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Auction 7 Catalogue

Lots 351-400


351. [TEXAS]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

Memorial of the City of Galveston to the Democratic State Convention at Galveston, July 15th, 1902. and to the Twenty-Eighth Legislature of the State of Texas. N.p., [1902].

Galveston: ‘The Playgrounds of the Nation’ A Descriptive View Book in Colors. Denver: H. H. Tammen Co., c1913.

(2 vols.)

($150-250)

352. [TEXAS]. Lot of 10 titles, including:

PARISOT, P. F. The Reminiscences of a Texas Missionary. San Antonio: St. Mary’s Church, 1899. Howes P67.

Plus 9 others.

(10 vols.)

($100-200)

353. [TEXAS]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

SAGE, Rufus B. Rufus B. Sage: His Letters and Papers, 1836-1847. With an Annotated Reprint of his “Scenes in the Rocky Mountains and in Oregon, California, New Mexico, Texas, and the Grand Prairies.” Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1956. 2 vols. With an introduction, biographical sketch and note.

Plus 1 other.

(3 vols.)

($150-300)

354. [TEXAS]. Lot of 5 titles of C. L. Sonnichsen, including:

SONNICHSEN, C. L. Ten Texas Feuds. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1957.

SONNICHSEN, C. L. The El Paso Salt War [1877]. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, Texas Western Press, 1961. Illustrations by Jose Cisneros.

Plus 3 others.

(5 vols.)

($100-200)

355. [TEXAS]. STREETER, Thomas W. Bibliography of Texas 1795-1845. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1956. 5 vols. Part 1-Texas Imprints, V. 1, 1817-1838. 4to, wrappers. Fine. Part 1-Texas Imprints, V. 2, 1839-1845. Part 2-Mexican Imprints relating to Texas 1803-1845, V. 3. Part 3-U. S. & European Imprints relating to Texas, V. 1, 1795-1837. Part 3-U. S. & European Imprints relating to Texas, V. 2, 1838-1845.

(5 vols.)

($400-800)

356. [TEXAS]. Lot of 9 titles, including:

SWEET AND KNOX. Sketches from “Texas Siftings.” New York: Texas Siftings Publishing Co., 1882. Adams, Herd 2218.

Plus 8 others.

(9 vols.)

($200-400)

357. [TEXAS]. WHITE, Joseph M. A New Collection of Laws, Charters and Local Ordinances of the Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain. Philadelphia: T. & J. W. Johnson, 1839. [2, ads] vi, xv [1] 731 + [5] 10-753 pp. 2 vols., large 8vo, original full law sheep, black and red calf spine labels. Vol. 1 cover is detached, bindings worn and stained.

First edition. American Imprints 59207. Rader 3636. Streeter 1359: “This well known collection of laws is entered as it includes in Volume I a reprinting from Kimball’s translation of Laws and Decrees of the State of Coahuila and Texas, Houston, 1839. Through Decree 120 enacted February 19, 1830, and also a reprinting of the text and notes of the second edition of Austin’s Translation of the Laws, Orders and Contracts, Columbia, 1837. This reprint of the second edition of Austin’s Laws, Orders and Contracts is much superior to the reprint in Gammel’s Laws of Texas 1822-1897, Austin, 1898, as it includes the numerous annotations, none of which are reprinted by Gammel.” Also includes material on legal affairs in early Louisiana and Florida, biography of John Law, Indian lands, etc.

(2 vols.)

($250-500)

358. [TEXAS (ALAMO)]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

MYERS, John Myers. The Alamo with Maps. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1948. First edition.

RYDER-TAYLOR, Henry & Charles H. Stanford. History of the Alamo and of the Local Franciscan Missions. San Antonio, Texas: Nic Tengg, n.d.

Plus 5 others.

(7 vols.)

($50-100)

359. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

BAKER, D. W. C. (compiler). A Texas Scrap-book: Made Up of the History, Biography and Miscellany of Texas and Its People. New York: A. S. Barnes, [1875]. Basic Texas Books 5. Howes B47. Raines, p. 18.

DAY, James M. (compiler). The Texas Almanac: 1857-1873: A Compendium of Texas History. Waco: Texian Press, 1967. Basic Texas Books 172S.

Plus 1 other.

(4 vols.)

($250-500)

360. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

BANCROFT, Hubert Howe. History of the North Mexican States and Texas. San Francisco: A. L. Bancroft & Co. and the History Company, 1884 & 1889. xlviii, 751 + xvi, 888 pp., 2 folding maps, illustrations. 2 vols., 8vo, original full tan sheep with black leather labels. Ex-library, with bookplates and cards at front, & call number shellacked on Vol. II spine. Despite being ex-library this is a better set than usually found, with the hinges strong and only mild to moderate shelf wear.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 6: “One of the best single histories of Texas.” Cowan, p. 11. Graff 155. Howes B91. Raines, pp. 20-1: “Were I restricted to a single book on Texas, I would, without hesitation, take Bancroft’s history.” An invaluable, comprehensive history of Texas.

BROWN, John Henry. History of Texas, From 1685 to 1892. St. Louis: L. E. Daniell, 1892-3. 2 vols. Basic Texas Books 22. Howes B856. Raines, p. 32.

(4 vols.)

($300-600)

361. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

BARKER, Eugene C. Life of Stephen F. Austin Founder of Texas, 1793-1836: A Chapter in the Westward Movement of the Anglo-American People. Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1925.

xv [1] 551 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates. 8vo, original blue cloth, upper cover with gilt embossed bust portrait of Austin. Owner’s bookplate on front paste-down endpaper, ink ownership inscription on front free endpaper. Basic Texas Books 7. Howes B137.

GAMBRELL, Herbert. Anson Jones: The Last President of Texas. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1964. xiv [2] 530 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original green cloth. Fine in d.j.

“Second edition, with Annotations and Enlarged Bibliography.” Basic Texas Books 68: “Best edition because it includes Gambrell’s extensive annotations, which had been omitted by the publisher in the first edition. This is the best biography of a Texan.” Campbell, p. 33. Dobie, p. 86.

JAMES, Marquis. The Raven: A Biography of Sam Houston. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1929. Second edition. Basic Texas Books 103B1: “Same as first edition, except without the words ‘First edition’ on verso of title.”

LESTER, C. Edwards. The Life of Sam Houston. New York: J.C. Derby, et al, 1855. Basic Texas Books 126A: “This is the first biography of Sam Houston, in large part autobiographical. Controversial since the day of its issue, it is still one of the basic sources for information on the life of Houston”. Howes L271. Rader 2221. Raines, p. 225. Sabin 40229.

Plus 2 others.

(6 vols.)

($200-400)

362. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

BINKLEY, William Campbell. Expansionist Movement in Texas, 1836-1850. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1925. x, 253 pp. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 16: “The most comprehensive account of Republic of Texas imperialism and the eventual setting of the western borders of the state.”

BOLTON, H. E. Texas in the Middle Eighteenth Century: Studies in Spanish Colonial History and Administration. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1915. x [2] 501 pp., frontispiece map, maps, plans. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers. Wrappers with several small tears. Basic Texas Books 20.

CONNOR, Seymour V. The Peters Colony of Texas: A History and Biographical Sketches of the Early Settlers. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1959. Basic Texas Books 32.

HOGAN, William Ransom. The Texas Republic: A Social and Economic History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1946. First edition. Basic Texas Books 91.

MARSHALL, Thomas Maitland. A History of the Western Boundary of the Louisiana Purchase, 1819-1841. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1914. xiii [1] 266 pp., maps (some folding). 8vo, original grey printed wrappers. Fragile wraps lightly worn and chipped, internally very fine.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 136: “This is one of the most lucid studies of the struggle to establish the boundary line between Texas and the United States. Eugene C. Barker called it ‘a history of the diplomacy of the Louisiana-Texas border.’“ Howes M321. Rader 2354.

Plus 1 other.

(6 vols.)

($400-800)

363. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 8 titles, including:

BOLLAERT, William. William Bollaert’s Texas. edited by W. Eugene Hollon & Ruth Lapham Butler. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1956]. xxiii [1] 423 [1] pp., plates. 8vo, original blue and red cloth. Fine in lightly worn d.j.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 18: “Most entertaining book on the Republic of Texas, this is also one of the most perceptive.” The English author visited Texas 1842-1844.

CASTAÑEDA, Carlos E. (editor & translator). Mexican Side of the Texan Revolution [1836] by the Chief Mexican Participants. Dallas: P. L. Turner Co., [1928]. viii, 391 pp., facsimiles, endpaper maps. 8vo, original dark blue cloth. Fine in the rare d.j. (split and repaired but preserved in acid-free d.j. protector).

