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Auction 6: Lots 11-20


Item 11, detail

11. BURNET, David G. (1788-1870), Frederick A. Sawyer (?-?) & John M. Swisher (1819-1891). Autograph letter, signed by Sawyer, with approval signature of Burnet, and docket signature of Swisher, addressed to Bailey Hardeman, Secretary of the Treasury, regarding payment of $100 to cover forwarding expenses of Col. Austin as Quartermaster General. War Department, August 17, 1836. 1 p., 4to. Creased where formerly folded, else very fine.

This document, signed by Burnet, Sawyer, and San Jacinto veteran Swisher (New Handbook VI:180-81), was written during the extremely difficult time after the Texian Revolution, when the government of the Republic of Texas was being formed under the greatest of difficulties. Burnet signed his approval on this letter in his capacity as ad interim President of the Republic of Texas (New Handbook I:848-49). Sawyer (New Handbook V:906) wrote the letter as Burnet's acting Secretary of War. Recipient Hardeman (New Handbook III:448-49) was Secretary of the Treasury of the young Republic. The document also bears interest for referring to Stephen F. Austin's role as Quartermaster General of the Texian Army.
($2,000-4,000)


12. BURNET, David G. (1788-1870). Engraved Republic of Texas bond completed in manuscript, signed by Burnet on January 1, 1841, as President of the Republic of Texas. Text commences: Government Bond, Payable to Holder.... The Republic of Texas Promises to Pay to [Charles DeMorse] Stock Commissioner or Order One Hundred Dollars.... New Orleans: Endicott & Clark, [1840]. Vignette of Vulcan at his forge at center, cattle at left, bull at upper right, steamship with Texas flag at lower right, and five point star at bottom. All coupons present; triangular clip cancels. Cancel cuts reinforced on verso.

Republic of Texas $100 bond at 8% interest, issued under the Act of February 5, 1840. Also signed by bondholder Charles DeMorse (1816-1887, New Handbook II:591-92), stock commissioner under Mirabeau B. Lamar. DeMorse founded the Clarksville Northern Standard in 1842 and continued as its publisher and editor until his death. He helped in the organization of the Democratic Party in Texas and has been called the "Father of the Texas Democratic Press." Criswell 40A.
($150-300) $373.75

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Item 13 - detail

13. [CALIFORNIA PICTORIAL STATIONERY]. Mammoth Grove Hotel J. L. Sperry, Proprietor. Big Trees, Calaveras Co., Cal. ________ 188_. N.p., n.d. Pictorial stationery with printed text. Double sheet, folded to 4 pp.: 25.3 x 20.2 cm. (10 x 8 inches). 2 wood-engraved illustrations on p. [1], double column printed text on pp. [3-4]. Creased where formerly folded, a few short splits at folds.

With a letter from P. P. Hoskins to "My Dear Family," from Stockton, June 6, 188?, saying that the Mammoth Grove Hotel was not all that he had anticipated and discussing his trip. The illustrations, signed in print by T. J. Pettit, depict the hotel and a short section of fallen trunk with a stairway to its top. The extensive printed text is entitled "Description of the Mammoth and South Park Groves." This issue (with two illustrations and printed date "188") is not in Currey & Kruska, Bibliography of Yosemite (see pp. 122-24).
($500-750)


"Some of the finest examples of the lithographer's art during the latter part of the century"—Mathes

14. CASTRO, Casimiro & Antonio García Cubas. Album of the Mexican Railway: A Collection of Views Taken from Nature...With a Description of the Line and Country Through Which it Passes. Mexico: Debray, 1877. [4] 48 pp. (title and text in English and Spanish, French text at end), 25 chromolithographed plates (including title) of sites and towns along the Mexican Railway route, double-page map. Oblong folio, original green gilt pictorial cloth. Binding somewhat rubbed, soiled, and upper joint repaired; occasional minor reinforcement to blank margins of a few text leaves and at least one plate; lithographs and map generally fine condition and bright (one or two with very minor surface abrasion). This book is difficult to find complete with all of the plates and the map, as in the present copy.

