Dorothy Sloan – Books

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Ranching Catalogue Part 3
Items 2815-2839

The items in this catalogue have been sold. This catalogue was issued in print form in 2016, and is presented in full on our website as a courtesy to users and for reference purposes.

2815. JAMES, Vinton Lee. Frontier and Pioneer Recollections of Early Days in San Antonio and West Texas. San Antonio: Artes Graficas, 1938. 210 pp., 8 plates (mostly photographs and portrait), text illustrations. 8vo, original brown embossed and gilt decorated cloth. Fine. Privately published and uncommon.

First edition. Adams, Burs I:214: “This scarce, privately printed book of memoirs has some mention of King Fisher, Ben Thompson, and Billy the Kid.” Guns 1157: “Rare. Tells about King Fisher and his death and makes some mention of Billy the Kid.” Herd 1149. Vinton Lee James (1858-1939), a member of the John James family in San Antonio, certainly was in a good position to relate the early history of San Antonio and West Texas. James wrote this book in the first place to memorialize his father, John James, an early settler and important surveyor in Texas (see Handbook of Texas Online: John James). The first part of the book is devoted to his life, including a cattle drive to California in 1854. (Ironically, James became better known as a sheep rancher after importing 500 head of Merino sheep to his ranch in the Bandera-Uvalde area.) The narrative then continues with the author’s own life, which constitutes the bulk of the book and dwells considerably on hunting and fishing, which the author particularly enjoys and which activities he would like to see continue by way of legislation that regulates and protects the taking of game. His descriptions of West Texas are excellent and include a chapter on Texas Ranger James Dunn. Finally, the book includes a section on San Antonio society and activities. $350.00

 

2816. JAMES, Vinton Lee. Frontier and Pioneer Recollections.... San Antonio: Artes Graficas, 1938. Another copy, variant binding (maroon cloth). Binding very lightly rubbed, otherwise fine. $300.00

 

2817. JAMES, Vinton Lee. Frontier and Pioneer Recollections.... San Antonio: Artes Graficas, 1938. Another copy, wrappers issue. 8vo, original stiff tan pictorial wrappers. Very fine. The wrappers binding is the most difficult to find. $375.00

 

First Edition of Will S. James’ 27 Years a Mavrick

2818. JAMES, W[ill] S. 27 Years a Mavrick [sic] or Life on a Texas Range by W. S. James Author of Parson Levi Skinner’s Illustrated Sermons. Illustrated. Chicago: Donohue & Henneberry, Publishers, Printers and Binders, n.d. [1893]. Copyright on title verso: 1893. 6, 9-213 pp., 2 photographic prints of author (frontispiece: author as cowboy; and opposite p. 190: author as preacher, the latter included in pagination), 24 full-page text illustrations (line drawings), printed on only one side of sheet. 8vo, original navy blue pictorial cloth stamped in gilt and blind with image of a hand pointing toward a bull’s head. Some outer wear, a few spots on lower cover, text with a few small chips to blank corners, including title. This is an elusive imprint, and when found it is usually in dreadful condition due to the horrible, cheap pulp paper on which it was printed. The entire book has been carefully restored and washed by Green Dragon Bindery, who declare that it is good to go for another couple of hundred years when most other copies will have crumbled due to the original acidic paper on which it was printed. Front free endpaper and front flyleaf with contemporary ink ownership inscription: “Mr. Frank Sievert: Alpine, Cook Co. Ill.”

First edition. Later editions issued under title: Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or 27 Years a Mavrick.... Only in the first edition in cloth is the stamped bull head found on the binding. Line 17 on page 52 has “modern” instead of “ancient.” The number of illustrations varies: the first edition has two photographs of author and twenty-four full-page line drawings (subsequent editions omitted the photographic portraits of the author). The added illustrations in later editions are believed to have been a ploy to rev up sales, and some of them were actually prints meant for other books. In all editions the chapter numbers jump from chapter 13 to chapter 26. In Steck’s facsimile of this edition, R. H. Porter comments: “There is no doubt that the first edition proved popular. The publisher changed the title to Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or 27 Years a Maverick on subsequent editions.... [This] first edition...remains as one of the really hard-to-find cowboy and cattle industry books. It seldom appears in rare book catalogues and is even unknown to many of the bibliographers of cowboy and range books. Later editions, frequently called first editions, appear with some frequency in the better dealers’ catalogues.” Regarding the rogue spelling “Mavrick,” James states: “Some one might ask, why the name Mavrick is not spelled like the name from which the term originated, which has an ‘e,’ making Maverick; the reason is that I prefer to spell it as designated in the title and if that is not sufficient, I am at a loss to apologize for the change, the name here refers to unmarked cattle and not to people.” The reason for the change of publisher may be related to this news tidbit: “There was an explosion of natural gas on the 4th inst. wrecked the lower part of the printing establishment of Donohue & Henneberry on Dearborn Street” (Publishers’ Weekly 1093, January 7, 1893, p. 14). Donohue bought out Henneberry in 1903 and began using the M. A. Donohue & Company imprint.