First edition. Basic Texas Books 61B, 138A, 180B & 207A. Accounts of the Texas campaign of 1836 as related by five of the chief Mexican participants. A landmark in Texas historiography, including translations and notes on works by Santa Anna, Martínez Caro, Filisola, Urrea, and Tornel. See Howes C155, F127, S98, T302, & U31, and Streeter 930, 923, 853, 940, & 932.

HUNTER, Robert Hancock. The Narrative of Robert Hancock Hunter: Describing in his Own Manner his Arrival to Texas in 1822 & His Participation in Events of the Texas Revolution. Austin: Encino Press, 1966. vii [1] 27 [2] pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original tan cloth over pictorial boards, original glassine d.j. Very fine.

Limited edition (640 copies), second edition (First edition, Austin, 1936). Basic Texas Books 100A: “Beautifully designed and edited by William D. Wittliff. The most vivid of all recollections of the Texas Revolution.” Whaley, Wittliff 18.

JENKINS, John Holland (editor). Recollections of Early Texas: The Memoirs of John Holland Jenkins. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1958]. xxvi, 307 pp. Basic Texas Books 105.

KENNEDY, William. Texas: The Rise, Progress, and Prospects of the Republic of Texas. Fort Worth: Molyneaux Craftsmen, 1925. [4] [ix]-xlviii, 939 pp., 3 maps (2 folding). Thick 8vo, original maroon cloth. Joints rubbed. Ink ownership inscription.

Facsimile of the second edition (same collation as the first edition, published in London the same year, 1841). Basic Texas Books 117F: “The most comprehensive account of Texas published during its decade as an independent nation, and a work of such profound influence that it was a key factor in gaining English recognition of Texan independence.” Howes K92. Streeter 1385n. Wheat, Transmississippi West 451 & p. 173: “The great Arrowsmith map of Texas is reproduced in full-size facsimile.”

LANE, Walter P. The Adventures and Recollections of General Walter P. Lane a San Jacinto Veteran, Containing Sketches of the Texan, Mexican, and Late Wars, with Several Indian Fights Thrown In. Marshall, Texas: News Messenger, 1928. 180 pp., frontispiece portrait. 12mo, original tan cloth. Very fine.

Second edition (First edition, Marshall, 1887), with added biographical material. Basic Texas Books 119A: “Best edition. One of the best Texas military memoirs, this is also a prime source on the period from the Texas Revolution through the Civil War. No Texas military hero spent more time in the thick of the action than Lane, and his memoirs are meaty with anecdotes and incidents relating to the revolution, the Indian campaigns, the Mexican War, and the Civil War.” Howes L69. Tate, Indians of Texas 1254.

MUIR, Andrew Forest (editor). Texas in 1837: An Anonymous, Contemporary Narrative. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1958]. xxi [1] 232 pp., map, illustrations. 8vo, original green cloth. Very fine in d. j. First book edition (first published serially in The Hesperian). Basic Texas Books 148: “Earliest written account of Texas as a republic.”

NICHOLS, James Wilson. Now You Hear My Horn: The Journal of James Wilson Nichols 1820-1887. Austin & London: [Design and typography by Carl Hertzog] University of Texas Press, 1967. [2, limitation leaf] xvi [6] 212 pp., illustrations, endpaper maps (by Jose Cisneros and Eldridge Hardie). 8vo, original brown cloth over green cloth. Very fine publisher’s green cloth slipcase.

First edition, limited edition (250 copies signed by editor). Basic Texas Books 152: “One of the most delightful American pioneer narratives ever written, and a valuable contribution not only to our knowledge of events in Texas history but to our understanding of the frontier spirit as well.” Lowman, Printer at the Pass 218.

(8 vols.)

($250-500)

364. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. BROWN, John Henry. Indian Wars and Pioneers of Texas. Austin: L. E. Daniell, n.d. Basic Texas Books 23. Howes B857.

(1 vol.)

($400-800)

365. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

CARTER, Robert Goldthwaite. On the Border With Mackenzie, or Winning West Texas from the Comanches. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961. [2] xxvi, 580 pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original maroon and black cloth gilt. Very fine.

Limited edition (750 copies), second edition (First edition 1935), augmented with reprints of six of the rare pamphlets of the primary source material on the subjugation of the Native Americans of the Panhandle and Llano Estacado. Basic Texas Books 25: “One of the best sources on the Federal cavalry campaigns against the Indians in the 1870s. Campbell, p. 177. Decker 48:45: “This important historical work, the original edition of which was issued in a very limited number, has been most elusive since its first publication in 1935.” Dykes, Western High Spots (“Western Movement: Its Literature”), p. 18. Howes C195. Rader 611. Tate, Indians of Texas 3002: “Perhaps the best first-hand description of Texas military life and campaigns against Comanches and Kiowas during the turbulent 1870s. As a captain in Ranald Mackenzie’s Fourth Cavalry, Carter participated in some of the most important events, and he describes these in great detail. No one researching this phase of Comanche and Kiowa history can afford to overlook this source.” See New Handbook I:1001 (Carter) and IV:416 (Mackenzie).

EMMETT, Chris. Texas Camel Tales. Austin: Steck-Vaughn Co., [1969]. xx, 234 pp., illustrated. 8vo, orange cloth. Very fine in d.j. with one snag. Basic Texas Books 55: “The best account of the famous camel experiment in Texas.”

GARD, Wayne. Sam Bass. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1936. x, 262 pp., 8 photographic plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original tan cloth. First edition. Adams, Guns 803: “The most complete and reliable work on Sam Bass to date. The author is the only biographer to trace Bass’s ancestry;” One-Fifty 60. Basic Texas Books 71. Dobie, p. 141: “Most of the whole truth.”

GREENE, A. C. The Last Captive: The Lives of Herman Lehmann. Austin: Encino Press, [1972]. xxi [1] 161 [1] pp., numerous documentary photographs. 8vo, original tan paper-covered pictorial boards. Very fine in d.j.

Fourth and best edition. Basic Texas Books 124D: “One of the most remarkable accounts of life among hostile Texas Indians, this is also one of the few surviving accounts of life in nineteenth-century Texas from the Indian point of view. Greene’s version is a triumph of editing and scholarship.” Lehmann was captured in May, 1870, lived with the Comanches for eight years and became Quanah Parker’s adopted son, only reluctantly returning to Anglo society.

HARDIN, John Wesley. The Life of John Wesley Hardin, from the Original Manuscript, as Written by Himself. Seguin, Texas: Smith & Moore, 1896. 12mo, original pale blue-grey printed wrappers. First edition. Adams, Guns 919; One-Fifty 66. Basic Texas Books 84A. Graff 1780. Howes H188.

LEHMANN, Herman. Nine Years Among the Indians 1870-1879. Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1927. x, 235 pp., photoplates. 12mo, original gilt-lettered maroon cloth. Very fine in d.j.

Second edition, extensively revised. Basic Texas Books 124A: “One of the most remarkable accounts of life among hostile Texas Indians, this is also one of the few surviving accounts of life in 19th century Texas from the Indian point of view.” Campbell, p. 86. Dobie, p. 34: “Best captive narrative of the Southwest.” Graff 2246. Howes J232. Rader 2122. In 1870 at the age of ten, the author was taken from his home in Mason County by an Apache raiding party. After undergoing harsh tribal initiation, he became an Apache warrior and later joined the Comanches.

PIKE, James. Scout and Ranger. Being the Personal Adventures of James Pike of the Texas Rangers in 1859-1860. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1932. Basic Texas Books 162C. Reprinted from the 1865 edition.

(7 vols.)

($150-300)

366. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 4 titles, including:

CASTANEDA, Pedro de. “Account of the Expedition to Cibola Which Took Place in the Year 1549....” [And]: “Relación de la journada de Cibola....” In: Fourteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Washington: GPO, 1896. lxi [1] 637 pp., numerous maps, photographs, and plates. Small folio, original gilt-decorated olive cloth.

First edition in English, and first edition in the original Spanish of Castaneda’s account of the Coronado expedition, previously known only by the French edition. This edition contains the original Spanish version along with Winship’s English translation and excellent commentary. Basic Texas Books 28A.

CASTANEDA, Pedro de Journey of Francisco Vazquez de Coronado: 1540-1542. San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1933. Limited edition (550 copies). Basic Texas Books 28E. Grabhorn 195. Howes W571.

Plus 2 others.

(4 vols.)

($150-300)

367. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

COX, James. Historical and Biographical Record of the Cattle Industry and the Cattlemen of Texas and Adjacent Territory. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1959. 2 vols., complete, illustrated. Folio, original brown leather over brown gilt pictorial cloth. Very fine in publisher’s slipcase. Original prospectus laid in.