First edition. Mathes, Mexico on Stone, pp. 41, 60 & Plates 11, 23, & 25: "Some of the finest examples of the lithographer's art during the latter part of the century.... Chromolithography by Debray y Cía of the work of Casimiro Castro and A. Sigogne illustrating Antonio García Cubas' extraordinary Album del Ferrocarril Mexicano." Palau 48628. The plates include spectacular views of Veracruz, Orizaba, Puebla, and illustrations of stations, locomotives, freight and passenger trains, bridges and tunnels, etc. The superb double-page orographic map is spectacular, showing the dramatic mountains and volcanoes between Veracruz and Mexico City from a bird's-eye view. This glorious plate book, published the same year that Porfirio Díaz came to power, captures a pivotal moment in Mexican history, with its clashing images of powerful machines intruding into pristine, picturesque landscapes, heralding the evolution of the country from a rural-agrarian world of "many Mexicos" to a unified modern technological society.
($4,000-6,000) $9,200.00

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More Turmoil in the "Two Bills" Empire

15. CODY, William Frederick ("Buffalo Bill") & Gordon William Lillie ("Pawnee Bill"). Archive of 58 original letters, manuscripts, and financial and legal instruments (many signed) by and about Cody, the legendary plainsman and showman, and his partner Lillie, and their ventures, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and Pawnee Bill’s Far East Show. Various places, mostly 1910-1914, a few earlier. Very fine to very good, most signed by Cody and/or Lillie.

See our Auction 4, item 55, for the other half of this archive. After that auction, our consignor found the remainder of the archive. This grouping concentrates on a slightly earlier period and contains more documents signed by Cody. From his own life experience on the frontier, William F. Cody (1846-1917), created a West that indelibly survives in the imagination of America and the world (Thrapp, Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography I, pp. 293-94). As with the Buffalo Bill material offered in our Auction 4, the focus of the present offering is the declining days of the incredibly successful empire forged by Cody and his partner Lillie (1860-1942; Thrapp II, pp. 855-56). "The Two Bills" merged their operations in 1908 (a copy of their contract is in the present archive), but unproductive outside investments drained Cody of resources and forced him under the yoke of the unscrupulous Harry Tammen. The present archive includes nine signed autograph letters from Buffalo Bill to Pawnee Bill written during a troubled 1911 season; 1912-13 contracts and promissory notes with the United States Lithograph Company (obligations which went largely unmet and became part of the foreclosure proceedings against the Two Bills show); and records of the sale of Cody's ranch near North Platte, Nebraska. See Don Russell, The Wild West (Fort Worth: Amon Carter Museum, 1970). Materials in the archive include:

Typescript Inventory: "Invoice of Principal Effects of Buffalo Bill's Wild West." December 28, 1903(?). 1 p., folio. Invoice, with docketing on another leaf: "Agreement of Cody to Wind up Wild West Co also Invoice of Principal Effects of Wild West."

Typescript copy of a contract. New York, December 4, 1908. 4 pp., folio. This contract establishes the merger of Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Pawnee Bill's Far East, and provides for the operation, management, and meeting expenses of the show over the winter and during the 1909 season. Parties to the contract, with equal undivided interests are Ruth L. Bailey, William F. Cody, and Gordon W. Lillie. Cody's responsibilities are that he "shall have charge of the performance and shall, when physically able so to do, appear in the saddle as the 'star' of said performances, and to that end the said Cody agrees to devote his entire time and best energies during the show season of 1909 to the success of the enterprise." Pawnee Bill is to act as "manager of the business of said amusement enterprise" and agrees to assign the name of Pawnee Bill's Far East Company to the enterprise.

Bank check, signed by G. W. Lillie for Pawnee Bill's Wild West, in the amount of $55,126.53, drawn on and payable to the order of the Fidelity Trust Company of Philadelphia. May 26, 1909. With attached autograph note in Pawnee Bill's hand: "Covering the purchase of Buffalo Bill's interest for him from the Bailey estate—including the 1/3 interest in the Buffalo Bill show—1/3 the wintering of the [ditto marks] and also the payment of notes and interest held by the Bailey estate against W. F. Cody, Buffalo Bill personally."

