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colonists, and mediated disputes between the Texas colonists and Mexican author-

ities. Músquiz was present at the fall of the Alamo and assisted in identifying the

bodies of the Alamo defenders. See

Handbook of Texas Online

(Ramón Músquiz).

A native son of San Antonio, José Antonio Navarro (

1795

-

1871

) participated in

the

1813

Gutiérrez-Magee expedition, supported Austin’s colonization venture, rep-

resented Texas both in the Coahuilatecan and national legislatures, signed the

Texas Declaration of Independence, participated in the Texas Revolution, afterward

served as an advocate for wronged Tejanos, joined the Texan–Santa Fé expedition,

served as the sole Hispanic delegate to the convention for annexation in

1845

,

helped write the

fi

rst constitution of Texas as a state, and defended the right of

Texas to secede from the Union in

1861

. He was too old to join the Confederacy, but

sent four of his sons to serve. Navarro County was named in his honor. See: Eugene

C. Barker, “Native Latin American Contributions to the Colonization and

Independence of Texas,”

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

46

(April

1943

);

Handbook of Texas Online

(José Antonio Navarro); and Louis W. Kemp,

The Signers

of the Texas Declaration of Independence

(Houston: Anson Jones Press,

1944

, pp.

235

-

243

).

José Miguel de Arciniega, legislator, military explorer, and alcalde of San Antonio

de Béxar, acted as an investigator-spy on behalf of Mexico between

1816

and the early

1820

s. He checked on possible illegal immigration of Anglos into Texas in

1816

(iron-

ic considering the modern context) and investigated Richard Field and his possible

plot to form an alliance with Texas tribes against Mexican authority. He served with

the provincial deputation of Texas, which allowed abandoned mission lands to be

distributed to settlers. He held elected o

ffi

ces in the

1820

s and

1830

s and took over as

political chief when Músquiz fell ill. Arciniega was appointed land commissioner for

Stephen F. Austin’s colonies in November

1830

, laid out the town of Bastrop in

1832

,

and received a Spanish grant of

48

,

708

acres in

1835

. General Cos chose Arciniega to

be his interpreter in negotiations for the surrender of Béxar in December

1835

. See

Handbook of Texas Online

(José Miguel de Arciniega).

A native of San Antonio, Gaspar Flores de Abrego (

1781

-

1836

) proved a strong ally

of Stephen F. Austin and his colonists. He was one of thirty-

fi

ve signers of an

1835

anti-Centralist memorial drafted at the meeting, considered to be the

fi

rst strictly

revolutionary meeting in Texas. At a January

1836

meeting of soldiers and citizens to

address concerns about Santa Anna and Mexican intent with regard to Texas, Flores

served on a committee that included James Bonham, James Bowie, and Juan Seguín.

As the Texas Revolution progressed, Flores and Seguín took charge organizing the

safe exit of families into East Texas. See

Handbook of Texas Online

(José Gaspar María

Flores de Abrego).

(

$15

,

000

-

30

,

000

)

Texian Loan

13

. [AUSTIN, Stephen F.]. TEXAS (Provisional Government). COMMISSIONERS.

Texian Loan....

New Orleans: Benjamin Levy,

1836

. Engraved document, unused, with

Stephen F. Austin’s unsigned ink manuscript note: “copy

fi

rst loan” and his ink can-

cel.

4

to broadside, text within ornate typographical border. Creased where formerly

folded, small void at top left blank margin, otherwise

fi

ne.

Item

12