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AUCTION 22

 

Folio Lithographs from McKenney & Hall Indian Tribes of North America


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433.     [NATIVE AMERICAN PORTRAITS]. [KING, Charles Bird (after)]. Three hand-colored lithographs from a folio edition of Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall’s Indian Tribes of North America. When leaders of various tribes came to visit President Monroe in 1821, McKenney, Superintendent of Indian Affairs and a defender of Native American interests, commissioned artist Charles Bird King to paint portraits of the delegates in their choice of dress. Most of King’s original paintings subsequently burned in a fire at the Smithsonian. The lithographs in McKenney and Hall’s publication are the only extant record of the likenesses of many of the prominent Native American leaders of the nineteenth century. See: Howes M129. Bennett, American Nineteenth-Century Color Plate Books, p. 79. Field 992. Lipperheide Mc4.

HAYNE HUDJIHINI, EAGLE OF DELIGHT

Hayne Hudjihini Eagle of Delight. Philadelphia Published by E.C. Biddle Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1833 by E.C. Biddle in the Clerks office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pa. [below image] Painted by C.B. King | Lehman & Duval Lithrs. Hand-colored lithograph, head-and-shoulders portrait of female Oto, wife of Chief Shaumonekusse, long black braids with hair parted at center, white and black beaded ear loops, four necklaces, silver bracelet, ruffled blouse or dress top, white and black fur or shawl loosely wrapped around her shoulders, one delicate hand showing. Image: 26 x 20.5 cm; image & text: 30.3 x 20.5 cm; overall sheet size: 44.6 x 33.7 cm. A few small spots and very faint age-toning, otherwise fine (professionally washed and stabilized). Old wooden frame. Hayne Hudjihini or Eagle of Delight (ca. 1804-1822) accompanied her husband to Washington, D.C. in 1821 and so delighted those she met that she was loaded down with presents and King painted several portraits of her. She was thought to be the most beautiful of all the Native American wives who visited Washington. Unfortunately, she died of measles shortly after her return home. A portrait of her hangs in the White House Library.

TUKO-SEE-MATHLA, A SEMINOLE CHIEF

Tuko-See-Mathla A Seminole Chief. Published by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark, Phila. Drawn, Printed & Coloured at the Lithographic & Print Colouring Estblishment, 94, Walnut St. Phila. Entered according to act of Congress in the Year 1843, by James G. Clark in the Clerks office of the District Court of the Eastern district of Pennsylvania. Hand-colored lithograph, full-length standing portrait of male Seminole chief carrying a rifle, wearing striped, fringed wrap skirt, striped shirt, red sashes around neck and waist, red feathered headdress, silver arm bands, shin-high moccasins with buttons, and medal around neck. Image: 36.2 x 24.5 cm; image & text: 45.7 x 24.5 cm; overall sheet size: 49.7 x 35.6 cm. Other than very mild uniform age-toning, fine (professionally washed and stabilized). Old wooden frame. Tuko-See-Mathla, also called John Hicks, was an influential Native American leader elected head of his tribe in an election supposedly rigged by U.S. agents. He opposed U.S. slave raids into Florida, separate schools for Indians, and efforts to move Seminoles from their land. Despite his efforts, however, he eventually moved back to Alabama and was finally killed by tribesmen who opposed U.S. policies.

WA-NA-TA, THE CHARGER, GRAND CHIEF OF THE SIOUX

Wa-Na-Ta. The Charger, Grand Chief of the Sioux. Philadelphia, Published by E.C. Biddle. Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1837 by E.C. Biddle in the Clerks office of the District Court of Eastern District of [scrubbed]; [below image at right] Lehman & Duval Lithrs. Hand-colored lithograph, full-length standing portrait of male Sioux chief holding a rifle, wearing brightly colored blankets, feathered headdress, necklace of grizzly bear claws, and red leggings decorated with bird feathers. Image: 35.5 x 21 cm; image & text: 40 x 21 cm; overall sheet size: 44.5 x 33.8 cm. Other than very mild uniform age-toning, fine (professionally washed and stabilized). Old wooden frame. Wa-Na-Ta (ca. 1795-1848) was an influential Sioux (Yanktona, on the Minnesota River) leader who fought against the Americans in the War of 1812, even leading a charge on Fort Sandusky, whence his nickname. For his exceptional heroism he was received at the English court and promoted to Captain. After the war, however, he sided with the U.S. In 1825, he signed the Treaties of Fort Pierre and Prairie du Chien, which established peace and territorial boundaries between the Sioux, Chippewas, Sac and Foxes, and Ioways. He was murdered by his people, who were upset with his leadership. Major Stephen H. Long met Wa-Na-Ta in 1835 and commented: “We had never seen a nobler face, or a more impressive character.”

($1,200-2,400)

Sold. Hammer: $1,200.00; Price Realized: $1,440.00

Auction 22 Abstracts

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