Laura Lyons McLemore, Inventing Texas: Early Historians of the Lone Star State (College: Texas A&M Press, 2004), p. 87: “As the revolutionary generation aged and began to die out, Texans became conscious of the need to preserve the memory of men and deeds. In an effort to gain support for the preservation of Texas history, all kinds of personal accounts were regarded as history and used to keep alive these memories. This outpouring of nostalgia in the guise of history became more democratic.... Some of these authors retained the exciting, colorful style of romanticism, but some, like Will James, studiously avoided the sensational and tried to give straightforward accounts.”

Agatha, p. 60: “In 1893 a popular book in a cheap edition was published in Chicago by W. S. James. This story...was good proof that good people were interested in the romance of the plains whether true to fact or manufactured with an eye for quick sales to a gullible public.” Basic Texas Books 104: “Written by a cowboy turned preacher, this is a valuable account of the life of a Texas cowhand. James was born on his father’s ranch in Tarrant County near Fort Worth.... He worked as a cowhand from childhood until 1885 when he was converted, after which, he says ‘I went out among the cattlemen and worked as a missionary....’ Straightforward descriptions of the cowboy and of ranch life. [R. H. Porter] reports: ‘No edition examined had a page 7 or 8.’” Dobie, Life and Literature of the Southwest, pp. 108-109: “A genuine cowboy who became a genuine preacher and wrote a book of validity. This is the best of several books of reminiscences by cowboy preachers.” Graff 2194 (first edition, in wraps). Herd 1159: “Scarce.... Much sought by collectors of cattle books” (incorrectly designates this issue as a reprint). Howes J51 (lists subsequent edition first, but next lists the present edition, with the note “anr. issue, probably the first”). Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 20 (lists the revised edition of the same year). Rader 2067 (later edition). Raines, p. 125 (brief entry, too generalized to draw any conclusion). $2,500.00

 

2819. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: Donohue, Henneberry & Co. Publishers, [1893 or after]. Copyright on title verso: 1893. [2] 9-190, 193-213 pp., frontispiece portrait of author in cowboy gear, 32 full-page text illustrations. 8vo, original rich dark blue pictorial pebbled cloth stamped in black, spine gilt-lettered. Binding worn, upper hinge split, text browned and fragile due to poor quality of paper, overall very good.

Early issue of preceding, with new title page and omitting prefatory material and plate of James as a preacher facing page 190 in earlier versions. Basic Texas Books 104A: “Some assert that this is the first printing, but I believe it to be second.” R. H. Porter, in his introduction to the Steck facsimile of the first edition, states: “In all of the reprints published under the more commonly known title of Cow-Boy Life in Texas.... the introduction on pages 3-4...and the preface by the author on pages 4-5 are omitted.” See Porter’s book for additional notes on the various issues of James’ book. $450.00

 

Pictorial Wrappers

2820. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., n.d. [1893? or later]. [2] 9-190, 193-213 [1, ads] pp., 25 full-page text illustrations (not including wrapper illustration). 8vo, original pictorial wrappers with illustration of cowboy lassoing a bull, lettering in red and black. Upper hinge splitting, wraps somewhat darkened, text browned and fragile due to poor quality of paper, overall very good, considering the fragile format and the possibility of rowdy readers. Preserved in a four-fold case (brown cloth over decorated paper, red leather spine label). Understandably scarce in the very fragile original wraps.

Later issue, title page with imprint of M. A. Donohue & Co., omitting preface, introduction, and both photographic plates of author. Mixed issue when compared to entries 104B to 104F in Jenkins’s Basic Texas Books. Spine with “No. 92. Cow Boy Life in Texas”; verso of upper wrap with “The Flashlight Detective Series”; verso of final leaf: “Famous Books for Boys”; lower wrap with same text on recto and verso: “Biographies of Prominent Border Bandits.” The true bibliographical sequence of this highly popular publication has never been fully documented, although Jenkins in Basic Texas Books and R. H. Porter in his text accompanying the 1968 Steck facsimile make a good shot at detangling the plethora of reprints of this exceedingly popular book. Porter states in his preface: “The cowboy of the Southwest, especially Texas, had been maligned and overglorified in dime novels and other books about the West before W. S. James wrote his book in 1893. The distorted picture of the real cowboy in Western writing before 1893 may be the reason that James, a real cowboy, wrote a book to correct the wrong impressions that the reading public was getting of the cowboy. The book may not be much as literature, but it is an honest attempt to portray the Texas and Southwest cowboy as he really was.” The lower wrap of this wraps issue includes a blurb for the present book: “This is the only realistic and yet withal true recital of wild life on the boundless plains of Texas, it being the actual experience of 27 years in the exciting life of a genuine Cow Boy. The author was born in Texas at a time when no man’s life was safe and the whole southwest from the Missouri to the Rio Grande was infested with cruel and blood-thirsty outlaws. Contains more than 50 [sic] illustrations from life. 213 pages. PRICE: cloth, 75 cents; paper, 25 cents.” $250.00