Second edition, limited edition (550 copies). Basic Texas Books 34A: “Facsimile reprint with a new 6-page introduction by J. Frank Dobie.”

DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush Country. Dallas, Texas: Southwest Press, 1929. xv [1] 314 pp., photoplates, text illustrations. 8vo, original tan cloth over rattlesnake skin patterned boards. Basic Texas Books 44C.

HALEY, J. Evetts. Charles Goodnight: Cowman & Plainsman. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin & Riverside Press Cambridge, 1936. xiii [3] 485 pp., frontispiece portrait, map, and text-illustrations by Bugbee. 8vo, original beige cloth. The scarce d.j. is not present. Very light wear. Bookplate of Paul Woodward on front free endpaper.

First edition. Adams, Guns 890; Herd 960. Basic Texas Books 81: “Superb biography of one of the greatest Texans.” Campbell, 101 42. Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. 10. Dobie, pp. 104, 160. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 13. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 5; Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bugbee) 74; Kid 225; Western High Spots, p. 18 (“Western Movement: Its Literature”); p. 30 (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West”); p. 70 (“High Spots of Western Illustrating”); p. 78 (“A Range Man’s Library”): “Best biography ever written of a range man and may be the best biography ever written about a Westerner;” p. 103 “The Texas Ranch Today”); p. 118 (“Ranger Reading”): “Properly classed as a Ranger item because Goodnight served as a scout and guide for the Texas Rangers during the War Between the States.” Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 35: “The best Texas biography I’ve read.” Howes H36. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 18. One Hundred Head 76: “Haley’s biography of Goodnight was based on ‘Goodnight’s own lusty narrative.’” Rader 1730. Reese, Six Score 53: “Best biography of a cowman ever written. Goodnight’s career spanned the history of the development of West Texas, from Indian fighting to oil wells. Goodnight, while not the largest cattleman in Texas, was undoubtedly the most important. Haley’s beautifully written biography, perhaps his best book, is an ample vehicle for a mighty figure, and is a classic of American biography.” Robinson 8. Tate 2374: “Much information on Goodnight’s earlier years as an ‘Indian fighter’ in northwestern Texas, and his association with Comanches, especially Quanah Parker.” “Very possibly the best range biography ever written. Goodnight was a pioneer rancher in west Texas and was actively involved in ranching for sixty-five years.”—Taylor & Maar.

HASTINGS, Frank S. A Ranchman’s Recollections: An Autobiography. Chicago: The Breeder’s Gazette, 1921. xiv, 235 pp., frontispiece, photoplates. 12mo, original tan pictorial cloth.

First edition. Adams, Herd 1009: “An excellent book, now becoming scare, written by the manager of the SMS Ranch of Texas. Well-told stories of cowboy life.”. Basic Texas Books 86: “One of the best books on the Texas cattle industry. The stories told to Hastings by the cowboys themselves, however, are what make the book so valuable.” Campbell, p. 83. Dobie, p. 105. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 5. Graff 1814. Greene, The 50 Best Books on Texas, p. 20. Howes H287. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 19. Rader 1819. Reese, Six Score 56.

Plus 1 other.

(6 vols.)

($200-400)

368. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

DUVAL, John C. Early Times in Texas. Austin: H. P. N. Gammel & Co., 1892. 135 [1] 1-253 pp. 12mo, original green cloth. Paper browned and brittle due to cheap paper, binding worn, stained, and slightly cockled, front hinge cracked. A poor copy, with gift inscription “Presented to Col. M. M. Templeton by his friend Ashby[?] S. James - Feb. 24, 1892.” Related material is tipped in at back following printed appendix of names of men who fought in the Texas Revolution (some additions and corrections in pencil): (1) contemporary typewritten roll (on verso of General Land Office, Wichita County map, 1888) of Kentucky volunteers mustered in under Captain James Pope Price June 10,1836. (2) contemporary typewritten list with manuscript title “List of the men who fell at the Alamo the 6th of March 1836” and typewritten title “Certificate of B. Lockhart,” copy of a certificate by Wm. C. Walsh, dated August 24, 1886. (3) nineteenth-century handwritten list of “Dr. Jack Shackelford's Company.”

First edition, first issue (including The Young Explorers). Agatha, p. 51. Basic Texas Books 51: “The most literate of all 19th century Texas memoirs. Of all personal accounts of old-time Texas, his book is perhaps the best written and most interesting.” Dobie, p. 55. Graff 1188. Howes D603. Rader 1248. Raines, p. 74. WLA, A Literary History of the West, p. 108: "The Duval books [present work and his biography of Big Foot Wallace, see above], published originally in 1870 and 1892 respectively, deal with the battle for Texas independence. They continue the Turnerian view of the West as a place of growth and freedom. Young Duval came to Texas with ‘a vision of a freer life and a wider range of action than was possible elsewhere.’ But these tales have their own way of arriving at the truth. Like footpaths winding through the woods-lot, they lead in the right direction and get you to your destination sooner even than does the big road. As artifacts in the development of western studies, [they] are significant. They lack in critical discrimination, to be sure, but they worked to establish the potential of western materials and helped to emphasize the essential historical coherence of the materials. They provided the foundation for more sophisticated works to come.” A classic account of pioneer life in Texas by “the first Texas man of letters” (J. Frank Dobie).

Plus 2 others.

(4 vols.)

($150-300)

369. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. EDWARD, David B. History of Texas; or, the Emigrant’s, Farmer’s, and Politician’s Guide to the Character, Climate, Soil and Productions of that Country: Geographically Arranged from Personal Observation and Experience. Cincinnati: J. A. James & Co., 1836. 336 pp., folding engraved map of the Republic of Texas with grants hand-colored in outline (Map of Texas containing the Latest Grants and Discoveries by E. F. Lee, 12-5/16 x 8-1/2 inches). 12mo, original blue cloth, yellow printed paper spine label. Binding lightly rubbed, stained, and with a few old repairs. Text lightly foxed, a few old splits to map repaired on verso with old U. S. Postal seals. The map is fine and crisp, with no losses. Despite the condition report, much nicer than usually found. Alex Dienst’s copy, with his notes on rarity on verso of map. This copy does not have the ad leaf at end, which was not inserted into all copies.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 53: “One of the best accounts of Texas on the eve of the Revolution. The book attempts to be unprejudiced, but the author was clearly anti-Texan at heart.” Clark, Old South III:35: “Like Mrs. Holley’s Texas, this work was extensively used as a basis for many other books on that state written in the 1830s and 1840s.” Graff 1208. Howes E48: “Conditions just prior to the Revolution described by an actual observer.” Rader 1279. Raines, p. 74. Streeter 1199: “One of the essential Texas books. It gives a good account of the physical features and towns and products of Texas of 1835.” Edward reprints many scarce Texas laws and decrees. The excellent little map is, based on the Austin-Tanner conformation (Day, p. 24).

(1 vol.)

($1,200-2,400)

370. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. FOOTE, Henry Stuart. Texas and the Texans; Or, Advance of the Anglo-Americans to the Southwest. Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1841. viii, 13-314 + 403 pp. 2 vols., 12mo, original blind-stamped green cloth, spines with gilt lone stars. First edition. Basic Texas Books 63: “One of the most influential books on Texas in its time, this work is still of considerable value and interest. It suffers from the intense prejudices of the author, but it nevertheless provides material on numerous aspects of Texas history not available elsewhere. Foote wrote his work as a deliberate piece of propaganda, with the goal of encouraging annexation to Texas to the U. S. This objective led Foote into some startling statements, such as his remarks against the Mexicans, ‘whose extermination may yet become necessary for the repose of this continent.’“ Eberstadt 162:292b: “Contains many rare documents and is a valuable authority. Foote wrote at the request and with the aid of the most prominent Texas pioneers and officials of the Republic. It discusses Burr’s project; the Magee expedition; civil history of the Republic; and recognition by the U. S.” Graff 1376. Howes F238. Raines, p. 84. Streeter 1377: “Rather entertaining.”

(2 vols.)

($400-800)

371. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 10 titles, including:

GILLETT, James B. Six Years with the Texas Rangers, 1875 to 1881. Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., [1921]. 332 pp., frontispiece, plates (portraits). 8vo, original gilt-lettered dark green cloth. Fine, with ownership inscription of Dane Coolidge, noted writer on cowboys.

First edition. Adams, Guns 829; One-Fifty 62. Basic Texas Books 76. Clark, New South I:83A: “Gillett’s service with the Rangers was in the western and northwestern part of Texas, an area that was real frontier in the 1870s. An excellent account of frontier lawless society.” Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. [9]. Dobie, p. 59-60: “I regard Gillett as the strongest and straightest of all ranger narrators.” Dykes, Western High Spots (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West”) p. 20; (“Ranger Reading”), p. 116. Graff 1553. Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 73: “Gillett joined the Rangers in 1875 at age 18, but he never succumbs to the deification process so many other writers (including Webb) stumble through when recall those gods of the frontier.” Howes G177.

