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AUCTION 24

Daily Life in Vera Cruz State During the War

<p>Item [1]</p>


508.    

[VERA CRUZ]. Ten 1847 documents issued in Vera Cruz state mostly concerning various local matters. Most are first editions.

All items begin with the heading: Juan Soto, Gobernador Constitucional del Estado Libre y Soberano de Veracruz, á sus habitantes, sabed: Que el honorable Congreso del estado ha decretado lo siguente.

[1] Broadside: 39 x 28.5 cm. [Xalapa, 1847]. Dated in type January 21, 1847, and January 22, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, upper left corner chipped, creased where formerly folded, small marginal tear at lower left.

Sets up qualifications for jurors (e.g., must be 25 years old, know how to read and write, etc.).

[2] Broadside: 45 x 30 cm. [Xalapa, 1847]. Dated in type January 27, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, upper left corner and lower left margin chipped, creased where formerly folded. With contemporary ink manuscript note at bottom stating it was published.

Orders the Tribunal Superior de Justicia to collect comparative crime statistics from year to year for crimes against persons, property, and the public order “á fin de que pueda conocerse si la criminalidad aumenta ó disminuye en el Estado.” A highly unusual sociological study.

[3] Broadside: 31.3 x 21.2 cm. [Xalapa, 1847]. Dated in type January 27, 1847, and January 30, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, upper left corner chipped, creased.

Establishes an agricultural society and provides qualifications for who may be a member. One of its functions is to promote colonization.

[4] Broadside: 30.5 x 23 cm. [Xalapa, 1847]. Dated in type January 29, 1847, and February 1, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, a few minor marginal holes, right margin slightly chipped

Suppresses article 18 of the Constitution and reorganizes Congress, including procedures for investigating crimes by high officials.

[5] Broadside: 30 x 21.5 cm. [Xalapa, 1847]. Dated in type February 1, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, upper right corner slightly chipped. With contemporary ink manuscript note at bottom stating it was published. On embossed paper.

States that Congress will use the powers granted to it by part 12 of article 65 of the Constitution during the invasion.

[6] Broadside: 32 x 21 cm. [Veracruz, 1847]. Dated in type February 19, 1847, and March 1, 1847. Upper margin, upper left corner, and lower left corner lightly chipped. With contemporary ink manuscript note at bottom stating it was published.

Second edition.

Establishes procedures for investigating issues involving the “Gobernador, Vice-Gobernador y Magistradas del Superior Tribunal de Justicia.”

[7] Broadside: 30.3 x 22 cm. [Santa Fe, 1847]. Dated in type March 3, 1847, and March 14, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, left margin slightly chipped, right margin somewhat irregular. With contemporary ink manuscript note at bottom stating it was published.

States that vacancies will not be filled without Congress’ approval. At this point American troops had landed at Collado Beach.

[8] Broadside: 30 x 22 cm. [Xalapa, 1847]. Dated in type April 14, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, minor marginal chipping. With contemporary ink manuscript note at bottom stating it was published.

Relieves taxes on certain foods (e.g., rice, butter, etc.) during the invasion. At this point, Veracruz had surrendered.

[9] Broadside: 32.5 x 22 cm. [Huastusco, 1847]. Dated in type September 23, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, lower corners chipped.

Provides procedures for actions against “alcaldes á jueces de paz.” All such procedures had to be on “sello quinto” paper. Xalapa had fallen on April 19. Huastusco was one of the towns on the line of retreat between Veracruz and Mexico City.

[10] Broadside: 32 x 22.5 cm. [Huastusco, 1847]. Dated in type September 21, 1847. Old stab holes in left margin, lower left corner chipped, right margin slightly irregular.

Announces that José Gutiérrez de Villaneuva is vice-president.

 

All these are interesting examples of how daily life and government went on despite the war.

Juan Soto Ramos (1798-1859), a professional soldier, tried earnestly to defend Veracruz City, but an exhausted treasury and an equally financially exhausted citizenry frustrated his efforts. He tried to raise money for the defense of Cerro Gordo and Orizaba, but with equally unsuccessful results. The state had an enormously difficult financial situation because of the lack of revenues caused by the American blockade.

($200.00-$400.00)

Auction 24 Abstracts

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