 

2821. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., 407-429 Dearborn St., n.d. [1901? or after]. Copyright on title verso: indecipherable. [2] 9-190, 193-213 pp., twenty-five full-page text illustrations. 8vo, original pale blue-grey pictorial cloth stamped in black, spine gilt-lettered. Spine extremities lightly worn, text browned due to poor quality of paper, otherwise very good (better than usual).

Later issue, new title page with imprint M. A. Donohue & Co. and omitting preface, introduction, and both photographic plates of author. Basic Texas Books 104E or F (suggesting copyright 1898 or 1899). This printing has publisher’s earlier address (407-429 Dearborn Street), but the publisher’s name is the new name adopted in 1901. The history of the publisher provides some assistance in conjecturing date of publication of this oft-printed book. The copyright notices on title versos are usually so battered that the date is illegible. Perhaps a better way to speculate date of publication is by variants of the publisher’s name and address. According to the information compiled by Sid Huttner on The Lucile Project web pages: “M. A. Donohue & Co. based in Chicago, Illinois, was established in 1861, initially known as Cox and Donohue, Bookbinders. The publisher’s original location was 407-429 Dearborn St. in Chicago’s South Loop. The company was known for inexpensive editions of popular works of fiction. It focused on publishing sets and series of books (i.e., ‘libraries’). Around 1880, the name of the company was changed to Donohue & Henneberry, and in 1901 to M. A. Donohue & Company. It continued in business to the 1960s at 711-727 S. Dearborn St., Chicago.” $200.00

 

2822. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., 407-429 Dearborn St., n.d. [1901? or after]. Copyright on title verso indecipherable. [2] 9-190, 193-213 [1, ads] pp., 25 full-page text illustrations. 8vo, original blue pictorial linen stamped in black. Moderate outer wear, text browned and fragile due to poor quality of paper, otherwise very good.

Later issue, publisher M. A. Donohue & Co., and advertisement for “Famous Books for Boys” on verso of p. 213. $125.00

 

2823. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., 407-429 Dearborn St., n.d. [1901? or after]. Copyright on title verso indecipherable. [2] 9-190, 193-213 [1, ads] pp., 25 full-page illustrations. 8vo, original tan pictorial cloth stamped in black. Shelf-worn, especially at spinal extremities, pulp paper browned as usual.

Later issue. $100.00

 

2824. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., n.d. [1901? or after]. Copyright on title verso indecipherable. [2] 9-190, 193-213 [1, ads] pp., 25 full-page text illustrations. 8vo, original teal pictorial cloth stamped in black. Usual shelf wear and browning of paper. Book label of Baton Rouge book dealer.

Later issue. $100.00

 

2825. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., n.d. [1901 or later]. Copyright on title verso indecipherable. [2] 9-190, 193-213 [1, ads] pp., illustrations. 8vo, original brown pictorial cloth stamped in black. Moderate outer wear, text browned and fragile due to poor quality of paper, otherwise very good.

Later issue, with advertisement for “The Bandit Four” on verso of page 213. $100.00

 

2826. JAMES, W[ill] S. Cow-Boy Life in Texas, or, 27 Years a Mavrick [sic]: A Realistic and True Recital of Wild Life on the Boundless Plains of Texas, Being the Actual Experience of Twenty-Seven Years in the Exciting Life of a Genuine Cow-Boy among the Roughs and Toughs of Texas. Over Fifty Illustrations, Taken from Life. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Co., [1901 or later]. Copyright on title verso indecipherable. [2] 9-190, 193-213 [1, ads] pp., illustrations. 8vo, original cream pictorial wrappers. Wrappers lightly worn, text browned and fragile due to poor quality of paper, otherwise very good.