BARRY, [James] Buck[ner]. Texas Ranger and Frontiersman: The Days of Buck Barry in Texas, 1845-1906. Edited by James K. Greer. Dallas: Southwest Press, 1932. [i-ii, blank] iii-xi [1] [2, list of illustrations] 254 pp., frontispiece, photographic plate, 4 maps, text illustrations. 8vo, original green cloth. Binding somewhat discolored and a trifle shelfworn, otherwise fine and clean, mostly unopened.

First edition. Dobie, p. 60. Dykes, Ranger Reading. Howes G398. Basic Texas Books 11: “Best memoir of a Texan Ranger during the mid-19th century, covering his early life in North Carolina as hunter and schoolteacher, trip at the age of 23 through Texas in the last year of the Republic, service in the Mexican War under Jack Hays, and life as a pioneer on what was then the farthest frontier of Texas.” Rader 1682.

GILLETT, James B. Six years with the Texas Rangers, 1875-1881. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 1925. xvi, 259 pp., photoplates. 8vo, original navy cloth. Second edition, edited and with an introduction by M. M. Quaife. Adams, Guns 829n; One-Fifty 62n. Basic Texas Books 76A. Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 73n. Howes G177n.

JENNINGS, N. A. A Texas Ranger. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1899. First edition. Adams, Burs 218; Guns 1173; One-Fifty 85. Basic Texas Books 107. Campbell, p. 217. Dobie, p. 60. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 20. Fifty Texas Rarities 50. Graff 2208. Howes J100. Mohr, The Range Country 690. Rader 2086.

PAINE, Albert Bigelow. Captain Bill McDonald: Texas Ranger: a Story of Frontier Reform. New York: J. J. Little & Ives Co., 1909. 448 pp., portrait frontispiece portrait, plates, facsimile. 8vo, original blue cloth lettered in white. First edition, “special subscription edition.” Adams, Guns 1669: “Biography of one of the better-known Texas Rangers, this volume deals with many Texas and Oklahoma outlaws;” One-Fifty 110. Basic Texas Books 158: “Life of the most famous Texas Ranger of the time. The importance of the book lies in its bringing nationwide attention to the legend of the Texas Ranger. Accounts of his fights against cattle thieves, outlaws (he stood down Bat Masterson, who seldom backed away from a fight), train and bank robbers, rioters, etc.” Campbell, p. 78. Dobie, p. 60. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Hutchison) 33; Western High Spots, p. 118 (“Ranger Reading”). Howes P14. Rader 2570.

RAYMOND, Dora Neill. Captain Lee Hall of Texas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1940. xiii [1] 350 [2] pp., plates, foldout map, illustrations. 8vo, original tan cloth. First edition. Adams, Guns 1827. Basic Texas Books 167: “Charming, carefully researched biography of one of the most enigmatical peace officers. As a fighting ranger and lawman, few if any surpassed Lee Hall.” Howes R85.

ROBERTS, Dan W. Rangers and Sovereignty. San Antonio: Wood Printing & Engraving, 1914. 8vo, original green cloth. First edition. Adams, Guns 1870. Basic Texas Books 178. Howes R339. Tate 3274.

WEBB, Walter Prescott. The Texas Rangers: a Century of Frontier Defense. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1935. Adams, Guns 2333; One-Fifty 145. Basic Texas Books 212. Howes W194.

Plus 2 others.

(10 vols.)

($400-800)

372. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

GREEN, Thomas J. Journal of the Texian Expedition Against Mier; Subsequent Imprisonment of the Author; His Sufferings, and Final Escape from the Castle of Perote, with Reflections upon the Present Political and Probable Future Relations of Texas, Mexico, and the United States. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1845. xiv [2] [17] 487 pp., folding map, plan, 11 engraved plates. 8vo, later green cloth. Occasional mild foxing, otherwise fine and clean.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 80: “The most important account of the tragic Texan expedition against Mier and the drawing of the black beans, this is also one of the most vitriolic Texas books. The book recounts the abortive expedition in 1842 under William S. Fisher and Thomas J. Green into Mexico after the withdrawal of the Somervell Expedition.” Graff 1643: “One of the most exciting accounts. As a participant Green was able to write a vivid and terrifying tale. He was particularly bitter toward Sam Houston and believed Houston was responsible for the deaths of those Americans shot as brigands.” Howes G371. Rader 1670. Raines, p. 98. Streeter 1581 & p. 329 (selected as one of the top books for a Texas collection): “The unauthorized so-called Mier expedition into Mexico by a group of hot-headed Texans when one out of ten of the captured Texans was immediately shot.”

Plus 1 other.

(2 vols.)

($300-600)

373. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

HALEY, J. Evetts. Fort Concho and the Texas Frontier. San Angelo: Carl Hertzog [for] San Angelo Standard Times, 1952. [12] 352 [2] pp., illustrations by Bugbee, maps by Cisneros. 8vo, original terracotta cloth. First edition. Basic Texas Books 83 “This is one of the best books about any of the vital string of federal forts established in West Texas to tame the frontier.” First Printings of Texas Authors, p. 31. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 79B.

SONNICHSEN, C. L. Pass of the North: Four Centuries on the Rio Grande. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1968. xii [2] 467 pp., plates, photos. Basic Texas Books 191. Signed by author C. L. Sonnichsen, typographer Carl Hertzog.

Plus 5 others.

(7 vols.)

($150-300)

374. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

HALLENBECK, Cleve. Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: The Journey and Route of the First European to Cross the Continent of North America 1534-1536. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1940. First edition. Scholarly edition presenting a paraphrase of the narrative of Cabeza de Vaca and investing the possible route. Basic Texas Books 24BB.

BISHOP, Morris. The Odyssey of Cabeza de Vaca. New York: The Century Co., [1933].

CÉLIZ, Francisco. Diary of the Alarcón Expedition into Texas, 1718-1719. Los Angeles: Quivira Society, 1935.

Limited edition. Basic Texas Books 29: “The Celiz Diary records the founding of the town of San Antonio and the mission of the Alamo.” Clark, Old South I:13. Howes C254. Tate 1708: “A valuable description of all the tribes contacted during a march from Mission San Juan Bautista to Los Adaes, Louisiana. Researchers interested in the tribes, as well as the mission system, should consult this highly descriptive source.”

MORFI, Juan Agustín de. History of Texas 1673-1779. Translated, with Biographical Introduction and Annotations, by Carlos Eduardo Castañeda. Albuquerque: Quivira Society, 1935. 242 + [6] 243-496 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, map. 2 vols., 8vo, original white parchment over rose boards. Other than few traces of dust soiling to binding, a very fine set.

First edition (500 copies). Basic Texas Books 145: “Best contemporary 18th century history of Texas. The volumes consist of a biography of Morfi, a list of his writings and extant letters, the text of his history, a bibliography, and index. In 1777 he accompanied the Teodoro de Croix expedition as chaplain.” Campbell, p. 172. Howes M792. Tate 1814: “An essential source of descriptive information on Texas during the 1770s. Morfi’s lengthy discussion of the various Indian tribes in Texas comprises the best report of his generation.” Morfi is considered the first Texas historian. Contains a list of ranches in Texas at the time and avenues for researching other related topics. The author comments: “Nothing proves the fertility of the land and the richness of the soil more than the incredible number of wild horses and cattle found everywhere.”

WEDDLE, Robert S. The San Sabá Mission: Spanish Pivot in Texas. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1964]. First edition. Basic Texas Books 215 “Explanation of how the Spanish exploration and settlement of Texas fit into the general scheme of Spanish military and ecclesiastical expansion.”

Plus 2 others.

(9 vols.)

($400-800)

375 [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

HOLLEY, Mary Austin. Texas. by Mrs. Mary Austin Holley. Lexington: J. Clarke & Co., 1836. Lacks map. Basic Texas Books 94. Graff 1935. Howes H593. Raines, p. 116. Streeter 1207.

HATCHER, Mattie Austin. Letters of an Early American Traveller. Mary Austin Holley, Her Life and Her Works 1784-1846. Dallas, TX: Southwest Press, [1933].

MARCY, Randolph B. Exploration of the Red River of Louisiana in the Year 1852. Washington: A. O. P. Nicholson, 1854. xvi, 310 pp., 65 lithographed plates (a few with tinted grounds, geological folding plate). 8vo, original blind-stamped brown cloth. Occasional mild foxing and browning (the plates are generally quite clean and fresh), contemporary gift inscription on front pastedown. Without the separately issued map folders.

