Dorothy Sloan – Books

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Ranching Catalogue Part 3
Items 2665-2689

The items in this catalogue have been sold. This catalogue was issued in print form in 2016, and is presented in full on our website as a courtesy to users and for reference purposes.

2665. HOUSE, Boyce. Texas—Proud and Loud. San Antonio: Naylor, [1945]. [8] 104 pp., illustrations by Winston Croslin. 8vo, original blue pictorial cloth. Mild outer wear, and light staining to last few leaves.

First edition. Includes a chapter entitled “Final Roundup” and a story about Jack Potter and a trail trip. Unfortunately there are a large number of disgusting racist jokes. $10.00

 

2666. HOUSE, Edward M. Riding for Texas: The True Adventures of Captain Bill McDonald of the Texas Rangers.... As Told by Colonel Edward M. House to Tyler Mason. New York: Reynal & Hitchcock, [1936]. xii [2] 229 pp. 12mo, original tan pictorial cloth. Endpapers browned, else fine in lightly worn price-clipped d.j.

First edition (portions were first printed serially in Liberty magazine under the title “Hell in Boots”). Guns 1043: “Like most books about the Texas Rangers, this one also deals with some of the outlaws of Texas.” Ranger McDonald was known as “the man who would charge hell with a bucket of water.” In addition to his occasional stock-raising ventures (primarily in the early 1880s), “his raids on cattle thieves and train robbers in No Man’s Land and the Cherokee Strip made him a Texas legend” (The Handbook of Texas Online: William Jesse McDonald). $35.00

 

2667. HOUSTON, Neal B. Ross Santee. Austin: Steck-Vaughn Company, [1968]. ii [2] 44 pp., Santee illustrations. 8vo, original beige printed wrappers. Fine.

First printing. Southwest Writers Series 18. Biography and bibliography of Santee. In addition to being a range author and illustrator, Santee punched cows and wrangled horses around Globe, Arizona, for several years. $10.00

 

2668. HOWARD, Joseph Kinsey. Montana: High, Wide, and Handsome. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1944. vi, 347 pp., illustrations by Peter Hurd, endpaper maps by Irvin Shope. 8vo, original tan cloth. Fine in d.j.

First edition. Guns 1049: “A well-written book giving some history of Montana, its vigilantes, and some of its latter-day outlaws.” Herd 1078. Smith 4696. The Montana newspaperman’s first book gives great detail on cattlemen, rustlers, immigrants, settlers, farmers, drought, etc. $35.00

 

2669. HOWARD, O[liver] O. My Life and Experiences among Our Hostile Indians: A Record of Personal Observations, Adventures, and Campaigns among the Indians of the Great West, with Some Account of Their Life, Habits, Traits, Religion, Ceremonies, Dress, Savage Instincts, and Customs in Peace and War. Hartford: A. D. Worthington & Company, [1907]. 570 pp., 10 chromolithograph plates, illustrations. 8vo, original dark blue embossed cloth gilt. Short crack to front hinge, else fine.

First edition. Campbell, pp. 36-37: “Beautifully illustrated with full-page engravings, chiefly from photographs supplied by the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, and a series of colored plates showing Indian objects of interest and curiosity in facsimile.... Much on the Cheyenne and Nez Percé tribes.” Graff 1981. Howes H710. Munk (Alliot), p. 109. Paher, Nevada 901: “Personal observations, adventures, and campaigns among Indians are mixed with some accounts of their lives, habit, traits, religion, dress, etc.” Rocq 14552. Saunders 2967. Sloan, Auction 9 (quoting Pingenot): “Autobiography of General Howard, who lost an arm in the Civil War, served on the western frontier, and accepted the surrender of Chief Joseph of the Nez Percé.” Smith 4699. Also covers Apaches in Arizona, Whitman Massacre, Custer’s Last Stand, Cochise, Modoc War, Piute and Bannock War, Chief Joseph, and the Civil War.

Ranching interest includes cattle rustling by Cochise, Seminole Billy Bow Legs, the Aravipa-Apache, et al. The Crow are described as “excellent herders.” The author addresses the controversies that arose on the Navaho reservation regarding stockmen grazing their herds on the vast stretches of land in the public domain and their proclivity to blame and punish the Navajo for all rustling and stock killing. Howard notes the large herds of cattle and horses owned by the Nez-Percé in White Bird Canyon. At the Yakima reservation, Howard describes their method of branding (not so different from what we remember witnessing as a child in Texas) and notes that the only thing Indians enjoy more than branding is killing cattle with firearms. The author speaks positively regarding the peaceful Pi-Utes in the Humboldt River area, and doubts they rustled cattle as claimed by settlers. During his last field assignment, in summing up the causes of Indian disrest and violence, Howard comments: “But it seems never to have occurred to many of our wise men that these people who had been accustomed for generations to get their living by hunting the buffalo, killing game, and selling peltries, could not immediately be transformed into gardeners and farmers. For the feeding of cattle and the herding of horses, and the pasturing of large flocks of sheep, immense tracts of the rolling prairies of the West have been needed and taken by white men, and they have not hesitated to use freely the public domain.” $150.00

 

2670. HOWARD, R. W. (ed.). This Is the West. New York, etc.: Rand McNally, [1957]. [8] 248 pp., plates, maps, numerous illustrations (some photographic). 8vo, original brown cloth. Fine in lightly worn d.j.

