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Basic Texas Books

: JENKINS, John H.

Basic Texas Books

. Austin: Texas State Historical

Association, 1988.

Clark,

Old South

: CLARK, Thomas D.

Travels in the Old South

.

Norman: University of

Oklahoma Press, 1956-59. 3 vols.

Crossroads of Empire:

AMON CARTER MUSEUM & UT ARLINGTON.

Crossroads of

Empire: Early Printed Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 1513-1900. June 12-July 26, 1981.

N.p.,

n.d.

California 49:

HECKROTTE,

Warren (editor).

California 49: Forty-Nine

Maps of

California from the Sixteenth Century to the Present

. San Francisco: California

Map

Society Occasional Paper No. 6 with The Book Club of California, 1999.

Cowan II: COWAN, R. E.

& R.

G.

A Bibliography of the History of California, 1510—

1930....

San Francisco

:

John Henry Nash, 1933. 2 vols.

Eberstadt:

EBERSTADT,

Edward

& Sons.

The

Annotated Eberstadt

Catalogs of

Americana...103 to 138.

New York: Argosy-Antiquarian Ltd., 1965. 4 vols.

Eberstadt 158 (

California Delineated

) 137: EBERSTADT, Edward

& Sons.

California

Delineated: Being a Collection of

Maps, Views, Broadsides, Imprints

& Other Rare Historical

Ephemera....

New York, 1962.

Goetzmann,

Exploration and Empire

:

GOETZMANN,

William

H.

Exploration and

Empire: The Explorer and the Scientist in the Winning of the American West.

New York:

Knopf, 1967.

the consignor. Su

Y

ce it to say that Dr. Sanderson’s journal is substantial, well-written, and

a contribution of major proportions to Western and Mormon history.

Following are a few very skeletal excerpts from Dr. Sanderson’s lengthy day-to-day

entries to give a just idea of content and style:

August 24

th

1846. Left Fort Leavenworth Monday morning in company with Lt. Smith

1

st

.

Dragoons... The country we passed over was beautify undulating and well watered...

The responsibility of pitching tents, preparing supper &c produced rather a singular feel-

ing. I found upon examination I had no co

V

ee pot, the key of my mess chest lost or mislaid.

I had to content myself with such supper as I could get, it consisted of hard bread, broiled

bacon & water....

Augst. 25

th

... I have just bid farewell to all appearances of civilization having passed the

last cultivated spot I expect to see in the U.S. until I return... Smith made a very impor-

tant discovery after we arrived in camp and that was a bottle of very

W

ne whiskey. As a mat-

ter of course it was attended to.

We traveled today about 18 miles had a v good supper

smoked a cigar and went to bed...

August 26

th

Met Mr. Clark of St. Louis returning from Bents Fort.

He gave us infor-

mation of General

Kearney’s

movements and the army of the West....

His

men on half

rations and Liquor very scarce...

August 30th...Preaching, dancing, singing and

W

dling going on this day being

Sunday....

Sept. 10

th

...Just before leaving camp this morning an express arrived from Santa Fe. The

Mexican Governor left the city to its fate, having under his command three thousand

troops, and several pieces of artillery.

We saw the letter form Genl. Kearny address to all...

Sept. 20

th

...I was somewhat amused to day passed two men seated on the grass their hors-

es grazing not very far distant from them. I thought they were devoutly engaged in prayer

or some religious ceremony. Curiosity prompted me to ride up when lo and behold they were

play cards on the wild plains...

We have a good deal of grumbling among the soldiers and

men about their hard marching. I am

W

rmly convinced if they had their own way, or left

to themselves they would not get to Santa Fe by Christmas...This Battalion will cost the

Government more money in proportion than any Corps they have, and if not mistaken will

render less service. The only way or plan the Government can adopt to make them useful is

to pout them to work building forti

W

cations....

REFERENCES CITED

30

th

Oct. Camped at Polvederea a small town.

Here we had another Fandango given

us. I remained until ten oclock and then left perfectly disgusted. The females generally was

pretty drunk...

Nov. 1

st

. Today the Guides left by Genl. Kearney joined us.

We were to day joined with

some Mexican traders with some thirty pack

mules going to trade with the Apache

Indians...

Nov. 8

th

. ...We have some twenty men on sick report, and I have within the last two days

three cases of measles....

Nov. 17

th

. ...Some tame animals was killed to day, which no doubt have been stolen by

the Apache Indians and strayed from them. These Indians are the terror of all the frontier

settlements of Sonora and Chihuahua...

Nov. 21

st

. Left camp early this morning, and took an old road leading from the Copper

Mines to Chihuahua and Senora. Travelled it about three miles. There our commanding

o

Y

cer was disposed to change his mind, which he did. I do not believe his organ of

W

rmness

predominates at any rate...

Dec. 11

th

. ...This has been a day of great events...the Command was attacked by wild

Bulls. They had been shot at and some of them wounded. They killed two mules and wound-

ed several

men one man very badly...it was a terri

W

c scene to see these furious animals....

Dec. 22

nd

.

We had a visit to day from the great Chief of the Pemo’s...one of the most

mild and benign countenances I never saw....He told our Commanding O

Y

cer he was

very glad to see him, and should have called upon him sooner but he had engaged in busi-

ness entrusted to his care, by General Kearney....

Dec.23

rd

. ...We met four Mexicans form California bringing letters to us from General

Kearney, from which we learn there has been a Revolution in the Country and the

Californians have all the Country in their possession from Monterey to San Diego...

General Kearney thinks things have been very badly managed but not authorized to say so

o

Y

cially....

Jan. 18. ...General Kearney

& Commodore Stock left San

Diego about the 29

th

December with six hundred

man consisting of

Dragoons,

Marines, Sailors

& some

Volunteers the Pebleu De Los Angeles the Capital of California.

We employed this day

mustering drilling and issuing ammunition, and to morrow will be ready to meet, or

receive a visit from the enemy....

($30,000-$60,000)