Second edition, House issue (first printing was Senate issue in 1853). Basic Texas Books 135A. Clark, Old South III:354. Howes M276. Meisel III, p. 144. Pilling 2471n. Plains & Rockies IV:226:2. Rader 2346n. One of the best nineteenth-century accounts of exploration of Texas, containing Marcy’s official report of his expedition to the headwaters of the Red and Canadian Rivers in Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Marcy’s report gives the first accurate description of the region, and is important for its observations of the Indian tribes he encountered. Holman and Tyler, in their forthcoming book on 19th lithographs of Texas, state that Marcy’s report provides “the first lithographic documentation of the Palo Duro Canyon.” About 30 of the lithographs are of Texas subjects.

MARCY, Randolph B., edited & annotated by Grant Foreman. Adventure on Red River. Report on the Exploration of the Headwaters of the Red River by Captain Randolph B. Marcy and Captain G. B. McClellan. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1937. xxxi [1] 199 [1] pp., plates, large folding map. 12mo, original green cloth. Very fine in d.j.

Scholarly reprint (First edition 1853). Basic Texas Books 135C: “Reprints only Marcy’s journal and summarizes the appendices. One of the most interesting accounts of an original exploration of unknown parts of Texas. No American explorer was known to have hitherto explored the headwaters of the Red River, and all known maps were inaccurate.” Howes M276n. Plains & Rockies IV:226n.

OLMSTED, Frederick Law. Journey through Texas, A; or, A Saddle-trip on the Southwestern Frontier; with a Statistical Appendix. New York: Dix, Edwards & Co., etc., 1857. [2] xxxiv, 516 pp., wood-engraved frontispiece, folding map by Colton. 12mo, original brown cloth. Binding worn at spinal extremities, joints, and corners, some mild staining on lower cover and fore-edges, label removed from rear pastedown, interior fine, the map excellent. This is a very difficult book to find in collector’s condition.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 157: “The most civilized of all nineteenth-century books on Texas, this is also the most interesting and the most dependable. Olmsted offers many insights into economic and social life. He gives one of the earliest descriptions of the Texas cattle ranch.” Dobie, p. 52. Clark, Old South III:481n & 482n. Coleman 3431. Graff 3097. Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 45. Howes O79. Raines, p. 159: “No better book yet written on travels in Texas.” Sibley, Travelers in Texas, p. 216. “Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1902), noted landscape architect and writer of travel books made extensive tours throughout the South from 1852 to 1857. One of the products of this travel was A Journey through Texas. On his route via Natchitoches down the Old San Antonio Road, through the German settlements, down to the coastal prairie towns, through San Antonio, Eagle Pass, Houston, and Liberty, Olmsted commented on all phases of town and country life in Texas. Olmsted was a fervent opponent of slavery, and his journeys through Texas and the other slave states confirmed his deep-seated antipathy to forced servitude and to the South in general” (New Handbook IV:1149).Tate 2591: “A classic in Texas literature.” McMurtry praised the book as “an intelligent, lively book, packed with keen observation and lightened by a delicate strain of humor. [It] remains one of the most readable of nineteenth-century American travel books.” It is surprising that this classic work is not in Adams, with its many references to cattle and sheep ranching, including an early description of a Texas cattle ranch, a detailed budget for establishing a ranch, and descriptions of Texas’ natural resources that lend themselves to ranching.

(5 vols.)

($400-800)

376. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. HOLLEY, Mary Austin. Texas. Observations, Historical, Geographical and Descriptive, in a Series ofLetters. Baltimore: Armstrong & Plaskitt, 1833. 167 pp., engraved folding map on thin paper (Map of the State of Coahuila and Texas, W. Hooker Sculpt. 10-3/8 x 13-5/16 inches). 16mo, later full brown calf, black leather spine label. Fresh endsheets; title with early small oval inkstamp and mild to moderate staining and abrasion (a few small tears and voids, but no losses), map with one old tape repair at fold (no losses), last leaf stained, overall a very good copy in a pleasing binding and with the rare Hooker map in great shape. First edition, the issue with copyright notice pasted in, in this case on the dedication leaf to Col. Stephen F. Austin (no priority established), the map with W. Hooker Sculpt. in imprint, “Beales and Rayuelas [sic] Grant,” and the other changes outlined by Streeter (see Streeter 1136).” Basic Texas Books 93B: “The first book on Texas by an Anglo-American.a key force in inducing subsequent immigration to Texas. Austin guided [Holley] in every aspect of the writing of her book, which she dedicated to him. His map of Texas, the best by far up to that time, was reprinted in smaller format for use in the book with corrections given by Austin to Holley.” Howes H593. Martin & Martin, p. 32 (discussing the map). Sibley, Travelers in Texas 1761-1860, pp. 178-79: “Mary Austin Holley opened the great era of travel literature in Texas with Texas: Observations, Historical, Geographical and Descriptive. Her books are standard sources for the later Mexican period because they are based on the writer’s observations and information obtained from her cousin, Stephen Fuller Austin.” Streeter 1135 (selected as one of the books “especially desirable for a Texas collection. One of my favorite books on life and travel in Texas”–pp. 327-28): “The first book in English entirely on Texas. For a long time, I have regarded it as one of the Texas classics.” Taliaferro 241: “Hooker’s map is one of the earliest maps of Texas to show all of Texas to the Arkansas River, including the Panhandle.” Vandale 87.

(1 vol.)

($6,000-12,000)

377. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. HOLLEY, Mary Austin. Texas. by Mrs. Mary Austin Holley. Lexington, KY: J. Clarke & Co., 1836. viii, 410 pp., folding map of Texas on thick paper (Map of the State of Coahuila and Texas. W. Hooker Sculpt. 10-9/16 x 13-3/8 inches). 16mo, original blue cloth, spine gilt-lettered TEXAS. Expertly recased, fresh endpapers. Occasional mild foxing. Map with the usual tear at juncture with book block (approximately 1-1/2 inches) and old tape repair that should be removed). Although the 1833 Holley (see preceding) commands a higher price, Holley’s 1836 book is more rare in commerce. First edition. Basic Texas Books 94: “An entirely different book from Mrs. Holley’s 1833 volume, this contains a great deal more information on Texas history, geography, and society.” Fifty Texas Rarities 15. Howes H593. Streeter 1207. Vandale 88. Streeter preferred Holley’s 1833 book, but Jenkins considered Holley’s 1836 book more important and influential, commenting (Basic Texas Books 94): “In addition to the San Jacinto reports, it includes the first book printing of the Texas Declaration of Independence, of the Republic of Texas Constitution, of Travis’ famous letter from the Alamo, of Austin’s Louisville Address of 1836, and other key documents of the revolution. It includes the full text of the Mexican Constitution of 1824 and translations of the colonization laws, as well as chapters on money and banking, the mails, trade, natural history, society and manners, religion and Indians. It includes the best physical description of Texas up to that time, and a clear and concise analysis of the colonization and land grant system and of Austin’s colonization activities.” Both of Holley’s books are great, and any serious collector of Texas and the West will aspire to both.

The Hooker map appears in a different issue than in Holley’s 1833 book preceding this entry. The grants are altered as designated by Streeter (see Streeter 1136), but the Thorn Grant has been removed and in its vicinity we find instead Filisola’s Grant. We have also noted issues of the Hooker map with the Filisola Grant stamped rather than printed, and we have even found copies of the Hooker map with the Filisola grant simply written in ink. (Someone should prepare a detailed analysis of the various incarnations of the Hooker map. In our Rarities sale (Auction Eight), we are offering another copy of the 1836 Holley and a copy of the 1834 Fiske with the Hooker map. Interestingly, each of the four maps in these books look similar upon first examination, but each of the four is quite different). Some additions and changes in the present issue of the Hooker map that do not appear in Holley’s 1833 book above are the addition of longitude and latitude lines, location of Native American tribes, “Herds of Buffalo” and “Droves of Wild Cattle & Horses” added, “Cross Timbers” added, Padilla and Chambers grant and DeLeon Grant added (other grants as well), Copano struck out and replaced with Corpus Christi, new towns and settlements of Laredo, Columbia, Bell’s Lang., New Washington, etc.

(1 vol.)

($5,000-10,000)

378. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. HOUSTOUN, Matilda Charlotte (Jesse) Fraser. Texas and the Gulf of Mexico, or Yachting in the New World. London: John Murray, 1844. 2 vols. First edition. Basic Texas Books 97. Howes H693. Raines, p. 120. Streeter, 1506.

(2 vols.)