Later issue, with advertisement for “Flashlight Detective Series” on verso of page 213. $125.00

 

2827. JAMES, W[ill] S. 27 Years a Mavrick or Life on a Texas Range…. Austin: Steck-Vaughn Company, [1968]. [10] 6, 9-232 pp., illustrations. 8vo, original blue pictorial cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. Preserved in publisher’s navy blue slipcase. All in editor R. H. Porter’s original mailing box to Dudley R. Dobie, along with Porter’s Christmas card and DRD’s notes.

Facsimile of the first edition. Basic Texas Books 104G. Excellent research tool with notes by R. H. Porter on the various printings. Porter acknowledges the assistance of Dudley R. Dobie in researching the various issues of James’s immensely popular book. $50.00

 

A Good Selection of Works by “The Pied Piper of the West”

2828. JAMES, Will. All in the Day’s Riding. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1933. xiv [2] 251 [1] pp., numerous illustrations by author. 8vo, original red cloth gilt-lettered on spine and upper cover, illustration of horse on upper cover. Except for minor chipping at upper spine and very light shelf wear, a very good copy. D.j. present but in poor condition. Gift inscription on front pastedown: “To Doris on the way to the West she loves so well. September 1933 Daddy.”

First edition, first issue, with the letter “A” and publisher’s seal at bottom of copyright page. Much of the material appeared previously in Scribner’s, Saturday Evening Post, etc. Frazier, pp. 72-78: “42 short stories and monographs, this fascinating book has more detail and more accurate cowboy lore than is in any other book anywhere. If you can’t find answers to your cow and horse work questions here, they probably don’t exist.” Herd 1150. Rader 2068. Smith 5108. James states in his preface: “A variety of writings that tell of the cowboy’s riggings, the cowboy today, and why the high heels, the big hat and such like, along with experiences in narrow escapes that’s all in the day’s riding. I’m not stretching the truth in none and all can be proved in most every day of the cowboy’s life. Even the stories, they might sound like fiction but they’re from facts. I can tell a lie with a grin while making a horse trade but I can’t write fiction, and as far as my writing being in cowboy vernacular, as some say, it strikes me as being only as anybody would talk who got his raising and education outside, and where university roofs is the sky and the floors prairie sod” (pp. 2-3). $100.00

 

2829. JAMES, Will. Big-Enough. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1931. [6] 314 pp., frontispiece, illustrations by the author. 8vo, original yellow pictorial cloth. Lightly soiled, otherwise fine. Bookplate.

First edition, first issue (letter “A” on copyright page). Smith 5112. Western coming-of-age novel about “a cowboy and a cowhorse-born on the same day. They growed up together to where they was big enough, Big-Enough for most anything.” Will James was born Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault in the province of Quebec on June 6, 1892. He left home as a teenager to live out his dream of becoming a cowboy in the American West, and went on to write and illustrate twenty-four books and numerous magazine articles about cowboying, horses, and the West. His works consistently captured the imagination of the public, earning him the nickname “the Pied Piper of the West.” $25.00

 

2830. JAMES, Will. Cow Country. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1927. xii, 242 pp., frontispiece, plates, illustrations by the author. 4to, original brown pictorial cloth. Fine.

First edition, second issue, without “A” on copyright page. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 51 (“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #48): “James was another writer-illustrator who utilized line drawings with good effect.... The pen and ink drawings in this book have power.” Herd 1152. Smith 5117. Collection of eight short stories about the open range, roundups, remudas, branding, cow camps, and cowboys. “Will James was able to permeate his work with an excitement and freshness that both the public and critics could not miss. He was invariably original in pictures and words and never derivative. He draws in pencil or ink in a technically superb and imaginative fashion which was perfectly united with the content and subject. His gestural (motion or action) abilities in art were of the highest rank and often unsurpassed even today” (Abe Hays, Western art critic and authority on Will James). $20.00

 

2831. JAMES, Will. Cowboy in the Making.... Arranged from the First Chapters of “Lone Cowboy.” New York: Scribner’s Sons, 1937. [8] 91 pp., illustrations by the author. 8vo, original teal pictorial cloth. Hinges discolored, otherwise fine in lightly worn d.j.

First edition, with letter “A” on copyright page. Smith 5120. Juvenile literature about an orphaned boy who strikes out with a French-Canadian trapper and befriends a pair of wolves. Grizzlies, blizzards, and classic cowboy scenes round out the tale. $45.00

 

2832. JAMES, Will. Cowboy in the Making.... New York: Scribner’s Sons, 1937. Another copy. Fine, d.j. not present. $35.00

 

2833. JAMES, Will. Cowboys North and South. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1924. xvii [1] 217 pp., frontispiece, plates, illustrations by the author. 8vo, original grey pictorial cloth. Spine dark, otherwise very good.