Second and best edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 77 (“A Range Man’s Library”): “Much to say on the whole of the range country.” Guns 1051: “First published as a Signet paperback without illustrations. It has chapters on gunmen and lawmen, dealing with Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch, the Johnson County War, and the Texas Rangers.” Herd 1079. Paher, Nevada 903. Chapters on mountain men, cowboys, Mormons, gunmen, lawmen, etc., with contributions by Walter S. Campbell, Walter Prescott Webb, Wayne Gard, Alice Marriott, S. Omar Barker, James D. Horan, Ramon Adams, and others. $15.00

 

2671. HOWARD, Sarah Elizabeth. Pen Pictures of the Plains. Denver: Reed, 1902. 128 pp., 16 photographic plates of Colorado scenes, portraits of Nathan Cook Meeker and his wife and daughter. 12mo, original green gilt-lettered cloth with color illustration mounted on upper cover, beveled edges. Cover illustration rubbed and light wear to cover, some staining to rear endpaper, internally fine.

First edition. Wilcox, p. 62: “Blank verse, largely concerned with the early days of the Greeley Colony.” Not in Wynar. A poetic tribute to the pioneer experience in Colorado, including the Meeker Massacre. Poems include “The Bronco Breakers” and “The Round-Up,” and the plates include several ranching-related images. $20.00

 

2672. HOWBERT, Irving. The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region Including an Account of the Battle of Sand Creek, and of Occurrences in El Paso County, Colorado, During the War with the Cheyennes and Arapahoes, in 1864 and 1868. New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1914. x, 230 pp., frontispiece, plates. 8vo, original blue gilt-lettered cloth, t.e.g. Fine, with author’s signed, dated inscription to C. C. Parks.

First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 233. Graff 1984. Howes H715. Rader 1958. Sloan, Auction 9 (quoting Pingenot): “An important contribution to the Indian war history of Colorado. Includes an account of the Battle of Sand Creek, in which Howbert was a participant, as well as occurrences in El Paso County, Colorado, during the war with the Cheyennes and Arapahoes in 1864 and 1868.” Wilcox, p. 62. Wynar 1512. Includes discussion of violent livestock-related conflicts between Native Americans and Anglo ranchers, including Garden Ranch, Holden Ranch, Gill’s Ranch, John Russell Ranch, et al. At one point all the ranches in the vicinity of Colorado City and other areas were abandoned. $50.00

 

2673. HOWBERT, Irving. The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region.... New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1914. Another copy. Fine, unopened, with author’s signed, dated inscription to Mrs. James D. Whitmore. $50.00

 

2674. HOWBERT, Irving. The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region.... New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1914. Another copy. Fine, with author’s signed, dated inscription to Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Wilder. $50.00

 

2675. HOWBERT, Irving. The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region.... New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1914. Another copy. Slight shelf wear, rear hinge cracked, pencil annotations in text, very good, inscribed and dated by author. $40.00

 

2676. HOWBERT, Irving. The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region.... New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1914. Another copy. Fine, partly unopened. $35.00

 

2677. HOWBERT, Irving. The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region.... Glorieta: Rio Grande Press, [1970]. [8] 230 [8, index] pp., frontispiece, illustrations, folding map, foldout photo reproduction, rear endpaper with facsimile newspaper accounts of author’s death. 8vo, original yellow decorative cloth. Fine.

Facsimile of the first edition. $20.00

 

2678. HOWBERT, Irving. Memories of a Lifetime in the Pike’s Peak Region. New York: J. B. Putnam’s Sons, 1925. [6] 298 pp., frontispiece. 8vo, original blue cloth. Fine in chipped and soiled d.j. Author’s signed, dated presentation inscription to J. Allard Jeancon. Program for banquet honoring Howbert laid in.

First edition. Campbell, p. 98. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 234. Wilcox, p. 62. Wynar 553. Material on Indian wars, railroads, and mining, along with several chapters first published in The Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region. $35.00

 

2679. HOWBERT, Irving. Memories of a Lifetime in the Pike’s Peak Region. New York: J. B. Putnam’s Sons, 1925. Another copy. A few marginal annotations in pencil, otherwise fine in chipped and torn d.j. Author’s dated presentation inscription to A. J. Fynn. $30.00

 

2680. HOWBERT, Irving. Memories of a Lifetime in the Pike’s Peak Region. New York: J. B. Putnam’s Sons, 1925. Light shelf wear, newspaper article about Howbert mounted on preliminary leaves, otherwise fine in chipped and soiled d.j. Author’s signed, dated presentation inscription to F. A. Mangold. $30.00

 

2681. HOWBERT, Irving. Memories of a Lifetime in the Pike’s Peak Region. New York: J. B. Putnam’s Sons, 1925. Another copy. Fine, d.j. not present. $20.00

 

2682. HOWBERT, Irving. Memories of a Lifetime in the Pike’s Peak Region. Glorieta: Rio Grande Press, [1970]. [10] vi, 298 [10, index] [17, photographs] pp., frontispiece, illustrations, folding map, rear endpaper with facsimile newspaper accounts of author’s death. 8vo, original yellow decorative cloth. Fine.