Typescript contract, signed by W. F. Cody. Little Rock, Arkansas, November 19, 1910. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). With two attached checks of the same date, each in the amount of $5,000, drawn on the account of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Pawnee Bill's Far East, made out to Cody, signed by G. W. Lillie, and endorsed on verso by Cody. By this contract, Pawnee Bill obtains an option to buy (for $10,000) 200 shares of stock in the Campo Bonito Milling and Mining Company of Tucson, Arizona.

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" [Buffalo Bill] to "Major" [Pawnee Bill] in Pawnee, Oklahoma. Boston, May 19, [1911]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits and envelope of the same stationery). "Why can't we keep all the money we take in? I wanted to make a good showing this week." Cody lists $18,500 in expenses, a prefiguring of financial troubles to follow.

Autograph letter, signed, from "Cody" to "Major" in Pawnee, Oklahoma. Fitchburg, Massachusetts, May 23, 1911. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits and envelope of the same stationery). "Everything is allright here so don’t worry. I'll telegraph you when it's necessary to come. Why Major I ran the show alone for six years.... I was it all the time. So why can't you have a good rest–and attend to your private business."

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major." Salem, May 26, [1911]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). "The more I think of it, I am sure we were lucky.... You see while Baker was getting into the steel car to get the wounded men and animals, I was telegraphing and telephoning for wrecking crews.... If I had not got an engin [sic], I would have driven all in on foot eight miles. But Baker saved the men's lives and the elephants and...stallions. Altogether it was a close call for us."

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major." May 26, [1911?]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). "We should be able to buy this coach cheap.... These coaches are scarce."

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major." Newburyport, May 27, [1911]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). "He also wanted to see me about the Cody Burgess group of mines.... His son is getting French capital interested. I offered this group of claims to J. Calvin Brown for $250,000 and to allow Brown $50,000 out of it if he makes the deal."

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major" in Pawnee, Oklahoma. Portsmouth, New Hampshire, May 29, [1911]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits and envelope of the same stationery). "We had two bad towns last week. Fitchburg & Newburyport. No one ever done business in either. The week hurt us at least $2000 in Lowell.... New England was never big for me. But wait till we start west. I predict a big season."

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major." Saco, Maine, May 30, [1911?]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). "I think the summer of the Great Penance Fair at San Francisco. We could show all that country in the spring. Then show San Francisco July, Aug. Sep. then Southern Cal. Oct. And if all goes well I sould [sic] be with you, And we could clean up a wagon load of money."

Autograph letter, signed, from "Cody" to "Major." Augusta, May 31, [1911]. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). "These towns are even worse than I expected. Am sending letters and notices from Omaha papers. I spent a little money telegraphing when we had the wreck. But the notices we are getting will more than pay us back."

Typescript telegram, from "Colonel" to "Maj G W Lillie," Pawnee, Oklahoma. Haverhill, Massachusetts, June 11, 1911. 1 p., oblong 8vo. Concerning acquisition of a stock car.

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major" in Pawnee, Oklahoma. Aurora, Illinois. Postmarked July 24, 1911. 1 p., 4to (on illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits and envelope of the same stationery). "We had one awful time here this morning. Arrived late. Long Haul bad dirt roads to a marshy lot. Wind blowing a gale. Got all the company out Indians and all to put the big top up. It kept getting away from us. Springy ground stakes wouldn't hold. At 1:30 rain, sleet & hail at 2 a regular blizzard struck the rear end of the top and blew it down.... It's been a hard day, Col."

Printed original contract completed in typescript and signed by R. M. Bickerstaff of the United States Lithograph Company and W. F. Cody for Buffalo Bill's Wild West & Pawnee Bill's Far East. December 12, 1911. 1 p., folio, with two attached typescript lists. Contract with U.S. Litho to print wall and window posters advertising the Two Bills show for the 1912-13 seasons. Sixty-nine different posters are to be provided in quantities of 2,000 to 6,000 each for a total of $43,577.50.

Promissory note completed in manuscript, signed by W. F. Cody and G. W. Lillie. Cincinnati, Ohio, December 15, 1911. Six-month note for $5,372.41, at 6% annual interest, payable to The United States Lithograph Company. With attached typescript letter signed, to G. W. Lillie, Huntington, West Virginia. Cincinnati, June 17, 1912. 1 p., 4to (stationery of The United States Lithograph Co.). Acknowledges receipt of drafts totaling $5,536.27 in settlement of the note.

