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AUCTION 24

Gold & Silver & Taxes

<p>Order 13</p>


352.    

[PRECIOUS METALS]. UNITED STATES. ARMY. GENERAL ORDERS. A group of six Army orders concerning controls on precious metals. All are 12mo, disbound, and in good condition. All are first editions.

1] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, Jan. 5, 1848. General Orders No. 8. [1]-2 [2, blank] pp. Signed by H.L. Scott.

Eberstadt, p. 73. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 401.

Ordering that all metals mined near the capital be sent there for payment of dues on the production.

2] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, January 27, 1848. General Orders No. 31. Broadside.

Eberstadt, p. 74. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 403.

Mandates that all precious metals coming into the city be declared or forfeited.

3] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, February 25, 1848. General Orders No. 13. Broadside. Signed by Lorenzo Thomas.

Broadside. Eberstadt, p. 75. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 406.

Modifies three general orders to prevent double taxation.

4] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, April 27, 1848. Orders No. 78. Broadside. Signed by Lorenzo Thomas.

Eberstadt, p. 76. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 410.

Sets the amount of duty on various forms of gold and silver (e.g., gold coins 3%, silver coins 6%), the export of which is now allowed.

5] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, Nov. 25, 1847. General Orders No. 358. Broadside. Signed by H.L. Scott.

Eberstadt, p. 72. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 396.

Forbids the export of unprocessed precious metals until further notice since it is required that Mexico support the American army. Also makes requirements for quartering troops.

6] Headquarters of the Army, Mexico, December 2, 1847. General Orders No. 362. Broadside.

Eberstadt, p. 72. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 397.

Forbids transporting precious metals to any place that cannot turn them into coinage.

 

Because of the requirement that Mexico support the U.S. Army while Mexico was occupied, the Army began to impose various tariffs and taxes, such as these, to raise the necessary revenues. Such policies were devastating to the Mexican government because they basically cut off most of its revenues.

($300.00-$600.00)

Auction 24 Abstracts

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