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AUCTION 19

“No Collection of Texana Complete without Richardson’s Texas Almanacs” (Raines)

194. [TEXAS ALMANACS].  Collection of 14 Texas almanacs, 1856-1882. Condition varies, some rough and a few incomplete.  Sold not subject to return. The almanacs for 1857, 1860, and 1861 bear the pencil signature of Eleanor Onderdonk (1884-1964), painter and art curator at the Witte Museum. As Jenkins (Basic Texas Books 172) comments:  “The Richardson almanacs comprise one of the finest research sources for virtually every aspect of nineteenth-century Texas history.  Particularly in the pre-war issues, there are literally dozens of memoirs, biographies, and historical essays of great value.  Most of these articles were written from interviews with participants, or by the participants themselves.  Much of our surviving eyewitness information on the Texas Revolution and Republic of Texas appears in the Richardson almanacs, as well as a vast amount of economic and statistical data.  Every volume, excepting only the war issues, is a separate mine for the researcher... In addition to the wealth of material on early Texas history, the Richardson almanacs, particularly the post-war issues, are rich in articles on cattle and sheep ranching, railroads, commerce, and annual statistical data.”  Discussing Texas almanacs as a rich source for the history of Texas counties, H. Bailey Carroll describes them collectively as “The Encyclopedia of Texas” (Southwestern Historical Quarterly 45:4).

RICHARDSON, W. & D. [The Texas Almanac for 1857....  Galveston:  Richardson & Co., 1856]. 1-32, [48 ads (some on colored paper)], [33]-159 [1] pp. (wanting pp. 1-10).  8vo, original lower tan printed wrapper (wanting upper wrapper).  Wrapper darkened and lightly chipped, ink stains on first few leaves, most leaves moderately to heavily waterstained.  Fair.
     First editionBasic Texas Books 172 (10,000 copies printed). Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 713.  This almanac begins a series on Texas history, here covering the early years up until Austin’s colony.  It also includes some biographies, such as those of Branch Archer, James Bowie, David S. Burnet, and Benjamin R. Milam.

RICHARDSON, W. & D. The Texas Almanac for 1858....  Galveston:  Richardson & Co., 1857. 194, [2], [80 (of 84) ads] pp., five woodcut plates (some signed J. H. Byram, Philadelphia).  8vo, original upper green printed wrapper (wanting lower wrapper).  Wrapper darkened, lightly chipped, with extensive paper tape repairs; text browned. Good.
     First editionBasic Texas Books 172 (25,000 copies printed). Howes T138. Raines, p. 174.  Winkler 886.  This edition continues the early history of Texas begun in the previous year, including much material on Austin’s colony.  Biographies include Thomas Jefferson Rusk, Mirabeau B. Lamar, and Sidney Sherman, all illustrated with a portrait.

RICHARDSON, W. & D. The Texas Almanac for 1859... [wrapper title]. [Galveston: The Galveston News...by W. & D. Richardson, 1858]. 224 [2] [78 ads] pp. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers.  Wrappers darkened and lightly chipped with small abrasion on upper wrapper costing a few letters, otherwise very good.
     First edition, first issue, with defamatory remarks about Col. Forbes and others who divided the spoils after the Battle of San Jacinto (p. 61). Basic Texas Books 172B. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174.  Winkler 1052. N. D. Labadie’s lengthy eyewitness narrative of the San Jacinto campaign; Col. Fernando Urissa’s account of the Alamo (first known eyewitness account of David Crockett’s death, according to Kilgore, How Did Davy Die?); G. W. Kendall’s “Sheep Raising in Texas”; biography of Sam Houston; Matamoros Expedition by the only survivor; “Overland Mail Route between San Antonio, Texas, and San Diego, California—Detailed Account of the Country and Everything Connected with this Great Enterprise”; “Progress of our Railroads”; etc. The anti-Houston tone in many of the eyewitness memoirs in the early Almanacs so infuriated Sam Houston that he lambasted Richardson from the floor of the U.S. Senate in 1859.

RICHARDSON, W. & D. [The Texas Almanac for 1860....  Galveston: Galveston News by W. &. D. Richardson, 1859].  228 [90 (of 92) ads] pp.  8vo.  Wants wrappers, spine repaired with paper tape, text lightly browned and slightly waterstained.  Fair.
     First editionBasic Texas Books 172D. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174.  Winkler 1204.  This edition contains extensive discussions of early Texas history continued from the previous edition.  Included are comments on the Battle of San Jacinto by both J. P. Borden and William Jones Elliott Heard.  Also printed is a brief history of the Texas Navy during the Texas Revolution, including lists of officers.  Considerable space is given to the raising of sheep and goats.

