Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  7 / 48 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 7 / 48 Next Page
Page Background

Wilkinson’s

General Atlas

was

fi

rst published in London in

1794

. This edition is

dated

1800

on the engraved title and

1807

on the contents leaf, and the maps are dated

between

1794

and

1807

. See Phillips,

Atlases

696

,

701

,

3532

a,

4301

. The maps were

engraved by T. Conder, D. Wright, E. Bourne, J. Roper, T. Fool, B. Smith, W. Harrison,

George Allen, and B. Baker. Five maps are of American interest (world, United States,

North America, West Indies, and South America). The map of the United States does

not yet show the Louisiana Purchase, but U.S. independence is acknowledged in the

title (

The United States of America Con

fi

rmed by Treaty

1783

).

(

$600

-

1

,

200

)

7

. AUSTIN, Moses. Autograph note signed. Promissory note for

$10

to TimMcMurray,

signed by Moses Austin and McMurray (the note holder’s name is signed McMurray,

but docket on verso is McMurry). Mine a Burton [Mine à Breton, present-day Potosi,

Missouri], June

17

,

1813

.

1

p.,

16

mo. Creased where formerly folded and a few minor

splits at folds, mild foxing, otherwise

fi

ne, with a strong, full signature and paraph.

Moses Austin (

1761

-

1821

), father of Stephen F. Austin, was the

fi

rst person to obtain

permission to bring Anglo-American settlers into Spanish Texas (

1820

). Earlier, he

had founded the lead industry in the United States, and “in

1798

established the

fi

rst

Anglo-American settlement west of and back from the Mississippi River” (

Handbook

of Texas Online

: Moses Austin) at Mine à Breton, the site from which the present note

was written. Moses Austin signed this document after obtaining a grant to a portion

of Mine à Breton.

In

1789

Moses Austin was awarded the contract to roof the Richmond, Virginia

capitol in lead. Wanting to improve the e

ffi

ciency of his operation, he brought expe-

rienced miners and smelterers from England. The resulting expertise and industry he

introduced into the lead business established the U.S. lead industry. Aaron Burr’s

conspiracy, the War of

1812

, and a depressed economy slowed sales for Moses Austin.

He joined forces with others to increase the money supply and founded the Bank of

St. Louis, the

fi

rst bank west of the Mississippi. The bank failed in

1819

. Unable to

escape his ever-increasing burden of debt, in

1819

Austin came up with yet another

new and bold scheme—the establishment of an Anglo-American colony in Spanish

Texas. He traveled to Texas and, by sheer chance and luck, encountered Baron de

Bastrop, whom he had not seen for nineteen years. Through the intervention of

Bastrop, Austin obtained permission to establish his Texas colony in

1820

. Due to the

hardships he su

ff

ered during his trip out of Texas, he died on June

10

,

1821

. Moses

Austin’s deathbed request was that his son Stephen F. Austin carry out the “Texas

Venture.” Stephen F. Austin faithfully complied. See next entry.

(

$1

,

000

-

$2

,

000

)

Austin Writes about the First Steamboat in Texas

8

. AUSTIN, Stephen F. Autograph letter signed (“Estevan F. Austin”), in Spanish, to

José María Viesca, Mexican Governor of Coahuila y Tejas, recommending that Henry

Austin and his family be admitted to the colony and discussing Henry Austin’s expe-

rience with steamboats. [San Felipe de] Austin, January

4

,

1830

.

4

pp.,

4

to, including

integral address. Folds browned and reinforced with tissue, mild to moderate foxing.

This is an excellent letter with interesting and early commentary on steamboating

in Texas. Austin urges Governor Viesca to permit his cousin Henry Austin (

1782

-

1852

)

Item

7

Item

8