at right:

Entered According to Act of

Congress, the 2

nd.

day of April, 1832, by H. S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania.

Two

insets at lower left: (1)

Table of Distances

; and (2)

Map of the Roads

&c from Vera Cruz

& Alvarado to Mexico.

Inset at right margin:

Statistical Table

. Pocket map, folded into

original 16mo dark brown ribbed blind-stamped cloth covers, with matching dark

brown diced cloth label on upper cover gilt-lettered:

MEXICO

(covers present but

detached). Engraved map with original full color and outline coloring. 58 x 73 cm

(22

x 28

æ

inches).

Mild o

V

setting, some splits at folds repaired on verso, three

small ink spots at left margin.

Original pocket folder worn and split at spine, and

bearing Thomas W. Streeter’s notes on inside front cover, including provenance

(1928 Cadmus $15) and “Tanner’s map of

Mexico, 2d ed 1846....This interesting for

California....”

“Second edition” (dated 1846; copyright

April 2, 1832);

Lawrence

Martin’s

sequence (g). Eberstadt 114:68 (o

V

ering an undesignated Philadelphia 1846 version, at

$37.50 in 1939). Streeter Sale 3824 (this copy).

Wheat,

Mapping the Transmississippi

West

#528: “The Southern border of California is shown as 32° west of the gulf, and the Rio

Ascension east of it,

much farther south than the border

W

xed by the Treaty, and even

farther south than the

Gadsden purchase of 1853-4. The southern border of

New

Mexico is just north of El Paso. Texas extends to the east bank of the Rio Grande

(including Santa Fe) and with the long panhandle. The copyright date shows that this

was a hurriedly gotten up map to catch the pennies of those interested in following

the war with Mexico”; Vol. III, pp. 37-38: “With Disturnell coming out with a map of

Mexico largely copied from one of Tanner’s early productions,

Henry S. Tanner could

ill a

V

ord to sit by in silence. In 1846, therefore, he brought out a ‘second edition’ of

the 1832 issue of his ‘

Map of the United States of

Mexico’ (even retaining the original

copyright date). So far as areas now in the

United States are concerned, this is a

throwback map, with the Timpanogos, Buenaventura and St. Felipe rivers (and even

the Los Mongos River!)

X

owing from the intermountain area to the Paci

W

c Coast.

Farther east, Long’s geography is still used. Tanner must have been trying to live on

his reputation—or else he was in a great hurry—when he published this map.” Wheat,

Maps of the California Gold Region

33n. Texas is now shown separate from Mexico, with

the long panhandle and southern boundary at the Rio Grande rather than the Nueces

River. Place names have been added, including the City of Austin.

We

W

nd no sales records in the usual sources, other than this copy, which sold at the

Streeter Sale in 1969.

($15,000-25,000)

6. [TREATY MAP]. [POCKET MAP]. TANNER,

H[enry] S[chenck].

A Map of the

United States of

Mexico, as Organized and De

W

ned by the Several Acts of the Congress of That

Republic, Constructed from a Great Variety of Printed and Manuscript Documents by H. S.

Tanner. Fourth Edition, 1847.

Below neatline at left:

Published by H. S. Tanner

[remains of

address slightly visible]

.

Below neatline at right:

Entered According to Act of Congress, in

the year 1846, by H. S. Tanner, in the Clerk’s

O

Y

ce of the District Court for the Southern

District of

New York.

Two insets at lower left: (1)

Table of

Distances

; and (2)

Map of the

Roads

&c from Vera Cruz & Alvarado to Mexico.

Insets at right margin: (1)

Statistical

Table

; and (2)

Harbour of Vera Cruz

. Pocket map, folded into original 16mo purple

blind-stamped cloth, upper cover gilt-lettered:

TANNER’S TRAVELLING MAP OF

MEXICO

(covers present but detached). Engraved map with original full color and out-

line coloring. 57.3 x 73.2 cm (22

¬

x 28

inches). A few light stains at old folds and one

small void in

Statistical Table

(a

V

ecting only one numeral and a tiny segment of a verti-

cal bar line), a few folds neatly reinforced on verso. Pocket folder faded from purple to

brown, inside upper cover with Streeter’s notes, including provenance (paid $4.00 in

1941).

“Fourth edition” (dated 1847; copyright 1846); Lawrence

Martin’s sequence (i).

Streeter Sale 3824 (this copy).

Wheat,

Mapping the Transmississippi

West

#554 & Vol. III,

p. 48.

Wheat,

Maps of the California Gold Region

32n (listing the “Third edition” dated

1846, and mentioning that the Library of Congress owns a copy of the present edition);

see also 33n.

The alterations to the 1846 Tanner map which are included on the present map are

important because they include updated geography based on Frémont’s explorations.

Wheat in

Mapping the Transmississippi

West

comments on Tanner’s 1846 improvements

(#529): “The plate has been changed to follow Frémont in California, including the

Great Basin. The southern boundary of California now extends from Pt.

Mondrains

northeast to the mouth of the Gila, while the United States boundary with Sonora is still

much too far south.

New Mexico is still con

W

ned to a narrow strip between the Rio

Grande and the mountains that form the continental divide, all east of there being Texas,

which ends at the Arkansas River. North of that stream the map has been altered to show

the Parks and South Pass.” In

Maps of the California Gold Regions

,

Wheat remarks on the

1846 updates (#32): “The ‘Old Spanish Trail’ from Santa Fé to Los Angeles is promi-

nently displayed (though not identi

W

ed) on this map, and Frémont’s route south from

Nueva Helvetia to the Mojave Desert and on to Great Salt Lake is included. Large fan-

ciful bays extend inland from Los Angeles and Ventura.

Much of the California portion

of this map is based on Frémont’s map, and it is similar to that listed as

1847—Disturnell

.”

Numerous changes can be seen in California, including addition of place names for Los

Angeles and San Francisco and developments on the Mexican-American War front (such

as Taylor’s troops on the Rio Grande in South Texas). Tanner boldly angled the bound-

ary between

Upper and Lower California to the southwest, to include

Guaymas.

Lawrence Martin points out that had

Disturnell done likewise, the

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nal boundary

between Upper and Lower California might have been drawn quite di

V

erently in the

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

This edition of Tanner’s map seems to appear on the market with more frequency

than other editions.

We sold a copy of this edition of Tanner’s map at our Auction 8

(November 1999) for $14,000 (one short split at fold with no loss, in original pocket

covers, slightly faded and with one old ink spot, otherwise very

W

ne). That same year

Swann sold a slightly lesser copy (tape repairs on verso and in pocket covers) at $13,000.