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Ranching Catalogue Part 1 (Authors A-C)

Items 1-24

The items in this catalogue have been sold. This catalogue was issued in print form in 2002, and is presented in full on our website as a courtesy to users and for reference purposes.


“We Pointed Them North”—Fine in the Scarce D.J.

1. ABBOTT, E. C. (“Teddy Blue”) & Helena Huntington Smith. We Pointed Them North: Recollections of a Cowpuncher. New York & Toronto: Farrar & Rinehart, [1939]. xv [1] 281 pp., 7 photographic plates, title and text illustrations from drawings by Ross Santee, 2 maps. 8vo, original rose cloth with wrap-around label illustrated by Santee. Very fine in near fine d.j. (price-clipped), with illustration by Santee. The d.j. is very scarce. A desirable copy.
First edition, with initials “FR” in device on title verso. Adams, Burs I:1. Campbell, pp. 83-84. Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 1. Dobie, p. 94: “Franker about the women a rollicky cowboy was likely to meet in town than all the other range books put together.” Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #1. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 12; Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Santee 22); Kid 273; Western High Spots, p. 85 (“A Range Man’s Library”).” Guns 1. Herd 1: “One of the best books of recent years depicting cowboy life. The hero was a well-known character of his day.” Malone, Wyomingana, p. 10: “Reminiscences of an old-time cowboy of the 70s and 80s chiefly in Montana but typical also of Wyoming at the time of the Texas cattle drives. Easy, informal style.” Reese, Six Score 1: “This is perhaps the most straightforward account of cowboy life. Teddy Blue Abbott was raised in Nebraska; after leaving home, his first job as a cowboy was with the notorious Olive outfit. He had numerous other jobs before coming up the trail to Montana in 1883, where he remained. In 1884 Abbott went to work for Granville Stuart, foreman and part-owner of the D-H-S outfit, at that time the largest in Montana. Eventually he married one of Stuart’s daughters and settled down, but not before some hot times in Miles City and elsewhere.” Smith 1. $350.00

2. ABBOTT, E. C. (“Teddy Blue”) & Helena Huntington Smith. We Pointed Them North: Recollections of a Cowpuncher. New York & Toronto: Farrar & Rinehart, [1939]. Another copy. A bit of slight fading of cloth along edges, otherwise fine in price-clipped d.j. with a few splits and lacking slanted strip (approximately 1.5 x 12.1 cm) extending along lower edge of back panel of d.j.—only light loss of printed text. Ink ownership inscription of A. E. Clymonds of Lincoln, Nebraska, dated August 31, 1940, and his note: “Purchased Butte Mont. Snook Art Store.” $300.00

3. ABBOTT, E. C. (“Teddy Blue”) & Helena Huntington Smith. We Pointed Them North.... Chicago: The Lakeside Press, R. R. Donnelley & Sons, 1991. lxx [2] 385 pp., frontispiece portrait of Abbott, map in full color, many illustrations (mostly full-page, some in color, many photographic). 12mo, original black cloth. Very fine. Editor Ron Tyler’s signed presentation copy.
Revised edition, with added annotated historical introduction and numerous illustrations (some by Charles Russell, along with photographs by L. A. Huffman, Christian Barthelmess, and others). Tyler’s introduction and footnotes include previously unpublished material, such as excerpts and correspondence from the Abbott Family Papers in the Montana Historical Society. Excellent edition with the added text, illustrations, and Tyler as editor. $40.00

4. ABERNETHY, Francis Edward. J. Frank Dobie. Austin: Steck-Vaughn, [1967]. ii [2] 52 pp. 12mo, original tan printed wrappers, stapled. Very fine.
First edition. Southwest Writers Series 1. Cook 420. Biographical sketch and critical survey of one of the premier writers on the range country. “The best critical survey thus far published” (Tinkle). $20.00

5. ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). Built in Texas. Waco: E-Heart Press, 1979. ix [3] 276 pp., profusely illustrated with photographs by Abernethy and line drawings by Reese Kennedy. Oblong 4to, original charcoal cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
First edition. Publication No. 42 of the Texas Folklore Society. Basic Texas Books 203:XLII. Scholarly study on folk building in Texas, including chapters of interest for ranch architecture (“Barns and Outbuildings,” “Gates and Fences,” and “Holding Water”). $45.00

6. ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). Observations and Reflections on Texas Folklore. Austin: Encino Press [for Texas Folklore Society], 1972. viii [2] 151 pp., photographic illustrations (by Abernethy), line drawings by James R. Snyder. 8vo, original red cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
First edition. Publication No. 37 of the Texas Folklore Society. Basic Texas Books 203:XXXVII. Whaley, Wittliff 92. Collection of essays on Texas folklore with contributions by J. Frank Dobie, Mody C. Boatright, Ron Tyler, Joyce Gibson Roach, Elton Miles, J. Mason Brewer, Francis Abernethy, and others. Ranching interest is in “The Folklore of Texas Feuds” by C. L. Sonnichsen and “Horse Penning: Southeast Texas, 1913” by Bill Brett (southeast Texas was one of the last free-range areas in Texas). $35.00

7. ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). Paisanos: A Folklore Miscellany. Austin: Encino Press [for Texas Folklore Society, 1978]. ix [3] 180 pp., illustrations (many photographic), line drawings by Linda Miller Roach. 8vo, original maize cloth. Very fine in lightly worn d.j. with mild stain from old label on back portion. Carl Hertzog bookplate.
First edition. Publication No. 41 of the Texas Folklore Society. Basic Texas Books 203:XLI. Whaley, Wittliff 153. Collection of essays on Texas folklore with contributions by J. Frank Dobie, Francis Abernethy, and others. Of ranching interest is Christine Boot’s essay: “Home and Farm Remedies and Charms in a German Manuscript from a Texas Ranch.” $30.00

8. ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). T for Texas: A State Full of Folklore. Dallas: E-Heart Press, 1982. [2] xiii [1] 277 pp., plates (mostly photographic). 8vo, original red pictorial cloth. Fine.
First edition. Publication No. 44 of the Texas Folklore Society. Basic Texas Books 203:XLIVn. Includes “Pecos Bill: His Genesis and Creators” by James M. Day; “A Letter from the Long Circle” by Wayne Echols, about his experiences as a ranch hand and in rodeo; and “Night Horse Nightmare” by Paul Patterson, about the A. C. Hoover Horse Ranch. $20.00

9. ABERNETHY, Francis Edward (ed.). Tales from the Big Thicket. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1966]. xii, 244 pp., photographic illustrations, folding map. 8vo, original turquoise cloth. Fore-edges lightly foxed, else fine in fine d.j.
First edition. Tate, Indians of Texas 1187 (citing article “Tales of the Alabama-Coushatta Indians” by Howard Martin). Has a chapter by Solomon Alexander Wright on herding cattle through the Big Thicket in the 1880s. $35.00

10. ABERT, [John W.]. Abert’s New Mexico Report 1846-’47.... Albuquerque: Horn & Wallace, 1962. vii [1] 182 [1] pp., colored frontispiece after a painting by Peter Hurd, illustrations, endpaper maps. 8vo, original brown cloth over beige mottled boards. Very fine in lightly worn d.j. (illustrated by Hurd).
Facsimile reprint of the 1848 edition (SED 23), with added foreword by William A. Keleher. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Hurd 40). Flake 7n. Graff 5n. Howes A11n. Plains & Rockies IV:143n. Rittenhouse 2n. Saunders 2691n. Streeter 168n. Wheat, Transmississippi West 532n. Many observations on raising sheep and goats on the relatively sparse vegetation in lower-elevation New Mexico. For Abert’s field notebook for this journey, see next entry. $55.00

11. ABERT, J[ohn] W. Western America in 1846-1847: The Original Travel Diary of Lieutenant J. W. Abert Who Mapped New Mexico for the United States Army with Illustrations in Color from His Sketchbook. Edited by John Galvin. [San Francisco: Designed and printed by Lawton and Alfred Kennedy for] John Howell-Books, 1966. [12] 116 [1] pp., color plates after Abert’s watercolors, 2 folding maps, text illustrations (mostly in color). Folio, original ecru decorated cloth. Very fine in original glassine d.j.
First edition of Abert’s previously unpublished field notebook of 1846-47 recording his journey from Fort Leavenworth to Santa Fe, his examination of New Mexico, and his return (see previous entry). Abert’s diary, first published in 1848, constitutes one of the earliest U.S. publications relating to New Mexico. $110.00

