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tern, spine gilt in

fi

ve compartments with wide raised bands, the bands tooled in gold

on spine, publisher’s gilt-lettered burgundy leather label on upper cover, endpapers

of thick sheened cream paper with brown

fl

oral stippled pattern. Binding with some

edge wear and fading, marginal browning to some sections of endpapers due to con-

tact with the leather, occasional mild foxing (mostly con

fi

ned to endsheets and pre-

liminary and terminal blanks), occasional o

ff

setting from maps to text. The maps are

uniformly very

fi

ne with very good coloring. Overall a very

fi

ne, complete, handsome

copy with early nineteenth-century bookplate of Nathan Appleton, whose coat of

arms consists of three apples surmounted by an elephant head. Appleton (

1779

-

1861

),

U.S. merchant, manufacturer,

fi

nancier, politician, and philanthropist, is best known

as a pioneer in establishing textile manufacturing in New England and combining

economic development with social responsibility.

The Texas map is as follows:

Texas

. [Boston],

1838

. Engraved map (by G. W.

Boyton), original outline coloring in blue, borders shaded blue.

35

.

7

x

28

.

8

cm (

14

x

11⅜

inches). There are at least six di

ff

erent versions of Bradford’s Texas map, all from

the atlases that Bradford published between

1835

and

1840

. The earliest of the Texas

maps came out in Bradford’s

1835

atlas in small format and with outline coloring. In

1838

, Bradford revised his atlas to this larger format. He made the map of Texas larg-

er and updated it to re

fl

ect new knowledge. Variations occur in engraving and color-

ing, such as full color versus outline color. We have seen at least four versions of

Bradford’s large-format Texas map from the same plate, the present copy being an

intermediate state with outline coloring advancing the border of Texas to the Rio

Grande, but with land grants rather than county lines, which came later, and here the

city of Austin is not yet located. Bradford was the

fi

rst maker of atlases to include a

separate map for Texas. Martin & Martin

31

: “Bradford[’s large-format]...map of

Texas...was even more clearly patterned on [Stephen F.] Austin’s. Aside from showing

Texas as a separate country, the map and text Bradford inserted into his atlas is histor-

ically important for clearly demonstrating the demand in the United States for infor-

mation about Texas during the Revolution and the early years of the Republic. It also

serves to con

fi

rm the importance of Austin’s map as source for that information.”

First edition

of Bradford’s large-format atlas, one of the

fi

rst U.S. atlases with

lengthy textual information, and the earliest atlas published in the United States that

contained maps of Texas as a republic (see Martin & Martin, plate

31

). Howes B

701

.

Phillips,

Atlases

1381

n. Sabin

7261

. Streeter Sale

88

. Wheat,

Mapping the Transmissis-

sippi West

430

&

431

& II, p.

165

.

(

$8

,

000

-

16

,

000

)

Early American Pocket Atlas

3

. [ATLAS]. GIBSON, John.

Atlas Minimus; or, A New Set of Pocket Maps, of Various

Empires, Kingdoms, and States, with Geographical Extracts Relative to Each. Drawn

and Engraved by J. Gibson, from the Best Authorities, a New Edition, Revised, Corrected,

and Improved.

Philadelphia: Mathew Carey, April

14

,

1798

. [

82

] pp.,

36

copper-

engraved maps.

24

mo (

13

.

2

x

9

.

7

cm;

5⅛

x

inches), nineteenth-century full dark

brown calf, covers stamped with elaborate

fl

oral motif, gilt-lettered black calf spine

label (upper cover neatly reattached). Title page with two minor losses in upper

Item

3

Item

2