Promissory note completed in manuscript, signed by W. F. Cody and G. W. Lillie. Cincinnati, Ohio, December 15, 1911. Six-month note for $5,372.41, at 6% annual interest, payable to The United States Lithograph Company. With attached typescript letter signed, to Charles Metius, Buffalo Bill's Wild West & Pawnee Bill's Far East, Dayton Ohio. Cincinnati, June 25, 1912. 1 p., 4to (stationery of The United States Lithograph Co.). Acknowledges payment of the note on June 24th.

Autograph letter, signed, from "W. F. Cody" to "Major." New York, December 22, 1911. 2 pp., 4to (pictorial stationery of The Waldorf-Astoria, New York). "By that time my ore will be here, both quartz & placer. Then the Edison Clifford Co. will test it with their own mills at Orange. And I know it will stand the test. Then the contract will be signed. And I will be a partner with them. And for that reason I haven't tried to sell stock, with the exception to Barney Link who will take $50,000 worth of it which will give us all the money we will require to mine our ore & get it to the Edison Mills which they will build near our tunnels & placer mills on our placer grounds."

Printed original "supplementary contract," completed in typescript, signed by R. M. Bickerstaff for the United States Lithograph Company and G. W. Lillie for Buffalo Bill's Wild West & Pawnee Bill's Far East. January 15, 1912. With the embossed Corporate seal of the Two Bills show. 1 p., 4to. Contract with U.S. Litho to print posters advertising the Two Bills show. Seven different posters are to be provided in quantities of 2,000 to 6,000 each for a total of $5,295.

Promissory note completed in manuscript, signed by Gordon W. Lillie, President, and Charles Metius, Treasurer. January 23, 1912. 1 p., 8vo. Buffalo Bill's Wild West & Pawnee Bill's Far East Combined promises to pay $20,000 to Gordon W. Lillie.

Autograph letter, signed, from "Col" to "Major" in Trenton, New Jersey. Oracle, Arizona, March 17, 1912. 1 p., 4to (stationery of Cody-Dyer Mining and Milling Co., with stationery envelope). "I am here at the mines trying to straighten out things. That these thieving Getchells got [illegible] so into. I may have to send young Getchell to the Penn yet."

Promissory note completed in manuscript, signature torn off. Chicago, Illinois, January 9, 1913. Four-month note for $781.17, at 6% annual interest, payable to National Printing & Engraving Co. With attached typescript letter signed, to Major Gordon W. Lillie, Baltimore, Maryland. New York, May 14, 1913. 1 p., 4to (stationery of The National Printing & Engraving Co.). "Enclosed herewith you will find your note for which you gave currency last night at Newark."

Typescript Telegram from W. F. Cody to Maj D. W. Little [sic]. North Platte, Nebraska, January 21, 1913. 1 p., 8vo. With autograph reply of G. W. Lillie on a Western Union Night Letter form. 1 p., 8vo. Cody wires, "Telegraph me here authority to make loan with Tammen." Lillie replies, "Col W. F. Cody has full authority to make loans and sign same for Buffalo Bills Wild West and Pawnee Bills Far East Co." The beginning of the disastrous loan from Tammen, which was to lead to the demise of the Two Bills show and the virtual vassalage of Cody to Tammen's Sells-Floto Circus.

Printed original contract completed in typescript, signed by Wm. F. Cody and G. W. Lillie for Buffalo Bill's Wild West & Pawnee Bill's Far East and the vice president of the United States Lithograph Company. February 15, 1913. With the embossed corporate seal of the Two Bills show. 1 p., 4to, with attached typescript list. Stamped as "Plaintiff's Exhibit." Contract with U.S. Litho to print posters advertising the two Bills show. Nineteen different posters are to be provided in quantities of 2,000 to 6,000 each for a total of $15,092.50.

"Check for Grounds." Printed form completed in manuscript. Dated at York, Pennsylvania, March 3, 1913. 1 p., 8vo (pictorial check logo of Buffalo Bill's Wild West combined with Pawnee Bill's Great Far East). Orders the treasurer of the show to pay F. H. Bierman $60 "for the use of his grounds, if used for the Exhibition." The form sets forth the terms under which the agreement is made: the licensor agrees to keep off the grounds and all lanes or passageways leading to the grounds "all other Exhibitions, Booths, or places for the sale of refreshments, liquors, etc."