First edition, second issue (without letter “A” on copyright page) of author’s first book. Campbell, p. 131: “Much about horses, cattle, and cowboy life.” Dobie, p. 108. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 36 (“High Spots of Western Fiction: 1902-1952”). Herd 1153. Howes J55: “First and best of his many books.” Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 20n. Smith 5121. From the jacket: “The stories of Will James...are left in the picturesque vernacular and hence are more than ever real. As the author says: ‘Good English is all right, but when I want to say something I believe in hitting straight to the point without fishing for decorated language.... I was born and raised in the cow country, I am a cowboy, and what’s put down in these pages is not material that I’ve hunted up, it’s what I’ve lived, seen, and went thru before I ever had any idea that my writing and sketches would ever appear before the public.’” $25.00

 

2834. JAMES, Will. The Drifting Cowboy. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1925. xii, 241 pp., illustrations (some full page) by author. 8vo, original brown cloth over tan pictorial boards. Upper corners lightly bumped, gilt lettering on spine tarnished, endpapers browned due to contact with d.j. Overall very good in chipped d.j. in first issue.

First edition of author’s second book. Dobie, p. 108. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 36 (“High Spots of Western Fiction: 1902-1952”). Frazier, pp. 9-15: “The book continues to teach the ways of the working and playing West. Will James shows the fun side and the rough side of the cowboy’s life. As with his first book, this title is very scarce in a fine first edition with all the gilt lettering on the spine and with a fine dust jacket. The Drifting Cowboy was produced in only one first edition state and is identified as such by the date, 1925, at the bottom of the title page under Scribner’s name. All subsequent Scribner’s reprints have a later date or no date at the bottom of the title page.” Herd 1154. Smith 5130. $125.00

 

2835. JAMES, Will. “Filling in the Cracks” in Southwest Review 10:4 (July 1925). Pp. 2-25, illustrations by author. 8vo, original brown printed wrappers. Wrappers chipped.

First printing. Story of stunt riding and Western extra work in Hollywood in the 1920s. This issue also includes “Cliff Meeting,” by Conrad Aiken and “A Letter (A Poem)” by Robert Graves. $10.00

 

2836. JAMES, Will. Home Ranch. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1935. xvii [1] 346 pp., frontispiece, plates, illustrations by the author. 8vo, original reddish brown cloth. Fine.

First edition, with letter “A” and seal on copyright page. Herd 1155. Smith 5136. “Without pulling a single six-gun, fanning a trigger, or using any other stock device of Western fiction, Will James tells the story of life on the Seven X Ranch during the early 1900s. This authentic portrait of a ranching family details their dangerous work, their hopes and fears, and the rugged land in which they lived” (publisher’s blurb). $100.00

 

2837. JAMES, Will. Lone Cowboy: My Life Story. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1930. x [2] 431 [2] pp., frontispiece portrait, plates and illustrations by author. 8vo, original green pictorial cloth. Minor wear at spinal extremities, otherwise fine in price-clipped d.j. with slight edge wear.

First edition, with letter “A” and seal on copyright page. Campbell, pp. 49, 85. Dobie, p. 108. Herd 1157. McCracken, 101, p. 33: “James was a cowboy, an artist, and an author, writing and illustrating 24 books drawn on his experiences in the west. While touted as an autobiography, Lone Cowboy is now recognized as a mostly fictionalized account of James’s life. Coming on the heels of Smoky, this book was also a best seller and the story accepted as truth for many years.” Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 20n. Paher, Nevada 973. Saunders 4249. Smith 5146. $125.00

 

2838. JAMES, Will. Sand. New York & London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1929. x [2] 328 pp., frontispiece, illustrations by author. 8vo, original green pictorial cloth. Other than minor outer wear, very good.

First edition (this James title did not have an “A” on copyright page in the first issue; there are three lines of text on title verso). Frazier, pp. 31-34: “Sand is a novel about a wastrel tenderfoot who turns himself into a working cowboy. It takes a few years but he gets the job done. He gets the champion mustang nobody could catch, and the gal that was even harder to corral. A very satisfactory conclusion.... The drawings rank up with his best and none is a repeat.” Smith 5153. The “sand” referred to in the title is the grit it takes to face life’s challenges, highlighted here against the backdrop of harsh High Plains conditions and the conflict between a cowboy and a black stallion. $40.00

 

2839. JAMES, Will. Scorpion: A Good Bad Horse. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1936. viii, 312 pp., illustrations by author. 8vo, original terracotta cloth. Fine in soiled and torn d.j.

First edition, with letter “A” and seal on copyright page. Smith 5159. An outlaw’s seemingly bad horse converts him from a life of crime. $40.00