RICHARDSON, W. & D. The Texas Almanac for 1861....  [Galveston: Galveston News by W. &. D. Richardson, 1860] [wrapper title]. [2 ads on yellow paper], 336 pp.  8vo, original upper green printed wrapper (wants lower wrapper).  Wrapper and spine chipped, lower right blank corners lightly waterstained, otherwise very good. 
     First edition, second issue.  Basic Texas Books 172F (30,000 copies printed). Howes T138. Raines, p. 174.  Winkler 1373.  This edition contains a continuation of Texas history from the previous year’s edition, here concentrating on events after the Battle of San Jacinto, including the Treaty of Velasco, reprinted here along with its secret clauses.  Several reminiscences of the time by eye-witnesses and participants are included.  Other sections give the history of Indian wars and conflicts.  The detailed county-by-county discussions include comments on ranching and stock raising as appropriate.

RICHARDSON, W. The Texas Almanac for 1867..... Galveston: The Galveston News, [1866] [wrapper title]. 360 pp. 8vo, original upper green printed wrapper (wants lower wrapper).   Wrapper lightly chipped, text slightly browned, otherwise good.
     First edition. Basic Texas Books 172K. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 1518.  This edition reflects the concerns that lingered after the end of the Civil War.  There is even a section discussing the various fluctuations of Confederate and U.S. money.  Much of the text reflects the shift of Texas from primarily a cattle rearing state to one also more dependent on other stock, such as sheep, and on cotton as a staple crop.

RICHARDSON, W. The Texas Almanac for 1868.... Galveston: The Galveston News, [1867] [wrapper title]. 312 pp. 8vo, original green printed wrapper.  Wrapper lightly chipped, otherwise very good.
     First edition. Basic Texas Books 172L. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 1683. Includes obituary of George W. Kendall; Henry S. Randall’s articles on sheep raising; much on immigration to Texas; yellow fever in 1867; Indian depredations and captivities; Texas railroads; “Description of South-Western Texas” by Judge E. J. Davis of Brownsville; “Directions for a Small Farmer in Texas” by a Texas Farmer; “Grape Culture in Texas”; Gideon Lincecum on a wide variety of natural history subjects; “The Fall of the Alamo” by R. M. Potter.

RICHARDSON, W. The Texas Almanac for 1869, and Emigrant’s Guide to Texas... Galveston: W. Richardson & Co., [1868] [wrapper title]. 286 pp. (lacking pp. 287-288). 8vo, original blue printed upper wrapper (lacking lower wrapper).  Upper wrapper chipped and loose, otherwise good.
     First edition. Basic Texas Books 172M. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 1913. The preface states: “We have found it necessary to make the addition of ‘Emigrant’s Guide to Texas’ on our title-page, so that its true import may be understood by those who have not read The Texas Almanac before.” Several fine, long articles on emigration, along with essays on relations with Texas Indians, Bexar remonstrance, railroads, wine culture, Henry S. Randall on sheep raising; “Silk Culture in California”; “San Antonio and El Paso Mail Line”; much on cotton; and 27 pages of “Historical Reminiscences” taken from an 1833 file of the Brazoria Constitutional Advocate.
           
RICHARDSON, W. & A. H. Belo. The Texas Almanac for 1870, and Emigrant’s Guide to Texas....  Galveston: The Galveston News, [1869] [wrapper title].   286 pp. 8vo, later red buckram with gilt-lettered spine, original tan printed upper wrapper bound in (lower wrapper wanting).  Wrapper moderately chipped and laid down, first few leaves damaged, otherwise good.
     First edition, the variant with preface dated January, 1870. Basic Texas Books 172O. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 2593. Issued during Reconstruction, Richardson states: “Our anomalous political condition, our compound form of government partly military and partly civil, together with the numerous vacancies in the postal and every other department, caused by the exclusion of nearly all qualified to fill the offices, from their inability to take the required oath, or from their assumed disloyalty—these and other causes have so utterly deranged the ordinary functions of our State Government as to render every search for the usual statistical information unavailing.” Contains Texas Reconstruction Constitution; account of the Alamo by Martínez Caro; Battle of San Jacinto by Delgado; “How to Find a Home in Western Texas”; “Laws Regulating the Trade in Hides and Cattle”; H. C. King’s “Sheep Husbandry”; S. W. Allen’s “Stock-Raising and the Cattle Trade of Western Texas”; J. De Cordova’s “The Panhandle of Texas”; J. M. Wilson’s “The Mesquite Tree”; etc. 