($800-1,500)

379. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

HUNTER, J. Marvin (compiler & editor). The Trail Drivers of Texas: Interesting Sketches of Early Cowboys and their Experiences on the Range and on the Trail during the Days that Tried Men’s Souls–True Narratives Related by Real Cow-Punchers and Men who Fathered the Cattle Industry in Texas. [San Antonio: The Old Trail Drivers Association, 1920]. [3] 498 [1] pp., photographs. 8vo, original light blue pictorial cloth. Volume 1 only. Contemporary pencil ownership inscription. Light marginal browning to text due to the cheap paper on which the book is printed.

First edition. Adams, Burs 204; Guns 1084; Herd 1103: “Perhaps the most important single contribution to the history of cattle driving on the western trails.” Basic Texas Books 99: “This compilation is the essential starting point for any study of Texas trail driving days.” Campbell, 101 49. CBC 4977. Dobie, p. 108. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 21. Dykes, Kid 77; Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 6. Western High Spots, p. 28 (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West”). Graff 2020. Howes H816. King, Women on the Cattle Trail, p. 16.: “Includes mention of trail drivers’ wives; one account of a girl who went up the cattle trail.” Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 19. One Hundred Head 77. Rader 1988. Reese, Six Score 61: “This vast compilation of original accounts by old trail drivers is one of the best cattle books, and the largest collection of first-hand narratives of the range cattle industry.” Includes the account of a nineteen year old girl masquerading as a boy who went on a spring drive from New Mexico to Colorado in 1888. Amanda Burks’ 1871 trip on the trail from Nueces County, Texas, to Newton, Kansas; Mrs. Slaughter’s experiences on the trail in 1896 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, to Liberal, Kansas; etc.

HUNTER, J. Marvin (compiler & editor). The Trail Drivers of Texas: Interesting Sketches of Early Cowboys and their Experiences on the Range and on the Trail during the Days that Tried Men’s Souls–True Narratives Related by Real Cow-Punchers and Men who Fathered the Cattle Industry in Texas. Published under the Direction of George W. Saunders, President of The Old Trail Drivers’ Association. Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1925. xvi, 1,044 pp., illustrations (mostly photographic). Thick 8vo, original gilt-lettered navy blue cloth. Very fine and bright in d.j. with a few short tears. Second edition revised.

(2 vols.)

($150-300)

380. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

JOHNSON, Adam R. Partisan Rangers of the Confederate States Army. Edited by William J. Davis. Louisville: Geo. G. Fetter Co., 1904. xii [2] 476 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates (mostly portraits). 8vo, original gilt-decorated maroon cloth. An exceptionally fine copy, tight and bright.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 108: “One of the most interesting firsthand narratives of Texas Indian fighting, stagecoaching, and Confederate cavalry operations. Johnson fought Indians in Texas in the 1850s, was a driver for the Butterfield Overland Stage in Texas, and surveyed a vast amount of virgin territory in West Texas.” Coulter, Travels in the Confederate States 257. Graff 2213. Howes J122. Nevins, CWB I:113. Parrish, Civil War Texana 51.

NOEL, Theophilus. Campaign from Santa Fe to the Mississippi Being a History of the Old Sibley Brigade. Houston, Texas: Stagecoach Press, 1961. xxvii [1] 183 [2] pp., maps. 8vo, original pale green cloth. Very fine in d.j.

Limited edition (700 copies). Basic Texas Books 134B. Harwell, In Tall Cotton 134n. Howes N167n. Plains & Rockies (1953 ed.) 420an. The Sibley Brigade was a Confederate force that fought entirely west of the Mississippi: in New Mexico, Galveston, and in the Red River battles in Louisiana. Reprinted from the original 1865 edition.

RAMSDELL, Charles William. Reconstruction in Texas. New York: Columbia University, 1910. First edition. Basic Texas Books 166. Howes R42. Rader 2658.

(3 vols.)

($300-600)

381. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. JOHNSTON, J. E., W. F. Smith, F. T. Bryan, N. H. Michler, S. G. French. Reports of the Secretary of War, with Reconnaissances of Routes from San Antonio to El Paso. Also, the Report of Capt. R. B. Marcy’s Route from Fort Smith to Santa Fe; and the Report of J. H. Simpson of an Expedition into the Navajo Country; and the Report of Lieutenant W. H. C. Whiting’s Reconnaissances of the Western Frontier of Texas. Washington: SED64, Union Office, 1850. 250 pp., 2 large folding maps, 72 lithographed plates (many colored, some folding. 8vo, later black cloth. Short tear to first leaf neatly mended with tape, usual age-toning to paper, one tear to the first large folding map (no loss of image). All plates and maps are present and in much nicer condition than usually found.

First edition. Alliot, p. 119. Basic Texas Books 111: “A valuable compendium of reports of government exploration that led to the opening of West Texas to travel and settlement.” Bennett, p. 63. Field 1413: “One of the most accurate and complete of all the narratives of exploration of the country of the Zuñi and Pueblo Indians.” Howes J170. Meisel III:113. Plains & Rockies IV:184. Raines, p. 218. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, p. 279: “Among the earliest chromolithographs to appear in a government report.” Wheat, Transmississippi West 641.

(1 vol.)

($700-1,200)

382. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

KENDALL, George Wilkins. Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition. London: Wiley & Putnam, 1844. [2] 405 + xii, [11]-406 pp., folding map, 5 plates. 2 vols., 12mo, original blind-stamped plum cloth, spines gilt-lettered, gilt-pictorial spines. Slightly shelf-slanted, spines sunned, top-edges dusty, hinges cracked, occasional foxing to interior (mostly affecting tissue guards). Uncommon. First British edition (from the American sheets, with cancel title). Basic Texas Books 116B.

Plus 1 other.

(4 vols.)

($400-800)

383. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. LUBBOCK, Francis Richard. Six Decades in Texas or Memoirs of Francis Richard Lubbock: Governor of Texas in War-Time, 1861-63: A Personal Experience in Business, War and Politics. Austin: Ben C. Jones & Co., 1900. xvi, 685 pp. 8vo, original olive green cloth, stamped in gilt and black, gilt star on upper cover. First edition, deluxe edition, with gilt star on upper cover. Basic Texas Books 130. Dobie, p. 52. Howes L542. Nevins, Civil War Books II, p. 196. Parrish, Civil War Texana 59. Raines, p. 141.

(1 vol.)

($250-500)

384. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

MAVERICK, Mary Ann. Memoirs of Mary A. Maverick Arranged by Mary A. Maverick and Her Son Geo. Madison Maverick. San Antonio: Alamo Printing Co., 1921. 136 [3] pp., frontispiece, plates. 8vo, original beige pictorial wrappers. Small, old library label at foot of spine, minor dust-soiling.

First edition, first state. Adams, Herd 1460: “Gives the history of her husband’s experiences in his cattle venture, and the true origin of the term ‘maverick’ as applied to unbranded cattle.” Basic Texas Books 140: “One of the most interesting and important narratives of life in Texas during the 1830s and 1840s. Engrossing and colorful.” Campbell, p. 94. CBC 351. Dobie, pp. 57, 62: “Essential.” Graff 2727. Howes M433: “First woman from the States to settle in San Antonio.” King, Women on the Cattle Trail, p. 17: “Good account of early days in the Austin and San Antonio area.” Winegarten, p. 40.

GARD, Wayne. The Chisholm Trail. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1954. xii, 296 pp., plates, map, illustrations by Eggenhofer. 8vo, original grey and red cloth. Very fine in d.j. Signed by author.

First edition. Adams, Guns 797; Herd 875: “Not the first history of the famous cattle trail, but one of the best.” Basic Texas Books 70: “Entertaining and scholarly, this is the best book on the Chisholm Trail. A large number of fellow historians provided assistance, including J. Frank Dobie, Carl Coke Rister, Edward Everett Dale, Ralph Bieber, and Ramon Adams. It would be difficult to imagine a more solidly researched book.” Campbell, 101 37. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Eggenhofer) 77; Western High Spots, p. 15 (“Western Movement: Its Literature”): “Tops on the most important of the trails”; p .78 (“A Range Man’s Library”): “Best book in print on that drove road”; p.103 (“The Texas Ranch Today”).

LEA, Tom. The King Ranch. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., c1957. [13] [1]-467 [2] + [13] [469]-838 [3] pp., illustrations by the author (some in color), facsimiles, maps. 2 vols., square 8vo, original ecru and terracotta cloth, decorative spines lettered in silver, black, and terracotta. Very fine set in publisher’s slipcase.