Facsimile of the first edition. $15.00

 

2683. HOWE, Charles Willis. Timberleg of the Diamond Trail and Other Frontier Anecdota. San Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. ix [1] 153 pp., illustrations by R. L. McCollister. 8vo, original yellow pictorial cloth. Fine in fine d.j. Signed by the author.

First edition. Adams, Burs I:198. Guns 1053: “Has a chapter on bad men and the law, dealing with some of the better-known Oklahoma and New Mexico outlaws.” Herd 1080. Frontier anecdotes, beginning with the title character, Chowning A. Embree of the Diamond Trail Ranch, a colorful one-legged Panhandle cowhand, and encompassing the Texas Rangers, Native Americans, ranching, cowboys, and many rugged characters of Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico (among them Wild Bill Hickok and Billy the Kid). $25.00

 

2684. HOWE, Charles Willis. Timberleg of the Diamond Trail.... San Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. Another copy. Fine in fine d.j. $15.00

 

2685. HOWE, Elvon L. (ed.). Rocky Mountain Empire: Revealing Glimpses of the West in Transition from Old to New, from the Pages of the “Rocky Mountain Empire Magazine” of the Denver Post. Garden City: Doubleday and Company, [1950]. xiv [1] 272 pp., illustrations and d.j. by H. Ray Baker, endpaper maps. 8vo, original half tan cloth over boards. Fine in lightly worn d.j. Presentation copy, signed by Palmer Hoyt, author of the foreword.

First edition. Guns 1054: “Chapter on Bill Carlisle, the lone train robber of Wyoming.” Herd 1081. While the emphasis is on frontiersmen, mountain men, military matters, and Native Americans, there are several cattle-related pieces, such as “King of the Steer Ropers” and “Last Roundup on the Bell.” $30.00

 

2686. HOWE, Elvon L. (ed.). Rocky Mountain Empire. Garden City: Doubleday and Company, [1950]. Another copy. Fine in lightly worn and soiled d.j. $15.00

 

2687. HOWE, Elvon L. (ed.). Rocky Mountain Empire. Garden City: Doubleday and Company, [1950]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original light brown cloth with decorative spine. Ink ownership inscription, else fine. $10.00

 

2688. HOWELL, Glade F. Early History of Malad Valley. N.p., 1960. vii, 130 leaves (one-sided mimeograph), maps. 4to, original yellow printed wrappers with black cloth spine. Fine.

Unpublished master’s thesis, Brigham Young University. Malad Valley was a Welsh Mormon settlement. In 1855 Brigham Young gave this description of southern Idaho: “Malad Valley, north of the Bear River, has been considered a pretty desolate, cold, hard, sterile valley. As we passed through it on our way north, we considered it tolerably good grazing country, and that people could possibly live there. But after we had traveled over the basin rim into Bannock County, down through the little Bannock Valley, over to Salmon River and wended our way down that stream through the swamps and willows and climbed over the points of the bluffs to keep from being mired, and returned again to Malad Valley, it looked to us like the most beautiful valley that any person had ever saw. Before this experience we thought nobody could live there, and I expect that if we had gone a few hundred miles north it would have looked still better.” Howell writes that the first Anglos to arrive in the Malad Valley were trappers, sent by the St. Louis Missouri Fur Company, in 1810. Only trappers and Indians visited the valley until 1849 when Captain Stansbury led an expedition through the area. Miners followed the trappers and brought the first cattle into the valley, probably from Fort Hall in 1853. The valley was ideal for livestock grazing and as a result of high meat costs at the mines, many of the miners decided to change their livelihood from mining to ranching. The area is prized for its lush grasses for grazing. $40.00

 

2689. HOYT, Henry F. A Frontier Doctor. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin Company & Riverside Press, 1929. xv [1] 260 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, facsimiles. 8vo, original brown blindstamped cloth. Lightly browned and bookdealer’s label partially removed from front flyleaf, else fine in lightly worn d.j.

First edition. Adams, Burs I:19; One-Fifty 74: “Scarce.... Well written and interesting book with some material on Billy the Kid and life in old Tascosa, Texas. The author’s information on Billy the Kid is correct. He also gives some new material on Jesse James.” Campbell, pp. 89-90. Dobie, p. 108. Dykes, Kid 145: “Dr. Hoyt was probably the first physician to practice medicine in the Texas Panhandle. Patients were few and far between and he had to become a cowboy to keep eating.” Guns 1055. Herd 1084. Howes H747. Rader 1963: “Frontier and pioneer life of Texas and New Mexico.” Saunders 2970. The author, who became the U.S. government’s chief surgeon during the Spanish-American War, was born in Minnesota Territory in 1854. He worked for the railroad before becoming a physician, and here recounts experiences from Deadwood to Tascosa. The author personally knew Siringo, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and Lew Wallace. Introduction by Frank B. Kellogg. $85.00