RICHARDSON, W. [The Texas Almanac for 1872, and Emigrant’s Guide to Texas.... Galveston: The Galveston News, 1871]. xiv, 242 pp. (lacking pp. 57-60). 8vo, original tan printed upper wrapper (lacks upper wrapper).  First few leaves and lower wrapper chipped, old tape repairs to spine, otherwise fair.
     First edition. Basic Texas Books 172Q. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 2859. “Encouragement to Immigrant”; “A Practical Plan by Which any Man in Texas May Make His Land Valuable, and at the Same Time Give the Poor Immigrants Comfortable and Independent Homes”; “Sheep Husbandry” by Henry C. King; “Texas, the Poor Man’s Country”; Roessler’s “Mineral Resources of Texas”; “Frontier Legends” by J. Eliot; “Aboriginal Antiquities of Texas” by J. H. Kuykendall; “The Germans in Texas”; J. M. Wilson’s “The Water Power of Western Texas” (with a description of the springs of Edwards Aquifer); J. H. Sheppard’s “Survivors of the Texas Revolution”; “Battle of Velasco in 1832—Full Particulars By a Participant”; “The Carancaway Indians” by J. H. Kuykendall; “Old Texians”; “The Last of the Alabamas.”

RICHARDSON, BELO & CO. The Texas Almanac for 1873, and Emigrant’s Guide to Texas... [wrapper title]. [Wrapper imprint]: Galveston: The Galveston News, [1872]. 240 pp., numerous ads. 8vo, original goldenrod printed wrappers.  Lower wrapper chipped, torn, and separated, otherwise good.
     First edition. Basic Texas Books 172R. Howes T138. Raines, p. 174. Winkler 3099. Includes a detailed “Record of Texas Cattle Passing Caldwell, Kansas, Driven over the Old Chisholm Trail, for the year 1872,” giving owner, number of cattle, and other information for 292 herds. W. P. Zuber’s “An Escape from the Alamo”; “Early History of Anahuac”; “Reminiscences of Early Texans” by Henry S. Brown; Col. A. M. Hobby’s “Life of David G. Burnet”; pioneer nurseryman Onderdonk’s “Fruits of Western Texas”; much on railroads; newly established city of Dallas; stock raising; “Texas Minerals” by Roessler; immigration, including a prospectus on the East Texas Immigration Society and “How to Find a Home in Western Texas.” The Panic of 1873 adversely affected the Richardson firm, and this was the last of the Richardson almanacs.

BURKE, J.  Burke’s Texas Almanac for 1878....  Houston:  J. Burke, [1877].  200 pp.  8vo, original upper green printed wrappers.  Except for minor flaws to wrappers, very good.
     First edition. The running title is “Texas Rural Almanac,” and the text is pitched towards those who inhabit non-urban areas.  Considerable attention is given to rural pursuits, such as sheep raising and fruit cultivation.  One unusual section urges that people plant the McCartney rose as hedges rather than try to erect fences:  “Serving as our barriers for the orchard and the vineyard, the field and the pasture, it will enable our people to utilize the vast area of our magnificent State, and hasten the day for the development of our slumbering resources” (p. 55).

BURKE, J.  Burke’s Texas Almanac for 1878....  Houston:  J. Burke, [1877].  [6 ads (some on colored paper)], 200 pp.  8vo, later black, gilt-lettered cloth, original upper green printed wrapper bound in (wants lower wrapper).  Good.
     First edition.  Another copy.

BURKE, J.  Burke’s Texas Almanac for 1883....  Houston:  J. Burke, [1882].  16, [4 ads in red and blue ink], 17-224 pp.  8vo, original green printed wrappers.  Wrappers detached, slightly chipped, and mildly stained; lower blank corners of most leaves missing, otherwise good.
     First edition.  Includes information for emigrants, discussion of Civil War battles in Texas, and laudatory commentary on such industries as fruit growing, stock herding, and farming.  ($1,500-3,000) 

Auction 19 Short Title List | Auction 19 Prices Realized

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