12. ABERT, J[ohn] W. Through the Country of the Comanche Indians in the Fall of the Year 1845: The Journal of a U.S. Army Expedition Led by Lieutenant James W. Abert of the Topographical Engineers...Whose Paintings of Indians and Their Wild West Illustrate This Book. [San Francisco: Designed and Printed by Lawton and Alfred Kennedy for] John Howell-Books, 1970. xi [7] 77 pp., color frontispiece, 23 color plates, 2 foldout maps, text illustrations. Folio, original beige cloth gilt. Very fine in plain white d.j.
First edition. Abert’s diary of his expedition to Texas and New Mexico was first published as a government document in 1846. In this handsome edition Abert’s original watercolor sketches are reproduced for the first time. Graff 6n. Howes A10n. Plains & Rockies IV:120n. Raines, p. 1n. Tate, Indians of Texas 2134. Abert turns his discerning gaze to several topics of ranching interest: Shawnee cattle, attacks on cattle by bobcats and wolves, cattle and sheep raising on the Mora River, cattle being driven to supply Doniphan’s command, etc. $95.00

13. ACHESON, Sam. Dallas Yesterday. Edited by Lee Milazzo. Dallas: SMU Press, [1977]. xxii, 403 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original brown cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. On front free endpaper is Milazzo’s lengthy signed presentation inscription to Carl Hertzog “For Carl Hertzog.... Since I was merely the editor, and since Acheson did not write any columns about Carlos Impresor, I pulled a sneaky on everybody: check the index, p. 395. In short, there was no way that my first (and possibly only) book would fail to include Carl Hertzog! With the best wishes of Lee Milazzo.” Index entry for Carl Hertzog references p. 404; the book ends on p.403. Carl Hertzog bookplate.
First book edition (collection of articles first published in the Dallas Morning News). Articles on Frank Reaugh; Belle Starr, the “Bandit Queen”; Tom Marsh, “Noted Teen-Age Hunter” and pioneer stockraiser; etc. $50.00

14. ADAIR, Cornelia. My Diary: August 30th to November 5th, 1874. Austin & London: University of Texas Press, [1965]. xxiv [6] 125 pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations by Malcolm Thurgood, photographs. 12mo, original turquoise cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
Reprint of the rare first edition (Bath, 1918)—we have had the original edition only once. Herd 7n. Howes A37n. Vandale 2n. Winegarten I, p. 33; II, pp. 2-3: “A New York aristocrat, she and her second husband John Adair (Englishman) went on a buffalo hunt (1874).... Along with Charles and Molly Ann Goodnight, they founded first Texas Panhandle Ranch, JA Ranch, Palo Duro Canyon (1877). As widow she bought out the Goodnights, managing the 1/2 million acre ranch.” $65.00

15. ADAMS, Alexander B. Sunlight and Storm: The Great American Plains. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, [1977]. [2] 479 pp., illustrated title, photographic plates. 4to, original white cloth. Very fine in lightly worn d.j.
First edition. General history of the Great Plains from the arrival of the first Europeans to the early twentieth century, including chapters on “Cowboys and Farmers” and “Indians and Cattletowns.” $35.00

16. ADAMS, Andy. Cattle Brands: A Collection of Western Camp-Fire Stories. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, 1906. [11] 316 [2] pp., brands. 8vo, original olive cloth illustrated with brands. Slight shelf wear, front blank flyleaf absent, one signature carelessly opened, overall very good, the neat binding fresh and tight.
First edition. Campbell, p. 241. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 41 (“High Spots of Western Fiction: 1902-1952”). Hudson, Andy Adams, pp. 54-76. Smith 30. Tuska & Piekarski, Encyclopedia of Frontier & Western Fiction, pp. 5-6: “[Adams’] anthologies, Cattle Brands...and Why the Chisholm Trail Forks...are particularly good collections of campfire tales.... Adams rebelled against dime novel stereotypes.” In the introduction to Cattle Brands, Adams writes: “A hard day’s work or a reminiscent night may be recalled in its pages, wherein the characters around the fire were the men who redeemed the Lone Star State from crime and lawlessness. The cowboy may be met in his own salon, with his back to the wagon wheel or his head pillowed in a saddle, looking up at the stars. In fact, all the characters met in these brands were men—nothing more, just men.” $110.00