First trade edition, first printing (line 1, p. 507, vol. 2 commences: “Alice” rather than “For Alice.” Adams, Herd 1319. Basic Texas Books 121. Campbell 101 56. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea) 65. Western High Spots, pp. 79, 102. Herd 1319. King, Women on the Cattle Trail, p. 17: “This ranch history includes substantial information about Henrietta King.” Lowman, Printer at the Pass 99; Printing Arts in Texas, p. 54n: “One of the most important books ever to emerge from a Texas background. Its typographical achievement is equally distinguished.” Reese, Six Score 69n.: “Perhaps the most exhaustive ranch history ever written.” In 1885 Henrietta King inherited the debt-ridden ranch of 500,000 acres from her visionary but impractical husband. She ran the ranch until her death in 1925, developing some of the earliest scientific techniques for beef production. The noted Santa Gertrudis breed, for which the King ranch is now renowned, started under her direction. At her death, the ranch had grown to well over one million acres, she had cleared all debts, and left an estate of over $5 million.

MATTHEWS, Sallie Reynolds. Interwoven: A Pioneer Chronicle. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1958. xiv [4] 226 [3] pp., frontispiece portrait, plates, illustrations by E. M. Schiwetz, endpaper maps, genealogies, and brands. 8vo, original terracotta cloth over patterned beige pictorial cloth stamped in gilt and blind. Very fine.

Second edition, limited edition (1500 copies), revised, with added photograph of author, and introduction by Robert Nail (replacing the Will James introduction). Adams, Herd 1454n. Basic Texas Books 139C. Dobie, p. 62: “Ranch life in the Texas frontier as a refined and intelligent woman saw it.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Schiwetz) 36; Western High Spots (“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #90); p. 80 (“A Range Man’s Library”). Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas 21: “Tells more about daily life on the frontier than any comparable narrative. A good history of a large part of the cattle frontier from the 1860’s to modern times. The most beautiful specimen of [Hertzog’s] work.” Lowman, Printer at the Pass 105. Printing Arts in Texas, p. 20: “Dobie judged it ‘another instance of the last edition being more desirable than the first.’” Reese, Six Score 78n: “One of the best portraits of ranch life from a woman’s point of view.”

Plus 1 other.

(5 vols.)

($250-500)

385. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. McCONNELL, H. H. Five Years a Cavalryman; or, Sketches of Regular Life on the Texas Frontier, Twenty Odd Years Ago. Jacksboro, Texas: J. H. Rogers & Co., 1889. viii [11]-319 pp. 8vo. First edition. Basic Texas Books 131: “This is the most lively and authentic account of cavalry life in West Texas after the Civil War.”

(1 vol.)

($250-500)

386. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. MILLER, Thomas Lloyd. Bounty and Donation Land Grants of Texas 1835-1888. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1967. xii, 894 pp. 4to, original green cloth. Very fine in lightly worn d.j.

First edition. Basic Texas Books 144: “The most important published guide to early military service records in Texas, a mine of information on the land system and land grants.” Indispensable research tool.

(1 vol.)

($50-100)

387. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

MORFI, Juan Agustín. History of Texas 1673-1779. Translated, with Biographical Introduction and Annotations, by Carlos Eduardo Castañeda. Albuquerque: Quivira Society, 1935. 242 + [6] 243-496 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, map. 2 vols., 8vo, original white parchment over rose boards. One minor stain to upper cover of vol. I, otherwise very fine set. First edition ( 500 copies). Basic Texas Books 145: “Best contemporary 18th century history of Texas. The volumes consist of a biography of Morfi, a list of his writings and extant letters, the text of his history, a bibliography, and index. In 1777 he accompanied the Teodoro de Croix expedition as chaplain.” Campbell, p. 172. Howes M792. Tate 1814: “An essential source of descriptive information on Texas during the 1770s. Morfi’s lengthy discussion of the various Indian tribes in Texas comprises the best report of his generation.” Morfi is considered the first Texas historian (Handbook II:233).

JONES, Anson. Memoranda and Official Correspondence Relating to the Republic of Texas, its History and Annexation. Including a Brief Autobiography of the Author. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1859. [2] 648 [4, ads] pp., engraved frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original brown blind-stamped cloth. Binding worn and faded, blank flyleaves adjacent to front free endpapers foxed as usual, text very clean and binding tight. First edition. Basic Texas Books 113: “The only formal autobiography of a president of the Republic of Texas. Billington called it ‘one of the fullest accounts of the early history of Texas and an essential source of information on its republican period and annexation.’ Jones came to Texas in 1833 and became a participant in the activities leading to the revolt against Mexico, surgeon and judge advocate at the Battle of San Jacinto, Secretary of State under Houston, and last President of Texas. His activities in behalf of Texas led him to be called, quite justly, ‘the Architect of Annexation.’” Howes J191. Raines, p. 129. Tate 2071. Jones portrays Sam Houston as a less than heroic figure.

JOUTEL, Henri. Joutel’s Journal of La Salle’s Last Voyage 1684-7. New Edition with Historical and Biographical Introduction, Annotations and Index by Henry Reed Stiles. Albany, NY: Joseph McDonough, 1906. [8] 258 pp., large folding map, frontispiece of La Salle. Small 4to, original beige cloth over drab blue boards, printed paper labels on upper cover and spine. Spinal extremities lightly worn and discolored, a bit of dust-soiling to edges, otherwise fine. Limited edition (500 copies). Basic Texas Books 114H. Clark, New South I:14 (referring to the present edition): “The outstanding edition.” Howes J308. Handsomely printed edition of Joutel’s account of La Salle in the Mississippi Valley, and the edition generally considered the most scholarly. This was the first edition to contain the valuable “Bibliography of the Discovery and Explorations in the Mississippi Valley.”

Plus 2 others.

(7 vols.)

($250-500)

388. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 2 titles, including:

NEWELL, C[hester]. History of the Revolution in Texas, Particularly of the War of 1835 & ’36. New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1838. xii, 215 pp., lithographic folding map of Texas. 8vo, original blind-stamped brown cloth. Spinal extremities chipped, lower half of spine loose, occasional mild foxing, overall a very good copy in original cloth; the excellent map, which is frequently lacking, is very fine, with no splits or tears. First edition, with the dedication leaf appearing on page [iv] and the map dated 1838, points that Streeter recognizes without establishing any priority of issues. Basic Texas Books 151A: “The work begins with an excellent summary of Mexican history from 1821 to 1835, followed by a sketch of Texas history from 1832 to 1835, ending with Cos’ retreat from San Antonio. The events of 1836 are described, including quotations from participating Texans and from Mexican accounts, such as Almonte’s diary. Of particular value are the account of Santa Anna’s capture [and his] confrontation with Houston shortly afterwards. Newell was one of the first to seduce Sam Houston into giving particulars of the campaign.” Clark, Old South III:215: “Useful, divided almost equally between history and description. This is one of the best, as well as one of the earliest, works published about Texas while it was a republic.” Graff 3010. Howes N115. Rader 2479. Raines, p. 154: “One of the rare and reliable books on Texas.” Streeter 1318. See New Handbook IV:991.

Plus 1 other.

(2 vols.)

($1,500-3,000)

389. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 5 titles, including:

PIKE, Zebulon Montgomery. The Expeditions of Zebulon Montgomery Pike, to Headwaters of the Mississippi River, through Louisiana Territory, and in New Spain, During the Years 1805-6-7. A New Edition, Now First Reprinted in Full from the Original of 1810, with Copious Critical Commentary, Memoir of Pike, New Map. by Elliott Coues. New York: Francis P. Harper, 1895. 3 vols. Basic Texas Books 163F. Field 1217. Graff 3290. Howes P373. Rader 2672. Raines, p. 165. Rittenhouse 467. Sabin 62836. Streeter 1047. Wagner-Camp 9.

PIKE, Zebulon Montgomery. Zebulon Pike’s Arkansaw Journal: In Search of the Southern Louisiana Purchase Boundary Line (Interpreted by his Newly Recovered Maps). [Colorado Springs]: Stewart Commission of Colorado College & The Denver Public Library, [1932]. xcvi, 200 pp., frontispiece portrait of Pike, maps. 8vo, original navy blue cloth. Fine. Basic Texas Books 163H. Howes H259. Rittenhouse 467n.

PIKE, Zebulon Montgomery. The Journals of Zebulon Montgomery Pike with Letters and Related Documents. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, [1966]. 2 vols., encased. Basic Texas Books 163I.

Plus 2 others.

(8 vols.)

($400-800)

390. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

SOWELL, A. J. Early Settlers and Indian Fighters of Southwest Texas. Austin: Ben C. Jones & Co., 1900. viii, 844 pp., 12 plates, illustrations. Large, thick 8vo, post-fire red buckram. Usual light waterstaining to text, front hinge cracked. First edition. Basic Texas Books 193: “The work contains 132 accounts of early pioneers, mostly as told by them directly to Sowell. most of the work relates to Indian fights and Texas Rangers. This material is fresh and for the most part not repeated in other works.” Dobie, pp. 58 & 60. Graff 3909. Howes S797: “Nearly all copies were either destroyed or damaged by fire.” Rader 2957. Raines, p. 193.