Autograph note, initialed, from "A McN[amara]" to "My dear Fred." San Francisco, California, March 3, 1913. 1 p., 4to (stationery of Arthur McNamara and Co., Investments). "Herein pencil copy of the Cody note as requested. Trust it will answer your purpose. The privilege to pay Sept. 14, 1914 is noted therein."

Two copies of typescript real estate description of "Codys Scouts Rest Ranch." The ranch is described as comprised of 2,675 acres, with $35,000 worth of improvements, including "Colonel Codys large modern home residence, containing fourteen rooms including two bath rooms, flush water closets, light by electricity, hot and cold water, in all parts of the house and modern throughout," a large stable, three tenement houses, corrals, pens, and lots, a fully equipped blacksmith shop, etc., etc. The Cody ranch boasts 12 miles of its own private telephone lines.

Typescript sale contract, signed by W. F. Cody and James M. Hamilton. Chester, Pennsylvania, March 27, 1913. 1 p., folio. Hamilton agrees to buy Cody's Scouts Rest Ranch in North Platte, Nebraska, for $100,000. The sale is to include "all implements, crops, fifty horses and two stallions, and about thirty-five cows. Mrs. Cody to take what furniture she may want from house." Hamilton agrees to pay $5,000 as earnest money, $37,500 upon receipt of the deed, assume the $25,000 mortgage on the property and $32,500 in mortgage debts which Buffalo Bill owes Pawnee Bill on the Irma Hotel in Cody, Wyoming.

Typescript Bill of Sale, signed by Fred H. Garlow, attorney for Buffalo Bill, and Louise M. Cody. Undated. 1 p., 4to. Transfers ownership of the farm implements and stock on Cody's Scouts Rest Ranch to James M. Hamilton.

Autograph receipt, signed, from G. W. Lillie to W. F. Cody. Philadelphia, April 3, 1913. 1 p., 4to. (illustrated stationery for "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Combined with Pawnee Bill’s Great Far East," with their portraits). Pawnee Bill acknowledges receipt of $10,000 as half payment on the mortgage on the Irma Hotel in Cody, Wyoming, and $1,700 interest on the same. Also signed by James M. Hamilton as witness.

Quit claim deed, completed in typescript, signed by Fred H. Garlow, attorney for Buffalo Bill, Louise M. Cody, and notary O. E. Elder. April 7, 1913. 1 p., folio. Deeds Cody's undivided half interest in the Cody and Dillon Canal in Lincoln County, Nebraska, to James M. Hamilton.

Quit claim deed, completed in typescript, signed by Fred H. Garlow, attorney for Buffalo Bill, Louise M. Cody, and notary O. E. Elder. April 7, 1913. 1 p., folio. Deeds 4.74 acres adjoining the Cody and Dillon Canal in Lincoln County, Nebraska, to James M. Hamilton.

Quit claim deed, completed in typescript, signed by Fred H. Garlow, attorney for Buffalo Bill, Louise M. Cody, and notary O. E. Elder. April 8, 1913. 1 p., folio. Deeds 7.96 acres adjoining the Cody and Dillon Canal in Lincoln County, Nebraska, to James M. Hamilton

Typed letter, signed, from Arthur McNamara to J. B. Davis in Pawnee, Oklahoma. San Francisco, October 13, 1914. 1 p., 4to (stationery of Arthur McNamara & Co., Investments, with stationery envelope). A general letter on the status of the Cody Ranch loan.

Autograph letter, signed, from G. W. Lillie to "Bill." Undated. 2 pp., 8vo. "I have over $23,000 in cash my personal money.... I have made an offer through my attorney to turn this over to the U. S. Litho Co. and Tammen in settlement of the claims they hold against me. My atty writes me that Mr Tammen said he considered it a fair offer and that he was willing to take it. But Marks for the printing co refused – Now I have waited two years trying to bring a settlement all the time but am unsuccessful."

Eight canceled bank checks, signed by G. W. Lillie. July 20, 1909, through December 18, 1911. Drawn on the account of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Pawnee Bill's Far East at Fidelity Trust Company, Philadelphia (seven are on engraved company checks illustrated with the portraits of Cody and Lillie).