17. ADAMS, Andy. Cattle Brands.... Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, 1906. Another copy. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate and new endpapers (the celebrated mesquite endpapers used in Tom Lea’s King Ranch, in a trial maize variant rather than pale green [see item 891 herein for more on these endpapers]). A well-read copy: binding worn, bruised, frayed, dinged, and darkened; text browned and a few leaves with short tears. Ex-library with remains of small label on spine, call letters removed from spine, contemporary inked number on dedication leaf.
“‘Mr. Texas,’ J. Frank Dobie (1888-1964), liked to take pot-shots at Zane Grey factories. He expected books about cowboys to smell of cows.... He ranked Andy Adams...supreme.”—WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 1304. Ergo, it would seem that dear old “Pancho” Dobie would have approved of this copy. $75.00

18. ADAMS, Andy. “The Cattle on a Thousand Hills” in The Colorado Magazine 15:5 (September 1938). Pp. 168-80. 12mo, original grey printed wrappers. Very fine.
First printing of a lecture given by Adams in Colorado Springs on April 17, 1906. Hudson, Andy Adams, pp. 159 et seq. & 262: “The lecture...contains four main divisions: the ancient and lasting association of man with cattle, the ox and man, the cow and man, and the effect of pastoral life on the people who live it.” A thoughtful essay on the primal values of the West, from a historical perspective. This issue also contains an overland by a lady who was 19 at the time: “Seventy Years Ago—Recollections of a Trip through the Colorado Mountains with the Colfax Party in 1868 As Told by Mrs. Frank Hall to LeRoy R. Hafen” (pp. 161-68). $40.00

“The Log of a Cowboy”—First Issue

19. ADAMS, Andy. The Log of a Cowboy: A Narrative of the Old Trail Days. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, 1903. [10] 387 [1] pp., 6 plates by E. Boyd Smith (including frontispiece). 8vo, original olive green gilt-pictorial cloth. Shelf worn (frayed at spinal extremities and corners; upper corner bumped), back cover rubbed, lower hinge cracked, generally very good, internally fine. Contemporary ink gift inscription: “Hoyt D. Whipple Christmas Gift from Mother Dec 25th 1903.”
First edition, first issue, without the map or mention of it in “List of Illustrations.” The date is printed on the title, and “Published May, 1903” is on copyright page. Agatha, pp. 134-35. Campbell, p.84. Dobie, pp. 94-95: “If all other books on trail driving were destroyed, a reader could still get a just and authentic conception of trail men, trail work, range cattle, cow horses, and the cow country in general from The Log of a Cowboy.” Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #34. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Smith 21); Western High Spots, pp. 20, 27-28 (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West”), p. 35 (“High Spots of Western Fiction: 1902-1952”), p. 78 (“A Range Man’s Library”). Graff 13. Herd 8. Howes A45. Hudson, Andy Adams, p. 226: “There can be no doubt about the artistic excellence of The Log of a Cowboy, the only acknowledged masterpiece in the literature of the cattle country.” Lee, Classics of Texas Fiction, pp. 2-3. McCracken, 101, p. 19: “One of the definitive tales of trail driving, the book gives a lively picture of the men, animals, and terrain of the cattle trail.” One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 58. Malone, Wyomingana, p. 1. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 15. Reese, Six Score 2. Rosenstock 905. Smith 31. WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 525: “Considered by many to be the best of the cowboy genre.” “A lively, unvarnished portrait of cowboy life” (Slatta, Cowboys of the Americas). $250.00