WILBARGER, J. W. Indian Depredations in Texas. Austin: Hutchings Printing House, 1889. xii [2] 672 pp., 37 woodcuts attributed to William S. Porter (O. Henry). First edition. Basic Texas Books 218. Howes W407. Raines, p. 219.

Plus 1 other.

(4 vols.)

($500-1,000)

391. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

STAPP, William Preston. The Prisoners of Perote. Austin, Texas: The Steck Co., 1935. A facsimile reproduction of the original 1845 edition. Basic Texas Books 197C.

SANTLEBEN, August. A Texas Pioneer: Early Staging and Overland Freighting Days on the Frontiers of Texas and Mexico edited by I. D. Affleck. New York and Washington: Neale Publishing Co., 1910. Basic Texas Books 181. Graff 3676. Howes S104.

SMITHWICK, Noah. The Evolution of a State: Or Recollections of Old Texas Days. Austin, TX: Gammel Book Co., [1900]. Basic Texas Books 189. Graff 3872. Howes S726.

(3 vols.)

($250-500)

392. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 4 titles, including:

[TEXAS (Republic)]. Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas. Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1907-1908. Washington: GPO for American Historical Association, 1908-1911. 646 + 807 + 810 pp. 3 vols., 8vo, mixed binding, Vol. I in original blue cloth, second and third vols. in contemporary beige buckram. Bindings with some shelf wear, light ex-library (bookplate removed from front pastedowns of last two vols., a few blindstamps.

First editions. Basic Texas Books 73: “Basic source book for official diplomatic papers of the Republic of Texas, indispensable for any study of this period of Texas history.”

AUSTIN, Stephen F. The Austin Papers. Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1919. Washington: GPO, 1924. 2 vols. only (of 4). Basic Texas Books 4.

LAMAR, Mirabeau Buonaparte. The Papers of Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar. Austin: Texas State Library, [1921-1922]. 4 vols. (of 6). Basic Texas Books 118.

Plus 1 other.

(10 vols.)

($150-300)

393. [TEXAS (BASIC TEXAS BOOKS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

YOAKUM, H. History of Texas from its First Settlement in 1685 to Its Annexation to the United States in 1846. New York: Redfield, 1856. 482 [4, publisher’s ads (supplied from another copy) + 576 pp., 4 maps and plans (2 folding), folding facsimile, 4 plates (portraits). 2 vols. Contemporary three-quarter brown sheep over marbled boards, spines with raised bands and black leather labels. Binding scuffed, some foxing, endpapers abraded and remains of old envelope or pocket on rare pastedown of Vol. 1.

Second printing (the work first came out the previous year and was identical with the present edition, except the date of on the title-page was altered). Most copies of the first printing were destroyed by fire. The 1855 printing is on the Vandale list of Texas rarities (Vandale 200). Basic Texas Books 224A: “Includes the very valuable ‘Memoir of Colonel Ellis P. Bean,’ one of the most important resources on Texas history during the early part of the 19th century. Yoakum had the use of materials, many no longer extant, provided to him by Sam Houston, Thomas J. Rusk and numerous others. Contains numerous letters of Sam Houston never before published, and of the 1,266 footnotes in the main text, 739 are to original manuscripts, letters, or primary sources.” Howes Y10. Raines, p. 223 (citing only the second edition). “Still indispensable to a study of the period it covers” (Eugene C. Barker). Tate 202: “Numerous references to the ‘Indian problem’ and efforts to solve it--all reflecting the frontiersman’s viewpoint.”

YOAKUM, H. History of Texas From Its First Settlement in 1685 to its Annexation to the United States in 1846. Austin: Steck-Vaughn Co., [1935]. Facsimile reproduction in one volume of the 1855 edition. Basic Texas Books 224E.

Plus 1 other.

(5 vols.)

($300-600)

394. [TEXAS (BIG BEND)]. Lot of 7 titles, including:

RAHT, Carlisle Graham. The Romance of the Davis Mountains and Big Bend Country: A History. El Paso: Rahtbooks Co., [1919]. Adams, Herd 1850; Guns 1783. Basic Texas Books 206n; Graff 4316. Howes R16.

Plus 6 others.

(7 vols.)

($60-100)

395. [TEXAS (CIVIL WAR)]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

SPRAGUE, J. T. The Treachery in Texas, The Secession of Texas, and the Arrest of the United States Officers and Soldiers Serving in Texas. New York: New York Historical Society, 1862. Raines, p. 194.

MAXEY, S. B. Address of Hon. S. B. Maxey, of Texas. Washington: Rufus H. Darby, 1884.

WINKLER, Mrs. A. V. Confederate Capital and Hood’s Texas Brigade. Austin: Eugene Von Boeckmann, 1894.

Plus 3 others.

(6 vols.)

($250-500)

396. [TEXAS (COUNTY & LOCAL HISTORY)]. Lot of 13 titles, including:

BARLER, Miles. “Early Days in Llano” [cover title] Personal Reminiscences. [Llano: Llano Times, 1915]. 76 pp. 16mo, original brown wrappers printed in red. Very fine.

Third edition (the first edition, published in Llano in 1898, exists in only one copy–Vandale 10; OCLC locates 4 copies of the second edition, ca. 1905). Adams, Guns 140. Herd 206. CBC 3031. Collection of articles originally published in the Llano Times containing reminiscences of an Ohioan who came to Texas in 1850 with the Oatmans and worked as a cowboy in Bastrop County with Grandpa Oatman and then Col. Bunton. After accumulating a hundred head of cattle, he settled in Llano County in 1857. Cowboying, Indian fights, outlaws, rustlers, bear hunts, Civil War, etc.

EDWARDS, J. B. Early days in Abilene. [Abilene]: C. W. Wheeler, [1938]. Adams, Guns 662; Herd 746.

GEORGE, Floy Watters. History of Webster County: 1855 to 1955. Springfield, Missouri: Roberts & Sutter, [1955].

HOLT, R. D. (editor). Schleicher County or Eighty Years of development in Southwest Texas. Eldorado, Texas: Eldorado Success, 1930. Adams, Herd 1058.

Plus 9 others.

(13 vols.)

($200-400)

397. [TEXAS (COUNTY & LOCAL HISTORY)]. Lot of 11 titles, including:

[FARBAR, Jerome H.]. Houston: “Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea.” Denver: H. H. Tammen, 1913.

HUTTO, John R. Howard County in the Making. [Big Spring: Jordan’s], 1938.

LUCAS, Mattie Davis & Mita Holsapple Hall. A History of Grayson County, Texas. Sherman, Texas: Scruggs Printing Company, [1936].

NEVILLE, A. W. The Red River Valley: Then and Now. Paris, Texas: North Texas Publishing Co., 1948. Adams, Guns 1604.

[NEW BRAUNFELS]. Kalender der Neu-Braunfelser Zeitung für 1908. [New Braunfels], 1908.

Plus 6 others.

(11 vols.)

($250-500)

398. [TEXAS (DALLAS)]. Lot of 3 titles, including:

COCHRAN, John H. Dallas County: A Record of its Pioneers and Progress. Dallas: Service Pub. Co., [1928].

BROWN, John Henry. History of Dallas County, Texas: From 1837 to 1887. Dallas: Milligan, Cornett & Farnham, 1887. Howes B855. Raines, p. 31.

Plus 1 other.

(3 vols.)

($150-300)

399. [TEXAS (EL PASO)]. Lot of 12 titles, including:

MILLS, Anson. My Story. Washington: Anson Mills, 1918. Howes M623.

MILLS, W. W. Forty Years at El Paso: 1858-1898. N.p., 1901. Adams, Guns 1505. Howes M633. Graff 2807.

STRICKLAND, Rex W. El Paso in 1854, with a 30-Page Handwritten Newsletter by Frederic Augustus Percy Entitled El Sabio Sembrador. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1969.

WHITE, Owen Payne. Them Was the Days: from El Paso to Prohibition. New York: Minton, Balch & Co., 1925. Adams, Guns 2386; Herd 2510.

Plus 9 others.

(13 vols.)

($250-500)

400. [TEXAS (HOUSTON)]. Lot of 6 titles, including:

YOUNG, S. O. A Thumb-Nail History of the City of Houston Texas from its Founding in 1836 to the Year 1912. Houston: [Rein & Sons Co.], 1912.

[FARBAR, Jerome H.]. Houston: “Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea”. Denver: H. H. Tammen, 1913.

YOUNG, S. O. True Stories of Old Houston and Houstonians: Historical and Personal Sketches. Houston: Oscar Springer, 1913. Adams, Guns 2469.

Plus 3 others.

(6 vols.)

($100-200)


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