Manuscript statement of expenses for the Cody Ranch for the period May 2 to May 9, 1914. May 9, 1914. Itemizes $142.90 in expenses for labor, meat, hardware, oats, and corn.

Two canceled bank checks, signed by G. W. Lillie, Mang'r, Pawnee Bills Pioneer Days. August 1, 1917, and September 4, 1917. Drawn on the Bank of Coney Island.

Autograph note, signed by G. W. Lillie. Undated. 1 p., 8vo. Payment authorization for $5.00.

Autograph note, signed by G. W. Lillie. Undated. 1 p., on verso of envelope postmarked 1913. Payment authorization for $3.00.

Two envelopes addressed to G. W. Lillie in Buffalo Bill's hand. One postmarked February 16, 1911, on stationery of the Campo Bonito Mining & Milling Co.; the other postmarked September 17, 1913, on pictorial stationery of The New Savoy Hotel, Denver.

($10,000-20,000) $11,500.00


Crockett Almanacs–American Humor

16. [CROCKETT ALMANAC]. Davy Crockett's Almanac. 1845. I leave this Rule for Others when I'm Dead, "Be Always Sure Your Right, then Go A-head." Calendars Correct for the Entire Union, the Territories, Texas, and British Provinces. Boston: James Fisher, [1844]. [36] pp., numerous comic woodcut illustrations. 12mo, pictorial self-wrappers, sewn. Some marginal chipping (affecting only a word or two of imprint) and light uniform browning, but overall a very good copy.

First edition. American Imprints 44-1865. Grolier, American Hundred 39: "It was the Crockett Almanacks which made Crockett a legendary figure and a part of American folk-lore...Rourke, Crockett's biographer, observes that the legendary Crockett stories 'constitute one of the earliest and perhaps the largest in our cycles of myth, and they are part of a lineage that endures to this day, in Kentucky, Tennessee, and the Ozark Mountains.' Source for the tall tales about Crockett, Mike Fink, Daniel Boone, and Kit Carson.... The Almanacks exemplify the racy, untutored frontiersman, self-reliant and proud of his ignorance of 'book larnin.'" Howes C897n. Streeter 1490A (locating only the copy at AAS): "Reference to Texas on the title-page, page [4] has the caption title, 'Crockett's opinion of Oregon, and the Annexation of Texas to the U.S.,' and page [25], the caption title, 'Colonel Crockett's Trip to Texas and Fight with the Mexicans.'" See also Streeter 1194 (citing the 1836 almanac but referring also to this 1845 imprint): "The Crockett 'Go Ahead' almanacs...are choice pieces for any collection on American sport and folk lore."
($1,000-2,000) $1,150.00

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17. [CROCKETT ALMANAC]. "Go Ahead!!" The Crockett Almanac 1840. Vol. 2. No. 2. Nashville: Ben Harding, [1839]. 36 pp., numerous comic woodcut illustrations. 12mo, pictorial self-wrappers, sewn. Covers worn and soiled, old ink stain at upper right, generally a very good copy for one of these popular almanacs, which people tended to read and re-read, thus making them difficult to find in fine collector's condition.

First edition. Allen, Tennessee Imprints 1545. American Imprints 55899 (locating 4 copies). Howes C897n. Another of these hilarious productions glorifying Davy.
($800-1,500) $920.00

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18. DICKENS, Charles (1812-1870). Autograph letter signed, to I. A. Overs(?). Devonshire Terrace, July 11, 1842. 1 p., 12mo. Very fine. Matted, framed, and under glass.

Dickens acknowledges a previous note and says that he will be pleased to receive a visit:

I am truly glad to hear that you are so much better; and am rejoiced (though not surprised) by this new instance of Dr. Elliotson's kindness, and surpassing goodness of heart. I shall not fail to tell Mr. Ainsworth that you mentioned his very considerate reply with your note, and I shall add that I feel personally obliged to him for it. I am usually at home every day between 11 and 12; and on Sunday, as of old, am almost always visible at that time. I shall be glad to see you whenever you like to come. Always faithfully yours, Charles Dickens.

($800-1,200) $920.00

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