20. ADAMS, Andy. The Log of a Cowboy.... Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, 1903. [10] 387 [1] pp., 6 plates by E. Boyd Smith (including frontispiece), map. 8vo, original olive green gilt-pictorial cloth. Binding with mild to moderate staining, slightly shelf-slanted, internally fine, clean, and tight.
First edition, second issue, with the added map (Map [1882] Showing the Trail), which is now added to the “List of Illustrations.” The date is printed on the title, and “Published May, 1903” is on copyright page. “Adams made his last drive in May, 1889, when he took some cattle, including some of his own, on to the Cherokee Strip. Although he did make several trail drives, most of his experiences were vicariously accumulated from talking to cowboys and cowmen from Texas and Kansas.... [In Colorado Springs] he saw a performance of Harry O. Hoyt’s play Texas Steer in 1898 and was so displeased with its portrayal of Texas cowboys that he decided to write his own play [Corporal Segundo]. In this way Adams came upon his true profession; he became a writer.... His ability to reproduce cowboy language and for storytelling were evident.”—Tuska & Piekarski, Encyclopedia of Frontier & Western Fiction, p. 5. $165.00

21. ADAMS, Andy. The Log of a Cowboy.... Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, [1903]. [11] 387 pp., 6 plates by E. Boyd Smith (including frontispiece), map. 8vo, original olive gilt-pictorial cloth. Very light wear to spinal extremities and corners, otherwise exceptionally fine and bright. Scholar Margaret Long’s copy, with her small printed ownership label on front pastedown and her pencil notes on back pastedown.
First edition, later issue, with the added map, which is included in the “List of Illustrations.” Title without date, but “Published May, 1903” on copyright page. “A bonafide cowboy chose the trail drive narrative as the vehicle for relating not only the adventures but also the hardships of the puncher’s life.... When Adams settled in Colorado after a decade in Texas, he wrote The Log of a Cowboy (1903), considered by many to be the best of the cowboy genre. Almost plotless, the narrative is structured around a trail drive from the Rio Grande to Montana in 1882. The serious business of the drive, as well as the campfire storytelling, the pranks and the cowtown sprees are narrated by trail crewman Tom Quirk. Sharp detail and first-person narration give events of the drive an immediacy not present before in fiction about the cowboy. Wister created an immortal cowboy hero, but it was Andy Adams who first breathed life into the everyday working cowboy as a protagonist in fiction.”—WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 524. $140.00

22. ADAMS, Andy. The Log of a Cowboy.... Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, [1903]. Another copy. Light shelf wear (mainly at foot of spine and corners), a few leaves carelessly opened, otherwise fine, binding bright. Contemporary pencil ownership inscription of Mrs. S. N. Wood on front pastedown and title, manuscript shelf number in ink on front free endpaper. $110.00

Signed by Andy Adams

23. ADAMS, Andy. The Log of a Cowboy.... Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton, Mifflin and Company & Riverside Press, n.d. [11] 387 pp., 6 plates by E. Boyd Smith (including frontispiece), map. 8vo, original brown pictorial cloth in pale blue pictorial d.j. (soiled, chipped, and missing lower two-thirds of d.j. spine). Front endsheets browned, otherwise fine, author’s big, bold signature in purple ink across title: “Most Sincerely Andy Adams 2/5/1934.” Contemporary pencil ownership inscription on front free endpaper.
Later printing. The book is one of the most popular of the Western genre, and was reprinted repeatedly. “[Adams’] first ‘novel,’ Log of a Cowboy, appeared in 1903, won a certain, although not overwhelming, success, and respect for it has grown with the years. Today it is considered a classic of the cattle frontier, and has sold overall about 50,000 copies.... [Adams] was an honest writer”—(Thrapp I, p. 7). $165.00

24. ADAMS, Andy. The Log of a Cowboy.... New York: Grosset & Dunlap Publishers, n.d. [8] 387 pp., 6 plates by E. Boyd Smith (including frontispiece). 8vo, original yellow pictorial cloth. A few mild stains to binding, otherwise fine. Author’s large signature on title: “Sincerely yours Andy Adams April 19, 1916.”
Later printing, front matter excludes the “List of Illustrations” and the map is not included. $140.00


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