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AUCTION 24

Them Versus Us

<p>Order 296, p. [1]</p>


253.    

[MARTIAL LAW]. UNITED STATES. ARMY. GENERAL ORDERS. A group of eight general orders mostly concerning crimes and punishments in Mexico City. Almost all these cases arise from Scott’s imposition of martial law, which allowed for trials of Americans who committed crimes against Mexicans and vice-versa. All are 12mo and disbound.

[1] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, Sept. 24, 1847. General Orders 296 [i.e., 297]. [1], [3, blank] pp. Light vertical crease, otherwise fine. Signed by H.L. Scott.

First edition. Eberstadt, p. 70. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 392.

Warns soldiers not to interfere in religious processions and announces suspicions that when Santa-Anna emptied the prisons, he armed the convicts.

[2] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, November 20, 1847. General Orders 356. [2] [2, blank] pp. Signed by H.L. Scott.

First edition. Eberstadt, p. 72. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 396.

Announces verdicts in several trials of Americans, including one soldier who stole a dollar from a priest and another who stabbed a fellow soldier in self-defense.

[3] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, November 26, 1847. General Orders 360. [1] 2-3 [1, blank] pp. Signed by H.L. Scott (secretarial).

First edition. Eberstadt, p. 72. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 397.

Announces verdicts in trials of soldiers and Mexicans for various crimes such as robbery, including the case of teamster James McGlinchy, convicted of killing a mule.

[4] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, December 13, 1847. General Orders 371. [1] 2-3 [1, blank] pp. Left edge uneven, slight staining, minor voids in gutter margin. Signed by H.L. Scott.

First edition. Eberstadt, p. 72. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 398.

Announces verdicts in trials of several Mexicans and soldiers for various crimes, including Ignacio Orbis García, who stoned a military guard, and several soldiers found guilty of assaulting a Mexican watchman.

[5] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, December 18, 1847. General Orders 378. [1]-2 [2, blank] pp. Left margin uneven, voids in gutter margin. With contemporary manuscript correction; signed by H.L. Scott.

First edition. Eberstadt, p. 73. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 399.

Announces verdicts in trials of several Mexicans and soldiers, including one Mexican who tried to “introduce spiritous liquors into a barracks” and a soldier who broke into a private house, the punishment for which was severe.

[6] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, Dec 18, 1847. General Orders 379. [1]-2 [2, blank] pp. Left margin uneven, voids in gutter margin, light vertical crease. Signed by H.L. Scott.

First edition. Eberstadt, p. 73. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 399.

Reports the results of trials for several soldiers, one of whom was convicted for murdering a woman named Dolores García and is sentenced to be hanged two days later until “he is dead, dead, dead.”

[7] Headquarters of the Army of Mexico, Mexico, March 31, 1848. Orders 43. [1] [3, blank] pp. Left margin uneven, old stab holes voids in gutter margin. Signed by Lorenzo Thomas.

First edition. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 408.

Gives instructions for troops to be on guard duty during an election.

[8] Headquarters, Army of Mexico, Mexico, May 27, 1848. Special Orders 63. [1] [3, blank] pp. Left margin with old stab holes. Signed by Lorenzo Thomas.

First edition. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 409.

Orders officers with furniture from the National Palace to turn it in.

 

These documents provide a fascinating look into daily life between soldiers and Mexicans during the American occupation. Some crimes are somewhat trivial, such as petty theft, while others, such as murder, are more serious. It is clear that the system of martial law was kept quite busy during this time.

($1,000.00-$2,000.00)

Auction 24 Abstracts

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